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1.
Digital Biomarkers ; 6(1):19-30, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824097

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Clinical research and treatment of childhood obesity is challenging, and objective biomarkers obtained in a home-setting are needed. The aim of this study was to determine the potential of novel digital endpoints gathered by a home-monitoring platform in pediatric obesity. Methods: In this prospective observational study, 28 children with obesity aged 6–16 years were included and monitored for 28 days. Patients wore a smartwatch, which measured physical activity (PA), heart rate (HR), and sleep. Furthermore, daily blood pressure (BP) measurements were performed. Data from 128 healthy children were utilized for comparison. Differences between patients and controls were assessed via linear mixed effect models. Results: Data from 28 patients (average age 11.6 years, 46% male, average body mass index 30.9) and 128 controls (average age 11.1 years, 46% male, average body mass index 18.0) were analyzed. Patients were recruited between November 2018 and February 2020. For patients, the median compliance for the measurements ranged from 55% to 100% and the highest median compliance was observed for the smartwatch-related measurements (81–100%). Patients had a lower daily PA level (4,597 steps vs. 6,081 steps, 95% confidence interval [CI] 862–2,108) and peak PA level (1,115 steps vs. 1,392 steps, 95% CI 136–417), a higher nighttime HR (81 bpm vs. 71 bpm, 95% CI 6.3–12.3) and daytime HR (98 bpm vs. 88 bpm, 95% CI 7.6–12.6), a higher systolic BP (115 mm Hg vs. 104 mm Hg, 95% CI 8.1–14.5) and diastolic BP (76 mm Hg vs. 65 mm Hg, 95% CI 8.7–12.7), and a shorter sleep duration (difference 0.5 h, 95% CI 0.2–0.7) compared to controls. Conclusion: Remote monitoring via wearables in pediatric obesity has the potential to objectively measure the disease burden in the home-setting. The novel endpoints demonstrate significant differences in PA level, HR, BP, and sleep duration between patients and controls. Future studies are needed to determine the capacity of the novel digital endpoints to detect effect of interventions.

2.
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities ; 67(6):458-459, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1823912

ABSTRACT

Reports an error in "Parents' perceptions on physical activity for their children with autism spectrum disorders during the novel Coronavirus outbreak" by Oguz Kaan Esenturk (International Journal of Developmental Disabilities, 2021[Dec], Vol 67[6], 446-457). When this issue of the journal was first published online, the papers appeared in the wrong order. The order has been amended and the page numbering subsequently corrected. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-39934-001). Considering that parents are one of the key figures in their child's participation in physical activity, it is extremely important to examine parents' perceptions and experiences of physical activity in order to protect children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) from the inactive life during the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak and to include them in physical activities in the home environment. Although it is still a new subject, there is no research that addresses parents' physical activity knowledge, needs and recommendations for the physical activity experiences of children with ASD during the COVID-19 outbreak, and offers solutions accordingly. Considering this gap in the literature, the aim of this qualitative study is to explore parents' perceptions on physical activity for their children with ASD. Participants of the study were 10 parents with children with ASD, who participated in one-to-one semi-structured phone calls. Interview data were analyzed thematically. The analysis of the data revealed three main themes: 1) Possible benefits of physical activity during the COVID-19 outbreak, 2) Physical activity barriers during the COVID-19 outbreak, and 3) Recommendations for physical activity during the COVID-19 outbreak. The results revealed that parents thought that physical activities had a positive effect on the development areas of their children with ASD. It was determined that parents want to involve their children in physical activities in the home environment, but they have barriers that they need to overcome. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
Obshta Meditsina / General Medicine ; 24(2):53-58, 2022.
Article in Bulgarian | GIM | ID: covidwho-1823830

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome, caused by corona-virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, is a leading reason for unknown and unusual clinical manifestations that are still challenging to manage. One of the most common of them is post-COVID-19 (long COVID, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, chronic COVID) syndrome that is present in 10-20% of SARS-CoV-2 patients, beyond 12 weeks from the diagnosis of the infection. Although many investigations have been started, its early detection remains difficult and limits its timely therapeutic approach. Physical activity is a confirmed modulator of the clinical manifestations and prognosis in many chronic diseases. This review aims to summarize data, regarding post-COVID-19 syndrome, as well as, to explain that regular physical activity could reduce many of the symptoms and long-term effects of COVID-19 infection.

4.
Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Humana ; 22(2):412-419, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822697

ABSTRACT

The mortality rate from COVID-19 in Peru continues to increase, considered by January 24, 2022, as the third country with the most cases and deaths in all of South America. Confinement favors an extremely sedentary lifestyle, physical inactivity, and poor eating practices causing serious health risks. Objectives: Describe the eating habits and lifestyles of medical students during the CoVID-19 quarantine. Materials and Methods: Multicenter Descriptive Cross-sectional Study. Results: A total of 886 medical students participated. The female gender prevailed with 81.49% (n = 722) compared to the male gender with 18.51% (n = 164). Regarding the perception of health, only 4.51% (n= 40) rated it as low and the remaining 95.49% rated it as satisfactory (n= 111), good (n= 495), very good (n= =200) and excellent (n=40). The predominant healthy habits were not smoking 91.08% (n= 807) and doing physical activity 78.78% (n= 698);During the pandemic, physical activity was reduced, reaching 53.95% of students. Conclusions: Medical students during the COVID-19 confinement stage, medical students opted for regular healthy eating habits and preventive behaviors. However, daily physical activity was predominantly low.

5.
Revista Medica Herediana ; 33(1):15-23, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822664

ABSTRACT

In Peru, one of the first interventions to flattened the epidemiologic curve of the pandemic was quarantine that changed eating behavior, physical activity and mental health of the population. Objective: to determine modifications in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health in young adults before and after the quarantine. Methods: cohort study involving 384 adults from 18 to 24 years of age that were subjected to a virtual interview and application of an international questionnaire to evaluate changings in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health contrasted by Chi square. Results: an increase in the distribution of daily foods [breakfast (p<0.001), morning snack (p<0.05), lunch (p<0.001), afternoon snack (p<0.001), dinner (p<0.05)] and an increase in ingestion of fruits (p=0.005) and reduction in the ingestion of fast food (p<0.05) and candies (p=0.03). Physical activity decreases specially in males vs females (28.4% vs. 25.3%) and there was a reduction in the total number of sleep hours, mental health was severely affected. Conclusions: quarantine induced variations in eating behavior, reduction in physical activity and increase in mental health disorders. These modifications put the population at risk for weight gain or obesity and eventually to non-transmissible diseases.

7.
Sports Medicine and Health Science ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821483

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to describe yoga practice and verify its association with depression, anxiety, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic among Brazilian practitioners. A cross-sectional anonymous online survey was conducted in all regions of Brazil using a snowball sampling strategy among yoga practitioners. A total of 860 participants (87% female, aged: 19–82 years) completed the survey. Sociodemographic data, lifestyle factors, yoga practice during the pandemic, and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) scores were collected between July 9 and July 15, 2021. Overall, 9.5%, 9.3%, and 5.6% of participants exhibited some traits (mild to severe) of depression, anxiety, and stress, respectively. Hatha yoga (48%) was the most commonly practiced yoga style. In the adjusted analysis, a higher yoga experience (>5 years) was associated with better anxiety (odds ratio;bootstrap 95% confidence interval: 2.42;1.32, 4.49) and stress status (1.80;1.06, 3.00) than beginners (<1 year). Practitioners who reported higher time and days of yoga practice during the study period were more likely to show normal levels of depression (odds ratio: 2.56–6.49;p < 0.05), anxiety (odds ratio: 3.68–8.84;p < 0.05), and stress (odds ratio: 2.15–5.21;p < 0.05). Moreover, the maintenance of practice frequency during the pandemic was associated with higher odds of normal levels of depression (2.27;1.39–3.79), anxiety (1.97;1.25–3.10), and stress (1.97;1.32–2.96). In conclusion, our findings indicated that a higher level of yoga practice was associated with better mental health levels during the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders ; : 103843, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821420

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 pandemic has affected people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) on various levels. Pandemic lockdown influenced the access to typical measures of physical activity such as out-door training or gym exercises. Methods We performed a survey assessing physical activity during pandemic lockdown among PwMS treated in our MS center. The questionnaire encompassed questions regarding physical activity before and during lockdown, including the employment of online technologies. Results The survey was completed by 262 PwMS. Physical activity before lockdown was declared by 74.4% of PwMS, regular exercises were declared by 30.9% of participants. Among physically active PwMS 50.5% limited their physical activity during the COVID-19 lockdown. The decrease in physical activity was reported more frequently by PwMS with higher levels of disability, particularly declaring regular exercises before lockdown. In the opinion of 39,7% of PwMS online training could replace standard exercises, however only 19,9% of PwMS were actively looking for online training during the lockdown. The interest in online exercise was greatest in the group ≤30 years of age and EDSS ≤2. Synchronous exercises were the preferred online training, particularly among PwMS with EDSS≥4. Conclusion Our findings indicate a need for systematic educational and organizational measures, promoting physical activity among PwMS and acknowledging pandemic conditions.

9.
Journal of Transport & Health ; 25:101345, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821398

ABSTRACT

Background Over the last two decades, bicycling as a mode for transportation has declined by 64% among 16- to 20-year-old adolescents in Switzerland, the largest decrease of any age group. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of a bicycle training on adolescents’ cycling skills. In addition, the study investigated whether there is a relationship between school distance, mode of transport, bicycle use and cycling skills. Methods 77 adolescents (Mean age = 17.1 ± 0.8 years) were assigned to the intervention group (n = 48) or control group (n = 29). In both groups, a validated practical cycling skills test was performed at baseline and 2 weeks after baseline. The intervention group performed 2 h of bicycle training one week after the baseline test. A questionnaire was used to determine bicycle use, mode of transportation and distance to school. Due to Covid-19 school closures, only an online questionnaire was administered at 6-month follow-up. To analyze the effects of cycling training on cycling skills, multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, gender, and baseline cycling skills were applied. Results Compared to the control group, the total cycling skills increased in the intervention group (β = 4.54, [0.89 : 8.19], p = 0.02), as well as riding over a wooden plank with a ladder profile (β = 1.14, [0.08 : 2.19], p = 0.04) and controlled riding over a step (β = 1.48, [0.63 : 2.33], p ≤ 0.001). An association was found between bicycle use, mode of transportation, and cycling skills (p < 0.05). In contrast, no association could be found for school distance. Conclusion Cycling training improved adolescents’ cycling skills in the short term. Cycling skills correlated with bicycle use and mode of transportation.

10.
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821333

ABSTRACT

Background Accelerated functional decline is a concern among older cancer survivors that threatens independence and quality-of-life. Pilot studies suggest that vegetable gardening interventions ameliorate functional decline through improved diet and physical activity. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the rationale, recruitment challenges, and enrollment of the Harvest for Health randomized controlled trial (RCT) that will test the impact of a home-based, vegetable gardening intervention on vegetable & fruit (V&F) consumption, physical activity, and physical functioning among older cancer survivors. Modifications made to the intervention and assessments to assure safety and continuity of the RCT throughout the COVID-19 pandemic also are reported. Design Harvest for Health is a 2-year, 2-arm, single-blinded, wait-list controlled RCT with cross-over. Participants /setting: Medicare-eligible survivors of cancers with >60% 5-year survival were recruited across Alabama from October 1, 2016 to February 8, 2021. Intervention Participants are randomly-assigned to a wait-list control or a 1-year home-based gardening intervention and individually-mentored by Extension-certified Master Gardeners to cultivate spring, summer, and fall vegetable gardens. Main outcome measures While the RCT’s primary endpoint is a composite measure of V&F consumption, physical activity, and physical functioning, this paper focuses on recruitment and modifications made to the intervention and assessments during COVID-19. Statistical analyses performed Chi-square and t-tests (α<0.05) were used to compare enrolled vs. unenrolled populations. Results Older cancer survivors (n=9,708) were contacted by letter and telephone;1,460 indicated interest (15% response rate), 473 were screened eligible and consented, and 381 completed baseline assessments and were randomized. Enrollees did not differ from non-respondents/refusals by race and ethnicity, or rural-urban status, but were comprised of significantly higher numbers of comparatively younger survivors, those who were female, and survivors of breast cancer (p-values<0.001). While COVID-19 delayed trial completion, protocol modifications overcame this barrier and study completion is anticipated by June 2022. Conclusions This RCT will provide evidence on the effects of a mentored vegetable gardening program among older cancer survivors. If efficacious, Harvest for Health represents a novel, multifaceted approach to improve lifestyle behaviors and health outcomes among cancer survivors – one with capacity for sustainability and widespread dissemination.

11.
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology ; 20(1):43-68, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820643

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The sudden changes in school educational modality due to the COVID-19 pandemic and social isolation have affected the lifestyle, mental and emotional health, and perception of their academic training in students with high intellectual abilities. The aim of this study was to analyze the predictor variables of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method. This study involved 409 third to fifth grade high school students with high intellectual abilities and who receive a free special education associated with talent and high achievement (COAR). Ages ranged from 14 to 17 years (M = 15.26, SD = .89). The Brief Study Satisfaction Scale (EBSE), Emotional Fatigue Scale (ECE), Eating Habits and Physical Activity Scale (EHAAF), Pittsburgh Index, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale-2 (GAD-2) and Epworth Short Sleepiness Scale (ESE) were used. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the normality of the variables was assessed. In addition, a predictive model was analyzed based on goodness-of-fit indices using structural equation modeling. The analyses were performed using SPSS 24.0 and Amos 24.0 statistical software. Results. The descriptive analysis yielded adequate skewness and kurtosis coefficients. The analyses showed that all variables were significantly correlated (p < .01). Likewise, the predictive model of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies and emotional exhaustion presents adequate goodness-of-fit indices (X-2 = 7.427, gl = 6, p = .283, X-2/gl = 1.238, TLI = 0.994, CFI = 0.998, RMSEA = 0.024 and SRMR = 0.186). Conclusion. This study presents a predictive model of sleepiness, study satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is concluded that physical activity, eating habits and sleep quality are predictors of sleepiness and, in turn, generalized anxiety, physical activity and sleep quality predict emotional fatigue, which is also a predictor of satisfaction with studies.

12.
Psychology in the Schools ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819386

ABSTRACT

In the United States, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic necessitated nationwide closures of kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12) schools. Stay-at-home orders and social distancing mandates were also implemented to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize the existing literature on how COVID-19 impacted K-12 students' eating patterns, physical activity, and sleep in the United States. Utilizing the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a literature search was conducted between October and December 2021. Inclusion criteria were studies focused on COVID-19 and eating patterns, physical activity, and sleep in students enrolled in K-12 schools since March 2020. International studies were excluded. Mixed findings were observed for eating patterns whereby the consumption of unhealthful savory and sweet items and healthful snacks (e.g., fruit and vegetables) increased. Reductions in physical activity and disrupted sleep routines were also observed. Heterogeneity in methodological procedures may limit the generalizability of these findings. In the United States, preliminary data suggest that select health-promoting behaviors were negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Given that prolonged unhealthful eating patterns, physical inactivity, and poor sleep contribute to chronic disease risk, initiatives that increase health-promoting behaviors are warranted.

13.
Progress in Nutrition ; 24(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1819021

ABSTRACT

Background: Eating behaviour and lifestyle are highly susceptible to changes in the individual’s external environment. COVID-19 pandemic resulted in policies that severely impacted individual habits and daily routines. Growing literature highlights the adverse psychological impact of COVID-19 on eating behaviour and lifestyle. Methods: This study aimed to assess eating behaviour and lifestyle in Saudi Arabia during the strict lockdown. A self-reported online questionnaire was used to assess eating behaviour and lifestyle changes, including physical activity, sleep, and digital device use compared to that pre-lockdown. Results: A total of 1,860 participants completed the questionnaire. Weight gain was reported by 31%, whereas 41% reported decreased physical activity. The use of digital devices increased by 70%, with 59% of participants reporting symptoms of digital eyestrain. Mostly, 72% reported decreased fast-food delivery, mainly due to fear of contracting the virus. This decrease paralleled a 66% increase in home cooking. On the contrary, 15% reported weight loss, and 21% increased their physical activity. Conclusion: These findings provide important insight into the effects of COVID-19-related lockdown on eating behaviour and lifestyle.

14.
Progress in Nutrition ; 24(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1819019

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected day-to-day life and is changing how people eat and even how they exercise, as many individuals have developed a passive sedentary lifestyle. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on dietary quality and physical activity among Saudi adults. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 738 adults in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The modified Dietary Quality Score (DQS) and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) were used in this study. Results: In total, 76% of the participants had average dietary habits, while 16% of the participants were identified as having unhealthy dietary habits. The total average amount of time performing physical activity (PA) was 2079.08 ±2454.14 minutes/week, and the highest average was for vigorous PA (1372.47 ±1665.62 minutes/week). Conclusion: The COVID-19 crisis has rapidly affected people’s daily lives, including their dietary quality and physical activity. This pandemic has had significant effects on the lifestyle, quality of life and wellbeing of individuals and societies, and it may continue to affect them in the future.

15.
Anatolia: Turizm Araştırmaları Dergisi ; 32(1):100-105, 2021.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1818839

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the role of active and social recreational activities in the lives of the elderly during the COVID-19 pandemic period.

16.
Sindrome Cardiometabolico ; 11(1):39-43, 2021.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818557

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is without a doubt an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, occupying the first place over other disorders such as obesity and dia-betes. Therefore, primary prevention is essential, especially during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, it is important to revise and update the strategies for prevention, including changes in lifestyle such as in nutrition and physical activ-ity, for which there are numerous possibilities and alternatives arising every day and that must be studied to determine their efficacy and safety. Likewise, additional factors and comorbidities that may elevate cardiovascular risk must also be assessed in order to apply opportune pharmacological treatments as prevention, some of them being accepted and widely used, and others being controversial. In con-sequence, further research is necessary to determine the best strategies for CVD prevention and continue innovation. Thus, the objective of this article is to review each of the modifiable cardiovascular risk factors with their respective alternatives, updates, and innovative therapeutic methods.

17.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818141

ABSTRACT

The relationship between Long Covid (LC) symptoms and physical activity (PA) levels are unclear. In this cross-sectional study, we examined this association, and the advice that individuals with LC received on PA. Adults with LC were recruited via social media. The New Zealand physical activity questionnaire short form (NZPAQ-SF) was adapted to capture current and pre-COVID-19 PA levels and activities of daily living (ADLs). Participants reported how PA affected their symptoms, and what PA recommendations they had received from healthcare professionals and other resources;477 participants completed the survey. Mean age (SD) was 45.69 (10.02) years, 89.1% female, 92.7% white, and median LC duration was 383.5 days (IQR: 168.25,427). Participants were less active than pre-COVID-19 (26.88 ± 74.85 vs. 361.68 ± 396.29 min per week, p < 0.001) and required more assistance with ADLs in a 7-day period compared to pre-COVID-19 (2.23 ± 2.83 vs. 0.11 ± 0.74 days requiring assistance, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the number of days of assistance required with ADLs, or the amount of PA, and the different durations of LC illness (p > 0.05). Participants reported the effect of PA on LC symptoms as: worsened (74.84%), improved (0.84%), mixed effect (20.96%), or no effect (28.72%). Participants received contradictory advice on whether to be physically active in LC. LC is associated with a reduction in PA and a loss of independence, with most participants reporting PA worsened LC symptoms. PA level reduction is independent of duration of LC. Research is needed to understand how to safely return to PA without worsening LC symptoms.

18.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818132

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced school closures, resulting in home schooling, more time spent at home and fewer opportunities for physical activity (PA). This study explored factors influ-encing PA and sedentary behaviours (SB) within the home environment during the first lockdown, starting in March 2020. Twenty semi-structured interviews (20 parents and 23 children, 12 years ± 1.25) were conducted. Data were coded using thematic analysis on NVivo© and concepts from McLeroy’s socioecological model for health promotion were used to analyse the data. Findings indicate that children’s PA and SB at home were influenced by: (i) individual-level factors (e.g., gender, compe-tence, attitudes and motivation);(ii) interpersonal-level factors (e.g., siblings, parents, pets, friends and coaches);(iii) organisation-level factors (e.g., school, clubs and societies), (iv) community-level factors (e.g., home and local environment, access to facilities, social norms, time constraints and home equip-ment), and (v) policy-level factors (e.g., lockdown restrictions). Stay-at-home mandates resulted in perceived reductions in PA and increases in SB within the home;however, this provided alternative positive opportunities for families, including more time to spend together and exploring green and blue spaces in the local area.

20.
JMIR Formative Research ; 6(4), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1817817

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 restrictions may make it difficult for people to engage in the recommended amounts of physical activity (PA). Objective: The influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on PA, as well as the links between PA and mental health, was investigated in this study. Methods: Participants were recruited using convenience sampling and responded to an online survey between April 15 and July 1, 2021, with ages ranging from 18 to 24 years (n=156, 40.9% of the sample) to ≥55 years (n=28, 7.4% of the sample). To assess general psychological distress, depression, anxiety, and pandemic anxiety, a battery of mental health assessments was used. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Short Form was used to collect PA data from participants, who were then classified as inactive, minimally active, or highly active. Participants also indicated the locations where they performed PA before and during COVID-19. Results: A sample of 381 individuals was included in this research. The logistic regression analysis results were interpreted as odds ratios (ORs), where an OR higher than 1 indicated a greater chance of an event occurring and an OR less than 1 implied a lower likelihood of an event occurring. Logistic regression results revealed that inactive individuals were more likely to develop psychological distress (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.27-3.69, P=.004), depression (OR 3.81, 95% CI 1.92-7.57, P<.001), and anxiety (OR 1.86, 95% CI 0.99-3.47, P=.05) as compared to highly active individuals. Furthermore, when compared to highly active people, those who were only minimally active had a higher risk of depression (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.05-4.33, P=.04). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests revealed that COVID-19 has a greater impact on reducing the chances of less active individuals engaging in PA outside and in public spaces. Highly active people's physical exercise locations had changed less, and their exercise frequency at home increased. Conclusions: Programmatic and policy interventions geared particularly toward enhancing PA among those less active may be a helpful strategy for addressing the worldwide pandemic's mental health crisis. © 2022 JMIR Publications Inc.. All right reserved.

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