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1.
Ceska Gynekol ; 87(2): 100-103, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879868

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is a widely discussed topic during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Due to newly emerging covid-19 variants, vaccination has become more and more important. These new variants pose a risk for the development of maternal and neonatal complications. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey among pregnant women to assess the awareness of covid-19 and vaccination. Among the respondents, 58% were vaccinated with at least one dose and 51% were fully vaccinated. Also, 77% percent of responders thought that there was an increased risk of severe covid-19 infection among pregnant women versus non-pregnant women, while 71% were aware of the risk of fetal death associated with covid-19 infection. Although the rate of awareness among pregnant women is quite high (up to 87%), it is crucial to present the advantages of vaccination among gynecologists and doctors of other specialties as they are able to motivate women to be vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
Future Microbiol ; 17: 803-812, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879383

ABSTRACT

Many underlying medical conditions have been linked to worse COVID-19 prognosis. Based on reports on SARS-CoV-1 and Middle East respiratory syndrome infections, pregnancy has been considered a predisposing factor to severe COVID-19, with pregnant women being a high-risk group for several physiological reasons. Specifically, pregnant women undergo physiological adaptations that predispose them to severe respiratory viral diseases, including SARS-CoV-2. However, a significant amount of evidence suggests that the clinical outcome of COVID-19 among pregnant women is not different from the general population. In view of this, this report discusses the physiological conditions in pregnant women that adversely affect their immunity, cardiovascular homeostasis, and their endothelial and coagulopathic functions, thereby making them more prone to severe viral infections. We also discuss how these physiological adaptations appear to paradoxically offer protection against severe COVID-19 among pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Jpn J Nurs Sci ; : e12494, 2022 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879064

ABSTRACT

AIM: This observational study aimed to describe the rate and degree of difficult experiences with COVID-19 pandemic-related changes (DE) during pregnancy, clarify the relationship between DE and self-compassion of women postnatally, and investigate the influence of compassion from a partner (CP) and compassion from the woman's mother (CM) on this relationship. METHODS: Data from 46 1-month postnatal women in Japan were collected through a self-report questionnaire from October to December 2020. Self-compassion was measured using the Japanese version of the Self-Compassion Scale; DE, CP, and CM were measured using original questions based on prior studies. RESULTS: Almost all participants (97.8%) experienced more than one DE during pregnancy. Data analyses revealed that DE in maternity hospitals (d = 0.76), DE in social support (d = 0.53), and CM (d = 0.64) were associated with self-compassion. A two-way analysis of variance suggested that CM moderated the relationship between self-compassion and DE in preparation for the baby (η2  = 0.11) and the birth plan (η2  = 0.11), whereas CP moderated the relationship between self-compassion and DE in social support (η2  = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that self-compassion negatively correlates with DE in maternity hospitals and social support. Additionally, CM may buffer the influence of DE in preparation for the baby and the birth plan on self-compassion; moreover, CP may buffer the influence of DE in social support on self-compassion. This study highlights the importance of supporting perinatal women to adapt to COVID-19-related changes through cooperation with their families, which may increase self-compassion.

4.
Metas de Enfermeria ; 24(10):7-14, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1879838

ABSTRACT

Objective: to analyse the impact of the infection by SARSCoV- 2 in pregnant women, in terms of obstetric and perinatal consequences. Method: a descriptive, longitudinal, observational and retrospective study conducted in the Hospital Infanta Cristina (Parla, Madrid) with pregnant women infected with COVID-19 during the second half of their pregnancy and/or labour, since the start of the pandemic in Spain in March until December 2020. The association between the need for hospital admission and sociodemographic, anthropometric and pregnancy variables was analysed with the Student's T test, Mann Whitney U test, Pearson's Chi Squared and Fisher's Exact Test, with a p< 0.05 significance. Results: the study included 46 women;37% of them were Spanish, and their mean age was 31.3 years. The mean Body Mass Index (BMI) of the pregnant women was of 25.9 kg/m2, the majority were multiparous, and there was a predominance of asymptomatic pregnancies (54.23%) followed by symptoms such as cough and dyspnea (13%) and fever (13%). Four women required hospital admission, and one of them required Intensive Care. No significant differences were found according to hospital admission, although the gestational age at the time of delivery was lower among hospitalized women (38 vs. 39.5 weeks;p= 0.095) and their BMI was higher (29.7 vs. 25 kg/m2;p= 0.559). There were no perinatal deaths. Conclusions: infection by COVID19 does not seem to have any impact on pregnancy evolution or perinatal survival, although further research is required. © 2021 DAE Editorial, Grupo Paradigma. All rights reserved.

5.
Lijecnicki Vjesnik ; 144:128-132, 2022.
Article in Croatian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1879781

ABSTRACT

Maternity practices such as skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth, breastfeeding within one hour of birth, rooming-in, and breastfeeding support are considered quality standards in perinatal care and are part of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, a program developed by the World Health Organization and UNICEF. The COVID-19 pandemic significantly disrupted and reduced the implementation of these practices, especially in the initial phase of the pandemic. Social distancing has disrupted access to health services intended to educating pregnant women and young families about breastfeeding and parenthood, as well as the availability of breastfeeding support in maternity and neonatology wards and after discharge home. All these changes have negatively affected the emotional health of mothers and families, and the inability to provide personal education and support for breastfeeding has been sought in the virtual world, online courses and counseling. The pandemic has reduced the rate of breastfed children, which in the long-term can have significant negative effects on the health of children, mothers and society as a whole. © 2022 Hrvatski Lijecnicki Zbor. All rights reserved.

6.
Pediatriya - Zhurnal im G.N. Speranskogo ; 101(1):209-214, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1879762

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2, is a severe systemic thrombotic syndrome with respiratory tract damage that emerged in 2019 in China with the development of a subsequent pandemic. Over the past two years, very little information has been accumulated on the prevalence, transmission routes, and the clinical picture of the disease among newborn infants. Given the limited data in the domestic literature, authors present not only a description of the first clinical observation of confirmed new coronavirus infection in a premature newborn, but also a brief review of the literature on the description of the epidemiology, clinic and methods of therapy for COVID-19 in infants. © 2022, Pediatria Ltd. All rights reserved.

7.
Journal of Obstetrics and Women's Diseases ; 71(1):11-22, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1879704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, viral pneumonia is the leading clinical form of coronavirus infection and a significant cause of maternal mortality. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the course of severe and extremely severe forms of COVID-19, its impact on pregnancy and fetus, as well as on maternal mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, we evaluated 39 case histories of patients with severe and extremely severe COVID-19, which were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 22 pregnant women with a severe course of coronavirus infection and a favorable outcome. Group 2 comprised 17 pregnant women in whom complications caused by SARS-CoV-2 were fatal. RESULTS: More than 80% of patients with severe disease course had anaemia in pregnancy. The most significant clinical and anamnestic factors of adverse outcome were gestational diabetes mellitus (p = 0.02), preeclampsia (p = 0.05), and oligoamnios (p = 0.01). Obesity in group 2 was twice more common. The clinical manifestations of the disease in the both study groups were dominated by fever, shortness of breath, weakness and dry cough. In patients with a fatal outcome at the height of the disease, the levels of leukocytosis, urea and lactate dehydrogenase were higher than in those who recovered (p = 0.05). Besides, the levels of alanine transferase and aspartate transaminase were twice as high as in pregnant women who recovered later. Patients in the both study groups required oxygen support as respiratory failure progressed. The vast majority of patients with severe and extremely severe forms of coronavirus infection were in the third trimester of pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Women in the third trimester of pregnancy are more susceptible to severe and extremely severe COVID-19 with an unfavorable outcome. Gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia and oligoamnios are significant comorbidities that predispose to severe course and poor outcome in pregnant women and puerperas with COVID-19. The characteristic clinical manifestations of the severe course of coronavirus infection are shortness of breath and fever against a backdrop of significant damage to the lung tissue. A pronounced increase in hepatic enzymes and placental insufficiency is a harbinger of an unfavorable outcome as a manifestation of multiple organ failure. © 2022 by the authors.

8.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 454, 2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866292

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends self-monitoring of blood pressure (SMBP) for hypertension management. In addition, during the COVID-19 response, WHO guidance also recommends SMBP supported by health workers although more evidence is needed on whether SMBP of pregnant individuals with hypertension (gestational hypertension, chronic hypertension, or pre-eclampsia) may assist in early detection of pre-eclampsia, increase end-user autonomy and empowerment, and reduce health system burden. To expand the evidence base for WHO guideline on self-care interventions, we conducted a systematic review of SMBP during pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: We searched for publications that compared SMBP with clinic-based monitoring during antenatal care. We included studies measuring any of the following outcomes: maternal mortality, pre-eclampsia, long-term risk and complications, autonomy, HELLP syndrome, C-section, antenatal hospital admission, adverse pregnancy outcomes, device-related issues, follow-up care with appropriate management, mental health and well-being, social harms, stillbirth or perinatal death, birthweight/size for gestational age, and Apgar score. After abstract screening and full-text review, we extracted data using standardized forms and summarized findings. We also reviewed studies assessing values and preferences as well as costs of SMBP. RESULTS: We identified 6 studies meeting inclusion criteria for the effectiveness of SMBP, 6 studies on values and preferences, and 1 study on costs. All were from high-income countries. Overall, when comparing SMBP with clinic-monitoring, there was no difference in the risks for most of the outcomes for which data were available, though there was some evidence of increased risk of C-section among pregnant women with chronic hypertension. Most end-users and providers supported SMBP, motivated by ease of use, convenience, self-empowerment and reduced anxiety. One study found SMBP would lower health sector costs. CONCLUSION: Limited evidence suggests that SMBP during pregnancy is feasible and acceptable, and generally associated with maternal and neonatal health outcomes similar to clinic-based monitoring. However, more research is needed in resource-limited settings. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42021233839 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced , Pre-Eclampsia , Blood Pressure , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory , Female , Humans , Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn , Pre-Eclampsia/diagnosis , Pregnancy
9.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; : 100673, 2022 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection are at increased risk for severe disease including hospitalization, intensive care admission, ventilatory support and death. Although pregnant patients were excluded from investigational trials for pharmacologic treatments for COVID-19 illness, the National Institutes of Health Treatment Guidelines state efficacious treatments should not be withheld from pregnant patients. Infusion of Casirivimab and Imdevimab (REGEN-COV), a monoclonal antibody therapy, was shown to reduce the risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related hospitalization or death from any cause and resolved symptoms and reduced severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 viral load (SARS-CoV-2) more rapidly than placebo. In July of 2021 the Food and Drug Administration released an Emergency Use Authorization for REGEN-COV. Although pregnant persons were not included in the original trials, given the higher risk of morbidity and mortality in the pregnant population, our institution offered REGEN-COV to our pregnant patients beginning in August of 2021. Side effects after REGEN-COV administration are rare and thought to be secondary to COVID infection rather than REGEN-COV. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to track the safety and clinical outcomes of unvaccinated pregnant patients who received REGEN-COV and compare these outcomes to a contemporary cohort of patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and were eligible but did not receive REGEN-COV. Our hypothesis was that REGEN-COV administration during pregnancy is safe, and that pregnant persons who received REGEN-COV would experience less severe COVID-19 respiratory illness by decreasing length of hospital stay, decreasing ICU admission, and decreasing the need for oxygen and other COVID-19 therapeutics. STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective cohort study of pregnant patients who either tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 or had a known exposure to a COVID-19 positive person, and therefore have been eligible for REGEN-COV at our institution. Within this cohort, we compared those who received REGEN-COV to those who did not receive REGEN-COV between March 2021 and October 2021 at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. The main outcomes studied were perinatal outcomes, safety data and the clinical course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: From March 2021 to October 2021, 86 pregnant people tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 via real time-PCR or had a confirmed exposure. Among this group, 36 received REGEN-COV and 50 did not. There were no instances of infusion rate adjustment or discontinuation, anaphylaxis, or death among those individuals who received REGEN-COV. One individual experienced worsening shortness of breath over 24 hours after administration which was classified as an infusion-related reaction. There were not any significant differences in perinatal outcomes, length of hospitalization, rates of ICU admission, additional pharmacologic treatment for COVID-19, or oxygen requirement between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of REGEN-COV is safe in pregnancy and did not increase adverse maternal, neonatal, or obstetrical outcomes. There was not a statistically significant difference in COVID-19 related outcomes in our high-risk population. Given the likely safety of this drug in pregnancy and its known benefits in the non-pregnant population, we advocate for continued use of this therapy and encourage the development of future studies to enroll a larger and more diverse cohort to explore its efficacy further.

10.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf ; 31(7): 804-809, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877670

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Women infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy are at increased risk of developing severe illness and experience a higher rate of preterm births than pregnant women who are not infected. The use of innovative or repurposed therapies to treat COVID-19 patients is widespread; however, there are very limited data regarding the patterns of use and safety profile of most of these therapeutics in pregnant women. We assessed the patterns of use of COVID-19 therapeutics during pregnancy using data from the International Registry of Coronavirus in Pregnancy (IRCEP). METHODS: The IRCEP is an international observational cohort study intended to assess the risk of major obstetric and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women with COVID-19. Women enrolled while pregnant or within 6 months after end of pregnancy. Follow-up for women enrolled while pregnant includes monthly online questionnaires throughout the pregnancy and, for live births, through the infant's first 90 days of life. Participants provide information on demographic characteristics, health history, COVID-19 tests and symptoms, medications, and obstetric and neonatal outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 5780 women with COVID-19 during pregnancy were identified from the IRCEP. Severity of COVID-19 was classified in 372 of them as severe, 3053 moderate, and 2355 mild. The most frequently reported COVID-19 therapies, other than analgesics, included azithromycin (12.8%), steroids (3.5%), interferon (2.4%), oseltamivir (2.1%), chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (1.7%), anticoagulants (2.0%), antibodies (0.9%), and remdesivir (0.3%). Most drugs were preferentially used for severe cases. Patterns of use varied by country. CONCLUSIONS: IRCEP participants reported use of therapeutics for COVID-19 during pregnancy for which there is little safety information. Findings on COVID-19 pharmacotherapy utilization patterns can guide future studies examining the safety of COVID-19 therapies during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Acta Neurologica Taiwanica ; 31(4):167-170, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1877042

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To highlight the factors leading to the delayed diagnosis of basilar artery occlusion and poor outcome in the postpartum period during the prevailing Corona Virus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Case report: We here report a case of a 34-year female who presented with a headache localized to the occipital region after cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Her headache severity increased over time, and she developed a generalized seizure episode and became unconscious. Subsequently, basilar artery thrombosis was diagnosed. Despite all efforts, she succumbed to death. We believe that we might have saved the patient's life if we could have made the diagnosis beforehand. Conclusion: We recommend that unless shown otherwise, postpartum headache and neck discomfort, even in individuals with no known risk factors, should have a low index of suspicion, early diagnosis using non-invasive radiological study such MRI to rule out this uncommon but deadly illness quickly. © 2022, Neurological Society R.O.C (Taiwan). All rights reserved.

12.
Sultan Qaboos Univ Med J ; 22(2): 167-178, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876291

ABSTRACT

As of August 11, 2021, approximately 206 million people worldwide had been infected with SARS-CoV-2. However, limited data are available regarding the effects of COVID-19 infection on pregnancy and maternal and perinatal outcomes. This review aimed to resolve this gap in literature. The MEDLINE®, SCOPUS and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched to identify relevant English-language articles published between January 2020 and February 2021. A total of 17 articles describing the outcomes of 762 pregnancies were identified. There were 613 babies born, including 16 sets of twins. Within the cases studied, 12 (1.6%) maternal deaths and eight (1.3%) stillbirths were reported. A small proportion of mothers (3.9%) required admission to the intensive care unit, usually due to associated comorbidities. Rates of caesarean and preterm delivery ranged from 27-100% and 4-50%, respectively. Further research is necessary to determine the effect of COVID-19 infection on early pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(5)2022 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875701

ABSTRACT

Infection caused by human parvovirus B19 (B19) often has mild yet wide-ranging clinical signs, with the course of disease usually defined as benign. Particularly prevalent in the population of young children, the virus is commonly transmitted to the parents, especially to susceptible mothers. During pregnancy, particularly the first and second trimesters, parvovirus infection can lead to pathology of the fetus: anemia, heart failure, hydrops, and disorders of physical and neurological development. In severe cases, the disease can result in fetal demise. This article presents a rare case of manifestation of B19 infection during pregnancy. At the 27th week of gestation, a sudden change in fetal movement occurred in a previously healthy pregnancy. The examination of both fetus and the mother revealed newly formed fetal subdural hematoma of unknown etiology and ventriculomegaly. Following extensive examination to ascertain the origin of fetal pathology, a maternal B19 infection was detected. Due to worsening fetal condition, a planned cesarean section was performed to terminate the pregnancy at 31 weeks of gestation. A preterm male newborn was delivered in a critical condition with congenital B19 infection, hydrocephalus, and severe progressive encephalopathy. The manifestation and the origin of the fetal condition remain partially unclear. The transplacental transmission of maternal B19 infection to the fetus occurs in approximately 30% of cases. The main method for diagnosing B19 infection is Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) performed on blood serum. In the absence of clinical manifestations, the early diagnosis of B19 infection is rarely achieved. As a result, the disease left untreated can progress inconspicuously and cause serious complications. Treatment strategies are limited and depend on the condition of the pregnant woman and the fetus. When applicable, intrauterine blood transfusion reduces the risk of fetal mortality. It is crucial to assess the predisposing factors of the infection and evaluate signs of early manifestation, as this may help prevent the progression and poor outcomes of the disease.


Subject(s)
Fetal Diseases , Parvovirus B19, Human , Parvovirus , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Cesarean Section , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Fetal Diseases/diagnosis , Fetus , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis
14.
Reproductive Health Eastern Europe ; 12(1):109-119, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1876539

ABSTRACT

Infection carried by pregnant women with COVID-19 in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy can have an adverse effect on the formation of obstetric complications associated with the pathology of implantation. We examined 109 pregnant women with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection by PCR at 4 weeks gestation – 21 weeks 6 days. The most frequent symptoms of the disease in these pregnant women were fever in 82 (75.2%) and anosmia, which was often combined with ageusia in 73 (66.9%). Rare manifestations were myalgia in 12 (11%) pregnant women, shortness of breath in 7 (6.4%), rhinorrhea in 7 (6.4%), complaints of a feeling of heaviness in the chest in 4 (3.7%). We established a decrease in the free β-hCG index to 0.94 (0.64–1.30) MoM. The incidence of fetal urinary tract damage was 7 (6.4%), of which 4 (3.7%) had congenital malformations. All childbirth was urgent. The average delivery time was 38.6 (37–42) weeks. Labor in 8% was complicated by the developed distress syndrome of the fetus in labor, which required the completion of labor by emergency caesarean section. © 2022, Professionalnye Izdaniya. All rights reserved.

15.
Journal of Communicable Diseases ; 2022:109-114, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1876402

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel corona virus has made the world standstill. In India COVID first and second wave has created dramatic fear among the pregnant mothers and the treating obstetricians. Objectives: To study the impact of COVID-19 in pregnancy, newborn and to compare the maternal and neonatal outcome among COVID-19 negative and COVID-19 positive pregnant women during the first and second COVID wave. Materials and Method: This was a prospective study done over one year from July 2020 to July 2021 in a tertiary care hospital in South India. 400 pregnant women attending antenatal outpatient department during COVID willing to participate in the study were included. Nasopharyngeal RT-PCR was done. Socio-demographic profile, maternal and neonatal outcome were compared between non COVID and COVID positive pregnant women. Results: A total of 400 pregnant women were screened for corona virus. 75 pregnant mothers turned positive for COVID-19 and 325 were negative. Among them, 10 were positive during first wave and 65 during second wave. Of them, 20 (26.7%) were asymptomatic and 55 (73.3%) were symptomatic. During the second COVID wave, there was a rise in missed miscarriage (21.5%), intrauterine growth restriction (46.15%), oligohydramnios (53.8%) and intrauterine demise (4.6%). The rate of caesarean and neonatal intensive care unit admission also increased to 70.3% and 59.5% respectively. Conclusion: This study has found increased maternal and neonatal adverse effects associated with COVID second wave. Hence vaccine should be recommended for all pregnant women. Copyright (c) 2022: Author(s).

16.
Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics ; 12(1-s):29-33, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1876380

ABSTRACT

Objective: The SARS-CoV-2 virus, which emerged in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, spread very quickly in a short time and was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Physiological and immunological changes during pregnancy cause complications in respiratory tract infections. Complications by COVID-19 lead to a systemic effect that causes maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In this study, we aimed to investigate histopathological changes and Ki-67 expression in placentas of women with positive COVID-19 infection. Study Design: Placentas of 10 samples COVID-19 positive and 10 samples Covid-19 negative pregnant patients who were hospitalized in the Gynecology and Obstetrics Clinic of Dicle University Faculty of Medicine were included in the study. Placental tissues were fixed in 10% formaldehyde (24 hours) and processed for routine paraffin wax tissue staining. Hematoxylin Eosin dye and Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining were performed.

17.
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care ; 11(5):1820-1825, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1875928

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics, maternal and neonatal outcome of pregnancies complicated with COVID-19 infection.

18.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 36(2): 423-433, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873055

ABSTRACT

Pregnancy seems to be a risk factor for severe disease with COVID-19. Although SARS-CoV-2 intrauterine transmission seems to be rare, most studies show COVID-19 during pregnancy increases the risk for pregnancy complications, with higher risk among those with severe disease compared with those mildly affected. Studies suggest that COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy is safe and effective. Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 have been found in umbilical cord blood and breast milk following maternal vaccination, which might provide protection to the infant. However, vaccination rates during pregnancy remain low. Studies are needed to understand ways to address SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy among pregnant persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
19.
Emergency Medicine Journal ; 39(6):483-484, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1874627

ABSTRACT

Editor’s note: EMJ has partnered with the journals of multiple international emergency medicine societies to share from each a highlighted research study, as selected by their editors. This edition will feature an from each publication.

20.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872911

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with enhanced disease severity in pregnant women. Despite the potential of COVID-19 vaccines to reduce severe disease, vaccine uptake remained relatively low among pregnant women. Just as coordinated messaging from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and leading obstetrics organizations began to increase vaccine confidence in this vulnerable group, the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concerns, including the Omicron variant, raised new concerns about vaccine efficacy because of their ability to escape vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. Early data point to a milder disease course following infection with the Omicron variant in vaccinated individuals. Thus, these data suggest that alternate vaccine-induced immunity beyond neutralization may continue to attenuate Omicron variant-induced disease, such as Fc-mediated antibody activity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to test whether vaccine-induced antibodies raised during pregnancy continue to bind to and leverage Fc receptors to protect against variants of concern including the Omicron variant. STUDY DESIGN: The receptor binding domain or whole spike-specific antibody isotype binding titers and Fc gamma receptor binding directed toward variants of concern, including the Omicron variant, were analyzed in pregnant women after receiving the full dose regimen of either the Pfizer/BioNTech BNT62b2 (n=10) or Moderna mRNA-1273 (n=10) vaccination using a multiplexing Luminex assay. RESULTS: Reduced isotype recognition of the Omicron receptor binding domain was observed following administration of either vaccine with relatively preserved, albeit reduced, recognition of the whole Omicron spike by immunoglobulin M and G antibodies. Despite the near complete loss of Fc receptor binding to the Omicron receptor binding domain, Fc receptor binding to the Omicron spike was more variable but largely preserved. CONCLUSION: Reduced binding titers to the Omicron receptor binding domain aligns with the observed loss of neutralizing activity. Despite the loss of neutralization, preserved, albeit reduced, Omicron spike recognition and Fc receptor binding potentially continue to attenuate disease severity in pregnant women.

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