Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
1.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2511: 3-20, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941363

ABSTRACT

Due to continuous technical developments and new insights into the high complexity of infectious diseases such as COVID-19, there is an increasing need for multiplex biomarkers to aid clinical management and support the development of new drugs and vaccines. COVID-19 disease requires rapid diagnosis and stratification to enable the most appropriate treatment course for the best possible outcomes for patients. In addition, these tests should be rapid, specific, and sensitive. They should rule out other potential causes of illness with simultaneous testing for other diseases. Elevated levels of specific biomarkers can be used to establish severity risks of chronic diseases so that patients can be provided the proper medication at the right time. This review describes the state-of-the-art technologies in proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics, for multiplex biomarker approaches in COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Cureus ; 14(5): e24682, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924621

ABSTRACT

Background The importance of prognostication in critical care cannot be over-emphasized, especially in the context of diseases like dengue, as their presentation may vary from mild fever to critical life-threatening illness. With the help of prognostic markers, it is possible to identify patients at higher risk and thus improve their outcome with timely intervention. Basic arterial blood gas (ABG) parameters, i.e., potential of hydrogen (pH), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) and bicarbonate are useful parameters, especially in critical care medicine as they are known to vary with the severity of illness. Hyperlactatemia is often referred to as a "powerful predictor of mortality". Basic ABG parameters and lactate have been used as an essential prognostic modality in critically ill patients for decades; however, the evidence remains limited for their role as prognostic markers in patients with severe dengue. Method We carried out an observational retrospective cohort study comprising 163 patients with severe dengue, admitted between July 2021 and November 2021 at Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of Shri Ram Murti Smarak Institute of Medical Sciences (SRMS IMS), Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India. Basic ABG parameters and lactate levels at the time of admission to MICU were compared between survivor and non-survivor groups of patients with severe dengue in order to evaluate their prognostic utility as predictors of mortality. Results pH (p<0.0001), PO2 (p=0.01) and bicarbonate (<0.0001) levels were significantly lower, while PCO2 (p=0.002) and lactate (p<0.0001) levels were significantly higher in non-survivor group as compared to survivor group. Lactate was found to be the best prognostic marker with Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 88.7% on Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis. Conclusion Basic arterial blood gas parameters and lactate can be used as feasible prognostic markers in patients with severe dengue.

3.
Archives of Razi Institute ; 77(3):1049-1058, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1912530

ABSTRACT

This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic value of relative changes from admission to discharge (%) of integrated congestion assessment to predict adverse outcomes in patients with irreversible heart failure (HF) during a one-year follow-up. The study included 122 patients (60% males, median age of 69 years) with decompensated HF. Most of the patients (92%) had a history of arterial hypertension, 53.3% had coronary heart disease, and 40.2% had type 2 diabetes mellitus. All patients underwent assessments, including NT-proBNP, lung ultrasound (LUS) B-line score, liver stiffness by transient elastography, and resistance and reactance by bioimpedance vector analysis (BIVA). The assessments were performed at admission and discharge, and a relative change from admission (delta percentage, %) was calculated. Long-term clinical outcomes were assessed by a structured interview conducted 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. The cut-offs for the occurrence of the endpoint events were % NT-proBNP of -25, % liver stiffness of -44, % B-line score on lung ultrasound of -73, % BIVA resistance of 18, and % BIVA reactance of 40. It was revealed that 55% of endpoint events, including 22 (18%) deaths and 33 (27%) readmissions, occurred within a median of 74 days (interquartile range: 33-147). Patients with an endpoint event had significantly worse values of all studied parameters in contrast to patients without it. There was a significant direct association between % NT-proBNP and % B-lines (r=0.18;P=0.04), and a highly reliable inverse association was observed between % liver stiffness and % BIVA reactance (r=-0.4;P < 0.001). No significant associations were found between the other parameters. Univariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated the independent prognostic value of all congestion markers under study (NT-proBNP, LUS B-lines, liver stiffness, and BIVA reactance) for predicting the combined endpoint. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed the independent prognostic value in predicting the risk of endpoint event for the following parameters: NT-proBNP (hazard rate [HR] 2.5, P=0.001), liver stiffness (HR 2.3, P=0.012), LUS B-line score (HR 2.2, P=0.008). However, it did not find any significant prognostic value for BIVA resistance and reactance. The relative admission-to-discharge change in the integral assessment of congestion had a prognostic value for predicting the risk of adverse outcomes (all-cause mortality and readmission rate) in patients with decompensated HF during a one-year follow-up.

4.
Sardechno sadovi Zabolyavaniya / Cardiovascular Diseases ; 53(1):31-36, 2022.
Article in Bulgarian | GIM | ID: covidwho-1887590

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused global health, social and economic system challenges. Adults with cardiovascular disease may be at a higher risk of mortality with COVID-19. Low ankle-brachial index (ABI) indicates a diagnosis of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease events. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between PAB and the consequences of COVID-19. Patients and Methods: 160 patients were analyzed, and 33 (20.6%) (mean age 41.33 years, 72.7% women) of them had COVID-19.

5.
Saglik Bilimleri Tip Dergisi, Firat Universitesi ; 36(1):46-50, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1871857

ABSTRACT

Objective: Covid-19, which causes an ongoing worldwide epidemic, affects millions of people with the emergence of its variant forms. This study aims to compare the levels of Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), which can be associated with disease severity in Covid-19 physiopathology, in patients and healthy population, and to determine whether it can be used as a prognostic and predictive marker. Materials and Methods: 43 mild [CT (Computed tomography) (-), (Female=21-Male=22)], 45 severe [CT (+), (Female=20-Male=25)] Covid-19 patients classified according to the disease severity constituted the experimental group of our study. In addition, 88 healthy (Female=46- Male=42) people comprised the control group.

6.
Commun Med (Lond) ; 1: 51, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860421

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic represents a major public health threat. Risk of death from the infection is associated with age and pre-existing comorbidities such as diabetes, dementia, cancer, and impairment of immunological, hepatic or renal function. It remains incompletely understood why some patients survive the disease, while others do not. As such, we sought to identify novel prognostic factors for COVID-19 mortality. Methods: We performed an unbiased, observational retrospective analysis of real world data. Our multivariable and univariable analyses make use of U.S. electronic health records from 122,250 COVID-19 patients in the early stages of the pandemic. Results: Here we show that a priori diagnoses of fluid, pH and electrolyte imbalance during the year preceding the infection are associated with an increased risk of death independently of age and prior renal comorbidities. Conclusions: We propose that future interventional studies should investigate whether the risk of death can be alleviated by diligent and personalized management of the fluid and electrolyte balance of at-risk individuals during and before COVID-19.

7.
EPMA Journal ; 12(3):243-401, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1848234

ABSTRACT

This special issue contains 7 articles on the principles of predictive, preventive and personalised (3P) medicine. Topics covered include: endothelin-1 and its potential as the diagnostic, prognostic and treatment target in the framework of 3P medicine;potential health risks associated specifically with the low body weight;management of COVID-19;wrist actigraphic approach;diagnosing hospital bacteraemia;and omics biomarkers in pituitary neuroendocrine tumors.

8.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 60(7): 1116-1123, 2022 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817522

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative pathogen of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) presents occasionally with an aberrant autoinflammatory response, including the presence of elevated circulating autoantibodies in some individuals. Whether the development of autoantibodies against self-antigens affects COVID-19 outcomes remains unclear. To better understand the prognostic role of autoantibodies in COVID-19, we quantified autoantibodies against 23 markers that are used for diagnosis of autoimmune disease. To this end, we used serum samples from patients with severe [intensive care unit (ICU)] and moderate (ward) COVID-19, across two to six consecutive time points, and compared autoantibody levels to uninfected healthy and ICU controls. METHODS: Acute and post-acute serum (from 1 to 26 ICU days) was collected from 18 ICU COVID-19-positive patients at three to six time points; 18 ICU COVID-19-negative patients (sampled on ICU day 1 and 3); 21 ward COVID-19-positive patients (sampled on hospital day 1 and 3); and from 59 healthy uninfected controls deriving from two cohorts. Levels of IgG autoantibodies against 23 autoantigens, commonly used for autoimmune disease diagnosis, were measured in serum samples using MSD® U-PLEX electrochemiluminescence technology (MSD division Meso Scale Discovery®), and results were compared between groups. RESULTS: There were no significant elevations of autoantibodies for any of the markers tested in patients with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Sample collections at longer time points should be considered in future studies, for assessing the possible development of autoantibody responses following infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Autoantibodies , Autoantigens , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Thromb J ; 18: 22, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospitals in the Middle East Gulf region have experienced an influx of COVID-19 patients to their medical wards and intensive care units. The hypercoagulability of these patients has been widely reported on a global scale. However, many of the experimental treatments used to manage the various complications of COVID-19 have not been widely studied in this context. The effect of the current treatment protocols on patients' diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers may thus impact the validity of the algorithms adopted. CASE PRESENTATION: In this case series, we report four cases of venous thromboembolism and 1 case of arterial thrombotic event, in patients treated with standard or intensified prophylactic doses of unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin at our institution. Tocilizumab has been utilized as an add-on therapy to the standard of care to treat patients with SARS-CoV-2 associated acute respiratory distress syndrome, in order to dampen the hyperinflammatory response. It is imperative to be aware that this drug may be masking the inflammatory markers (e.g. IL6, CRP, fibrinogen, and ferritin), without reducing the risk of thrombotic events in this population, creating instead a façade of an improved prognostic outcome. However, the D-dimer levels remained prognostically reliable in these cases, as they were not affected by the drug and continued to be at the highest level until event occurrence. CONCLUSIONS: In the setting of tocilizumab therapy, traditional prognostic markers of worsening infection and inflammation, and thus potential risk of acute thrombosis, should be weighed carefully as they may not be reliable for prognosis and may create a façade of an improved prognostic outcome insteasd. Additionally, the fact that thrombotic events continued to be observed despite decrease in inflammatory markers and the proactive anticoagulative approach adopted, raises more questions about the coagulative mechanisms at play in COVID-19, and the appropriate management strategy.

10.
Cureus ; 14(3): e23375, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791865

ABSTRACT

Background Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is an indispensable tool in emergency medicine. With the emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a need for improved diagnostic capabilities and prognostic indicators for patients who are symptomatic for COVID-19 has become apparent. POCUS has been demonstrated to be a useful diagnostic and prognostic tool in the emergency department (ED) in assessing other lung complications. Still, limited data regarding its utility in assessing COVID-19 are available. This study sought to evaluate whether POCUS findings in the ED were correlated with vital signs or laboratory abnormalities typically seen among patients with COVID-19. Methods A retrospective study was conducted that included 39 patients who presented with COVID-19 and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to a large, urban tertiary care ED. The study population was limited to adults aged 18 and above who came to the ED with the primary complaint of respiratory symptoms, met SIRS criteria on admission, and had images of at least one anterior and one posterior intercostal space per lung and a minimum of four intercostal spaces. POCUS images were obtained by trained operators in the ED using portable ultrasound machines, recorded in an image database, and reviewed by ultrasound fellowship-trained emergency physicians. Clinical data (e.g., acute phase reactants and vital signs) were obtained through a chart review of patients' electronic medical records. Results  Both the percentage of intercostal spaces with B-lines and the percentage of merging B-lines were correlated with decreased oxygen saturation on presentation. No other statistically significant correlations were observed between these sonographic findings and other vital signs or acute phase reactants, nor between these clinical data and the percentage of intercostal spaces that were positive for the shred sign. Conclusions With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency medicine physicians are on the frontline of identifying and caring for patients affected by the virus. This study found that sonographic findings associated with interstitial pneumonitis, notably merging B-lines, and the overall percentage of intercostal spaces with B-lines, were clearly associated with worsening oxygen saturation, now thought to be one of the driving causes of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19. As ultrasound has become a ubiquitous and indispensable tool in the ED, this study demonstrated its utility in assessing and managing patients with COVID-19. Bedside ultrasound is a cheap, fast, and non-invasive tool that healthcare providers can use as an essential adjunct in addition to laboratory markers and other imaging modalities for the diagnosis and prognosis of COVID-19.

11.
Revista Medica de Chile ; 149(11):1568-1576, 2021.
Article in Spanish | GIM | ID: covidwho-1787054

ABSTRACT

Background: The Araucania region in Chile had the greatest COVID-19 incidence and lethality in Chile Aim: To describe the clinical characteristics and evolution of patients admitted for COVID-19 in a high complexity Hospital in the region of La Araucan..a-Chile. Material and Methods: Review of medical records of the first 169 patients aged 55 .. 17 years (50% women) admitted for COVID-19 between march and may, 2020 at a regional hospital in Temuco Chile.

12.
Journal of the Association of Physicians of India ; 69(June):13-15, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1756068

ABSTRACT

This article extends our understanding of COVID19 AKI in hospitalized patients in a resource-constraint country like India. Even since the declaration of COVID19 infection as a pandemic in March, 2020, our understanding of this global human threat has increased tremendously. We now understand that renal involvement in COVID19 is much more frequent than initially thought and it independently contributes to morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanism of COVID-19 AKI is multifactorial which is in line with the other forms of AKI. Given extensive need for intensive care support and its economic implications, prognostic markers identified in different study populations around the world could potentially help in effective clinical triaging and cost-effective management. Future research should focus on variation in disease-epidemiology based on geographical location, variation in healthcare delivery system, socioeconomic indicators and how these factors influence clinical outcomes.

13.
Tianjin Medical Journal ; 49(11):1188-1192, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1755747

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effect of the systemic immune-inflammation index(SII) on the conversion time of virus nucleic acid turning negative in patients with coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19).

14.
Healthline, Journal of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine ; 12(1):46-54, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1717499

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The outbreak of Covid-19 has led to a health emergency and economic crisis worldwide. Mortality in productive age further worsens the crisis, so it is important to understand reasons for death in productive age group.

15.
Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal ; 23(10), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1629984

ABSTRACT

Background: The struggle of humanity with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, which affected the whole world and caused severe social and health crises, continues without deceleration. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the relationship between the abnormal laboratory parameters upon admission and the intensity of lung involvement using chest computerized tomography severity score (CT-SS).

16.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(24)2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580509

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected hundreds of millions of individuals and caused millions of deaths worldwide. Predicting the clinical course of the disease is of pivotal importance to manage patients. Several studies have found hematochemical alterations in COVID-19 patients, such as inflammatory markers. We retrospectively analyzed the anamnestic data and laboratory parameters of 303 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 who were admitted to the Polyclinic Hospital of Bari during the first phase of the COVID-19 global pandemic. After the pre-processing phase, we performed a survival analysis with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox Regression, with the aim to discover the most unfavorable predictors. The target outcomes were mortality or admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Different machine learning models were also compared to realize a robust classifier relying on a low number of strongly significant factors to estimate the risk of death or admission to ICU. From the survival analysis, it emerged that the most significant laboratory parameters for both outcomes was C-reactive protein min; HR=17.963 (95% CI 6.548-49.277, p < 0.001) for death, HR=1.789 (95% CI 1.000-3.200, p = 0.050) for admission to ICU. The second most important parameter was Erythrocytes max; HR=1.765 (95% CI 1.141-2.729, p < 0.05) for death, HR=1.481 (95% CI 0.895-2.452, p = 0.127) for admission to ICU. The best model for predicting the risk of death was the decision tree, which resulted in ROC-AUC of 89.66%, whereas the best model for predicting the admission to ICU was support vector machine, which had ROC-AUC of 95.07%. The hematochemical predictors identified in this study can be utilized as a strong prognostic signature to characterize the severity of the disease in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Machine Learning , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis
17.
In Vivo ; 35(6): 3305-3313, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The study provides a novel prediction model for COVID-19 progression and outcome by the combination of the CD8+: B-cells ratio with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Immune phenotyping was performed in 120 COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: A decrease in CD8+:B-cell (p<0.0001) and in lymphocyte-to-CRP (LCR) ratio (p<0.0001) was observed in intubated patients versus non-intubated with an increase for CD4+:CD8+ (p<0.01), NLR (p<0.0001) and CRP: Albumin (p<0.001). Receiving operating curve (ROC) analysis predicting requirement for mechanical ventilation revealed the highest AUC for CD8+:B-cells, (AUC=0.795, p<0.001) versus NLR (AUC=0.783, p<0.001), LCR (AUC=0.779, p<0.001), Albumin:CRP (AUC=0.750, p<0.001) and CD4+:CD8+ (AUC=0.779, p<0.001). Combination of the CD8+: B-cell ratio with the NLR increased the AUC (AUC=0.845, p<0.001). The combined ratios correlated with outcome defined as duration of hospital (r=0.435, p<0.001) or ICU stay (r=0.596, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Combination of the CD8+: B-cell ratio and NLR serves as a useful prognostic tool for COVID-19 patient progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neutrophils , B-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Lymphocytes , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol ; 32(8): 1857-1865, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a hallmark of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We aimed to characterize lymphocyte subsets' shifts and their correlations with other severity markers of MIS-C. METHODS: In this prospective cross-sectional study, we performed peripheral lymphocyte phenotyping in 32 patients with MIS-C. We analyzed lymphocyte subsets at three time points of the disease: the acute (A), convalescent (B), and recovery (C) phases. Based on age-normalized lymphocyte counts, we distinguished two groups of patients: "the mild" (higher lymphocyte counts) and "the severe" (lower lymphocyte counts). In addition, we examined differences between these groups regarding other severity markers. RESULTS: In phase A, 84% of children had lymphopenia. Decreased absolute counts of CD3, CD4, and CD8 cells were observed in, respectively, 88%, 72%, and 84% of patients. The natural killer cells were decreased in 63% and CD19 in 59% of children. "The severe" group had significantly higher procalcitonin and troponin I levels and lower platelets and albumin. Moreover, "the severe" group had hypotension more frequently (73% vs. 20%, p = .008). In phase B, all lymphocyte counts increased, and 32% of children had lymphocytosis. The increase of CD3, CD4, and CD8 counts correlated with some laboratory severity markers (hemoglobin, procalcitonin, D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, albumin), but not with steroid use. In phase C, most children had normal lymphocyte counts. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial shifts in lymphocyte counts during MIS-C apply most to T lymphocytes and correlate with the disease severity markers, particularly hypotension prevalence. A proportion of children with MIS-C develops transient lymphocytosis during convalescence.


Subject(s)
Lymphocyte Subsets , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Prospective Studies
19.
Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; : 1-6, 2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298600

ABSTRACT

The role of tracheotomy during the pandemic remains to be determined for severe COVID-19 pneumonia. We evaluated the effect of tracheotomy on prognostic markers and assessed 4 weeks survival in terms of clinical and biochemical characteristics of patients and time and type (open or percutaneous) of the operation. We performed a retrospective study considering ICU patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and tracheotomy, between May 30 and December 31, 2020. Four weeks survival postoperatively and alteration of biochemical markers were analyzed. 24 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and tracheotomy, included in this study. Median age was 68.3 years (range 38-90) with male:female ratio 16:8. All the patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia considering clinical symptoms and COVID-19 specific CT findings. RT-PCR test results were positive in 58.3%. Prognostic markers were found to be increased postoperatively with both types of surgery (75%). 1 week and 4 weeks survival after the operation was 66.7% and 45.8%, respectively. 4 weeks survival was decreased significantly with NLR ≥ 10 compared to NLR < 10 (15.3-81.8%). Nevertheless, 4 weeks survival differences between males and females (12.5% and 62.5%) and between age ≤ 50 and > 50 (100% and 35%) were also found to be statistically significant. Patients with younger age, male gender, and NLR < 10, were found to have longer survival after tracheotomy. Positive PCR results and preoperative critically increased biochemical markers were related to decreased survival. The number of comorbidities, time and type of surgery, and postoperative increment of prognostic markers seemed not to affect survival.

20.
J Clin Med ; 10(12)2021 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282524

ABSTRACT

Increased concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity troponin I (HsTnI) in COVID-19 patients have already been reported. The aim of this study is to evaluate which of these common markers of cardiac disease is the most useful predictor of fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients. One hundred and seventy-four patients affected with COVID-19 were recruited, and markers of cardiac disease and the clinical history of the patients were collected at admission in the infectious disease unit or intensive care unit. NT-proBNP, BNP and HsTnI values were higher in in-hospital non-surviving patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of NT-proBNP, BNP and HsTnI was performed, with NT-proBNP (AUC = 0.951) and HsTnI (AUC = 0.947) being better performers (p = 0.01) than BNP (AUC = 0.777). Logistic regression was performed assessing the relation of HsTnI and NT-proBNP to fatal outcome adjusting for age and gender, with only NT-proBNP being significant. The population was then divided into two groups, one with higher NT-proBNP values at admission than the cut-off resulted from the ROC curve (511 ng/L) and a second one with lower values. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed an absence of fatal outcome in the group of patients with NT-proBNP values lower than the cut-off (p < 0.001). NT-proBNP proved to be the best prognostic tool for fatal outcome among markers of cardiac disease in COVID-19 patients.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL