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1.
Journal of East European Management Studies ; 27(3):552-578, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056162

ABSTRACT

According to Budhwar and Gumming (2020), the COVID-19 crisis brought attention to the importance of having an international perspective. [...]studies from certain regions - such as the Hungarian example in this article - may provide an essential local perspective, in addition to the Human Resource Management (HRM) of the pandemic and may help us find global solutions. 2Theoretical background Many scholars have analysed the situation that has evolved as a result of the pandemic from different aspects. According to McLean and Jiantreerangkoo (2020), the following steps are necessary in HRD: planning, leading, changing of working conditions, systemic thinking even on an employee level, network analysis, ending racial discrimination, career planning and innovation. Since the beginning of the pandemic, HR has also focused on health and safety tasks (Caligiuri/De Cieri/Minbaeva/Verbeke/Zimmermann 2020;Adams/Walls 2020). [...]it is worth referring to the recently rather popular theory of societalization, which occurs when "strains suddenly burst their sphere-specific boundaries and become explosive scandals in society at large" (Alexander 2018:1049). According to ILO estimates, global hours worked dropped by 6.7 % in the second quarter of 2020, roughly equals to 195 million full-time job

2.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 64: 103459, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042054

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to explore the thoughts and feelings of Asian American nursing students regarding Anti-Asian racism that they might anticipate or experience during their clinical training. BACKGROUND: Asian Americans have long been viewed as perpetual foreigners and coronavirus disease 2019 has reinforced that negative view. Asian American nursing students may anticipate and experience racial discrimination during their clinical training, which could negatively affect their mental health. DESIGN: This is a qualitative research study using focus group discussions. METHOD: Focus group discussions were conducted over Zoom and audiotaped. The audiotapes were transcribed and validated for accuracy. A thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10. Emerging themes and subthemes were compared and discussed until agreements were made. RESULTS: Nineteen students participated in four focus group meetings, of which, 13 (68 %) had clinical training and six (32 %) were preclinical students. Four major themes emerged: (a) looking forward to hands-on learning opportunities, (b) enduring racial microaggressions, (c) maintaining professionalism in the face of racial microaggressions and (d) standing up for oneself and other Asian American healthcare workers. Preclinical students were anxiously waiting for clinical training so that they could have hands-on learning experiences. They anticipated that anti-Asian racism in clinical settings would be similar to what they had experienced on the streets and therefore, they were not afraid of it. Students who had clinical training reported experiencing a variety of racial microaggressions that varied from "side-eyes" to "verbal assault" and occurred at three levels: patients, nurses and clinical instructors. They reported that most of the microaggressions were familiar to them, but some, especially coming from their clinical instructors, were unique to clinical settings. CONCLUSION: Asian American nursing students experienced racial microaggressions during their clinical training which came from patients, nurses on the unit and their clinical instructors. Nevertheless, the students strove to maintain professionalism and stand up for themselves and other Asian healthcare workers as they gained confidence in clinical knowledge and skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Students, Nursing , Aggression/psychology , Asian Americans/psychology , Focus Groups , Humans , Microaggression , Pandemics , Racism/psychology
3.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(9): e38589, 2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039598

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, increased social media usage has led to worsened mental health outcomes for many people. Moreover, due to the sociopolitical climate during the pandemic, the prevalence of online racial discrimination has contributed to worsening psychological well-being. With increases in anti-Asian hate, Asian and Asian American social media users may experience the negative effects of online racial discrimination in addition to the reduced psychological well-being resulting from exposure to online COVID-19 content. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19-related social media use and exposure to online racial discrimination during the pandemic on the mental health outcomes (ie, anxiety, depression, and secondary traumatic stress [STS]) of Asian Americans compared with those of non-Asian Americans. In addition, this study explores the mediating role of negative affect and the moderating role of racial/ethnic identification. METHODS: An online survey was conducted through Amazon Mechanical Turk and a university-wide research portal from March 3 to March 15, 2021. A total of 1147 participants took the survey. Participants' social media usage related to COVID-19 and exposure to 2 online forms of racial discrimination (individual and vicarious), mental health outcomes (anxiety, depression, and STS), racial/ethnic identification, negative affect, and demographics were assessed. RESULTS: Our results showed that COVID-19-related social media use, individual discrimination, and vicarious discrimination were predictors of negative mental health outcomes (anxiety, depression, and STS). Asian Americans reported higher vicarious discrimination than Latinx and White Americans, but Asian Americans' mental health outcomes did not differ substantially from those of the other racial/ethnic groups. Racial/ethnic identification moderated the relationship between both types of discrimination and STS, and negative affect served as a mediator between both types of discrimination and all 3 mental health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that social media exposure continues to have a dire effect on mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study helps to contextualize the rise of anti-Asian American hate and its impact on mental health outcomes in the United States.

4.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Suppl 2):A522-A523, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2019945

ABSTRACT

AimsThe combined impact of race discrimination and COVID-19 on the everyday lives of Black Asian and minority ethnic families and communities has drawn to the fore the glaring inequalities that exist in British society today. Drawing from a socioecological framework this ongoing research focuses on the emotional and mental wellbeing and resilience of Black and South Asian young people and how they have been differently impacted by the pandemic. With Black and Asian families already disproportionately impacted by the health and economic disparities, children and young people have been doubly exposed to emotional and psycho-social trauma. The aim of the research has been to examine the factors that impact the health, well-being and resilience of Black and Asian minority ethnic families and children during the pandemic.MethodsStarting from a critical race theory perspective, the qualitative research design uses a wellbeing and resilience framework and socioecological approach, to connect micro-meso-macro social processes. Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and creative workshops have provided insight into the combined impact of COVID-19 and racial discrimination on Black and South Asian young peoples’ everyday life, and how they navigated change. Data was collated in 2021 through purposive and snowballing techniques including from a community groups and schools, with a total of 53 participants, aged between 12–19 who identified as Black, Asian or mixed Black/Asian heritage. A youth engagement panel was also set up to aid meaningful engagement and involvement with youth participants.ResultsFindings based on a thematic analysis, provide insight into the interconnectedness of young people’s relationships with family, peers, teachers, and community support workers for maintaining mental wellbeing. Isolation, anxiety, experiences of bereavement, separation from school and friends, conducting their lives online and the impact of social media, influenced their concerns about inconsistencies in the policing of ‘lockdown’ rules, education, health, mental health support, within the context of being young and from Black or Asian backgrounds. The prominence of BLM movement and amplification of racial injustices during the pandemic, encouraged participants to speak candidly about identity, racialization, belonging, friendships and highlight local, national and global processes of change necessary for tackling systemic racial discrimination.Although many communicated through social media, being at home and separated from peers/friends made them more introspective and reflective on their relationships and friendships.ConclusionFor Black and Asian young people already experiencing the adverse effects of structural inequalities, the pandemic has added some extra challenges in relation to maintaining their wellbeing. Their perspectives provide important insights into the complex multiplicity of factors that must be understood to build resilience post-COVID-19 - from new coping strategies, family connections, accessing support services, the importance and reliance on peer support and peer power, and the need for more culturally-responsive policies for young people;changes that respond sensitively to the emotional and mental wellbeing of Black and Asian young people.

5.
Human Organization ; 79(4):259-270, 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2011779

ABSTRACT

Migrant and refugee populations have been identified as among the most vulnerable to COVID-19 due to what medical anthropologists have described as structural vulnerability. We argue significant differences exist between migrant groups and offer lessons for society at large. We develop the concept of Viral encounters to frame an analysis of social narratives, representations. and practices involved in coping with threats of transmission and practices of prevention. Specifically, the globalized city of Prato offers a case study due to its unique relationship with COVID-19. Instead of a COVID-19 epicenter, however, Prato emerged as a contagion exception particularly as related to its Chinese migrant community. We use a place-based framework to argue that the threat of xenophobia, preparedness with quarantine, and the will of solidarity motivated an entire migrant community to take action - well before the nationwide lock down began and extending beyond its conclusion. We combine virtual ethnography with health data as well as evidence of xenophobia and solidarity to offer an analysis. We argue that the effects of solidarity reconfigure dominant ideologies of individualism, open space for collective orientation toward a human economy, and offer potential to alleviate detrimental impacts of pandemics.

6.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 77: 103250, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007382

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a sharp rise in anti-Asian hate crimes, limited data exist on racial trauma and its effects on Asian Americans. The current study investigated how racial discrimination and parental ethnic-racial socialization (cultural socialization, preparation for bias, and promotion of mistrust) were associated with racial trauma among Asian Americans in young adulthood. Increased cultural socialization and preparation for bias in childhood were hypothesized to be associated with lower levels of racial trauma, whereas increased racial discrimination and promotion of mistrust were hypothesized to predict higher levels of racial trauma. METHODS: Based on a retrospective report of young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, this longitudinal nationwide study within the United States examined 133 Asian and Asian American young adults ages 18-30 who participated in an online survey regarding ethnic identity, childhood ethnic-racial socialization practices, racial discrimination-related experiences, and racial trauma. RESULTS: Lifetime discrimination, but not COVID-19-related discrimination, was associated with higher levels of racial trauma. Greater levels of preparation for bias during childhood predicted lower levels of racial trauma in young adulthood. Contrary to the hypothesis, greater levels of cultural socialization predicted higher levels of racial trauma. Promotion of mistrust was not associated with later racial trauma outcomes. CONCLUSION: The current study underscores the long-term impacts of parent-child discussions about racism (i.e., preparation for bias) to address racial trauma in young adulthood. Future research should further examine cultural socialization to determine its effects on racial trauma among Asian Americans.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Socialization , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Journal of International Students ; 12:88-105, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2002870

ABSTRACT

Three Korean female doctoral students studying at U.S. higher education institutions address our lived experiences in this paper. By drawing on Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Asian Critical Theory (AsianCrit), we reflected upon the feelings and experiences that we swallowed to survive. We used collaborative autoethnography with artistic methods, such as digital collage and poetry, to share how we have wrestled with feelings of shame when reckoning our embodied knowledge of race and racism. Using CRT and AsianCrit, we disrupted racial stereotypes regarding Asians and their invisibility in racial discourses. We end with suggestions for providing support to Asian international students exploring racialized discourse and positioning themselves as qualified professionals and political agents. In sharing our stories, we hope to illuminate lived experiences that have been neglected, misunderstood, silenced, and forgotten.

8.
Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences ; 112(4):58-60, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1994581

ABSTRACT

Research reveals no evidence of discussion or efforts to improve the quality of life in African American homes. According to The COVID Tracking Project (2020), Blacks die at a 2.5 times higher rate than Whites. (See https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/ PST045219) When queried about their perception of healthcare in response to COVID-19, 64% of Blacks feel they are less likely than Whites to be offered a coronavirus/COVID-19 test, 63% indicate they are less likely than Whites to be admitted to the hospital for COVID-19, 59% believe they are less likely than Whites to be offered experimental treatments for the disease, and 60% believe they are less likely than Whites to receive the maximum treatment to save their lives while in the hospital (African American Research Collaborative, 2020).

9.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 38(2):113-140, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1994441

ABSTRACT

In 2010, a group of racialized doctoral students at an elite university in Canada collectively mobilized against institutional racism within their school of social work. They insisted that their school confront the ways in which White supremacy was embedded within various policies and practices. These early initiatives led to the creation of the Racialized Students’ Network (RSN). Although the RSN has ended, it has produced a new generation of scholars who continue to interrogate Whiteness and White supremacy. It has also offered roadmaps through which newer generations of racialized social work scholars can advance anti-racist and decolonial feminist perspectives within postsecondary social work institutions in Canada. In this article, the authors, who are now tenure-track or tenured professors at Canadian universities, demonstrate the ways in which graduate student anti-racist activisms are a central avenue for confronting Whiteness and institutional racism. Through a collaborative autoethnographic methodology, this article draws from the authors’ personal experiences within the RSN, the group’s source documents, and their collective analysis on how the RSN has informed their ongoing activism. They discuss how their everyday experiences align with current anti-racist struggles and movements to shape their actions and responses in academe. The RSN Model of Racialized Students’ Activism is presented to demonstrate the collective processes the student activists explored to reflect and apply their intersecting identities to support racialized students and address systemic racism.Alternate :En 2010, un groupe d’étudiants racisés, aux études doctorales dans une université canadienne, s’est mobilisé collectivement contre le racisme institutionnel au sein de leur école de travail social. Ces étudiants ont insisté pour que leur école confronte les façons dont la suprématie blanche s’ancrait dans diverses politiques et pratiques. Ces premières initiatives ont conduit à la création du Racialized Students’ Network (RSN). Bien que le RSN n’existe plus, il a donné naissance à une nouvelle génération de chercheurs qui continuent de s’interroger sur la blancheur et la suprématie blanche. Il a également offert des feuilles de route grâce auxquelles les nouvelles générations de chercheurs en travail social racisés peuvent faire progresser les perspectives féministes, antiracistes et décoloniales au sein des programmes de travail social dans les établissements postsecondaires au Canada. Dans cet article, les auteurs, qui sont maintenant professeurs titulaires ou permanents dans des universités canadiennes, démontrent comment les activismes antiracistes des étudiantes et étudiants sont une avenue centrale pour confronter la suprématie blanche et le racisme institutionnel. Grâce à une méthodologie autoethnographique collaborative, cet article s’inspire des expériences personnelles des auteurs au sein du RSN, des documents sources du groupe et de leur analyse collective sur la façon dont le RSN a influencé leur activisme actuel. Ils discutent de la manière dont leurs expériences quotidiennes s’alignent sur les luttes et les mouvements antiracistes actuels pour façonner leurs actions et leurs réponses dans le milieu universitaire. Afin de démontrer les processus collectifs entrepris par les activistes étudiants pour refléter et utiliser leurs identités entrecroisées afin de soutenir les étudiantes et étudiants racisés et confronter le racisme systémique, le modèle d’activisme des étudiantes et étudiantes racisés du RSN est présenté.

10.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 24(4): 970-976, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971770

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to examine how perceived racial discrimination is associated with mental distress among diverse Asian Americans and to explore the potential moderators in the relationship. Based on the 2015 Asian American Quality of Life (AAQoL) survey (n = 2609), direct influences were tested of the contextual (demographic, health-related, and immigration-related) variables and perceived racial discrimination on mental distress, as well as their interactions. About 30% of the sample reported perceived racial discrimination, and 44% fell into the category of having mental distress. Perceived racial discrimination was associated with 1.90 times higher odds of mental distress and had significant interactions with age, education, and ethnicity. The association of mental distress with perceived racial discrimination was higher among those who were 60 or older, less educated, and Vietnamese than among their respective counterparts. Findings can guide strategic and targeted interventions for high-risk groups.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans , Racism , Asian Americans/psychology , Ethnicity , Humans , Mental Health , Quality of Life , Racism/psychology
11.
Journal of Public Health Management and Practice ; 28(Suppl. 1):S1-S110, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1957724

ABSTRACT

This special issue includes 15 articles focusing on how public health professionals at local, state, and federal agencies and at academic institutions can address the pervasive structural racism against Asians by making them visible. Topics discussed are: anti-Latino racism, the racial state, and revising approaches to racial disparities;conquering the health disparities of structural racism;embedding equity in a local government's Response to COVID-19;the Massachusetts racial equity data road map;the power of community in addressing infant mortality inequities;disparities across income and health insurance in a national sample of US adults;community-informed mobile COVID-19 testing model to addressing health inequities.

12.
Economics & Sociology ; 15(2):11-23, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934656

ABSTRACT

. Utilizing a Community-Based Participatory Research model, faculty members of a local university school of social work completed a qualitative study of an emerging Bhutanese minority group's subjective view of their living experiences related to Covid-19 while living in Northeast, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Utilizing purposive sampling methodology, fifty samples, such as bilingual (English & Nepali) community leaders and Bhutanese residents participated in individual telephone interviews due to the high surge of Covid-19, from October 2020 to January 2021. The purpose of the study is to understand the subjective views of Bhutanese residents' lived experience during the peak of the global pandemic, COVID-19. The interview incorporated two components: 1. Demographic information and 2) Questionnaires developed by the researchers which were reviewed by two independent researchers in the university before their use. The study found that the Bhutanese community residents identified challenging needs in the areas of language barriers, unemployment, multigenerational living, and strategies to overcome hardship of Covid-19. The study findings point to the benefits of an interprofessional collaborative action with community organizations (faith-based organizations, social institutions, and cultural centers) to close the gap of social and health care disparities among minority populations. Community health care and social service institutions and organizations need to build relationships with leaders of local minority organizations in order to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate information about treatment, care and prevention of Covid-19 in the future.

13.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(8-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1929382

ABSTRACT

According to a report by Stop AAPI Hate (Yellow Horse et al., 2021), racial discrimination against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic occurred in businesses such as grocery stores, malls, and restaurants (30.1%) and most were in the forms of verbal harassment (63.7%) and shunning (16.5%). In other words, many Asian Americans experienced racial discrimination in retail environments during the pandemic. Yet, despite the negative experiences in retail, studies on the forms of racial discrimination Asian American consumers faced during the pandemic and in their everyday lives have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to close this gap and debunk the assumption that Asian Americans do not experience racial discrimination due to the "model minority" myth (Gee & Peck, 2018). Also, to highlight the experiences of Asian Americans to inform retailers about the consumer group that is increasing in numbers and buying power (Constante, 2018;Nielsen, 2020). Moreover, the researcher proposes and tests a theoretical framework that synthesizes the literature on attributional ambiguity theory, racial microaggressions, and consumer research on attribution, emotions, and behaviors. To answer research questions and test the theoretical model, one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted, and 18 East Asian Americans participated in the interviews. Two overt racial discrimination themes emerged from the interviews: No Asians in here please, All you Asians... Seven racial microaggression themes were found: Less than, The perpetual foreigner, Carriers of the virus, Invisible, Not a target customer, Stereotyped customers, and All the same. Three attribution themes were detected: Employee's negative attitude towards Asian Americans, Lack of contact with Asian Americans, and Ambiguous. Moreover, emotional responses were mostly other-directed (e.g., frustrated, irritated, and angry). Lastly, four behavioral response themes were discovered: Negative OCR, Direct complaint, No repatronage, and No action taken against the employee or retailer. Theoretical implications and future research are discussed for researchers and practical implications are provided for retailers and retail employees in terms of retail management. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
Sur International Journal on Human Rights ; 18(31):175-184, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1929202

ABSTRACT

An interview with Jamila Venturini, co-executive director of Derechos Digitales and Michel Roberto de Souza, director of public policy at the organization, is presented. Among other things, they discuss the advancing surveillance technology in countries of the Global South, the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the legitimization of greater surveillance in the control of public and private space, and increased racial and migratory discrimination as well as the principal challenges in the region in terms of guaranteeing the right to privacy, autonomy and access to citizens information.

15.
International Perspectives on Education and Society ; 42A:59-69, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1922583

ABSTRACT

This essay explores how women scholars grapple with gender and racial inequality during a syndemic. Using a culturally comparative lens, two mother-scholars, one Afro-Boricua who identifies as Black and the other Thai who identifies as Asian, examine this topic through a comparative international womanist theoretical framework. This discussion provides a brief overview of the challenges faculty women of color have faced around the world in contemporary history. It also interrogates how the professional identities of these scholars inform their teaching, scholarship, and personal lives during a period fraught with anti-Blackness and anti-Asian hostility, gender bias, familial demands, and heightened fear and isolation. Through counter-narratives, their lived experiences are placed into a global context and insightful comparisons spotlight specific challenges that uniquely converge for women of color in the academy. This analytical discussion reflects trends in the field of comparative education by examining the impact of gender and racial discrimination on women scholars of color within political, economic, social, and cultural landscapes.

16.
Change ; 54(4):23, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1918802

ABSTRACT

As postsecondary grantmaking foundations make sense of recent sociopolitical crises, including inequities exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic;attention to the Movement for Black Lives following the summer 2020 uprisings;and more openly racialized politics, they have been catalyzed to reconsider their racial equity commitments. Grantmakers are expanding beyond their historically white-dominated networks for knowledge and expertise on where to channel their influence toward transforming postsecondary education. These grantmakers are also reflecting on avenues to shift their grant dollars to funnel more funds to BIPOC-led and community-embedded recipient organizations. Without internal and external accountability to harness lessons of the last 2 years, grantmakers (and their grantees) risk returning to status quo practices that effectively entrench racialized hierarchies.

17.
Prev Med ; 162: 107153, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915101

ABSTRACT

Racial discrimination has intensified in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic, but how it disrupted healthcare is largely unknown. This study investigates the association of racial discrimination with delaying or forgoing care during the pandemic based on data from a nationally representative survey, the Health, Ethnicity and Pandemic (HEAP) study (n = 2552) conducted in October 2020 with Asians, Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks oversampled. Racial discrimination during the pandemic was assessed in three domains: experienced racial discrimination, race-related cyberbullying, and Coronavirus racial bias beliefs. Respondents answered whether they had delayed or forgone any type of healthcare due to the pandemic. Overall, 63.7% of respondents reported delaying or forgoing any healthcare during the pandemic. About 20.3% East/Southeast Asians, 18.6% non-Hispanic Blacks and 15.9% Hispanics reported experiences of racial discrimination, compared with 2.8% of non-Hispanic Whites. Experienced racial discrimination was associated with delaying/forgoing care among non-Hispanic Blacks (Adjusted odds ratios[AOR] = 4.58, 95% confidence interval[CI]: 2.22-9.45), Hispanics (AOR = 3.88, 95%CI: 1.51-9.98), and East/Southeast Asians (AOR = 2.14, 95%CI: 1.22-3.77). Experiencing race-related cyberbullying was significantly associated with delaying/forgoing care among non-Hispanic Blacks (AOR = 1.34, 95%CI: 1.02-1.77) and East/Southeast Asians (AOR = 1.51, 95%CI: 1.19-1.90). Coronavirus racial bias was significantly associated with delaying/forgoing care among East/Southeast Asians (AOR = 1.55, 95%CI: 1.16-2.07). The three domains of racial discrimination were consistently associated with delayed or forgone health care among East/Southeast Asians during the COVID-19 pandemic; some of the associations were also seen among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics. These results demonstrate that addressing racism is important for reducing disparities in healthcare delivery during the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology , Whites
18.
Educational Research for Social Change ; 11(1):VI-IX, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1904868

ABSTRACT

Notwithstanding the challenges in South Africa, Black people were also discriminated against in the services offered to people fleeing the war between Russia and Ukraine. [...]I ask, "What does breaking free mean in the context of Black-on-Black hatred and violence, racial discrimination and xenophobia, and Operation Dudula in South Africa?" "Are African refugees as human as Ukrainian refugees?" "Who is human, and whose rights should be celebrated?" "Are there some people whose humanity surpasses others?" "Are there people who are less human-whose rights do not matter?" "What do we mean by celebrating human rights amidst all the abuses of women, children, and those on the periphery of society, those who do not look like us, those who have different beliefs to our own?" "How long will we keep using 'them' and 'us' to divide humanity?" "When will the sexual health and reproductive rights of marginalised people be celebrated as human rights?" "When will the rights of the poor become human rights?" "Are human rights greater than environmental rights and ecological rights?" "Can humanity survive without the ecosystem?" "Can we celebrate humanity without celebrating all life forms and their support systems?" "Do human rights exist in unethical business and development?" I know I have asked too many questions, and the truth is that I have no answers to them yet. Ashnie Mahadew and Dipane Hlalele's article, "Challenging Gender Certainties in Early Childhood Care and Education: A Participatory Action Learning and Action Research Study," places the reader in the early childhood classroom to explore how dominant ideologies about gender can be challenged within communities, beginning with the youngest community members. [...]Year Student Teachers' Perspectives," 'Mathabo Khau discusses sexual rights within disability as a neglected and underdeveloped terrain in the human rights discourse worldwide, especially when addressing adolescent sexuality. [...]gender-nonconforming learners were mistreated in some schools while in others, these learners were accepted into friendship groups and class activities by teachers and other learners.

19.
Social Enterprise Journal ; 18(3):489-502, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1891385

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This study aims to outline the importance of distinguishing between different types of societal crises and the role that plays in how social enterprises may respond to crises at hand.Design/methodology/approach>Previous literature is used to distinguish between various types of societal crises discussed in the study. Social enterprise responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, economic recession and the racial uprising in the USA that all erupted at the start of the 2020 decade are explored to illustrate the need for different responses to each.Findings>The origin and manifestation of crises differ in that they may have public health, natural, economic or even intentionally man-made origins. In addition, in times of crisis, social enterprises must be prepared to innovate, adapt or at least manage the effects of one or more crises on their organizations. These innovations may be social, technology or economic innovations.Research limitations/implications>This study contributes to knowledge about the role and value of social enterprise as a tool for addressing societal issues. The three types of crises explored in this paper will likely reoccur and evolve to manifest in new ways. As such, it is imperative that research on the efficacy of social enterprises during times of crisis are conducted to inform practice, policy and future research.Practical implications>This study aims to inform and encourage institutions, particularly social enterprises, to recognize that “winter always comes.” Crises always happen in life and how organizations respond to such crises will differ based on the type of crisis at hand. This study particularly contributes to knowledge by emphasizing the need for social enterprises to think about both economic uncertainty and the role they play in addressing crises in the long-term, not just when they occur.Originality/value>To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of the first to explore the role and value of social enterprises as a tool for combatting major social crises such as racism, pandemics and recessions.

20.
Journal of Communication in Healthcare ; 15(1):34-43, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1890699

ABSTRACT

Background: The predominantly Black city of Albany, Georgia, and its metropolitan region, was hard hit during the first wave of COVID-19. In the midst of the wave, the local hospital produced a video of a Black man dying from COVID-19 as a part of its crisis communication strategy. The purpose of this study is to critically interrogate a crisis communications tactic used by one healthcare delivery system during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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