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1.
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy ; : 100217, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165789

ABSTRACT

Background Community pharmacists like other health care professionals in Lebanon have been grappling with a series of multifaceted, country-wide and ongoing challenges that have formed the impetus for this research. We aimed to explore experiences of community pharmacists in Beirut, Lebanon, during three concurrent crises in 2020: the Lebanese financial crisis, COVID-19 pandemic and the Beirut Port explosion. Methods A qualitative approach using a constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed. Between October 2020 and February 2021, semi-structured interviews were conducted with purposefully recruited community pharmacists working in Beirut. All interviews were conducted virtually, and data collected were analysed using inductive reasoning, with open coding and concept development. Results Thirty-five participants (63% female, mean age 30) were interviewed online. Emergent categories and theoretical concepts included 1. painting the picture - pharmacists describing the context/setting;2. impact of the crises - on community pharmacists, the profession, patients and the system;3. response to the crises - of community pharmacists, the profession (+ practice), patients and the system;and 4. need for advocacy and leadership. A theory was developed about "unsustainable resilience” in the scheme of ongoing crises. Conclusions The findings revealed a shared sense of futility and despair among pharmacists collectively as a profession, as well as a sense of unsustainable healthcare systems in Lebanon, and environments impacting on the resilience of pharmacists at an individual level. A call for action is needed for urgent sustainable structural and financial reforms, advocacy and planning for future resilient systems, as well as a resilient pharmacy profession and protection of pharmacists' wellbeing and livelihood.

2.
Psychiatry Research ; : 115030, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165772

ABSTRACT

This study investigated third year medical students' psychological well-being during clinical rotations at Mount Sinai hospitals in New York City during the COVID-19 pandemic. All students (n=147) starting rotations (psychiatry, surgery, obstetrics-gynecology, neurology, pediatrics, and medicine) could participate in quarterly, online, anonymous surveys comprised of validated screeners for psychological symptoms, risk, coping, and protective factors, demographics, COVID-19 worries, and stressful clerkship-related events. Associations between variables were examined with Chi-squared, Fisher's exact, t-, Wilcoxon Rank Sum, one-way ANOVA, and McNemar tests. Significant univariate predictors of psychological distress were included in stepwise multivariable linear regression models. The baseline survey was completed by 110 (74.8%) students;ninety-two (62.6%) completed at least one other survey. During the year, 68 (73.9%) students screened positive for depression, anxiety, or PTSD. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms peaked in June 2020 without significant changes in average scores over time. COVID-19 worries decreased over time but did not influence psychological symptoms at year-end. Eighty-three students (90.2%) experienced stressful clerkship-related events, which were traumatic and/or COVID-19-related for 26 (28.3%) and 22 students (24.0%), respectively. Baseline psychological distress, childhood emotional abuse, and resilience predicted depression, anxiety, and/or PTSD by year-end. This study highlights the importance of recognizing psychological distress and implementing interventions to support students' well-being.

3.
Journal of Affective Disorders ; 324:600-606, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165459

ABSTRACT

Background Studying the role of psychological resilience in self-perceived stress and mental disorders among family members of medical workers can help us understand its importance in mental health care and guide us to develop psychological intervention strategies for family members of medical workers. Methods A total of 671 family members of medical workers were enrolled. Self-perceived stress, resilience, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were measured in our research. Results The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms among relatives of medical workers were 49.0 %, 12.2 %, and 20.3 % respectively during the COVID-19 epidemic. According to the Multivariate regression model, compared with family members of doctor, family members of nurse and medical technologists were more likely to report anxiety symptoms. Female members of medical staff were more likely to have PTSD symptoms than male counterparts;and family members of medical technologist appeared to less likely have PTSD symptoms than family members of either doctor or nurse. The mediation analysis confirmed that mental resilience mediated the relationship between self-perceived stress and anxiety symptoms. Limitations Single cross-sectional study design without the follow-up comparative analysis, only self-reported measurements were adopted, and inadequate pre-set demographic variables. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, our study firstly demonstrated the risk of psychological distress present in the family members of medical providers during the COVID-19 epidemic. Meanwhile, our findings highlighted the importance of mental resilience in family members of frontline medical workers as it mediated the relationship between self-perceived stress and anxiety symptoms.

4.
Economic Modelling ; : 106147, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165237

ABSTRACT

We estimate the economic impacts of COVID-19 in the U.S. using a disaster economic consequence analysis framework implemented by a dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. This facilitates identification of relative influences of several causal factors as "shocks” to the model, including mandatory business closures, disease spread trajectories, behavioral responses, resilience, pent-up demand, and government stimulus packages. The analysis is grounded in primary data on avoidance behavior and healthcare parameters. The decomposition of the influence of various causal factors will help policymakers offset the negative influences and reinforce the positive ones during the remainder of this pandemic and future ones.

5.
Current Opinion in Psychology ; : 101547, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165201

ABSTRACT

We review recent evidence of nostalgia's ability to enhance and buffer different types of wellbeing. Nostalgia has been associated with increased hedonic wellbeing (e.g., life satisfaction, happiness) in various contexts. Nostalgia is triggered by and can mitigate against threats to hedonic wellbeing. Nostalgia also increases eudaimonic wellbeing (e.g., perceptions of vitality, environmental mastery, positive relationships) and mitigates threats to eudaimonic wellbeing through varying mechanisms. Two applications of these wellbeing benefits are being explored in recent research: nostalgia can help understand how people buffer negative psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic;and is being harnessed for wellbeing interventions. More experimental and longitudinal research is needed to establish and maximize the potential of nostalgia for bolstering resilience.

6.
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing ; 42:55-59, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165074

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted the quality of life of individuals around the world, including health care professionals. There has been little research that examines the role of resilience concerning the impact of COVID-19 on the quality of life of nursing students. This study aimed to determine how resilience influenced the quality of life among nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional research design was adopted for this study. A total of two hundred sixty-eight nursing students from three universities, South India responded in the web-based survey. Data was collected using self-reported questionnaires in June 2021. Results Our findings revealed that the participants' resilience was normal, which had a moderate impact on the quality of life of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 impact on QoL significantly differed with year of education (F = 3.087;p < 0.02) and university (F = 6.697, p < 0.001). Bivariate analysis revealed significant inverse relationships between the impact of COVID-19 on quality of life with resilience (r = −0.259;p < 0.001) and perceived knowledge on COVID-19(r = −0.168;p < 0.006). Conclusion In our study, we found that resilience had a moderate impact on the quality of life of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, it is important to promote students' resilience and improve their quality of life during stressful situations.

7.
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review ; 170:103016, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165915

ABSTRACT

As a critical infrastructure system of modern society, the global liner shipping network (GLSN) has become increasingly complex and thus vulnerable to disruptions. This study proposes a resilience assessment framework for the GLSN across two dimensions, including static resilience and dynamic resilience. First, by leveraging high-frequency vessel movement data, the GLSN is constructed. Then, with the clique percolation method (CPM), overlapping community structures and key nodes can be identified. The static resilience assessment is initially conducted using simulation techniques, with nodes attacked through pre-designed scenarios. Then, a network disintegration method is employed to consider the impact of traffic flow on system resilience assessment, which separates the weighted GLSN into different layers for evaluation. The results show that both overlapping community structure and traffic flow significantly impact the resilience evaluation of the GLSN. Finally, to assess the dynamic resilience of the GLSN, we propose an innovative, knock-on effect simulation model with tailored, locally weighted flow redistribution rules. It provides a method for predicting the impacts of potential global disruptions (e.g., the COVID-19 pandemic) and critical maritime infrastructure failures (e.g., the Suez Canal obstruction) on the shipping network, which are of great concern not only to academia but also to industry.

8.
Technological Forecasting and Social Change ; : 122288, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165893

ABSTRACT

Grounded in dynamic capabilities theory, this study investigates the impact of firms' technological orientation (TO) on their resilience to the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic (RTC). The mediating role of the maturity of their digital strategy (MDS) to this relationship is also considered. To do this, we conducted an online survey of 186 firms that operate in Germany and Italy and tested the study's hypotheses by applying the covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) and bootstrapped regression analysis. The results indicate that TO positively affects MDS, leading to higher RTC, whereas the relationship between TO and RTC is not significant. This study extends the knowledge about dynamic capabilities theory by providing empirical support for developing a mature digital strategy. Further, it highlights the importance for managers and policy makers to proactively respond to disruptive changes, such as those caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, thus contributing to organizational resilience literature that stresses the importance of ex ante initiatives to improve resiliency.

9.
Travel Behaviour and Society ; 31:244-253, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165889

ABSTRACT

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport has been one of the hardest hit transport modes, losing ridership due to fear of contagion. This can partially be explained by the lack of preparedness in the sector to a pandemic scenario, as only few cities had epidemic contingency plans for the transport sector. To anticipate disruptions caused by future crises, we look at the preparedness and the response to COVID-19 by the public transport sector in Belgium. We interview all public transport operators in Belgium and analyze the interviews through the disaster management framework. We also aim to distill the lessons that can be learned from the pandemic to increase resilience in future public transport planning. We find that no operator in Belgium had contingency plans ready for a pandemic scenario, but that other plans were deployed to adapt their offer to COVID-19 conditions. Although all operators lost a significant part of ridership, their offer was maintained throughout the crisis, albeit at a decreased level for some operators. The availability of reliable and real-time data is identified as an important learning by the operators, as well as the ability to identify a core response team in case of a crisis. COVID-19 was seen by the operators as a learning platform to face future crises and highlighted the need to increase reactivity through better preparedness and data availability. We recommend the structural use of foresight methods through for example scenario planning to increase the preparedness of operators in the case of future disruptions.

10.
Socioecon Plann Sci ; : 101452, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2159810

ABSTRACT

Since human health greatly depends on a healthy and risk-free social environment, it is very important to have a concept to focus on improving epidemiology capacity and potential along with economic perspectives as a very influential factor in the future of societies. Through responsible behavior during an epidemic crisis, the health system units can be utilized as a suitable platform for sustainable development. This study employs the Best-Worst Method (BWM) in order to develop a system for identifying and ranking health system units with understanding the nature of the epidemic to help the World Health Organization (WHO) in recognizing the capabilities of resilient health system units. The purpose of this study is to identify and prioritize the resilient health system units for dealing with Coronavirus. The statistical population includes 215 health system units in the world and the opinions of twenty medical experts are also utilized as an informative sample to localize the conceptual model of the study and answer the research questionnaires. The resilient health system units of the world are identified and prioritized based on the statistics of "Total Cases", "Total Recovered", "Total Deaths", "Active Cases", "Serious", "Total Tests" and "Day of Infection". The present descriptive cross-sectional study is conducted on Worldometer data of COVID-19 during the period of 17 July 2020 at 8:33 GMT. According to the results, the factors of "Total Cases", "Total Deaths", "Serious", "Active Cases", "Total Recovered", "Total Tests" and "Day of Infection" are among the most effective ones, respectively, in order to have a successful and optimal performance during a crisis. The attention of health system units to the identified important factors can improve the performance of epidemiology system. The WHO should pay more attention to low-resilience health system units in terms of promoting the health culture in crisis management of common viruses. Considering the importance of providing health services as well as their significant effect on the efficiency of the world health system, especially in critical situations, resilience analysis with the possibility of comparison and ranking can be an important step to continuously improve the performance of health system units.

11.
J Nurs Manag ; 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152808

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate health care professionals' perceived organizational support and its effect on their compassion, resilience and turnover intention in the United Arab Emirates. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic exerted unprecedented pressure on health care systems, professionals and management systems. Health care organizations begin to explore their roles and function in relation to risks and resilience, in addition to ascertain what level of organization support they are providing to their workers. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with a questionnaire administered to 538 health care workers, to examine their personal resources and organizational support during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 37.7% of nurses were found to have a moderate level of resilience, logistic regression showed that being married is a protective factor against resigning from the profession (OR = 0.462, P = .012, 95% CI: 0.254-0.842), and health care workers who perceived higher organizational support were approximately 50% less likely to have a turnover intention (OR = 0.506, P = .009, 95% CI: 0.303-0.845). Multiple linear regression model indicated significantly higher resilience among physicians (ß = 0.12, P < .05) and allied health care practitioners (ß = 0.12, P = .022). Organizational support had a significant positive relationship with resilience scores (ß = 0.20, P < .001); adequate training was significantly related to higher compassion levels (ß = 0.11, P < .05) and high organizational support scores were associated with increased compassion scores (ß = 0.27, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Front-line health care workers reported moderate organizational support during the pandemic, commensurately reflected in moderate levels of personal resilience and self-compassion. Continued and better support is vital for employee sustainability and the increased health system performance, including quality of care and patient outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers should help health care workers improve self-care strategies by strengthening personal resources, including shortened duty hours, offering adequate break time, providing a safe work climate and purveying adequate personal protective equipment and supplies to combat infections. They should build an empathetic work environment through understanding the needs of staff, helping tackle their work stress and sustaining cultures of compassion through promoting rewarding and flexibility strategies. Moreover, policymakers and nurse mangers should create a rewarding culture for nurses and other health care workers to increase their commitment to their jobs.

12.
Procedia Comput Sci ; 204: 581-590, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150434

ABSTRACT

This study examines the resilience behaviors of women entrepreneurs (WE) in Tunisia during the covid-19 crisis. We explore this question through the life stories of nine WE. An in-depth interview attempted to identify the repercussions of the crisis on WE and their businesses. The field study showed that this pandemic has imposed several constraints. The results obtained made it possible to identify the strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities experienced by the interviewed WE in the management of their businesses. They faced the following dilemmas: Audacity Vs Caution, Stability Vs Flexibility, Effectiveness Vs Efficiency and Individual Vs Collective.

13.
9th International Workshop on Simulation for Energy, Sustainable Development and Environment, SESDE 2021 ; : 1-9, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2164747

ABSTRACT

With the outbreak of a pandemic due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the present paper gives an overview of the impacts that this unprecedented situation has had on the environment, the economy and society so far. It will be explained in the paper in what way modeling and simulation helps to understand and to forecast the spread of disease by focusing on compartment models and agent-based models. The presentation of the extent of the consequences in the form of a literature review and the following derivation of recommendations for action highlight the weaknesses of the current economic system. In this respect, the key finding of the research showed that society would be more resilient towards crises like COVID-19 with a regionally and long-term oriented economy that puts social equity and environmental protection first. Therefore, political leaders must rethink the way business is done and should use the crisis as an opportunity to unite the rebuilding of the economy with sustainable development. Models and simulations can assist in finding an appropriate action plan. © 2021 9th International Workshop on Simulation for Energy, Sustainable Development and Environment, SESDE 2021. All rights reserved.

14.
Emerging Science Journal ; 6(6):1430-1443, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2164604

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic that attacked Indonesia and other countries of the world has changed human' way of life. The Covid-19 pandemic greatly influences the field of education, where all learning activities turn to online mode, which results in students' depression symptoms due to their unpreparedness. This study aims to analyze the impact of remote learning, family conditions, and mental resilience on depression symptoms in early childhood. This study used ex-post facto research (measurement after the event) because the research data for both independent variables and dependent variables occurred before this study was held. The study population was 80 children. The data collection method used was a questionnaire developed from the indicators of each variable. The analysis method used multiple regression. The data analysis used correlation and regression techniques, with regression analysis of three predictors and one criterion. The research findings showed that depression symptoms of early childhood are jointly influenced by remote learning, family condition, and mental resilience. However, two variables that do not affect the depression symptoms of early childhood are remote learning and mental resilience. It can be recommended that parents and parties involved in early childhood education give more attention to children. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee ESJ, Italy.

15.
Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ; 16(4) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2164119

ABSTRACT

Background: Anxiety persists following coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has caused dysfunction. Objective(s): We compared the effect of the online Balint group and pharmacotherapy on COVID-19-induced anxiety in Iranian health-care workers (HCWs). Method(s): In the current clinical trial in the north of Iran in 2021, the participants were randomly assigned to two groups, including the Balint group (eight 60-minute online sessions) and the pharmacotherapy group (sertraline), following a phone screening pro-cedure by a psychiatrist. The groups filled out two questionnaires, namely the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and Corona Disease Anxiety Scale, at baseline and after the intervention (fourth week). Result(s): Forty-five HCWs were assessed. There was a significant difference in total anxiety score and also in sub-component in each group (P <= 0.001). No significant differences were observed regarding the effectiveness of both interventions in anxiety (P = 0.52);however, the pharmacotherapy interventions significantly affected the resilience and related subscales (P <= 0.05). The domain of spiritual influences significantly increased in the pharmacotherapy group (P = 0.031). Conclusion(s): Balint group and pharmacotherapy can improve COVID-19-induced anxiety and boost resilience in HCWs. Copyright © 2022, Author(s).

16.
Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ; 16(4) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2164118

ABSTRACT

Background: Medical students serve as frontline individuals to COVD-19 patients, and their mental health affects the quality and safety of the provided services. Objective(s): The present study aimed to identify the relationship between anxiety, resilience, and posttraumatic growth of medical interns during COVID-19 pandemic. Method(s): This descriptive-correlational study was conducted in Kerman and Isfahan, Iran, from June to September 2020. The socio-demographic questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RIS), and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) were completed by 235 medical students. Pearson correlation test and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Result(s): The mean and standard deviation scores of anxiety, resilience, and posttraumatic growth were 10.49, 1.08, and 50.60, as well as 13.39, 65.70, and 15.90, respectively. The results showed no significant relationship between anxiety and resilience (r = 0.16 and P = 0.057). A positive and significant correlation was observed between resilience and posttraumatic growth (r = 0.42 and P = 0.000). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between anxiety and posttraumatic growth scores (r =-0.20 and P = 0.002). Conclusion(s): In sum, the more resilient and less anxious a person was, the greater his/her posttraumatic growth became. Therefore, it was recommended that appropriate psychological interventions be designed and implemented to improve the mental health of medical interns. Copyright © 2022, Author(s).

17.
Technological and Economic Development of Economy ; 0(0):1-25, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2163766

ABSTRACT

A global pandemic of coronavirus COVID-19 affects the manufacturing supply chains significantly. This study aims to identify and evaluate the reaction of manufacturing supply chains in using the concept of double-loop learning to mitigate the disruptions induced by COVID-19 at the early stage of pandemic. A two-stage research process has been developed that firstly involves determining the learning pattern of enterprises in industrial supply chains and identifying actions taken. Then, the relationship between taking actions in the field of double-loop learning in the manufacturing supply chains and expecting a change in their market situation, and having knowl-edge in the field of adaptation to changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic was examined. The study shows that there is a high level of caution in taking proactive measures in supply chains and a lack of knowledge in the field of adapting industrial supply chains to sudden disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(23), 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2163345

ABSTRACT

Research has provided substantial evidence on the role of parents' well-being in the quality of parent-child relationships and children's adjustment. Parents' stress and parental couple conflict have been linked to children's adverse developmental outcomes. However, little is known about the factors that affect parents' well-being when coping with multiple stressors such as those brought by the recent COVID-19 global pandemic. Our study intended to examine the predictors of parental well-being by looking at the contextual factors of COVID-19 home confinement, i.e., the use of digital media and parents' domestic workload, and family resilience in two countries: Ireland and Italy. Additionally, the age and number of children were controlled as potential variables impacting parents' well-being. A three-step hierarchical regression analysis was applied. The results showed that family resilience was a very strong predictor of parents' well-being after controlling for any other variable. Parental couples' conflict over the use of technology predicted lower levels of parents' well-being, while, notably, parent child-conflict and domestic workload were not associated with parents' well-being. Additionally, the age of children did play a role: the higher the mean age of children in the family the better the parents' well-being. The findings are discussed in the light of cross-country differences and their implications for research and practice.

19.
Rigas Tehniskas Universitates Zinatniskie Raksti ; 18(1):131-138, 2022.
Article in Latvian | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2162840

ABSTRACT

Urban planning has always reflected the major crises and technological developments. Throughout history, the most noteworthy advancements and innovations in urban planning have occurred in reaction to serious public health pandemics. The Covid-19 pandemic affected our negligent strategy to resilience in urban planning. The Covid-19 outbreak has touched everyone internationally and has caused us to rethink our lifestyle. This current crisis sheds new light on a number of challenges regarding urban planning. The Covid-19 pandemic has the potential to significantly change urban planning and the existing way of living. This situation demands understanding the obstacles faced, the mistakes, and the undiscovered opportunities in order to allow the construction of epidemic resilient communities. Therefore, this research is set out to investigate the impact of Covid-19 pandemic on urban planning. Taking into consideration several problems brought by the crisis, with an emphasis on the urban planning context and the changes taking place in the planning sector, this study followed the case study approach focusing on Amman – the capital city of Jordan. Urban planning in Amman has witnessed many spatial planning issues during the recent pandemic. Results indicated that we should rethink the current urban design and planning strategies to bring forth a new phase of sustainable and resilient urban cities which will enhance resilience to emerging future disease outbreaks.

20.
Nonprofit Policy Forum ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2162640

ABSTRACT

Lester Salamon first characterized nonprofits in the United States as "the resilient sector” in 2003. He based this characterization on the sector's growth, its ability to adapt to new economic and political conditions over time and its increasingly adaptive entrepreneurial culture. The view of nonprofits as resilient institutions has been reinforced since by their performance in recent crises including the COVID pandemic beginning in 2020 and the financial crisis of 2008–2009, though not without exception or assurance that nonprofits would necessarily be resilient in future crises. This paper examines some of the strategies nonprofits have employed to navigate recent crises and prepare themselves for less certain futures. It also teases apart the nature of resilience, asking how resilience at the organizational level differs from network level and sector-level resilience. Such differences have important implications for public policy vis-à-vis nonprofits. In particular, policies that would strengthen nonprofits at the organizational level may differ from, even conflict with, those that would strengthen the nonprofit sector as a whole. [ FROM AUTHOR]

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