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1.
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology ; 16(2):326-333, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957671

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 discovered in December 2019, Wuhan, China. It was transmitted globally producing the present COVID-19 pandemic. Concerns have been raised about the potential impact of COVID-19 on male reproductive organs and male fertility as the number of infections in the male community has increased. The objectives of current study are studying the relationship between the plasma levels of testosterone and the markers of immune reaction with the severity and mortality in a sample of COVID-19 patients. A cross section study included NO= 103 male patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, diagnosed by PCR and chest CT scan, (≥ 18 years old), and recovered in the respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). Several biochemical risk factors were determined Free Testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay(ELISA), D-dimer, Ferritin, CRP, Urea, Creatinine were measured by automated method by using Abbott Architect c4000 and Complete Blood Count(CBC). The results show that the serum free testosterone and SHBG levels a significant lower in non-survivor patients than survivor patients with COVID-19. While the other biomarkers (D-dimer, Ferritin, Urea, Creatinine) were significant higher in non-survivor patients than survivor patients. The CRP, WBC and lymphocyte showed that no significant between the both group of patients. In conclusion the study showed that lower free testosterone and SHBG levels enable significant role in increasing risk of COVID-19 mortality amongst adult male patients.

2.
Revista Brasileira de Oftalmologia ; 81, 2022.
Article in Portuguese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957667

ABSTRACT

With the advent of the pandemic scenario caused by SARS-CoV-2 in the beginning of the year 2020, a vast clinical picture was noticed among the infected individuals. Among the most common eye symptoms caused by Covid-19, dry eye (DE) has become quite prevalent in this environment. The narrative review study seeks to assess the risk factors associated with the emergence or intensification of DE conditions in the population during the pandemic period. A literature review showed the influence of positive pressure ventilation, incorrect use of masks, as well as electronic screens, in addition to anxiety and depression as predisposing factors for the development of dry eye disease. However, the need for more explanatory studies and for establishing a direct relationship between the causality of the factors is still noted

3.
Polish Annals of Medicine ; 28(2):244-249, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957648

ABSTRACT

I nt r o duc t i o n: First cases of a disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (CO-VID-19), caused by a novel virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) of the coronavirus family, were detected in December 2019. The disease is manifested by a variety of symptoms and can run a different course: from oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic to the development of acute respiratory failure and even death. Ai m: The aim of this paper is to provide critical analysis of the potential pulmonary complications after COVID-19 infection. Ma t e r i a l a nd me t ho ds: We have provided the systematic literature review based on which we have discussed the pathophysiology of COVID-19, its outco-mes, risk factors and pulmonary complications. R e s u l t s a n d d i s c u s s i o n: The organs that are most often affected by a SARS--CoV-2 infection are the lungs. An infection with this virus can lead to a severe respiratory tract illness, both in the acute phase and as a complication after a rela-tively mild case. There are numerous observations of patients convalescing from COVID-19 who suffer from the interstitial pulmonary disease with fibrosis. There are also reported cases of spontaneous pneumothorax after COVID-19. Co nc l us i o ns: It should be borne in mind that other late complications may appear with time.

4.
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproduction ; 16(2):158-175, 2022.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957618

ABSTRACT

These days, anticoagulants are in great demand. They are used as a prophylaxis for thromboembolic complications in various diseases and conditions in general therapeutic practice, cardiology, neurology, as well as obstetrics to manage high-risk pregnancies. The relevance of anticoagulants competent use has come to the fore in connection with the emergence of a new disease – COVID-19 and its serious complications such as developing thrombotic storm, in which the timely applied anticoagulant therapy is the key to the success of therapy. The risk of bleeding should be considered when using any anticoagulant. Age, impaired renal function and concomitant use of antiplatelet agents are common risk factors for bleeding. Moreover, only vitamin K antagonists and heparin have specific antidotes – vitamin K and protamine, respectively. Inhibitors of other anticoagulants are universal presented as inactivated or activated prothrombin complex concentrate and recombinant factor VIIa. Hemodialysis effectively reduces dabigatran concentration, activated charcoal is effective in the case of recent oral administration of lipophilic drugs. Research on new antidotes of currently available anticoagulants is under way, similar to testing of new types of anticoagulants that are sufficiently effective in preventing and treating thromboembolic complications with minimal risk of hemorrhagic. The main contraindication to anticoagulants use is the doctor's ignorance of the mechanisms of drug action and opportunities for suppressing its effect.

5.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(7):TC01-TC05, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957580

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Rhino-cerebral Mucormycosis (RCM), in the pre-Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) era, was thought to be solely associated with an immunocompromised state. However,anunforeseenoutbreakinthenumberofmucormycosis cases was seen with the increase in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Aim: To study and investigate the clinical characteristics, imaging findings, associated risk factors, and clinical outcomes in COVID-19 associated mucormycosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted comprising 480 cases of COVID-19 associated mucormycosis who presented to the institution between April 2020 and September 2020. The clinical and radiological data were studied and analysed. results: Out of a total of 480 cases, 443 (92.29%) were found to suffering from diabetes mellitus and 392 patients (81.66%) had a history of steroids intake in the studied population. Facial or per orbital swelling followed by pain were the most frequent presenting complaints found in 188 (39.16%) and 162 (33.75%) patients, respectively. Nasal septum and middle turbinate were the most common sites of disease involvement on nasal endoscopic examination. On radiological imaging, maxillary (438;91.25%) was the most commonly involved sinus followed by ethmoids (395;82.29%). Premaxillary/retroantral fat and orbits were the most common sites of extra sinonasal spread of infection found in 278 (57.91%) and 244 (50.83%) patients, respectively. About 238 (49.58%) patients showed bony erosion and dehiscence. Intracranial complications were seen in 73 (15.21%) patients. Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels showed significant value with higher disease staging. Oxygen supplementation was frequently associated with extrasinus spread of infection. A total of 44 (9.17%) patients succumbed to death despite aggressive antifungal treatment. conclusion: COVID-19 associated RCM shows frequent and extensive spread to extrasinus regions, especially with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, steroid administration, and oxygen supplementation. High clinical suspicion, early imaging, and prompt institution of antifungal therapy can aid in reducing mortality rate.

6.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:805-812, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic has forced nursing schools in Indonesia to implement online learning. The association between online learning variables and psychological distress among nursing students is not fully understood. AIM: This study aimed to assess psychological distress among nursing students and the association between online learning variables and psychological distress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2020 to February 2021. Six hundred and thirty-five nursing students from four universities in Indonesia participated in this study and were recruited through a consecutive sampling method. The measurement of psychological distress used the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between online learning predictors and psychological distress. RESULTS: Most of the respondents had severe psychological distress (n = 194;30.6%). Older age was found to act as a protective factor against psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = –0.159, p = 0.035;95% confidence interval [CI]: (–0.307)–(–0.011)). Contrarily, not living at their own home during lockdown (aOR = 1.019, p = 0.001;95% CI: 0.657–1.382), always feeling that online learning is expensive (aOR = 1.387, p = 0.001;95% CI: 0.645–2.130), always experienced poor Internet connection during online learning (aOR = 3.380, p = 0.001;95% CI: 1.935–4.826), and having no motivation toward online learning (aOR = 3.154, p = 0.001;95% CI: 2.372–3.936) acted as risk factors for having psychological distress. CONCLUSION: Cost and Internet access barriers as well as low motivation during the abrupt shift to implementation of online learning in the current pandemic situation acted as risk factors for psychological distress among nursing students.

7.
Clinical Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses ; 16(2), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957145

ABSTRACT

Background: Pregnant, childbirth, and postpartum women are a vulnerable population to COVID-19. Although our understanding of this disease is evolving every day, more answers are needed about the diagnosis and methods of clinical management in this group, the impact of the disease on pregnant women and newborns, and the potential for mother-to-child transmission, including anxiety and depression. Objectives: The study aims to identify factors that cause stress and depression in pregnant women during COVID-19. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study on pregnant women. Descriptive analysis is to explore the distribution of variables using the frequency distribution test and the influence of these factors on fears, depression and anxiety in pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic using Structural Equation Modelling Analysis. Results: This study found that education, comorbid factors, economy, education and pregnancy status did not affect fears, depression and anxiety in pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic with a p-value >0.05. Conclusion: Fears, depression and anxiety among pregnant women purely occur due to individual psychological conditions and are not influenced by the situation. Psychological strengthening for pregnant women is needed to be carried out continuously and not influenced by the COVID-19 situation in Indonesia.

8.
BMJ Paediatrics Open ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956803

ABSTRACT

Purpose Computer vision syndrome (CVS) describes a group of eye and vision-related problems that result from prolonged digital device use. This study aims to assess the prevalence and associated factors of CVS among students during the lockdown resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional, online, questionnaire-based study performed among high school students in Thailand. Results A total of 2476 students, with mean age of 15.52±1.66 years, were included in this study. The mean number of hours of digital device use per day (10.53±2.99) increased during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before its advent (6.13±2.8). The mean number of hours of online learning was 7.03±2.06 hours per day during the pandemic. CVS was found in 70.1% of students, and its severity correlated with both the number of hours of online learning and the total number of hours of digital device usage (p<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the factors associated with CVS included age ≤15 years (adjusted OR (AOR)=2.17), overall digital device usage >6 hours per day (AOR=1.91), online learning >5 hours per day (AOR=4.99), multiple digital device usage (AOR=2.15), refractive errors (AOR=2.89), presence of back pain (AOR=2.06) and presence of neck pain (AOR=2.36). Conclusions The number of hours of digital device usage increased during lockdown. Over 70% of children had CVS, whose associated factors, including hours of digital device usage, hours of online learning, ergonomics and refractive errors, should be adjusted to decrease the risk of acquiring this condition. Online learning will remain, along with CVS, after this pandemic, and we hope our research will be taken into account in remodelling our education system accordingly.

9.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:84, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956753

ABSTRACT

The aim is to determine oral manifestations in patients with COVID-19 disease and in the postcovid period. Methods: A special survey (questionnaire) was made in 424 people who had COVID-19 confirmed by RT-PCR, ELISA for specific IgM and IgG antibodies and Chest CT scan (168 people). 123 people had complaints and clinical symptoms in the oral cavity 2-6 months after the illness and they came to the University dental clinic. Laboratory tests have been performed (clinical blood test, blood immunogram, virus and fungal identification). Results: Survey results showed that 16,0% participants had asymptomatic COVID-19, 23,6% - mild and 48,1% moderate disease. 12,3% with severe COVID-19 were treated in a hospital with oxygen support. In the first 2 weeks 44,3% indicated xerostomia, dysgeusia (21,7%), muscle pain during chewing (11,3%), pain during swallowing (30,2%), burning and painful tongue (1,9%), tongue swelling (30,2%), catharal stomatitis (16,0%), gingival bleeding (22,6%), painful ulcers (aphthae) (8,5%) and signs of candidiasis - white plaque in the tongue (12,3%). After illness (3-6 months), patients indicated dry mouth (12,3%), progressing of gingivitis (20,7%) and periodontitis (11,3%). In patients who applied to the clinic we identified such diagnoses: desquamative glossitis - 16 cases, glossodynia (11), herpes labialis and recurrent herpetic gingivostomatitis (27), hairy leukoplakia (1), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (22), aphthosis Sutton (4), necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (13), oral candidiasis (14), erythema multiforme (8), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (2), oral squamous cell papillomas on the gingiva (4) and the lower lip (1). According to laboratory studies, virus reactivation (HSV, VZV, EBV, CMV, Papilloma viruces) was noted in 52 patients (42,3%), immunodeficiency in 96 people (78,0%), immunoregulation disorders (allergic and autoimmune reactions) in 24 people (19,5%). Conclusions: Lack of oral hygiene, hyposalivation, vascular compromise, stress, immunodeficiency and reactivation of persistent viral and fungal infections in patients with COVID-19 disease are risk factors for progression of periodontal and oral mucosal diseases.

10.
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ; 129:166, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956660

ABSTRACT

Quality Improvement project on postnatal debrief clinic Objective: To evaluate the post-natal debrief clinic service in the Princess of Wales Hospital (Cwm Taf). Design: This project was a service evaluation, which involved the collection of quantitative and qualitative data. The use of multi-modal data was beneficial, as it provided an objective measure of the outcomes of the clinic, whilst also allowing patients to voice their subjective opinions. Additionally, this study design was adopted as it facilitated the measurement of the service without the need for comparison to a universal standard for post-natal debrief, which doesn't exist. Method: Data was manually extracted from clinic letters and quality of the clinic was assessed through patient feedback forms. A total of 84 patient's outcomes and 53 feedback forms were reviewed. The clinic was compared with national guidelines and services. 20 patients' feedback was collected separately to gauge opinions on telephone clinic (introduced since the start of the COVID pandemic) and face-to- face appointments. Patients were interviewed during this research to gain an individual understanding of the challenges posed to women after traumatic birth experiences. Results: Notable risk factors for attending debrief clinic were identified, such as induction of labour and emergency caesarean section. The majority of patients (67%) seen in the debrief clinic were discharged back to GP care and required no further mental health support. Feedback overwhelmingly shows good satisfaction, with patients highlighting the caring and honest staff who provided clear explanations of labour events and reassurance for future pregnancies. Some areas were identified that may require improvement, such as admin support, referrals and waiting times. Many patients noted all mothers should be offered this service. Comparisons indicate that the clinic is exceeding most peer-led services and national guidelines. 60% of patients felt they preferred telephone over face-to- face appointments. Conclusion: Traumatic birth experiences are relatively common. It is vital to review the debrief services available to patients following these experiences. The clinic has been constantly evolving since its inception, to meet the needs of the patients it cares for and will continue to do so in the future. This service evaluation shows the clinic is providing an excellent level of care, however further evaluations needed in future as we recently introduced offering the debrief service to all the postnatal patients.

11.
Diabetes aktuell ; 19(07):290-290, 2021.
Article in German | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956430
12.
Journal of Chinese Medicine ; 2022(129):9-14, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955736

ABSTRACT

More than half of the human body consists of non-human microbes such as bacteria and viruses. Microbes can cause infection, inflammation, immune system disorders, obesity, diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses, even heart failure. Microbes are governed by the cycles of nature, including the cycles of day and night, and are influenced by what and when we eat. Research has shown intermittent fasting to be a promising approach for reducing inflammation, improving metabolic health and reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease, possibly through influencing gut microbial composition. This article explores the role of the microbiome and intermittent fasting on human health from the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

13.
Elife ; 112022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954753

ABSTRACT

Background: The variation in the pathogen type as well as the spatial heterogeneity of predictors make the generality of any associations with pathogen discovery debatable. Our previous work confirmed that the association of a group of predictors differed across different types of RNA viruses, yet there have been no previous comparisons of the specific predictors for RNA virus discovery in different regions. The aim of the current study was to close the gap by investigating whether predictors of discovery rates within three regions-the United States, China, and Africa-differ from one another and from those at the global level. Methods: Based on a comprehensive list of human-infective RNA viruses, we collated published data on first discovery of each species in each region. We used a Poisson boosted regression tree (BRT) model to examine the relationship between virus discovery and 33 predictors representing climate, socio-economics, land use, and biodiversity across each region separately. The discovery probability in three regions in 2010-2019 was mapped using the fitted models and historical predictors. Results: The numbers of human-infective virus species discovered in the United States, China, and Africa up to 2019 were 95, 80, and 107 respectively, with China lagging behind the other two regions. In each region, discoveries were clustered in hotspots. BRT modelling suggested that in all three regions RNA virus discovery was better predicted by land use and socio-economic variables than climatic variables and biodiversity, although the relative importance of these predictors varied by region. Map of virus discovery probability in 2010-2019 indicated several new hotspots outside historical high-risk areas. Most new virus species since 2010 in each region (6/6 in the United States, 19/19 in China, 12/19 in Africa) were discovered in high-risk areas as predicted by our model. Conclusions: The drivers of spatiotemporal variation in virus discovery rates vary in different regions of the world. Within regions virus discovery is driven mainly by land-use and socio-economic variables; climate and biodiversity variables are consistently less important predictors than at a global scale. Potential new discovery hotspots in 2010-2019 are identified. Results from the study could guide active surveillance for new human-infective viruses in local high-risk areas. Funding: FFZ is funded by the Darwin Trust of Edinburgh (https://darwintrust.bio.ed.ac.uk/). MEJW has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 874735 (VEO) (https://www.veo-europe.eu/).


Subject(s)
RNA Viruses , Viruses , Africa , Biodiversity , Humans , Probability , RNA , United States
14.
Int J Biol Sci ; 18(12): 4768-4780, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954698

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 is the biggest public health crisis in 21st Century. Besides the acute symptoms after infection, patients and society are also being challenged by the long-term health complications associated with COVID-19, commonly known as long COVID. While health professionals work hard to find proper treatments, large amount of knowledge has been accumulated in recent years. In order to deal with long COVID efficiently, it is important for people to keep up with current progresses and take proactive actions on long COVID. For this purpose, this review will first introduce the general background of long COVID, and then discuss its risk factors, diagnostic indicators and management strategies. This review will serve as a useful resource for people to understand and prepare for long COVID that will be with us in the foreseeable future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma ; 8(2):115-121, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1955535

ABSTRACT

Objective: An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) occurred in late 2019. A better understanding of this disease will help us in preventing and managing it. This study evaluated the risk factors and clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients admitted to Shahid Sadoughi hospital in Yazd with a diagnosis of COVID-19. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with the diagnosis of COVID-19 admitted to Shahid Sadoughi hospital in Yazd in May 2020, Iran. Patients’ clinical information, including their symptoms at admission, history of smoking or drug/ alcohol abuse, history of Td (tetanus, diphtheria) vaccine, radiographic/computed tomography (CT) scan findings, and blood oxygen saturation, was recorded. The patients were also asked about their previous history of diabetes, hypertension, autoimmune disorder, and cancer or history of diseases in heart, lung, liver, and thyroid. Laboratory findings, height, weight and body mass index of the patients were also recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21. Results: The mean age of 86 patients enrolled in the study was 61.40±17.37 years, of which 56 (65.11%) had mild pulmonary involvement and 30 (34.89%) had severe pulmonary involvement, according to CT scan results. Also, 26 (30.2%) of all patients had diabetes and about 30 (36%) had high blood pressure, but current smokers (6%) were rare. In patients with severe pulmonary involvement, the level of neutrophil, creatinine, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was higher than patients with mild pulmonary involvement. Out of 56 patients with mild pulmonary involvement, 47 patients had a history of Td vaccination in the last 5 years. Only one patient in the severe group had a history of Td vaccination. Conclusion: A lower percentage of blood lymphocytes as well as higher levels of neutrophils, creatinine, and LDH were observed in patients with severe pulmonary involvement. Numerous factors, especially more prominent laboratory abnormalities, determine the severity of the disease, and a better understanding of these factors can help physicians know the severity of the disease and its prognosis. These findings help us to further clarify the characteristics of COVID-19. Also, the effect of Td vaccine should be investigated in future studies. © 2022 The Author(s).

16.
IJID Reg ; 4: 53-58, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945221

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Longer reporting lags after symptom onset reportedly exert a substantial impact on onward transmission, increasing outbreak probability. Our study investigated the risk factors associated with reporting lag. Methods: Using active epidemiological surveillance data for all symptomatic cases reported in Osaka Prefecture during the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic (February 1-May 13, 2020), multivariable regression analyses were implemented to estimate the effects of exposure variables on reporting lag, by controlling for potential confounders. Results: Cases in their 30s showed a longer reporting lag than cases ≥ 80 years old. Cases who lived in areas with a high COVID-19 incidence demonstrated a longer reporting lag. Cases with a history of visiting a nightlife district also showed longer reporting lag than cases without such a history. Healthcare workers and cases with immunodeficiency both displayed shorter reporting lags than others. Conclusion: Identifying newly infected cases as soon as possible and increased testing capacity for all age groups, and for individuals with a history of visiting high infection-risk areas, represented important measures in shortening reporting lags in the first wave period. The evidence from this study may provide lessons for controlling future emerging diseases.

17.
Clin Chim Acta ; 532: 188-192, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1944409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To examine glycaemic status, and the impact of at-admission HbA1c levels on outcome, in a large group of participants hospitalized for COVID-19. METHODS: We inclued 515 participants with confirmed COVID-19 infection, with or without known diabetes, who met the following additional criteria: 1) age > 18 years, 2) HbA1c was determined at admission; 3) fasting plasma glucose was determined in the week of admission, and 4) discharge or death was reached before the end of the study. We examined attributes of participants at admission and 3-6 months post-discharge. To assess the associations of pre-admission attributes with in-hospital mortality, logistic regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Mean age was 70 years, 98.8% were of white race, 49% were female, 31% had known diabetes (KD), an additional 7% met the HbA1c criterion for diabetes, and 13.6% died. In participants with KD, FPG and HbA1c levels were not associated with mortality in adjusted analyses; however, in participants without KD, whereas FPG showed direct association with mortality, HbA1c showed slight inverse association. CONCLUSIONS: There was a very high prevalence of people without KD with HbA1c levels above normal at-admission. This alteration does not seem to have been related to blood glucose levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Adult , Aftercare , Aged , Blood Glucose/analysis , Fasting , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge
18.
Curr Med Sci ; 42(3): 561-568, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1942807

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of hypertension on the clinical outcome of COVID-19 patients aged 60 years old and older. METHODS: This single-center retrospective cohort study enrolled consecutive COVID-19 patients aged 60 years old and older, who were admitted to Liyuan Hospital from January 1, 2020 to April 25, 2020. All included patients were divided into two groups: hypertension and nonhypertension group. The baseline demographic characteristics, laboratory test results, chest computed tomography (CT) images and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed. The prognostic value of hypertension was determined using binary logistic regression. RESULTS: Among the 232 patients included in the analysis, 105 (45.3%) patients had comorbid hypertension. Compared to the nonhypertension group, patients in the hypertension group had higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, red cell distribution widths, lactate dehydrogenase, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, D-dimer and severity of lung lesion, and lower lymphocyte counts (all P<0.05). Furthermore, the hypertension group had a higher proportion of intensive care unit admissions [24 (22.9%) vs. 14 (11.0%), P=0.02) and deaths [16 (15.2%) vs. 3 (2.4%), P<0.001] and a significantly lower probability of survival (P<0.001) than the nonhypertension group. Hypertension (OR: 4.540, 95% CI: 1.203-17.129, P=0.026) was independently correlated with all-cause in-hospital death in elderly patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The elderly COVID-19 patients with hypertension tend to have worse conditions at baseline than those without hypertension. Hypertension may be an independent prognostic factor of poor clinical outcome in elderly COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Infect Dis ; 2022 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1936534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The characterization of reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 has been a subject of concern and controversy, especially with the surge of infections with highly transmissible variants worldwide. METHODS: This retrospective national study used comorbidities, vaccination status, SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC), and demographics data to profile SARS-CoV-2 reinfected participants, defined as having two RT-PCR positive SARS-CoV-2 tests within at least 90 days apart. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed the risk factors of reinfected cases. Two control groups were selected: non-reinfected participants reporting a positive test (control group one) and reporting a negative test (control group two). RESULTS: Between March 2020 and December 2021, 4,454 reinfected participants were identified in Saudi Arabia (0.8%, 95% CI 0.7-0.8). The majority (67.3%) were unvaccinated (95% CI 65.9-68.7) and 0.8% (95% CI 0.6-1.1) had severe or fatal SARS-CoV-2 disease. COVID-19 vaccines were 100% effective against mortality in reinfected individuals who received at least one dose while it conferred 61% (odds ratio [OR] 0.4, 95% CI 0.1-1.0) additional protection against severe disease post first dose and 100% post second dose. In the risk factor analysis, reinfection was highly associated with comorbidities such as HIV (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-5.2; p=0.009), obesity (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9; p=0.003), pregnancy (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4-7.4; p=0.005), and working in healthcare (OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-12.9; p<0.0001). The delta variant (B.1.617.2) was the most frequent VOC among the reinfected cohort. CONCLUSIONS: This in-depth study of reinfection profile identified risk factors and highlighted the associated SARS-CoV-2 variants. Results showed that natural-acquired immunity to SARS-CoV-2 through multiple reinfections together with vaccine-induced immunity provided substantial protection against severe SARS-CoV-2 disease and mortality.

20.
Supportive Care in Cancer ; 30:S21, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935787

ABSTRACT

Introduction COVID-19 infection is associated with a higher incidence of medical complications including AKI. It is not well known if racial differences are associated with worse outcomes. Methods All patient data from March 2020 through February 2021 were aggregated and analyzed as part of the D3CODE protocol at MD Anderson. Cohort: (1) positive COVID-19 test (2) baseline eGFR >60 ml/min/ 1.73m2 within 30 days prior to COVID infection. AKI defined by increased creatinine ≥0.3 within 30 days after infection. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival estimates. Multivariable Cox Proportional Hazard model regression analysis was used for hazard ratios. Results 635 patients with Covid-19 infection were identified. 124 (19.5%) developed AKI. AKI patients were more likely to have pneumonia (63.7% vs 37%, p<0.001), cardiac arrhythmias (39.5% vs 20.7%, p<0.001) myocardial infarction (15.3% vs 8.8%, p=0.046), require dialysis (2.4% vs 0.2%, p=0.025), mechanical ventilation (16.1% vs 1.8%, p<0.001), ICU admission (43.5% vs 11.5%, p<0.001) within 30 days, and had a higher mortality at 90 days of admission (20.2% vs 3.7%, p<0.001). Hispanic or Latino ethnicity (HR 56.6 CI 2.12-1510.57 p=0.016) vs White (HR 0.35 CI 0.02-6.02 p=0.47) was an independent risk factor associated with worse outcomes Conclusions Being Hispanic is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cancer patients with COVID-19 infection and AKI. Further studies are needed to address these disparities.

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