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1.
Understanding safeguarding for children and their educational experiences: A guide for students, ECTs and school support staff ; : 151-161, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2113361

ABSTRACT

Food insecurity in the United Kingdom has been described as a 'public health emergency' which has been exacerbated by the onset and continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on research evidence and a reflective account from a current primary school teacher, this chapter highlights the multifaceted impacts of food insecurity for children in schools. It also draws attention to some important considerations around food, education and food-related interventions for practitioners supporting children in schools. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
J Sch Health ; 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic intensified disparities for underserved populations as accessing resources became more difficult. Dairy Council of California launched the Let's Eat Healthy initiative to address nutrition security through collaborative solutions in the school environment. IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHOOL HEALTH POLICY, PRACTICE, AND EQUITY: To ensure nutrition security for children and families, nutritious food and nutrition education must go hand-in-hand. Improving access to high quality food can help address the health disparities that exist for people who are at increased risk for food insecurity. Nutrition education supports students' holistic learning and social and emotional learning skills. Nutrition education models must be increasingly flexible in the face of ongoing challenges. Collaborative efforts to connect food access hubs, such as schools, with support and resources to provide evidence-based nutrition education and agricultural literacy can equip individuals and communities with the knowledge, skills, and ability to make nutrient-rich food choices. CONCLUSIONS: Investments and strategies in nutrition security that utilize the Individual plus Policy, System, and Environmental (I + PSE) model, such as the Let's Eat Healthy initiative, will effectively influence positive behavior change and improve community health. Navigating challenges in a rapidly changing environment requires people and organizations to work together, across disciplines, to leverage knowledge, experience, resources, expertise, and creative thinking. Improving access to healthy food and nutrition education will be most effective when done through collaboration.

3.
Nutrients ; 14(20)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071664

ABSTRACT

As part of the COVID-19 economic recovery package, the Aotearoa New Zealand Government rolled out a universal free and healthy lunch programme to the 25% least advantaged schools nationwide. This study explored experiences of school lunch providers in the Hawke's Bay region. The aim was to create a systems map identifying points of intervention through which the lunch programme could be improved to meet the goal of reducing child food insecurity. Twelve lunch providers were interviewed to generate casual loop diagrams which were examined and integrated to form a single systems map. Seven themes arose during analysis: teacher support, principal support, nutrition guidelines and government support, supply chain, ingredient suppliers, student feedback and food waste. Teacher support was important for getting students to try new foods and eat the nutritious lunches. Principal support was a strong theme impacting opportunities for broader student engagement. This study employed systems science to highlight the importance of support from different stakeholders within the lunch programme to achieve the goal of reduced child food insecurity. Further work is needed to ensure the programme meets the wider goals of the government and community, and to determine the potential broader benefits of the programme.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , Refuse Disposal , Child , Humans , Lunch , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Schools
4.
Nutrients ; 14(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066295

ABSTRACT

School meals play a major role in supporting children's diets and food security, and policies for universal school meals (USM) have the potential to contribute to positive child health outcomes. During the COVID-19 pandemic, schools provided free school meals to all students in the United States, but this national USM policy ended in school year (SY) 2022-2023; however, a few states have adopted policies to continue USM statewide for SY 2022-2023. Research examining the challenges and strategies for successful continuation of USM is essential, along with studying pandemic-related challenges that are likely to persist in schools. Therefore, we conducted a study in Maine (with a USM policy) to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 and the concurrent implementation of USM, as well as examine differences in implementation by school characteristics, throughout the state. A total of n = 43 school food authorities (SFAs) throughout Maine completed surveys. SFAs reported multiple benefits of USM including increased school meal participation; reductions in the perceived stigma for students from lower-income households and their families; and no longer experiencing unpaid meal charges and debt. SFAs also experienced challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly regarding costs. When considering future challenges, most respondents were concerned with obtaining income information from families, product and ingredient availability, and the costs/financial sustainability of the school meal programs. Overall, USM may have multiple important benefits for students and schools, and other states should consider implementation of a USM policy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Lunch , Maine/epidemiology , Meals , Pandemics/prevention & control , United States
5.
Nutrients ; 14(18)2022 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043875

ABSTRACT

Universal school meals (USM) have the potential to increase access to healthy food for millions of U.S. students. This study evaluated school food authorities' (SFA) perspectives of federal USM in response to COVID-19 (school year (SY) 2021-22) and California's upcoming USM policy in the SY 2022-23. In February 2022, all SFAs in California (n = 1116) were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression examining differences by school demographic characteristics were used. Five hundred and eighty-one SFAs completed the survey; 63% of them first implemented USM during the COVID-19 pandemic. Reported benefits included increased student meal participation (79.2%) and reduced stigma (39.7%). Top challenges included staffing (76.9%) and meal packaging/solid waste (67.4%). Nearly all SFAs reported pandemic-related challenges procuring the necessary types (88.9%) and amounts of foods (85.9%), and non-food supplies/equipment (82.6%). Over 40% reported that federal reimbursements were insufficient to cover costs. SFAs with <40% FRPM-eligible students and/or higher student enrollment reported more current challenges and future concerns than those with ≥40% FRPMs and lower student enrollment. The top resources requested to implement CA's USM included additional facilities/equipment (83.8%), communications/marketing (76.1%), increasing meal participation (71.5%), and financial management (61.5%). Most California SFAs reported that implementing federal USM had the intended effect of feeding more children. This study's findings may be useful to the several other U.S. states implementing universal school meals in the SY 2022-23, and to other states or countries considering adopting a USM policy in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Lunch , Meals , Pandemics , Solid Waste , Students
6.
J Nutr Educ Behav ; 54(10): 957-963, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000555

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Examine characteristics of pandemic meal site (n = 602) location and meals served per site in Maryland, Spring 2020, following federal/state waivers for local meal site placement decision-making. METHODS: Using geographic information systems, we connected meal sites to census tract-level data and generated service areas from sites and distances from population-weighted census tract centroids to the closest pandemic meal site. Regression analysis determined associations of census tract pandemic meal site count and meals served per site with socioeconomic and demographic variables. RESULTS: Census tracts with more meal sites were urban (P < 0.001), food deserts (P < 0.001), and had higher percentages of children in poverty (P < 0.001). Sites serving fewer meals were in food deserts (P < 0.001) and areas with more children in poverty (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Waivers allowing local meal site placement decision-making supported meal sites in high-need areas. Geospatial approaches could optimize site locations to ensure maximum reach to populations in need. Additional supports may be needed to ensure children in poverty areas receive meals distributed at these sites.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Maryland/epidemiology , Meals , Pandemics , Schools
7.
African Renaissance ; 17(4):187-187–206, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1988972

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to investigate the resourcefulness of young people in response to COVID-19 in Cape Town. A qualitative research method was used, and a purposive sampling technique to select the participants. The study selected 10 young people who were at the forefront against the pandemic. A participatory approach through one-on-one semi-structured interviews was used to collect data. Data were analysed using thematic analysis, and the results presented in raw data to achieve the study objective. The rapid spread of the coronavirus in South Africa affected the health and social lives of young people. Cutting off access to school because of lockdown measures resulted in malnutrition for young people who depend on school food schemes. The study findings revealed that digital dexterity, community screening, food parcel distribution, social distance monitoring, and educational awareness comprise the strong reaction that young people embarked on in response to COVID-19. In conclusion, the study recommends that the National Youth Development Agency should offer a grant for young emerging social entrepreneurs during and after COVID-19 to respond to societal issues that affect them and promote community development.

8.
Nutrients ; 14(16)2022 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987907

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, significantly fewer of New York City's (NYC's) 1.1 million public school children participated in emergency grab-and-go meals-heightening the risk of inadequate nutrition security for many of NYC's most vulnerable residents. This study sought to examine student families' facilitators and barriers to participation in the grab-and-go meal service and their experiences with pandemic-electronic benefit transfer (P-EBT) funds, a cash benefit distributed when schools were closed. We recruited 126 parents of children in NYC public schools who had participated in the grab-and-go service. Using opened-ended questions, we interviewed 101 parents in 25 1-h online focus groups. We identified four main themes which broadly impacted school meal participation: communication, logistics, meal appeal, and personal circumstances. Key facilitating subthemes included clear communication, ease of accessing sites, and high variety. Key sub-themes negatively impacting participation included limited communication and low meal variety. Accurate, timely communication; easily accessible distribution locations; and convenient distribution times could have increased participation and satisfaction. For P-EBT, parents welcomed the funds and used them readily, but some experienced difficulties obtaining payments. The simultaneous inclusion of community-based research in the evaluation of emergency feeding programs could improve future outcomes for school meal participation and electronic benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Electronics , Humans , Meals , Pandemics
9.
Br Educ Res J ; 2022 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1935653

ABSTRACT

Households with children eligible for Free School Meals are at risk of food insecurity. This paper reports on a rapid-response study that investigated the impact of the school food voucher scheme during the COVID-19 crisis on young people, families and schools. It pays close attention to the reliance of the state on the goodwill of society and its citizens in feeding those most in need. The Capabilities Approach is used to highlight factors that inhibited and restricted the use of the vouchers to produce the capability of having good nutrition for children in need of Free School Meals. The approach moves towards creating a society where children and young people are able to lead a life of their own choice and contribute to key policy decisions. This qualitative study funded by the British Education Research Association was conducted between September 2020 and March 2021. The study posed two research questions: (1) how have schools responded to COVID-19 in relation to food during holiday provision; and (2) what have families identified as barriers to accessing the school food voucher scheme? Data collection involved online interviews with young people, schools and organisations (i.e. public health, director from the food industry. etc.). The findings highlight the difficulties with accessing and using the school food voucher and implications for future policy directions. Owing to this being a small-scale study, it is not generalisable to the wider population but does highlight localised issues.

10.
Japanese Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics ; 80(2):116-125, 2022.
Article in Japanese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1934502

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the implementation status of school lunches and simplified school lunches after a state of emergency was declared due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and the content of a simplified school lunch.

11.
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1905776

ABSTRACT

Food insecurity among children in the United States remains a serious problem, especially during summer months. While there are summer meal programs such as the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), participation rates are low. In response, in 2019, Meals-to-You (MTY) was piloted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture through the Baylor Collaborative on Hunger and Poverty where food boxes were delivered to households with a focus on rural areas. This was expanded during COVID to an Emergency Meals-to-You component. We find that among participating households, those receiving more boxes had larger declines in food insecurity, especially in more remote rural areas. © 2022 The Authors. Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Agricultural & Applied Economics Association.

12.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904450

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the operations of many farm and food businesses across Louisiana. Producers had to adapt to changes or closures of market outlets, including farmers markets, farm-to-school programs, and restaurants. Using data collected from an online survey, this research examines pre- and post-pandemic marketing channels and challenges faced by food producers.

13.
Collaborative Anthropologies ; 14(2):104-117, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871738

ABSTRACT

In this article we reflect upon recursive temporalities that shaped collaborative work on campus food insecurity. Our research examined disparities in access to food and dining services in order to understand the strategies college students use to mitigate the challenges of obtaining food and to develop suggestions to reduce the prevalence of food insecurity at our school. This collaborative endeavor and our research findings are both framed by perceptions and limitations of time. Within our team, we navigated semester turnover, cyclical incorporation of student researchers, competing commitments, and different time frames for quantitative and qualitive data collection and analysis. Our research participants-college students-juggled multiple responsibilities and experienced temporal shifts by semester, advancement through their school years, and housing changes that significantly impacted their food practices. Time constraints and conflicting temporal rhythms shaped our research and contextualized student engagements with food, creating challenges for conducting collaborative research and for students everyday access to meals. We argue for a reflexive consideration of the multiple temporalities, countertempos, and hidden rhythms that shape collaboration and contextualize research conducted on college campuses.

14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic created barriers to participation in school meals. As a result, many students may have missed out on school meals. The objectives of this study are (1) to compare the number of school meals served by New York State public schools during the first spring and summer of the COVID-19 pandemic to the number served before the COVID-19 pandemic, and (2) to determine relationships between the number of meals served and the levels of school district need and urbanicity. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of administrative data. The percentage change in the number of school breakfasts and lunches served was calculated for each month and by school district need level and urbanicity level. RESULTS: The number of school meals served decreased during the first spring of the pandemic compared to the spring of the previous school year (-43% in April, -51% in May), while the number of school meals served increased during the first summer of the pandemic compared to the summer of the previous school year (+92% in July, +288% in August). CONCLUSIONS: Waivers may provide flexibility to increase participation in school meals, especially during the summer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Lunch , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics
15.
Nutr Bull ; 47(2): 230-245, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840502

ABSTRACT

This paper explores changes to school food standards from 2010, free school meal provision during the COVID-19 pandemic across the UK and potential implications for children's diets. To obtain information on UK school food policies and free school meal provision methods we reviewed several sources including news articles, policy documents and journal articles. School food is an important part of the UK's health agenda and commitment to improving children's diets. Each UK nation has food-based standards implemented, however, only Scotland and Wales also have nutrient-based standards. School food standards in each nation have been updated in the last decade. Universal free school meals are available for children in the first 3 years of primary school in England and the first 5 years of primary school in Scotland, with plans announced for implementation of free school meals for all primary schoolchildren in Scotland and Wales. There is a lack of consistent monitoring of school food across the UK nations, and a lack of reporting compliance to the standards. Each nation differed in its response and management of free school meals during COVID-related school closures. Further, there are issues surrounding the monitoring of the methods to provide free school meal support during school closures. The role of school food has been highlighted during COVID-19, and with this, there have been calls for a review of free school meal eligibility criteria. The need for improved and consistent monitoring of school food across the UK remains, as does the need to evaluate the impact of school food on children's diets.


Subject(s)
Diet , Food Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Meals , Pandemics , Schools , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
Seguranca Alimentar e Nutricional ; 28(27), 2021.
Article in Portuguese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1836192

ABSTRACT

School meals are a right enshrined in the Federal Constitutional of Brazil, and it is the duty of the State to guarantee them to all students enrolled in the public basic education network. The main way to carry out this guarantee has been through the National School Feeding Program (PNAE). Since March 2020, when the World Health Organization declared the pandemic by COVID-19, several measures have been taken to control the disease, including the suspension of face-to-face classes, putting at risk the guarantee of the human right to school feeding in public school system. In view of this, this article, through a review, presents and discusses the reframing process and the challenges faced by PNAE in the context of the pandemic. It addresses the main changes that occurred with the enactment of Law n degrees . 13.987/2020, regulated by Resolution CD/FNDE n degrees 02/2020, which authorized, exceptionally, during the period of suspension of classes, the distribution of foodstuffs purchased with program resources to students' families. In addition, it presents the modalities adopted by the Executing Entities and the attributions of the different school feeding actors in the country, in the context of the pandemic, highlighting their reflexes on the food and nutritional security of this public.

17.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-11, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799616

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore best practices and challenges in providing school meals during COVID-19 in a low-income, predominantly Latino, urban-rural region. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews with school district stakeholders and focus groups with parents were conducted to explore school meal provision during COVID-19 from June to August 2020. Data were coded and themes were identified to guide analysis. Community organisations were involved in all aspects of study design, recruitment, data collection and analysis. SETTING: Six school districts in California's San Joaquin Valley. PARTICIPANTS: School district stakeholders (n 11) included food service directors, school superintendents and community partners (e.g. funders, food cooperative). Focus groups (n 6) were comprised of parents (n 29) of children participating in school meal programmes. RESULTS: COVID-19-related challenges for districts included developing safe meal distribution systems, boosting low participation, covering COVID-19-related costs and staying informed of policy changes. Barriers for families included transportation difficulties, safety concerns and a lack of fresh foods. Innovative strategies to address obstacles included pandemic-electronic benefits transfer (EBT), bus-stop delivery, community pick-up locations, batched meals and leveraging partner resources. CONCLUSIONS: A focus on fresher, more appealing meals and greater communication between school officials and parents could boost participation. Districts that leveraged external partnerships were better equipped to provide meals during pandemic conditions. In addition, policies increasing access to fresh foods and capitalising on United States Department of Agriculture waivers could boost school meal participation. Finally, partnering with community organisations and acting upon parent feedback could improve school meal systems, and in combination with pandemic-EBT, address childhood food insecurity.

18.
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management ; 41(1):350-350, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1733940

ABSTRACT

For many decades, children from low-income families have been able to receive free or reduced-price lunches and breakfasts at their school. Provision of school meals addresses concerns about student hunger and is believed to promote positive education and health outcomes for target children. When the COVID pandemic led to abrupt school closures in the Spring of 2020, students lost access to those school meals. Congress addressed the lack of school meals by creating greater flexibility in how food assistance was provided to children while they were unable to attend school in person.

19.
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management ; 41(1):367-371, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1733939

ABSTRACT

For many decades, children from low-income families have been able to receive free or reduced-price lunches and breakfasts at their school. Provision of school meals addresses concerns about student hunger and is believed to promote positive education and health outcomes for target children. When the COVID pandemic led to abrupt school closures in the Spring of 2020, students lost access to those school meals. Congress addressed the lack of school meals by creating greater flexibility in how food assistance was provided to children while they were unable to attend school in person.

20.
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management ; 41(1):364-367, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1733938

ABSTRACT

For many decades, children from low-income families have been able to receive free or reduced-price lunches and breakfasts at their school. Provision of school meals addresses concerns about student hunger and is believed to promote positive education and health outcomes for target children. When the COVID pandemic led to abrupt school closures in the Spring of 2020, students lost access to those school meals. Congress addressed the lack of school meals by creating greater flexibility in how food assistance was provided to children while they were unable to attend school in person.

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