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1.
Nurse Education Today ; JOUR: 105628,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2105635

ABSTRACT

Background During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, nursing and midwifery undergraduate students' time spent in home isolation and being engaged in home-based e-learning was extended. Limited research has been conducted on home-based e-learning behavior during home isolation, and the relationships between individual factors, such as self-control, self-efficacy, and other demographic characteristics, and home-based e-learning behavior are unclear. Objectives This study aimed to explore the associations between self-control, self-efficacy, and demographic information with home-based e-learning behavior among nursing and midwifery undergraduates during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design and methods A cross-sectional study was employed, and an online survey was conducted with 3733 nursing and midwifery undergraduates across seven provinces and cities in mainland China. Data were collected using the Brief Self-control Scale, General Self-efficacy Scale, Undergraduate Home-based E-learning Behavior Questionnaire, and Demographic Information Questionnaire. A multiple linear regression analysis using the stepwise method was conducted to identify predictors of home-based e-learning behavior. Results Undergraduates achieved an overall mean score of 26.02 (SD = 4.20) for home-based e-learning behavior and an overall mean score of 42.54 (SD = 6.22) and 27.59 (SD = 3.89) for self-control and self-efficacy, respectively. Better self-control (β = 0.250, P < 0.001), higher self-efficacy (β = 0.169, P < 0.001), universities being located in non-Hainan provinces (β = 0.249, P < 0.001), being a sophomore or freshman (β = −0.255, P < 0.001), and good perceived health status (β = −0.044, P = 0.003) were identified as the predictors of better home-based e-learning behavior among nursing and midwifery undergraduates. Conclusion Self-control, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics including the province of the university, grade level, and personal perceived health status were associated with home-based e-learning behavior. Universities should help nursing and midwifery undergraduates improve self-control and enhance self-efficacy while taking measures to decrease the impact caused by demographic characteristic differences.

2.
Journal of Business Research ; JOUR: 113442,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2105274

ABSTRACT

Irrefutable evidence attributes environmental challenges, such as air and noise pollution, to unsustainable transportation, especially in urban settings. In this context, urban public transport is a sustainable mobility system with ecological benefits. However, limited research focuses on understanding the factors that promote urban public transport adoption in the face of disruptive events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This study integrates the push-pull-mooring (PPM) model and institutional theory to examine urban commuters' intentions to switch to urban public transport in the post-COVID-19 era. This study is the first to investigate the trade-offs consumers perceive between green actions and personal health protection in the COVID-19 context. Our results indicate that regulative and normative environments, public transport's economic viability and commuters’ pro-environmental concerns and identities significantly influence their intentions to switch to public transportation. Furthermore, hygiene concerns and choice uncertainty partially moderate the tested associations. The study thus provides unique insights into the nuances of individual decision-making regarding public transport use. Leveraging our findings, we present implications for theory and practice. We also offer a possible framework for classifying consumers of green urban public transport, which can be used to create targeted communication to encourage commuters to switch to routine public transport use for sustainability and environmental protection.

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2101696

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In response to the coronavirus, or COVID-19, pandemic, governments around the world have enacted behavioral recommendations to slow the spread of the virus. At the time of this study, in November 2020, the United States (US), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that individuals adhere to protective guidelines including wearing face masks when outside of the home, maintaining social distancing (e.g., keeping 6 feet apart from others) from individuals with whom they do not live, and other recommendations like washing hands frequently. At the time of study inception, early data suggested that adherence to these protective behaviors was variable among US adults (Brenan, 2020;Coroiu et al., 2020;Czeisler et al., 2020;Fisher et al., 2020;Igielnik et al., 2020;Moore et al., 2020;Oosterhoff & Palmer, 2020;Perotta et al., 2020), with emerging adults (EA;i.e., individuals aged 18-25) demonstrating lower levels of adherence than older age groups. Protection motivation theory (PMT;Rogers, 1983) may provide insight into cognitive processes (e.g., threat appraisal and coping appraisal) that contribute to intention to adhere and actual adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors. The utility of the PMT model has been studied with respect to a variety of health behaviors including social distancing and is successful in predicting behavioral intention but explains less variance in adherence behavior. As such, attention to other factors that may impact behavior such as affective empathy, knowledge of COVID-19, and objective risk (e.g., risk of severe illness from COVID-19) may serve to explain additional variance above and beyond the PMT model in predicting intention or behavior with respect to COVID-19 protections. Therefore, the current study aimed to examine the utility of the PMT framework in predicting behavioral intention and adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors, current at the time of the study, in a sample of US EA and to examine whether select factors outside of the PMT model contribute additional variance to EA adherence behavior. We hypothesized that PMT variables together will explain significant variance in concurrent reports of intention to adhere to COVID-19 protective behaviors and will also predict actual adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors during the subsequent 2-week period. Behaviors of interest included social distancing with the general public, social distancing with friends, family, and significant other's that participants do not live with, social distancing with coworkers, and washing hands, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, and avoiding those who are sick. We expected self-efficacy to emerge as the most salient correlate of behavioral intention, and behavioral intention to explain the most variance in actual adherence behavior. Finally, we expected that the addition of affective empathy, knowledge of COVID-19, and objective risk combined would explain additional variance in adherence to protective behaviors above and beyond variance explained by PMT variables. A sample of 434 EA participants were recruited through various online recruitment methods (e.g., social media, MTurk). Participants completed demographic information, a PMT measure, and questions assessing adherence to nine protective health behaviors related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive analyses summarized information about the sample. Bias corrected accelerated bootstrapping based on 1,000 samples was used to adjust for non-normal data for multiple regression analyses. Consistent with hypotheses, the PMT model explained significant variance in intention to adhere to the nine protective health behaviors, and in 66.67% of analyses, self-efficacy was the most salient construct. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; JOUR(2-A):No Pagination Specified, 84.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2101493

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic induced a global educational emergency that abruptly threatened the continuity of education. Teachers and students were thrust into distance instruction, leaving many feeling unprepared to facilitate engaging reform-minded science, undermining their science identity, attitude, and self-efficacy. Even with the unprecedented instructional challenges, some elementary teachers were able to maintain their positive science beliefs and effectively continue to engage students. To understand the effectiveness of science teaching, science beliefs may serve as proxy data when evaluating teaching practices. To help guide education leaders and policymakers in their efforts to continue the momentum of reform-minded science, regardless of the teaching modality, the purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with elementary teachers who were able to maintain their positive science attitude and self-efficacy during the education emergency. Utilizing a sequential explanatory mixed-method design with a phenomenological approach, data were collected through both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews. Semi-structured interviews emphasized the types of factors that led to teachers' positive science attitude and self-efficacy in distance learning. Findings from this study indicate the factors associated with elementary teachers' belief maintenance included a combination of actions (interest and enjoyment in science and science teaching, voluntary pursuit of knowledge, prioritization of engaging reform-minded science instruction, and creating innovative instruction through leveraging technology and flexibility in free choice of supplies, projects, and overall student engagement), and dispositions (risk-taking, flexibility, embracing failure, and self-determination). These findings are discussed to help ensure effective reformed-minded science continues despite any future threat to education. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Teach Teach Educ ; : 103941, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096054

ABSTRACT

This study used latent growth curve models to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the development of teacher self-efficacy in student teachers. Results indicate that the teacher self-efficacy of student teachers taught during the first COVID-19 lockdown increased significantly less across a semester compared to student teachers taught prior to the pandemic, who gained practical experience in schools. There may be a cohort of student teachers at risk of entering the profession with lower self-efficacy than is typical. Universities and schools may wish to provide additional practical experiences to compensate for the missed opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

6.
Cogent Education ; JOUR(1), 9.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2087468

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of COVID-19 has forced many learning institutions to close or switch to remote learning as a preventative measure to reduce the spread of the virus. The greatest challenge was with practical courses where preservice teachers had to promptly acquire technological skills and online teaching pedagogies as part of their virtual field experience. This need for learning and applying online pedagogies and technological competencies to increase student performance can lead to different perceptions of self-efficacy in online teaching. The purpose of this study is to examine the predictors for enhancing preservice teachers' self-efficacy and satisfaction in online teaching and to investigate the association of their self-efficacy beliefs and their satisfaction with online teaching. Elementary preservice teachers (n = 257) from two teacher preparation programs in two universities in the United Arab Emirates completed a 5-point Likert scale survey. Results revealed that participants reported a high level of self-efficacy and satisfaction in online teaching mainly regarding their abilities to engage students in online classrooms and use of computers/educational technology. Students' technological knowledge was strongly correlated with participants self-efficacy beliefs. Interestingly, results showed that preservice teachers who have beginner experience in teaching scored significantly higher on their self-efficacy than those with moderate and advanced experience.

7.
Int J Dent Hyg ; 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the impact of self-efficacy on the intention to take preventive actions against infectious diseases, focusing on dental hygiene students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey was conducted through a questionnaire distributed to 300 dental hygiene students at the Department of Dental Hygiene, Gangneung Yeongdong College in South Korea. In total, 251 students completed the survey (response rate: 83.6%). The survey data were analyzed via exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. RESULTS: The analysis showed that self-efficacy positively affected students' intentions to take preventive actions against infectious diseases. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed that self-efficacy positively affected dental hygiene students' intentions for preventive actions against infections. Furthermore, it suggested that self-efficacy should be classified into psychological (confidence and judgment) and behavioral (drive and task challenge) categories, and a systematic survey to formalize the concept of self-efficacy should be developed. The results of this study should enable a better understanding of the self-efficacy's impact on the intention to take preventive actions against infectious diseases.

8.
Tour Manag Perspect ; 44: 101039, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086776

ABSTRACT

By applying the protection motivation theory, the study aims to investigate factors influencing tourism and hospitality (T&H) workers' career resilience when faced with health-related risks at work during a pandemic. Data were collected from 495 part-time and full-time employees in the Vietnamese tourism and hospitality sector. The study found that workers' perceived vulnerability and perceived severity of the pandemic were positively associated with career resilience. Perceived severity was positively related to self-efficacy and response efficacy, while perceived vulnerability was positively associated with self-efficacy only. Both self-efficacy and response efficacy positively influenced career resilience through the mediating role of health risk preventative behavior. Theoretically, the study advances the stream of research in resilience in general and career resilience in particular among T&H workers when faced with a health-related crisis. Practical implications are provided with recommendations on how to facilitate career resilience among T&H employees working in the current high-risk environment.

9.
Curr Res Ecol Soc Psychol ; 3: 100069, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086105

ABSTRACT

Although recent studies on the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have highlighted the negative effects of moral disengagement on intentions to comply with COVID-19 containment measures, little is known about the mediating role of moral disengagement in the relationship between regulatory self-efficacy in complying with the containment measures, beliefs in conspiracy theories and compliance with COVID-19 health-related behaviors. Data were collected from 1164 young adults (women, N = 796; 68.4%; mean age 25.60 ± 4.40 years) who completed an online survey from 15th May to 22nd June 2021. Results of the multi-group path analyses indicated that higher beliefs in conspiracy theories were associated with lower compliance with COVID-19 health-related behaviors, whereas higher self-efficacy beliefs in complying with the containment measures were associated with higher compliance with COVID-19 health-related behaviors. Moral disengagement significantly mediated the associations between beliefs in conspiracy theories, regulatory self-efficacy, and compliance with COVID-19 health-related behaviors. Finally, the tested model was gender-invariant. Findings suggest that public health authorities and social care professionals should promote interventions aimed at improving regulatory self-efficacy, emphasizing the moral significance of respecting or ignoring the recommended COVID-19 measures (e.g., physical distance in public), and enhancing people's concern for the potential harms of their immoral actions.

10.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2084023

ABSTRACT

Through the use of virtual simulations (VS) in nursing education, nursing students are exposed to a variety of clinical scenarios that may potentially improve their learning of competencies, increase their self-efficacy, and enhance their future clinical performance. Despite limited quantitative research incorporating evidence-based strategies such as prebriefing and debriefing as part of the VS experience, this educational technology continues to gain popularity. In 2020, the use of VS in the nursing curriculum exponentially increased when the global COVID-19 pandemic impacted traditional in-person clinicals, laboratory, and human patient simulation (HPS) experiences. Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs have benefited from the use of VS. Among the various types of programs that educate prelicensure nursing students, ADN programs prepare the greatest number of students, educate more culturally and academically diverse students, and are challenged to prepare competent nurse graduates within a short curriculum timeframe. The researcher aimed to explore the effect of the Virtual Simulation Paired Prebriefing-Debriefing (VSPPD) strategy on ADN students' self-efficacy perceptions and VS performance concerning the care of patients experiencing a myocardial infarction (COPE-MI). Guided by the National League for Nursing (NLN) Jeffries Simulation Theory (JST) and principles of Bandura's self-efficacy theory, this quasi-experimental, two-group (intervention group and control group), pretest and post-test educational intervention study examined five research questions: 1) What is the effect of the Virtual Simulation Paired Prebriefing-Debriefing (VSPPD) strategy on Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students' self-efficacy perceptions concerning the care of patients experiencing an MI? 2) What is the effect of the VSPPD strategy on VS performance scores? 3) What is the correlation between students' self-efficacy perceptions and VS performance scores? 4) What is the influence of selected demographic variables on students' self-efficacy perceptions concerning the care of patients experiencing an MI? 5) What is the influence of selected demographic variables on students' VS performance scores? Implemented with a third-semester, five-credit, advanced medical-surgical nursing course in the ADN curriculum, the VSPPD strategy aimed to positively influence nursing students' self-efficacy for performing cognitive, practical, and affective COPE-MI nursing skills and VS performance scores through students' participation in a paired prebriefing-debriefing and repeated completion of the same VS scenario preceded and followed by structured briefing conversations. The VSPPD strategy was developed by the researcher based on the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) Standards of Best Practice: SimulationSM, constructs of the JST, and the NLN vSim for Nursing Curriculum Integration Guide for Faculty. The effectiveness of this educational strategy was measured by the Care of Patients Experiencing a Myocardial Infarction Self-Efficacy Tool (COPE-MI SET©), the Virtual Simulation Survey (VSS), and students' VS performance scores. Data analysis results for the five research questions support the effectiveness of the VSPPD educational strategy on students' COPE-MI self-efficacy perceptions (in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains) and VS performance scores. Results also support that there is a positive correlation between students' COPE-MI self-efficacy perceptions and VS performance scores. While sample size limitation was a concern, this study also provided evidence that the VSPPD strategy caused positive changes in students' COPE-MI self-efficacy perceptions and VS performance scores regardless of students' age, previous experience with video or computer gaming, or previous healthcare work experience. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
Gadjah Mada International Journal of Business ; JOUR(3):310-323, 24.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2081745

ABSTRACT

This research aimed to investigate the determinants of panic purchasing to hoard food in Ho Chi Minh City during the lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Pragma-tism and the deduction approach were used for the research. During the lockdown period in Ho Chi Minh City, the purposive sampling technique was the first method used to reach the popula- tion that needed to be measured. Then, simple sampling was the second technique to collect data in the city in July and August 2021. Data were collected from 584 participants-higher than the required minimum sample size-who fulfilled the essential criteria to be included in the sample's population. Multi-quantitative methods, including descriptive statistics, reliability tests for items, exploratory factor analysis, and linear regression analysis, were used to analyze the data obtained. The main findings are that perceived scarcity, susceptibility, severity, cues to action, and self -ef- ficacy impacted panic purchasing to hoard foods. The results of this study are compared to the literature review in order to discuss panic buying behaviour, and recommendations are offered to policymakers and researchers in the future.

12.
Work ; 73(2): 393-404, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Implications of entrepreneurial education (EE), entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and personality traits (PT) on the entrepreneurial intentions of the deaf is yet unknown in existing literature. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of EE, ESE and PT on the entrepreneurial intentions among some 250 Deaf and Hard of hearing (DHH) students from two post-secondary institutions in Oyo state, Nigeria. METHODS: A descriptive research design was adopted, while a structured paper questionnaire was used for data collection. The data generated were analysed using descriptive statistics and the inferential statistics of Pearson Product Moment Correlation and hierarchical multiple regression at a 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS: The entrepreneurial intentions of DHH college students had a significant positive correlation with EE (r = 0.18, p < 0.05), agreeableness (r = 0.23, p < 0.05), and conscientiousness (r = 0.19, p < 0.05); but had a negative correlation with ESE, neuroticism and openness. Furthermore, personality traits and ESE were the highest predictors of entrepreneurial intention among DHH college students. CONCLUSIONS: Personality traits were the greatest predictor of the entrepreneurial intention of DHH college students post the COVID-19 lockdowns in Nigeria. Therefore, higher education institutions should intensify their efforts in entrepreneurial education and parents of DHH students should encourage them to seek entrepreneurial opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intention , Humans , Self Efficacy , Communicable Disease Control , Students , Hearing
13.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(10): e41415, 2022 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hydroxyurea therapy is effective for reducing complications related to sickle cell disease (SCD) and is recommended by National Health Lung and Blood Institute care guidelines. However, hydroxyurea is underutilized, and adherence is suboptimal. We wanted to test a multilevel mobile health (mHealth) intervention to increase hydroxyurea adherence among patients and improve prescribing among providers in a multicenter clinical trial. In the first 2 study sites, participants were exposed to the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, which included disruption to their regular SCD care. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the implementation of an mHealth behavioral intervention for improving hydroxyurea adherence among patients with SCD. METHODS: The first 2 sites initiated enrollment 3 months prior to the start of the pandemic (November 2019 to March 2020). During implementation, site A clinics shut down for 2 months and site B clinics shut down for 9 months. We used the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of the intervention. mHealth implementation was assessed based on patients' daily app use. Adherence to hydroxyurea was calculated as the proportion of days covered (PDC) from prescription records over the first 12 and 24 weeks after implementation. A linear model examined the relationship between app usage and PDC change, adjusting for baseline PDC, lockdown duration, and site. We conducted semistructured interviews with patients, health care providers, administrators, and research staff to identify factors associated with mHealth implementation and effectiveness. We used a mixed methods approach to investigate the convergence of qualitative and quantitative findings. RESULTS: The percentage of patients accessing the app decreased after March 15, 2020 from 86% (n=55) to 70% (n=45). The overall mean PDC increase from baseline to week 12 was 4.5% (P=.32) and to week 24 was 1.5% (P=.70). The mean PDC change was greater at site A (12 weeks: 20.9%; P=.003; 24 weeks: 16.7%; P=.01) than site B (12 weeks: -8.2%; P=.14; 24 weeks: -10.3%; P=.02). After adjustment, PDC change was 13.8% greater in those with increased app use after March 15, 2020. Interview findings indicated that site B's closure during COVID-19 had a greater impact, but almost all patients reported that the InCharge Health app helped support more consistent medication use. CONCLUSIONS: We found significant impacts of the early clinic lockdowns, which reduced implementation of the mHealth intervention and led to reduced patient adherence to hydroxyurea. However, disruptions were lower among participants who experienced shorter clinic lockdowns and were associated with higher hydroxyurea adherence. Investigation of added strategies to mitigate the effects of care interruptions during major emergencies (eg, patient coaching and health navigation) may "insulate" the implementation of interventions to increase medication adherence. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04080167; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04080167. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/16319.

14.
Psychol Rep ; : 332941221127631, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079208

ABSTRACT

The present study aims to (1) identify the profiles of subjective well-being (SWB) and psychological well-being (PWB) in a sample of pre-service teachers during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong, and (2) explore how different profiles are linked with teachers' self-efficacy. Participants were 291 pre-service teachers (Mage = 21.295, SD = 2.812, female = 89.903%) who were invited to complete self-report measures of SWB, PWB, and teachers' self-efficacy. Latent profile analysis with maximum likelihood estimation was conducted to identify well-being profiles that emerged in this sample. The results suggested a 3-class model with a high, moderate, and low well-being group. The findings also revealed that the pre-service teachers' well-being profiles as reflected by SWB and PWB indicators were consistent. Moreover, the pre-service teachers in the higher well-being group reported higher teaching self-efficacy than those in the lower well-being group. Findings highlighted the benefits of supporting pre-service teachers' well-being (i.e., SWB and PWB) to maintain their teachers' self-efficacy during the COVID-19 pandemic when teacher education and practicum are significantly disrupted. Interventions targeting various positive psychological skills (e.g., mindfulness, self-compassion, and positive reappraisal) are warranted. Future investigation is needed to examine the longitudinal relationship between pre-service teachers' well-being and self-efficacy.

15.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2074007

ABSTRACT

The central purpose of this quantitative research was to examine the relationships between leadership styles, job satisfaction, and employee decision-making self-efficacy in the Mid-Atlantic hotel industry during a crisis. This research's theoretical framework is based on the transformational, transactional, laissez-faire leadership styles, job satisfaction, and the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding (C-Lead). According to Callahan (2020), the COVID-19 pandemic is fertile ground for new research within the hotel industry. This investigation utilized the following reliable instruments: (MLQ, MSQ, and C-LEAD) to examine the relationships between variables. Cross-sectional data from a total of 150 participants within this industry was collected using the third-party vendor Qualtrics. The data was then examined using IBM software Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS). The findings revealed that leadership styles positively and negatively impact job satisfaction and decision-making self-efficacy during a crisis. This research added to the body of literature and provided a platform for further research by discussing the relationships between leadership styles, job satisfaction, and decision-making self-efficacy in the hotel industry in the mid-Atlantic region during a crisis. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Heliyon ; 8(11): e11085, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076134

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between depression, emotional exhaustion, self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, academic self-efficacy, and the use of virtual media in Peruvian university students during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A total of 569 college students (61.9% female), with a mean age of 21.73 years (standard deviation = 4.95), responded to the following questionnaires: Academic Self-Efficacy Scale, Single Item Self-Esteem Scale, Brief Scale of Satisfaction with Studies, Scale of Use of Virtual Media, Patient Health Questionnarie-2, and Single Item of Academic Emotional Exhaustion. Correlation statistics, regression models, and structural equation modeling (SEM) were used for data analysis. The results demonstrated a direct and significant correlation between virtual media use, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, depression, and emotional exhaustion (p < .01). In addition, satisfaction with studies (ß = -0.13), academic self-efficacy (ß = -0.19), self-esteem (ß = -0.14), and emotional exhaustion (ß = 0.19) predicted depression significantly, whereas virtual media use (ß = 0.17), study satisfaction (ß = 0.09), and depression (ß = 0.20) predicted emotional exhaustion associated with academics. The SEM model indicated that self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, and academic self-efficacy negatively predict depression, whereas academic self-efficacy positively predicts virtual media use. Finally, both virtual media use and depression positively predict emotional exhaustion. This model presents optimal goodness-of-fit indices (X2 = 8.926, df = 6, p = .178; comparative fit = .991, Tucker-Lewis = .979, root mean square error of approximation = .029 [confidence interval 90% = .000-.067], standardized root mean square residual = .022). Thus, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, and virtual media use predict depression and emotional exhaustion among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

17.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2073522

ABSTRACT

The role of the teacher is vital in promoting a classroom climate that supports student learning and social-emotional well-being. However, little consideration is given to offering interventions to support teachers in reducing stress and burnout that result in teacher turnover. Studies have concluded mindfulness practices to be an effective intervention for teachers to reduce stress, increase emotional regulation, and promote well-being. The restrictions resulting from the global COVID-19 pandemic caused many educational institutions to shift to a distance learning model. The applications of online mindfulness for classroom teachers are just beginning to be explored, with few studies investigating the effects of online mindfulness training for teachers. The purpose of this case study was to examine teacher perceptions of mindfulness, stress, and self-efficacy following a district-led online delivery of mindfulness at a selected public school in southeast Texas. The study involved participants experienced with online delivery of mindfulness training in the school year 2020-2021 and who continued mindfulness practice in 2021-2022 school year. A mixed-methods research approach was used in this case study. The findings from the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire- Short Form revealed awareness was statistically significant. Findings from the Perceived Stress Scale revealed 66% of participants had moderate stress levels. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale-Short Form findings revealed all the variables were statistically significantly different from how teachers perceived the delivery of teacher self-efficacy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

18.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2073414

ABSTRACT

Teachers are increasingly sought after to support students that are experiencing mental health concerns. Some of the most common mental health concerns include, but are not limited to, depression, anxiety, and behavioral problems (Centers for Disease and Control Prevention [CDC], 2020a). In the United States, these mental health diagnoses have been observed in children as young as 2 to 17 years of age (CDC, 2020a). As a result, teachers have become first responders in meeting the mental health needs of students. The purpose of this basic qualitative study was to further explore teachers' self-efficacy and collective efficacy and how they are responding to the mental health challenges of third-grade elementary school-aged students. Participants included 15 third-grade teachers from five schools from one school district: two traditional K-5 schools and three K-8 schools. Using Bandura's self-efficacy and collective efficacy frameworks, data revealed how teacher knowledge, skills, and strategies were influenced, along with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in addressing mental health concerns. Several findings emerged suggesting that teachers have a stronger sense of collective efficacy by working closely with school counselors, while teachers with a lower sense of collective efficacy do no seek collaborative relationships and other sources. In addition, teachers with a stronger sense of self-efficacy recognized the process in pre-identifying student mental health, while teachers with a lower sense of self-efficacy, lacked the tools to properly pre-identify students. This study has implications for teacher professional development and training, along with increasing specialized support staff. In addition, the study has implications for recognizing the coordination of education and mental health services to strengthen teacher self-efficacy and collective efficacy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

19.
Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070680

ABSTRACT

Why do some potential entrepreneurs promptly engage in entrepreneurial behavior while others do not pursue their entrepreneurial intentions or delay acting? This study investigated whether potential entrepreneurs' mindset shapes engaging in entrepreneurial behavior and the time until they do so. Over a 16-month period, holding more of a growth (vs. fixed) mindset positively predicted taking various entrepreneurial actions and doing so sooner. Interestingly, these effects vanished when individuals faced a less challenging context for entrepreneurship. Post-hoc exploratory analyses revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic magnified the impact of mindsets on entrepreneurial behavior. These findings pave the way for preliminary research on the viability of growth mindset interventions for fostering entrepreneurial behavior.

20.
Reference Services Review ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070254

ABSTRACT

Purpose This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts. The selected bibliography is useful to efficiently keep up with trends in library instruction for busy practitioners, library science students and those wishing to learn about information literacy in other contexts. Design/methodology/approach This article annotates 424 English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, theses and reports on library instruction and information literacy published in 2021. The sources were selected from the EBSCO platform for Library, Information Science, and Technology s (LISTA), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Scopus, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and WorldCat, published in 2021 that included the terms "information literacy," "library instruction," or "information fluency" in the title, or keywords. The sources were organized in Zotero. Annotations summarize the source, focusing on the findings or implications. Each source was categorized into one of seven pre-determined categories: K-12 Education, Children and Adolescents;Academic and Professional Programs;Everyday Life, Community, and the Workplace;Libraries and Health Information Literacy;Multiple Library Types;and Other Information Literacy Research and Theory. Findings The paper provides a brief description of 424 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions. Originality/value The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy within 2021.

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