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1.
Sibirskiy Psikhologicheskiy Zhurnal-Siberian Journal of Psychology ; JOUR(85): 190-204,
Article in Russian | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100557

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to develop and test an express diagnostic method for determining psychosemantic markers of self-regulation components deficiency in clients during an online counseling situation. The article describes the specifics of the population's appeals to psychological services from universities for psychological help since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. It shows that people's requests have a different focus: problems with behavior, problems with cognitive functions, problems with emotions, will, motivation, etc. However,a common component in all requests is a pronounced lack of self-regulatory resources in solving problems that arise in situations of increasing uncertainty. The study results of psychosemantic markers of components deficiency in human selfregulation during situations of increasing uncertainty are presented. The relevance of the results of the components deficiency in human self-regulation is determined by the fact that self-regulation is an important resource of an individual, which contributes to successful adaptation to various life difficulties and situations, including situations of forced increasing uncertainty such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the analysis of various theoretical works and empirical studies, 4 main groups of deficits (deficiencies) of self-regulation, characteristic of people in a situation of increasing uncertainty, were identified: deficiency of the operational component of self-regulation, deficiency of the emotional-volitional component of selfregulation, deficiency of the motivational component of self-regulation and deficiency in the individual-personal component of self-regulation. This empirical study of psychosemantic markers of deficiency in self-regulation components was carried out using the method of content analysis of requests from people who applied for help to the TSU psychological service during the COVID-19 pandemic. It was noted that the number of deficiencies in different people are both minimal (only 1 type of deficiency occurs) and maximum (all 4 identified types of deficiency occur). Thus, the predominant type of deficiency among people who applied for help to the psychological service of TSU was the deficit of the emotional-volitional component of self-regulation, namely, problems with the regulation of fear, anxiety and aggression. This fact indicates that the situation of uncertainty to a greater extent affected the emotional component of the psyche. In addition, it is the self-regulation of emotions that is one of the most complex types of self-regulation, and this is probably why there are more related requests to it. The deficit of the operational component of self-regulation was the least common. The novelty of the study is the indications psychosemantic tools, which allows collecting diagnostic information in the course of working with a client on an online consultative platform.

2.
Frontiers in Education ; 7, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2071077

ABSTRACT

This mixed-methods study investigated the learning and shifts in teaching practices that educators reported after participating in a trauma-informed schools professional development intervention. Training participants were 61 educators at a suburban U.S. elementary school. The year-long intervention included three after-school trainings, classroom coaching for a subset of teachers, and evaluation of school policies with administrators. Interview (n = 16) and survey (n = 22) data were collected. Quantitative results indicated that educators reported substantial shifts in their thinking and teaching practices. Almost half reported that their thinking shifted a lot and 55% reported that their practices shifted somewhat. Qualitative themes demonstrated increased understandings of trauma and secondary traumatic stress;increased empathy for students, families, colleagues, and compassion for self;enacting proactive strategies;reappraising interactions with students;increased collaboration with colleagues;and enacting self-care strategies as a result of participating in the professional development intervention. Results have implications for policy and practice, particularly the need for implementation and evaluation of trauma-informed approaches during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071408

ABSTRACT

A substantial number of patients report persisting symptoms after a COVID-19 infection: so-called post-COVID-19 syndrome. There is limited research on patients' perspectives on post-COVID-19 symptoms and ways to recover. This qualitative study explored the illness perceptions and recovery strategies of patients who had been hospitalised for COVID-19. Differences between recovered and non-recovered patients were investigated. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were held with 24 participating patients (8 recovered and 16 non-recovered) 7 to 12 months after hospital discharge. Data were interpreted using reflexive thematic analysis. Four overarching themes were identified: (I) symptoms after hospital discharge; (II) impact of COVID-19 on daily life and self-identity; (III) uncertainty about COVID-19; and (IV) dealing with COVID-19. Formerly hospitalised post-COVID-19 patients seem to have difficulties with making sense of their illness and gaining control over their recovery. The majority of non-recovered participants continue to suffer mostly from weakness or fatigue, dyspnoea and cognitive dysfunction. No notable differences in illness beliefs were observed between recovered and non-recovered participants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue , Qualitative Research
4.
Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Sciences ; 9(3):219-223, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2066896

ABSTRACT

Context: Self-regulated learning is a process by which learners choose goals for themselves and then try to regulate, control and manage their cognition, motivation, and behavior. The COVID-19 pandemic faced students to numerous educational challenges. Rapid transition of the traditional classroom to the virtual environment affected E-learning acceptance of the students in the age of the COVID-19 pandemic. Aim: The present study aimed to determine the relationship between online self-regulated learning and E-learning acceptance among Mazandaran University of medical sciences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Settings and Design: This descriptive-Analytical study was conducted on 234 Mazandaran University of medical sciences students. Materials and Methods: The nonprobability quota sampling method was used for data collection. Inclusion criterion was experience E-learning at least one semester in the age of COVID-19 pandemic. Internship medical sciences students were excluded. The online questionnaire consisted of three parts: Sociodemographic questionnaire, online self-regulated learning and E-learning acceptance. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, Pearson test, and univariate and multivariate linear regression model were utilized. Results: According to the univariate linear regression model, E-learning acceptance explored 19.8% variance of the online self-regulated learning. The multivariate linear regression showed age, gender, marital status, medical students, another job and E-learning acceptance explored 47.1% variance of the online self-regulated learning. Conclusion: The results showed that E-learning acceptance was correlated with online self-regulated learning. The faculty members and university managers can use strategies to enhance the E-learning acceptance to improve online self-regulated learning and facilitate barriers in the age of mandatory online learning. © 2022 Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Sciences ;Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

5.
Brain Behav ; 12(11): e2772, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059301

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown that obesity is associated with decreased executive function. Impaired executive functions lead to poor self-regulation, which in turn may result in persistence of unhealthy behaviors, including eating behaviors, throughout life. Increasing self-regulation in childhood and adolescence has positive effects on creating healthy behaviors such as reducing unnecessary eating and changing unhealthy eating habits. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate an intervention package based on cognitive self-regulation training in changing eating behaviors and reducing obesity in children and adolescents. METHODS: Fifty-six students with obesity aged 12-16 years participated in the study in three groups (cognitive self-regulation training [CSRT], diet, and control). The CSRT group received twenty 30-min online training sessions with a diet over 10 weeks. The diet group received only a diet with no other intervention, and the control group did not receive any intervention. RESULTS: The results of our 2 × 3 repeated-measures ANOVA showed that the CSRT group had a mean BMI decrease of 2.21 (kg/m2 ) after ten weeks, and 3.24 (kg/m2 ) at the follow-up time. The diet group had a BMI decrease of 0.49 (kg/m2 ) at the ten weeks. In addition, the results showed that the CSRT had a significant reduction in eating behaviors such as external eating and emotional eating. However, the other two groups showed no changes in eating behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that online cognitive self-regulation training has been effective in weight loss and eating behaviors. This study shows promising evidence for the efficacy of the online CSRT-training as a weight stabilization intervention in children with obesity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Pediatric Obesity , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Pediatric Obesity/therapy , Pediatric Obesity/psychology , Weight Loss/physiology , Feeding Behavior/physiology , Diet , Body Mass Index
6.
Journal of Interactive Media in Education ; 2022(1), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056029

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature related to assessment co-creation, specifically on students’ perspectives on their participation throughout the process, including the professor’s role as well as the knowledge and skills students acquired in assessment co-creation in online and blended settings. To do so, we conducted qualitative research where three cases were examined through a validated survey. Quantitative data (Likert scale and close-ended questions) was analyzed with excel whereas to study qualitative data we used Atlas.ti. As a result, students appreciated the opportunity given as they believe it helped them to better understand the assessment process, as well as allowing them to improve their own understanding of their assignments and, therefore, to better perform on them. Also, students claim they have acquired different skills: from academic to life-long learning skills. In conclusion, we believe assessment co-creation has great potential to help students’ self-regulation and agency as well as to enhance students’ motivation, proactivity, and collaborative participation in their own learning process. Finally, we would like to point out that more studies related to this topic need to be conducted since there are only a few examples. © 2022 The Author(s).

7.
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning ; 23(3):43-60, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2040540

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the effects of interactional, motivational, self-regulatory, and situational factors on university students’ online learning outcomes and continuation intentions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected from 255 students taking a business course at a university in southern China. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that while family financial hardship caused by COVID-19 was a marginally significant negative predictor of students’ learning outcomes, learner–content interaction;instructors’ provision of e-resources, course planning, and organisation;and students’ intrinsic goal orientation and meta-cognitive self-regulation were significant positive predictors with the latter two sets of predictors mediating the effects of learner–instructor and learner–learner interactions, respectively. Multinominal logistic regression analyses showed that learner–instructor interaction, learner–content interaction, and private learning space were significant positive predictors of students’ intentions to continue with online learning, but learner–learner interaction was a significant negative predictor. These findings point to the differential effects of various types of interactional and situational factors on learning outcomes and continuation intentions, and the instructor and learner-level factors that mediate the effects of learner–instructor and learner–learner interactions on learning outcomes. They contribute to our understandings of emergency online learning and provide implications for facilitating it © 2022, International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning.All Rights Reserved.

8.
Asia Pacific Education Review ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2031043

ABSTRACT

Over the past decade, the Japanese government and Japanese universities have increased student mobility, both inbound and outbound, to accelerate the internationalization of higher education. However, student mobility was halted in early 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and international students who had planned to engage in a traditional study abroad program could not enter Japan. The current study examined whether the unexpected implementation of online distance classes because of the pandemic affected the learning strategies of graduate students, including international students. In addition, we investigated whether the online courses functioned as an alternative to face-to-face classes. An analysis using structural equation modeling revealed that the period of enrollment, self-regulation, and country of residence were factors that influenced help-seeking behavior. Graduate students who had enrolled before the pandemic and already experienced face-to-face classes were more likely to actively seek help from instructors and classmates in online classes. Furthermore, graduate students who were unable to enter the country but were taking classes online also tended to actively engage in help-seeking from their instructors and classmates. Students' experiences of the sudden change to distance learning suggest that, to ensure a sustainable teaching and learning environment in various contexts, instructors should use class designs that consider distance learning, particularly designs that enhance students' help-seeking, even under normal circumstances. In addition, ensuring sufficient online/virtual spaces for communication among teachers and students is important.

9.
Ubiquitous Learning ; 15(2):69-86, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030445

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted with a view to exploring factors predicting learner satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic in a Vietnamese higher education context. Survey data from 2,338 university learners who were forced to study online owing to the COVID-19 pandemic was analyzed using a structural equation model (SEM) and thematic analytical strategies. Results indicated that learner–content, learner–learner interactions, and internet self-efficacy were positively correlated with learners’ satisfaction but that learner–instructor interaction and learners’ self-regulation were not. Learners showed satisfaction with live online learning but expressed concerns about the suitability of the live content delivery and the pre-uploaded materials for online learning. The study results offer useful implications for teachers and students in enhancing quality and promoting interpersonal interactions in online learning.

10.
Sustain Sci ; : 1-14, 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2027641

ABSTRACT

As many business activities-especially those associated with the energy-intensive industries-continue to be major sources of greenhouse gas emissions, and hence significantly contributing to global warming, there is a perceived need to identify ways to make business activities eventually carbon neutral. This paper explores the implications of a changing climate for the global tourism business and its intertwining global aviation industry that operates in a self-regulatory environment. Adopting a bibliometric analysis of the literature in the domain of global tourism and climate change (772 articles), the paper reveals the underlying sustainability issues that entail unsustainable energy consumption. The aviation industry as a significant source of carbon emission within the sector is then examined by analyzing the top 20 largest commercial airlines in the world with respect to its ongoing mitigating measures in meeting the Paris Agreement targets. While self-regulatory initiatives are taken to adopt Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF) as alternative fuel production and consumption for drastically reducing carbon emission, voluntary alignment and commitment to long-term targets remain inconsistent. A concerted strategic approach to building up complementary sustainable infrastructures among the global network of airports based in various international tourist destination cities to enable a measurable reduction in carbon emission is necessary to achieve a transformational adaptation of a business sector that is of essence to the recovery of the global economy while attempting to tackle climate change in a post-COVID-19 era.

11.
Asia Pacific Journal of Educators and Education ; 37(1):19-45, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026170

ABSTRACT

Students and lecturers are mostly accustomed to the physical learning environment in the classroom. The transition to online learning requires quick adaptation, and students often face challenges which cause hindrance in their learning. This paper aims at highlighting students’ adaptability in online learning which can help university students and management to respond effectively to the variable factors, namely, self-regulation and self-efficacy. Based on the social cognitive theory of motivation, this study examines the relationships between students’ selfregulation, self-efficacy and adaptability in online learning. Self-efficacy is examined as a mediator and moderator variable in the relationship between self-regulation and students’ adaptability. The samples comprised of 238 students from private universities in Malaysia through a survey questionnaire. Partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the hypotheses. The results showed a direct and positive relationship for all direct relationships between variables. In addition, self-regulation and students’ adaptability is significantly mediated by self-efficacy. However, in this study, the moderator analysis found no support. This study provides theoretical and practical implications to gain a better understanding of students’ adaptability in online learning and proposed intervention for higher education institution to address and promote self-regulation and self-efficacy among students. By implementing such interventions, it is hoped that students are better able to adapt, stay motivated and in getting the most out of online learning. © Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2022.

12.
International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (Online) ; 17(16):269-288, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024445

ABSTRACT

The unexpected prolonged expansion of the Covid-19 pandemic has urged nu-merous educational institutions worldwide, including Vietnam, to offer online courses. Identifying factors that impact student satisfaction and academic achievement, hence, becomes crucial in online learning environments. The current study examines the impact of students' self-regulated learning and Internet self-efficacy on these two learning outcomes in an online environment. The proposed research model consists of two exogenous variables including students' Internet self-efficacy and self-regulated learning, and two endogenous variables, namely students' satisfaction and academic achievement. 710 students from four universi-ties in Vietnam voluntarily participated in this study by completing an online sur-vey questionnaire. The data analysis was performed by Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). The results indicated that Internet self-efficacy, goal setting, and help-seeking have direct positive effects on both student satisfaction and academic achievement. Self-evaluation positively affected student satisfaction while it did not have an impact on student academic achieve-ment. Elaboration, environment structuring, and task strategies did not have a sta-tistically significant relationship with student satisfaction as well as their academic achievement. Students' satisfaction has a direct positive impact on their academic achievement. Pedagogical implications and limitations of the study are also deduced.

13.
Front Hum Neurosci ; 16: 920383, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022807

ABSTRACT

Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel treatment for smoking cessation and delay discounting rate is novel therapeutic target. Research to determine optimal therapeutic targets and dosing parameters for long-term smoking cessation is needed. Due to potential biases and confounds introduced by the COVID-19 pandemic, we report preliminary results from an ongoing study among participants who reached study end prior to the pandemic. Methods: In a 3 × 2 randomized factorial design, participants (n = 23) received 900 pulses of 20 Hz rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) in one of three Durations (8, 12, or 16 days of stimulation) and two Intensities (1 or 2 sessions per day). We examined direction and magnitude of the effect sizes on latency to relapse, 6-month point-prevalence abstinence rates, research burden, and delay discounting rates. Results: A large effect size was found for Duration and a medium for Intensity for latency to relapse. Increasing Duration increased the odds of abstinence 7-8-fold while increasing Intensity doubled the odds of abstinence. A large effect size was found for Duration, a small for Intensity for delay discounting rate. Increasing Duration and Intensity had a small effect on participant burden. Conclusion: Findings provide preliminary support for delay discounting as a therapeutic target and for increasing Duration and Intensity to achieve larger effect sizes for long-term smoking cessation and will provide a pre-pandemic comparison for data collected during the pandemic. Clinical Trial Registration: [www.ClinicalTrials.gov], identifier [NCT03865472].

14.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(11-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2011015

ABSTRACT

Online course enrollments continue to increase, and even more online courses are now offered as a result of the pandemic (O'Keefe et al., 2020). Although some students succeed in online courses (Battalio, 2009;Murray et al., 2012), most either earn low grades or do not complete the courses (Angelino et al., 2007;Wilson & Allen, 2011). Some courses are more successful than others in facilitating the learning process for online students (O'Keefe et al., 2020;Johnson, N. et al., 2020). Self-regulation has proven to be a key feature for online learning (Carvalho, Sana, & Yan, 2020). One way to explain this issue is through the theory of self-regulation. Tabak and Nguyen (2013) developed a conceptual model of self-regulation in online learning environments that contains components from three theories: Self-Regulation Model from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1991), Technology Acceptance Model (Davis, 1989), and the Five Factor Model of Personality (Barrick & Mount, 2005). Tabak and Nguyen's (2013) model explains self-regulation in an online learning environment as a continuous looping system and accounts for the roles and interaction of intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors, perceived ease of use and perceived usage as antecedent effects on the forethought, performance, and self-reflection phases of self-regulated learning. This qualitative case study uses constructionism to explore the significance of the modifications effective instructors made to course design and to the student learning factors and processes in their online courses that facilitated self-regulated learning. This case occurred during the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings in this study indicate instructors used course design modifications exemplifying support for and facilitation of learning processes so students were able to progress through the overall learning process smoothly. The results of this study could provide key insights for online educators to better support student self-regulation in online courses and may also provide educators with possible improvements in course construction, academic support, and time saving measures connected to online students and online courses. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

15.
Innovations in Education & Teaching International ; : 1-12, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2001117

ABSTRACT

The present study explored the relationship between undergraduate students’ digital literacy and self-regulation in online interaction (student-content, student-teacher, student-student). Investigating this relationship can facilitate identifying areas for improvement of support programmes and provide insights for effective online teaching and learning practices. The researchers collected data from 195 undergraduate students during the Covid-19 pandemic. Canonical correlation results indicated a significant and positive correlation (Rc = .41), meaning that having a positive attitude and high technical knowledge and skills regarding digital technologies can help students manage online teacher, peer, and content interactions. Moreover, the study identified that the digital literacy scale’s technical variable contributes to the correlation more than the attitude variable. This result implies that developing technical knowledge and skills might be more critical to promoting self-regulation in online interaction. Based on these results, the implications for online education and recommendations for supporting self-regulation in student interactions are discussed. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Innovations in Education & Teaching International is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

16.
Behav Sci (Basel) ; 12(8)2022 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997521

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 related restrictions resulted in a significant lifestyle change for many young adults in the United States. Although boredom and emotional self-regulation are clearly connected in empirical research, the question remains of what this association looks like in unique circumstances, such as early in COVID-19 pandemic at the height of restrictions. The purpose of the current study is to identify the association between boredom proneness and emotion regulation in college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. College students who completed a Boredom Coping Survey between October and December 2019 (n = 481) were recruited for a follow-up COVID-19 Boredom Survey in April 2020. Data from this sub-sample (n = 58) were used in a hierarchical regression predicting the role of boredom proneness on COVID-19 pandemic emotion regulation difficulties while controlling for age, sex, and COVID-19 related lifestyle changes. Findings indicated higher levels of emotion regulation difficulties were associated with higher levels of boredom proneness above and beyond demographic variables and COVID-19 lifestyle changes. Results are in line with prior theory and research on the importance of the environment or situational factors to the experience of boredom.

17.
J Consum Policy (Dordr) ; 45(3): 411-433, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982209

ABSTRACT

Borrower hardship, while a critical issue, is not often addressed by consumer protection frameworks across the Asia-Pacific. The widespread use of payment holidays during the COVID-19 crisis provides a significant case study on the importance of having borrower hardship provisions as a consumer protection tool. This paper compares the pre-pandemic availability of payment holidays in three Asia-Pacific jurisdictions: Australia, Singapore, and Hong Kong. It evaluates their existing legislative frameworks, as well as regulatory and industry guidelines on borrower hardship, and contrasts this with their use of payment holidays during the pandemic. Where there were existing industry guidelines on borrower hardship, lenders were able to spearhead an industry-wide approach towards payment relief without regulatory intervention by governments. Beyond the pandemic, the paper argues that self-regulation has potential for protecting borrower interests by standardising the scope of, and the procedure for, obtaining hardship relief. It argues that there is a need for a greater prevalence of industry codes of conducts governing lenders' approach towards borrower hardship across the Asia-Pacific.

18.
Physical Review Physics Education Research ; 18(2):26, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1978309

ABSTRACT

The 2020???2021 academic year was a unique time for many instructors who had to adapt their courses to be conducted remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This was especially challenging for physics lab courses, which usually emphasize hands-on experiments. Although many courses have now returned to in-person teaching, the possibility remains of future disasters necessitating similar remote courses. It is important to understand how undergraduate students experienced remote physics lab courses during the pandemic, including what aspects of the courses contributed to positive student outcomes. To investigate this, we surveyed over 5000 students from 24 different institutions, asking how the students engaged with their physics lab courses during the 2020???2021 academic year. Here, we describe the frequency with which the students performed various class activities, aspects of the course environment, challenges the students faced, aspects of the courses the students found enjoyable, and some student outcomes. We further study the impact of the course activities and course environment on four of the outcomes (self-reported learning of lab skills, self-reported learning of concepts, course enjoyment, and development of a sense of community). We find that students who were provided clear expectations, had enough time for their coursework, frequently worked in groups, and frequently had access to guidance from their instructors were more likely to report positive outcomes. This work demonstrates the importance of certain aspects of lab courses for several desirable outcomes in remote lab courses during a pandemic, with findings that may transfer to in-person or remote lab courses in the future.

19.
Moderna Sprak ; 116(1):47-66, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1976237

ABSTRACT

Since new learning environments are believed to affect student motivation and cognition, and thus, have a huge impact on the processes underlying self-regulated learning, the transition to online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have challenged students' ability to remain in charge of the learning process. Distance language learners could be particularly challenged by profusion of material, cognitive overload or unsettled participation patterns. Based on introspective data obtained from a representative sample of 321 university students majoring in various foreign languages, the present study aims to compare participants' self-regulation in standard and online education and identify problem areas which demand action. At the same time, it seeks to respond to earlier calls for providing teachers with insights into students' changing self-regulation routines and the processes underlying these changes. Data analysis clearly indicates that participants' self-regulation (SR) has significantly deteriorated due to the shift from standard to online learning with respect to all the investigated SR areas. Also, while the investigated students reported a relatively high level of SR in the planning stage, their dramatically low level of reflection over the learning process could be seen as an impediment to a smooth transition from standard to distance learning.

20.
Front Psychol ; 13: 857709, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952628

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused colleges and universities to rely heavily on online learning to continue knowledge dissemination to learners. This study used the second-generation model of unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) to comprehensively analyze the mediating effects of self-efficacy, which affects learners' effective use of online tools for learning, and capability of metacognition and self-regulation, which can independently adjust learning progress into the UTAUT2 model, on the learner's willingness to continue online learning [i.e., their behavioral intention (BI)] by constructing a UTAUT2-based e-learning model. This study administered questionnaires to undergraduates in universities in East China to collect data. The effects of performance expectancy, effort expectancy (EE), social influence (SI), and facilitating conditions (FCs), hedonic motivation (HM), price value (PV), and habits on BI (directly or through mediators) were analyzed through data analysis and structural equation modeling, and the UTAUT2-based e-learning model was accordingly modified. The results indicated that the self-efficacy enhanced the effects of EE, SI, FCs, HM, and PV on learners' BI; that metacognition and self-regulation (MS) capabilities enhanced the effects of EE on learners' BI; and that habits had a direct and strong effect on BI. This study also provided some suggestions to enhance higher education learners' willingness to continue online learning, such as improving social recognition and support, careful design of teaching content, easy-to-use technology, financial support. These results and suggestions may guide colleges and universities in conducting, continuing, or enhancing online education, particularly as the pandemic continues.

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