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1.
Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis ; 82, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2170098

ABSTRACT

Somnambulism, commonly known as sleepwalking, affects only 3% of the adult population. It is a parasomnia associated with the NREM phase characterized by incomplete awakening during sleep, with simple or complex behaviors with simultaneous full or partial amnesia of nocturnal experiences. Based on self-report and statistical analysis in SPSS of the results from the questionnaires, we investigated the effects of evening chronotype, COVID‑19 pandemic (SARS-CoV-2) and sleep disorders on the occurrence and frequency of sleepwalking episodes in adults. No significant statistical differences were found between the incidence and frequency of sleepwalking episodes and the mentioned factors. However, this does not exclude their influence. The conducted study is a good start for a rarely studied group of adult sleepwalkers. Future work should focus on increasing the study group and expanding the research methodology

2.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Negative Results ; 13:5568-5597, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2206746

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has seriously influenced all over the world and affectedthe health of people. In COVID-19 patients, physiological disorders develop like stress, anxiety, and insomnia. This study aimed to investigate sleep quality in COVID-19hospitalized patients of Muzaffarabad, Azad Jammu, and Kashmir. Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure sleep quality. PSQI was a self-rated questionnaire scale that contained seven components generated by the combination of 19 individual items. The components included were subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance, use of sleep medication and, daytime dysfunction. All components score from "0" to "3". The score "0" indicates no problem and the sum of the score 3 indicates severe difficulty. The seven components score was added to yield one global score. A score of 0 to 5 indicated no sleep disturbance and a score of more than 5 indicated sleep disturbance. The mean global score was 8.88+/-4.716 (Mean+/-SD). Current research revealed that 72.2% (n=73) ofpatients who had a global score of 5 or more than 5 had poor sleep quality and 27.8% (n=31) who had a score of less than 5 had good sleep quality (n=31) 13 male patients hada good quality of sleep and 36 male patients experienced a bad quality of sleep. In females, 18 female patients had a good quality of sleep and 37 female patients had a bad quality of sleep current study revealed that there was no association between gender and global PSQI, so sleep quality is independent of gender (chi2 =6.497, P =0.090, df = 3). Thisstudy also showed association between PSQI global score and age group. The 1st age group 15-32 year had a total of 48 patients. The study revealed that 54.16% (n=26) patients had bad sleep quality and 45.83% (n=22) patients had good sleep quality. The second age group from 33 to 55 years in which 76% (n=19) patients had bad sleep quality and 24% (n=06) patients had good sleep quality (r=0.342, P=0.001, df=6) showed that there is high relationship difference between increase group and sleep quality which showed that increase in age group, sleep quality become bad. The 3rd age group was over. Copyright © 2022 Authors. All rights reserved.

3.
Frontiers in Neurology ; 13 (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2199047
4.
Trials ; 23(1) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2196412

ABSTRACT

Background: Insomnia and poor sleep quality are highly prevalent conditions related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complications among clinical nurses. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a first-line treatment, CBT-I suffers from several major drawbacks. This study investigates whether the application of the internet-delivered mindfulness-based stress reduction (iMBSR) intervention will produce effects that are non-inferior to the internet-delivered CBT-I (iCBT-I) intervention in reducing the severity of insomnia in clinical nurses with insomnia at the end of the study. Method(s): This study protocol presents an internet-delivered, parallel-groups, assessor-blinded, two-arm, non-inferiority randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome is sleep quality, assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index. Secondary outcomes include depression, dysfunctional beliefs, five facets of mindfulness, and client satisfaction. Conclusion(s): It is expected that this study may address several gaps in the literature. The non-inferiority study design is a novel approach to evaluating whether a standardized, complementary treatment (i.e., MBSR) is as practical as a gold standard treatment rather than its potential benefits. This approach may lead to expanded evidence-based practice and improve patient access to effective treatments. Trial registration: Trial registration number: ISRCTN36198096. Registered on 24th May 2022. Copyright © 2022, The Author(s).

5.
Bmc Nursing ; 21(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2196248

ABSTRACT

BackgroundNurse managers play a pivotal role in quality patient care and staff satisfaction and retention. An overwhelming amount of work tasks and responsibilities might result in their sleep problems which are expected to aggravate in the context of the COVID-19, thereby affecting their overall health and work quality. However, little attention has been paid to sleep quality among nurse managers. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sleep disorders among nurse managers and identify related factors of sleep quality during regular prevention and control of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. MethodsThis cross-sectional online survey was conducted in 14 hospitals on a sample of 327 nurse managers in China. Participants were invited to complete the general demographic questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore the influencing factors of sleep quality among nurse managers. ResultsIn this study, 43.7% of nurse managers suffered from sleep disorders. Active coping style and frequent exercise were positive factors that could influence nurse managers' sleep quality, while passive coping style and age over 41 years old were negative predictors, collectively accounting for 52.0% of the variance of sleep quality. ConclusionsThe issue of sleep disorders among nurse managers during regular epidemic prevention and control period is underscored. Coping style and demographic factors including age and frequency of exercise can significantly affect nurse managers' sleep quality. Healthcare administrators should pay more attention to nurse managers' sleep disorders and implement targeted strategies based on influencing factors to ensure their sleep quality.

6.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 878356, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142278

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Motivated by challenges faced in outpatient sleep services for mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders (MHNDD) during the COVID-19 clinical shutdown, a pan-Canadian/international working group of clinicians and social scientists developed a concept for capturing challenging sleep and wake behaviours already at the referral stage in the community setting. Methods: In a quality improvement/quality assurance (QIQA) project, a visual logic model was the framework for identifying the multiple causes and possible interventions for sleep disturbances. Intake forms informed clinicians about situational experiences, goals/concerns, in addition to the questions from the Sleep Disturbances Scale for Children (SDSC), the ADHD Rating Scale-IV and medication history. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample. Results: 66% of the pilot study patients (n = 41) scored in the SDSC red domains (highest scoring) with highest sub-scores for insomnia (falling asleep 73%; staying asleep: 51%) and daytime somnolence (27%). A total of 90% of patients were taking at least one medication; 59% sleep initiation/sleep medications, 41% in combination with further non-stimulant medications, 9% with stimulants, 27% with antidepressants and 18% with antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was observed in 62% of all patients and in 73% of the ones medicated for sleep disturbances. Qualitative information supported individualisation of assessments. Conclusion: Our intake process enabled a comprehensive understanding of patients' sleep and wake profiles prior to assessment, at the referral stage. The high prevalence of insomnia in patients, combined with polypharmacy, requires special attention in the triaging process at the community level.

7.
Front Psychol ; 13: 1022966, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099236

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore how a stringent campus lockdown affects the physical activity (PA), sleep and mental health of Chinese university students living in student dormitories during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Data on PA, sleep and mental health were collected between 24 March and 4 April 2022 from 2084 university students (mean age = 22.4 years, 61.1% male students) via an online questionnaire distributed by the students' advisers of each dormitory. The Chinese short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-C), Athens Insomnia Scale (CAIS) and General Health Questionnaire 12-item (GHQ-12) were applied. The Mann-Whitney test and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to evaluate the PA profile differences between genders, before and during the lockdown period and between students' living environments. Chi-squared (χ2) or Fisher's exact test was used to assess changes in health behaviors by gender and students' living environment compared to before the lockdown. A mediation model was used to examine whether sleep disorder mediated the relationship between PA and mental health in different students' living environments. Results: Participants reported a significant decrease in weekly total PA levels (63.9%). Mean daily sedentary time increased by 21.4% and daily lying time increased by 10.7% compared to before lockdown. Among the participants, 21.2% had experienced insomnia, and 39.0% reported having high mental distress. Female students reported 10% higher rates of sleep disorders than male students (p < 0.001), and also experienced a higher incidence of mental disorders (p < 0.001). Students living with three roommates had a larger decrease in frequencies and durations of participation in light PA than other students (p < 0.001). PA was negatively associated with sleep and mental health, and sleep disorder was a mediating factor between PA and mental health in the students living with two and three roommates. Conclusion: This study showed that strict lockdowns within university dormitories during the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect on the health of university students by changing their health behaviors, physical activity and sleep. Our findings indicate a need for strategies to promote an active lifestyle for students in space-limited dormitories in order to maintain health during a prolonged lockdown.

8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep is a complex, reversible process that is responsible for the modulation of various physiological mechanisms. COVID-19-related sleep disorders are affecting different populations with a heterogenous prevalence, yet high rates among infected patients are frequently reported. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of insomnia in the early post-COVID-19 recovery period and explore the differences in the results acquired by the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) by gender and selected infection severity parameters. METHODS: The data presented in the paper come from a prospective, observational study on COVID-19 complications (SILCOV-19) consisting of 200 COVID-19 patients. The AIS was used for the quantitative measurement of insomnia symptoms based on ICD-10 criteria. RESULTS: 32% (n = 64) of all patients in the study group obtained results indicating sleep disturbances (>5 points on the scale), while 21.5% (n = 43) obtained results indicating insomnia (>10 points on the scale). The analysis of the results obtained by all patients in the AIS showed a significant correlation with the duration of symptoms (Spearman's rank-order: R = 0.18; p < 0.05), but not with the number of days spent in the hospital or age. Women achieved a higher score in overall AIS, as well as in questions assessing total sleep time, well-being the next day, physical and mental fitness the next day, and sleepiness during the day (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of insomnia in the early post-COVID-19 recovery period is high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Female , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
9.
Music and Medicine ; 14(1):54-61, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2084163

ABSTRACT

Sleep is essential to human survival, yet issues with getting restful, consistent sleep are a common problem. One in three adults do not reach the recommended amount of sleep often leading to a myriad of issues, from physical illness to mental and cognitive disorders, poor work attendance, and frequent disruptions in daily life. Traumatic experiences that occur early in life can have lifelong health implications, including sleep disorders and insufficient sleep. With the advent of COVID-19, people in the United States and across the world were forced to quarantine, thereby disturbing previously established patterns of behavior, daily engagement with others, and regulated sleeping habits. Being able to rejuvenate the physical, emotional, and mental state through sleep became more important yet also more difficult amidst the stresses of the pandemic. Healthcare professionals are seeking alternate options for patient treatments relative toward achieving healthy sleeping patterns. Inclusion of music may be a contributing option to this ongoing problem because it is easily accessible and can be personalized to individual tastes. It is cost effective, cost avoidant, and avoids the risk of serious side effects. The focus of this article is to explain how music may impact sleep, and to offer suggestions that optimize sleeping patterns through the conscientious application of music and music therapy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology ; 12(10):1639-1642, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067049

ABSTRACT

Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 232 1st year MBBS students in the age group of 18-23 years.

11.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(10)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066246

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Home confinement due to COVID-19 lockdown led to changes in daily routines, including social interactions, as well as restrictions on the possibility of playing sports and eating habits. These changes could have a greater impact on patients suffering from chronic diseases, such as endocrine patients, especially in emotional and behavioral dimensions. Materials and Methods: This study aimed to assess the effects of COVID-19-induced quarantine on daily habits in a group of patients with endocrine disorders, focusing on food consumption, eating habits and sleep during the confinement. Eighty-five endocrine patients were enrolled. A structured interview was administered to investigate socio-demographic information, general medical conditions, and habits adopted during quarantine. All patients underwent the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1) to assess state anxiety. Result: Results showed that subjects mainly had a sedentary lifestyle. We found a significant increase in the number of cigarettes in smokers and in meals consumed during confinement, as well as a high rate of sleep disturbance, especially insomnia. Notably, physical well-being resulted to be a predictive factor (OR = 0.38; 95%CI = [0.95,0.66]), whereas anxiety was a risk factor for sleep disorder (OR = 1.22; 95%CI = [1.10,1.40]), as was working in public and private offices and being a student. Conclusions: Changes in daily habits were likely due to the alterations in routine, resulting in greater boredom and inactivity during the day. In addition, future research should focus on the importance of patient adherence to therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Life Style , Surveys and Questionnaires , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
13.
J Sleep Res ; : e13752, 2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063867

ABSTRACT

Insomnia is the most frequent sleep disorder and a public health concern that increased during the Covid 19 pandemic. Fully restrictive lockdowns during Covid are interesting periods to examine the impact of environmental and behavioural changes on the emergence of insomnia symptoms. In this cross-sectional study we aimed to (1) determine the main factors associated with insomnia symptoms during a Covid-19 fully restrictive lockdown examining the associated daily life alterations and (2) create a predictive model of insomnia symptoms. We used the data drawn from the "Covid-RythmE" study that reached volunteers from the general French population through an online survey during the last 2 weeks of the 2 month full lockdown. Associations with insomnia symptoms were tested and significant associations were entered in a Backward Stepwise Logistic Regression (BSLR) to assess the best combination to classify individuals with or without insomnia symptoms. From the 1624 participants, 50.64% suffered from mild to severe insomnia symptoms as assessed by the ISI. The best combination for explaining insomnia symptoms with 74.26% of accuracy included: age (OR = 1.15), females (OR = 1.26), smaller home sizes (OR = 0.77), environmental noises (OR = 1.59), anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.24), depressive symptoms (OR = 1.15), regularity of sleep-wake schedules (OR = 1.25), exposure to screen during the morning (OR = 1.13), and LED light during the evening (OR = 1.17). Thus, lifestyle schedule and exposure to natural synchronizers such as light, are primordial in considering in insomnia physiopathology, prevention and treatment, as well as the associated mental health status.

14.
Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine ; 29(3):375-382, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056911

ABSTRACT

Introduction and objective: From March 2022, China has been in the rapid progressing stage of the Omicron outbreak. However, the mental status of clinical nurses against infection by the Omicron variant of COVID-19 has been not explored. Therefore, a nationwide online investigation with a larger sample size was conducted to explore the mental status of Chinese frontline clinical nurses, and its influencing factors using sound validated and reliable measurements. Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 1,204 clinical nurses fighting the Omicron outbreak were recruited across various provinces of China. Results: The mean age of the nurses was 30.43 (SD=6.59) years. The majority were female. The rates of these nurses with depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms were 29.2%, 37.2%, 19.1%, and 48.8%, respectively. The variables of department, insomnia, fear with COVID-19, turnover intention, job burnout, work coping style, and public recognition of nursing, were significant factors influencing the mental status of clinical nurses. Conclusions: The Chinese clinical nurses fighting the Omicron variant of COVID-19 had a similar level of depression and anxiety, a higher level of insomnia, and a lower level of stress, in comparison with nurses globally who experienced the initial period of the pandemic. Targeted investigation and interventions are urgently needed for Chinese frontline clinical nurses with high levels of anxiety, depression and insomnia, who fought against infection by Omicron. Much more professional advocacy is strongly recommended during control of the pandemic and recovery to consolidate the role and influence of nurses. The contribution and visibility of nursing should be recognized not only by the medical professionals, but by the public in general.

15.
Neuropsychopharmacol Rep ; 42(3): 315-322, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disruptions in biological rhythm (BR) are considered a factor in the spread of many chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and depression. It has been shown that imbalance in BR disrupts the body's physiological timings; therefore, it is essential to have a tool for BR evaluation. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 403 Jordanian participants (200 depressed people and 203 control groups). Classical test theory (CTT) was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of BRIAN. We aimed to validate the Arabic version of Biological Rhythms Interview Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) by investigating its internal consistency and validity, assessing its factor structure, and exploring its relationships with depression and sleep disorders. RESULTS: The internal consistency (α) was 0.91. The concurrent validity was supported by the severity of depression and sleep disorders (r = 0.87, r = 0.83, p < 0.001). The BRIAN's ability to differentiate between depressed people and the control group supported its discriminant validity (t = 21.2, p = 0.001). With a sensitivity of 75 and a specificity of 95.57, BRIAN revealed good accuracy in distinguishing between depressed and non-depressed persons at cutoff 44. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) analyses supported its proposed three-factor solutions. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that the BRIAN-A has acceptable validity in detecting BR and could be useful in examining the impact of circadian disturbance on the Arabic population.


Subject(s)
Neuropsychiatry , Sleep Wake Disorders , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Periodicity , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
16.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(2):301, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2044734

ABSTRACT

Appendix A Glossary COVID-19 Coronavirus Disease 2019 SARS-CoV-2 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 PRISMA Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses BCG bacillus Calmette-Guérin HAV Hepatitis A OSA obstructive sleep apnea Th T helper CER cardiorespiratory event rate HCWs healthcare workers Nab neutralizing antibody Tfh follicular helper T ASC antibody-secreting cells Ab Antibody HI hemagglutination inhibition PSQI Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index PBMCs Peripheral blood mononuclear cells TNF-α tumor necrosis factor α IL-1β interleukin 1β IFN-γ Interferon gamma Nabs neutralizing antibodies ASCs antibody-secreting cells GH Growth hormone Zhu, N;Zhang, D;Wang, W;Li, X;Yang, B;Song, J;et al.China Novel Coronavirus Investigating and Research Team.A novel coronavirus from patients with pneumonia in China, 2019.. Cell Res. .2021.Nov;;31((11):):1215–7.10.1038/s41422-021-00541-61748-783834341489 Wang, W;Balfe, P;Eyre, DW;Lumley, SF;O’Donnell, D;Warren, F;et al.Time of Day of Vaccination Affects SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Responses in an Observational Study of Health Care Workers.. Occup Environ Med. .2020.Dec;;78((5):):307–14.10.1136/oemed-2020-1067311470-792633298533 Rizza, S;Coppeta, L;Grelli, S;Ferrazza, G;Chiocchi, M;Vanni, G;et al.High body mass index and night shift work are associated with COVID-19 in health care workers.. J Endocrinol Invest. .2021.May;;44((5):):1097–101.10.1007/s40618-020-01397-01720-838632852704 Garbarino, S;Lanteri, P;Bragazzi, NL;Magnavita, N;Scoditti, E.Role of sleep deprivation in immune-related disease risk and outcomes..

17.
Children (Basel) ; 9(9)2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043601

ABSTRACT

Acute SARS-CoV-2 infections in children and adolescents are usually mild. However, they can suffer from ongoing symptoms, generally referred to as long COVID. Sleep disorders are one of the most frequent complaints in long COVID although precise data are missing. We assessed the sleep behavior of children and adolescents who presented at our outpatient clinic between January 2021 and May 2022 with the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ-DE). We compared the sleep behavior at three different time points: pre-COVID-19; post-COVID-19 at the initial presentation; and post-COVID-19 at re-presentation. Data from 45 patients were analyzed. Of those, 64% were female and the median age was 10 years (range: 0-18 years). Asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 disease was experienced in 89% of patients; 11% experienced moderate disease. The initial presentation occurred at a median of 20.4 weeks (6 weeks-14 months) after the infection. The CSHQ-DE score increased significantly from pre-COVID-19 (45.82 ± 8.7 points) to post-COVID-19 (49.40 ± 8.3 points; p ≤ 0.01). The score then normalized at re-presentation (46.98 ± 7.8; p = 0.1). The greatest changes were seen in the CSHQ-DE subscale score "daytime sleepiness". Our data showed that children and adolescents with long COVID often suffer from sleep disturbances. For most children and adolescents, these sleep disorders decreased over time without any further medical intervention aside from a basic sleep consultation.

18.
Qom University of Medical Sciences Journal ; 15(12):790-797, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2040670

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Factors disrupting the quality of sleep in patients with COVID-19 are considered one of the most important issues in the treatment of this disease. In this study, we aim to investigate the factors that disrupt the sleep quality of patients with Covid-19.

19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032969

ABSTRACT

This study assessed the association between emotional distress, sleep changes, decreased frequency of tooth brushing, and self-reported oral ulcers, and the association between COVID-19 status and decreased frequency of tooth brushing. Using a cross-sectional online survey, data were collected from adults in 152 countries between July and December 2020. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the associations between dependent (decreased frequency of tooth brushing, oral ulcers, change in sleep pattern) and independent (tested positive for COVID-19, depression, anxiety, frustration/boredom, loneliness, anger, and grief/feeling of loss) variables after adjusting for confounders (age, sex, level of education, employment status). Of the 14,970 participants data analyzed, 1856 (12.4%) tested positive for COVID-19. Respondents who reported feeling depressed (AoR: 1.375), lonely (AoR: 1.185), angry (AoR: 1.299), and experienced sleep changes (AoR:1.466) had significantly higher odds of decreased tooth brushing frequency. Respondents who felt anxious (AoR: 1.255), angry (AoR: 1.510), grief/sense of loss (AoR: 1.236), and sleep changes (AoR: 1.262) had significantly higher odds of oral ulcers. Respondents who tested positive for COVID-19 had significantly higher odds of decreased tooth brushing frequency (AoR: 1.237) and oral ulcers (AoR: 2.780). These findings highlight that the relationship between emotional distress and oral health may intensify during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral Ulcer , Psychological Distress , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Toothbrushing
20.
Meditsinskiy Sovet ; 2022(14):193-199, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026184

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The COVID-19 pandemic has become a global health problem worldwide. The consequences of the new coronavirus infection continue to be studied. Cardiovascular symptoms and sleep disorders are among the dominant complaints in post-COVID-19 syndrome in women. Aim. To assess sleep disorders, cardiovascular symptoms, body weight dynamics and their statistical relationships in women with post-COVID-19 syndrome. Materials and methods. Using a voluntary anonymous questionnaire, we assessed cardiovascular symptoms, body weight dynamics and sleep disorders in 253 women of different age groups who had COVID-19 at least 12 weeks ago. The severity of dyspnea was assessed using the mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council) scale. Resting heart rate was measured. Statistical processing of the obtained data was carried out using the StatPlus 2009 Professional program. Results and discussion. Among the manifestations of the cardiovascular system in post-COVID-19 syndrome in women of different age groups, palpitations, shortness of breath, and increased blood pressure predominate. There is a statistical pattern in the increased prevalence of rises in blood pressure in post-COVID-19 syndrome among women, depending on age. A variety of sleep disorders occur in all age groups of women, most often in the group of older women. Statistical relationships between sleep disorders and increased blood pressure, severity of dyspnea, palpitations in post-COVID-19 syndrome in women of different age groups were revealed. Severe dyspnea in post-COVID-19 syndrome was frequent noticed in older women. Weight loss in women with post-COVID-19 syndrome is associated with sleep disorders. Conclusions. Cardiovascular symptoms and sleep disorders in post-COVID-19 syndrome in women of different age groups are closely interrelated. The management of patients in post-COVID-19 syndrome should be carried out taking into account the diver-sity and interaction of various clinical manifestations. Correction of the identified violations should be comprehensive, based on an interdisciplinary approach of various specialists. © 2022, Remedium Group Ltd. All rights reserved.

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