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1.
Am Surg ; : 31348211031848, 2021 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244398

ABSTRACT

Virtual residency interviews during COVID-19 pandemic created a need for residency programs to use social media to increase their visibility and connect with potential applicants. This was, however, new and a road never travelled for many programs. This report describes how our General Surgery Residency Program increased its presence through social media by using various exposure methods and approaches, including diversifying presence and developing candid personalized content. Results suggest that these methods have increased our exposure and reach from an average of 7 people per post to posts reaching over 4500 people. Moreover, the video posts introducing our residents and faculty provided the highest activity and reach. Thus, appropriate use of social media with described interventions and new content creation could exponentially increase the visibility of a residency program. Moreover, educating faculty and residents on the use and importance of social media could increase their interest and participation as well.

2.
Polit Behav ; : 1-24, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235254

ABSTRACT

Numerous studies find associations between social media use and beliefs in conspiracy theories and misinformation. While such findings are often interpreted as evidence that social media causally promotes conspiracy beliefs, we theorize that this relationship is conditional on other individual-level predispositions. Across two studies, we examine the relationship between beliefs in conspiracy theories and media use, finding that individuals who get their news from social media and use social media frequently express more beliefs in some types of conspiracy theories and misinformation. However, we also find that these relationships are conditional on conspiracy thinking--the predisposition to interpret salient events as products of conspiracies--such that social media use becomes more strongly associated with conspiracy beliefs as conspiracy thinking intensifies. This pattern, which we observe across many beliefs from two studies, clarifies the relationship between social media use and beliefs in dubious ideas. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s11109-021-09734-6.

3.
Children (Basel) ; 8(2)2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234234

ABSTRACT

Neonatal follow-up has long focused on a model of surveillance and identification of short-term outcomes. This model has long become outdated, with evidence documenting the need for longer follow-up with known school-based challenges and significant gaps in knowledge by educators. This article reviews the history of neonatal follow-up and demonstrates a novel approach to neonatal follow-up, built largely with a hybrid virtual platform, which then became essential with the declaration of the pandemic in 2020.

4.
Information, Communication & Society ; 26(7):1452-1469, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20245149

ABSTRACT

In efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19, many countries have implemented a variety of lockdown and quarantine measures. With substantially reduced face-to-face interactions, many people may have relied heavily on social media for connection, information, and entertainment. However, little is known about the psychological and physical health implications of social media use during strict lockdown. The current study investigates the associations of social media use with psychological well-being and physical health among Wuhan residents (N = 1214). Our findings showed that non-COVID related self-disclosure was positively associated with psychological well-being, while COVID related information consumption and sharing were negatively associated with psychological well-being. Further, more generic use of social media was associated with lower psychological well-being, which in turn related to more somatic symptoms. Quarantined people used social media more frequently than non-quarantined people. Importantly, the negative association between social media use and psychological well-being was significantly stronger for quarantined people than unquarantined people. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Information, Communication & Society is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
Current Issues in Tourism ; 26(12):1974-1990, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20245125

ABSTRACT

This research aims to grasp the evolution of consumer demand and improve the resilience of the hotel industry under the public health crisis (COVID-19). Online reviews of 7,679 hotels in 10 cities were collected from Ctrip, China's major online hotel platform. Then, we applied opinion mining and time evolution to mine the change in consumer demand before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings show that some consumer demands (e.g. epidemic safety) will change during the outbreak period. However, during the nonoutbreak period, users were more concerned about their own check-in experience (e.g. hotel facilities, front desk services). This article provides new ideas for identifying the dynamic value of online reviews. We suggest that businesses focus on ensuring hotel safety during the crisis period. The results contribute essential theoretical and practical significance to the hotel industry's crisis management during public health crises.

6.
SEARCH Journal of Media and Communication Research ; 2023(Special Issue):17-32, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245111

ABSTRACT

While social media has grown in popularity in today's society, and has facilitated the dissemination of accurate and valuable information, it also raises the equally pressing concern of rampant proliferation of rumors and false news. The recent global outbreak of COVID-19 witnessed the explosion of fake and misleading health rumors in social media. Governments are tasked with providing the public with the right information to influence their behavior and engagement in emergency decision-making and optimally address the risks of rumor influence. Therefore, it is important to choose an appropriate response strategy in a rumor-induced health crisis. This study has two main objectives: to identify effective rumor response strategies by the government to stem the spread of rumor during a health crisis, and to examine the role of anxiety in this process using the Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT). Online quasi-experimental data was collected from 245 Chinese participants who were exposed to a false social media rumor that potato chips could spread COVID-19 and were randomly assigned to one of three rumor response strategies (denial, refute or attack). According to the one-way ANOVA results, the effect of the refute response on rumor-related behavior is the most positive, whereas the effects of denial and attack are not significantly different. The results of the mediation model using PROCESS Macro reveal that anxiety partially mediates the relationship between rumor response strategies and rumor-related behaviors (rumor dissemination intentions and behavior intention to consume products);the refute strategy reduces public anxiety and has a positive effect on public behavioral intentions. This study is relevant to COVID-19 rumor research with regard to government rumor response strategies on social media using data-based descriptive and quantitative analysis. © SEARCH Journal 2023.

7.
Societies ; 13(5), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245050

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, digital interactions ceased to be "just another form of communication”;indeed, they became the only means of social interaction, mediated and driven by information and communication technologies (ICTs). Consequently, working in a digital context switched from being a phenomenon to be studied to the primary means of socializing and the primary workspace for researchers. This study explores four different methodologies to question how discursive interactions related to power and newsworthiness may be addressed in digital contexts. The multimodal approach was reviewed through the affordances of critical discourse analysis, issue ownership and salience, morphological discourse analysis, and protest event analysis. It starts by theoretically addressing concepts of multimodality and phenomenology by focusing on the implications of both perspectives. It examines publications and interactions in digital contexts in Ecuador from March 2017 to December 2020 within three political phenomena. The results of the analysis of these publications and interactions suggest that when analyzing political participation and newsworthiness, the virtual becomes a subjective space. Moreover, qualitative research is one of the primary ways to combine multimodality with other forms of discourse analysis. This paper concludes that perceptions, practices, and meanings assigned to social online representations can be better analyzed through multimodality, which tackles the intertwined characteristics of virtual discourses. © 2023 by the authors.

8.
Educational Practice and Theory ; 45(1):101-117, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244949

ABSTRACT

This research study provides a case study of how the COVID-19 pandemic affected Japanese university students' views and attitudes on international topics and motivations for living and working abroad. During the pandemic, digital information, including social media, played a promi-nent role in how these students interacted and kept up with the news. We surveyed 204 students at a private university in Tokyo to help under-stand how the landscape of internationalization changed during the unique circumstances brought about by the pandemic. © 2023 James Nicholas Publishers.

9.
Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology ; 30(8):e183-e190, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244859

ABSTRACT

In the early occurrence of the Covid-19 pandemic, Indonesian and the world regarded Bali having a unique mechanism. Balinese or Bali residents are assumed excellently immune or difficulty infected from Covid-19. Interestingly, Balinese do not show overwhelmed panic as occurs in other areas although the Covid-19 cases in Bali are not low. There are various reasons why Balinese's actions to protect their health consider beliefs, religion, and culture. This paper is a survey of the Balinese's distinctive perception and behavior to face Covid-19. The information was gained from comments, opinions, and information about typical behavior posted on mass media and social media. The main source of the information was the WhatsApp groups of Banjar community (60 people), Bali academicians (76 people), Hindu organization alumni (113 people), and Bali medical staff (30 people). This study collected the information and conversations during early months of the pandemic in 2020 and 2021 when the Covid-19 cases skyrocketed and the government implemented the Community Activities Restrictions Enforcement (PPKM). This study concludes that the belief in the power of nature makes the sincerity and acceptance more easily appear. Moreover, tradition strengthens the trust. Support in social life also increases cooperative actions to the rules or advices of the Bali government and the custom village assembly to protect society from the pandemic.Copyright © 2021 Muslim OT et al.

10.
ACM Web Conference 2023 - Proceedings of the World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2023 ; : 3968-3977, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244828

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused substantial damage to global health. Even though three years have passed, the world continues to struggle with the virus. Concerns are growing about the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of infected individuals, who are more likely to experience depression, which can have long-lasting consequences for both the affected individuals and the world. Detection and intervention at an early stage can reduce the risk of depression in COVID-19 patients. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between COVID-19 infection and depression through social media analysis. Firstly, we managed a dataset of COVID-19 patients that contains information about their social media activity both before and after infection. Secondly, We conducted an extensive analysis of this dataset to investigate the characteristic of COVID-19 patients with a higher risk of depression. Thirdly, we proposed a deep neural network for early prediction of depression risk. This model considers daily mood swings as a psychiatric signal and incorporates textual and emotional characteristics via knowledge distillation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed framework outperforms baselines in detecting depression risk, with an AUROC of 0.9317 and an AUPRC of 0.8116. Our model has the potential to enable public health organizations to initiate prompt intervention with high-risk patients. © 2023 ACM.

11.
Science Insights Education Frontiers ; 15(1):2227-2245, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244580

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 mutates, the highly infectious omicron mutants (BA. 5.2., BF. 7) tension shrouded China. Given the internet information explosion and youth social media addiction, observing the mental impact on college students during the 2022 Shanghai closure is worthwhile. A pilot survey study was conducted to explore the anxiety levels of college students during the closure. The sample size was limited to 101 second-year college students. In addition to demographics, the survey involved the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, self-perceived COVID-19 anxiety, frequency of COVID-19 information reception, number of social media accounts, and number of electronic devices. Though 68.4% of students equipped with two electronic devices (N = 95) exceeded the students with only one electronic device, a Chi-square test showed that students with only one electronic device had the highest anxiety index (mean = 50). Further, the Kruskal-Wallis test indicated that the number of electronic devices affected the students' anxiety level (p = 0.027) while social media membership did not (p = 0.565). As a result, it was suggested that social media usage and pandemic information inputs among college students were significant concerns that required special attention from the government, schools, teachers, and families.

12.
Journal of Information Technology & Politics ; 20(3):250-268, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20244472

ABSTRACT

Social media platforms such as Twitter provide opportunities for governments to connect to foreign publics and influence global public opinion. In the current study, we used social and semantic network analysis to investigate China's digital public diplomacy campaign during COVID-19. Our results show that Chinese state-affiliated media and diplomatic accounts created hashtag frames and targeted stakeholders to challenge the United States or to cooperate with other countries and international organizations, especially the World Health Organization. Telling China's stories was the central theme of the digital campaign. From the perspective of social media platform affordance, we addressed the lack of attention paid to hashtag framing and stakeholder targeting in the public diplomacy literature. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Information Technology & Politics is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
Academic Journal of Naval Medical University ; 43(11):1264-1267, 2022.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244461

ABSTRACT

Objective To explore the effect of WeChat group management on blood pressure control rate and drug compliance of hypertension patients during the epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) . Methods A total of 428 consecutive patients with essential hypertension in our outpatient department from Jan. 2020 to Dec. 2020 were enrolled and randomly divided into experimental group and control group with a ratio of 1 : 1. There were 214 patients in the experimental group, 110 males and 104 females, with an average age of (55.48+/-6.11) years. There were 214 cases in the control group, 108 males and 106 females, with an average age of (56.52+/-5.19) years. WeChat groups were established for the 2 groups separately. Information on education, supervised medication and lifestyle of hypertension was provided to the patients in the experimental group through WeChat, while no active intervention was given to the control group. The blood pressure control rate and medication possession ratio (MPR) were calculated at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of intervention, and the differences between the 2 groups were compared. Results There were no significant differences in the blood pressure control rate (91.12%195/214 vs 90.65% 194/214, 86.67%182/210vs 89.62%190/212or MPR (0.90+/-0.03 vs 0.90+/-0.05, 0.85+/-0.04 vs 0.88+/-0.03) between the 2 groups at 1 or 3 months of intervention (all P>0.05). At 6 and 12 months, the blood pressure control rate (81.73%170/208vs 88.57%186/210,75.12%154/205vs 85.99%178/207) and MPR (0.74+/-0.04 vs 0.87+/-0.05, 0.58+/-0.05 vs 0.85+/-0.03) of patients in the experimental group were significantly higher than those in the control group (all P<0.05). Conclusion During the COVID-19 epidemic, WeChat group management of hypertension patients by doctors could improve patients' blood pressure control rate and drug compliance and strengthen patients' self-management ability.Copyright © 2022, Second Military Medical University Press. All rights reserved.

14.
2022 IEEE 14th International Conference on Humanoid, Nanotechnology, Information Technology, Communication and Control, Environment, and Management, HNICEM 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244294

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has given people much free time. With this, the researchers want to encourage these people to read instead of scrolling through social media. A barrier to reading for many people is not knowing what to read and disinterest in popular books that they would find when they search online. The existing websites that encourage book reading rely on social networking for their recommendations, while the collaborative filtering algorithms applied to books do not exist in the mobile application form. Readwell is a book recommender Android app with a Point-of-Sales System created using Java, Python, and SQLite databases. The information regarding the books was web scraped from the Goodreads website. It aims to apply the more efficient collaborative filtering algorithm to an accessible mobile application that allows users to directly buy the books they are interested in, thus encouraging the reading and buying of books. The researchers created unit test cases to validate the different functionalities of the application. © 2022 IEEE.

15.
2023 9th International Conference on eDemocracy and eGovernment, ICEDEG 2023 ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244243

ABSTRACT

Messaging platforms like WhatsApp are some of the largest contributors to the spread of Covid-19 health misinformation but they also play a critical role in disseminating credible information and reaching populations at scale. This study explores the relationships between verification behaviours and intention to share information to users that report high trust in their personal network and users that report high trust in authoritative sources. The study was conducted as a survey delivered through WhatsApp to users of the WHO HealthAlert chatbot service. An adapted theoretical model from news verification behaviours was used to determine the correlation between the constructs. Due to an excellent response, 5477 usable responses were obtained, so the adapted research model could be tested by means of a Structural Equation Model (SEM) using the partial least squares algorithm on SmartPLS4. The findings suggest significant correlations between the constructs and suggest that participants that have reported high levels of trust in authoritative sources are less likely to share information due to their increased behaviours to verify information. © 2023 IEEE.

16.
Orthopadie (Heidelb) ; 52(7): 539-546, 2023 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240037

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The classic paradigm of "learning on the patient in the operating room" is more and more in conflict with the growing requirements of cost-efficient work and patient safety. With the technology available today for simulator systems, the accessibility of digital tools and the development of a metaverse as a digital meeting place result in various application scenarios and alternatives to classic orthopedic training. SIMULATORS: First VR-desktop simulations in orthopedics and traumatology were developed more than 20 years ago. VR-desktop simulators consist of a computer with a video screen and a joint model. Different instruments can be paired with this system and allow haptic feedback. With innovative software, numerous training programs can be selected, and the user receives precise feedback on their performance. Immersive VR simulators have also played an increasingly important role in recent years. OTHER DIGITAL TOOLS: The use of digital media such as audio and video podcasts as learning and information sources increased in the context of COVID-19. There is also an increasing number of orthopedic and trauma surgery topics on social media platforms. In all fields, however, there is a risk of the spread of misinformation. A quality standard must be maintained. EFFECTIVENESS AND UTILITY OF THE TRAINING: In order to evaluate simulators and their value as a training tool, it is important to comply with various validity criteria. Transfer validity plays an essential role for clinical application. Various studies demonstrate that the skills learned on simulators can also be successfully transferred to real clinical scenarios. DISCUSSION: A lack of availability, costs and high effort are limitations of classic training methods. In contrast, there are versatile use cases of VR-based simulations that are individually adapted to the trainees and cannot endanger patients. The still high acquisition costs, technical obstacles and the not yet widespread availability are limiting factors. The metaverse still offers unimaginable possibilities today to transfer VR-based applications to experimental learning methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Internet , User-Computer Interface , Clinical Competence , COVID-19/epidemiology
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e44356, 2023 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital misinformation, primarily on social media, has led to harmful and costly beliefs in the general population. Notably, these beliefs have resulted in public health crises to the detriment of governments worldwide and their citizens. However, public health officials need access to a comprehensive system capable of mining and analyzing large volumes of social media data in real time. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to design and develop a big data pipeline and ecosystem (UbiLab Misinformation Analysis System [U-MAS]) to identify and analyze false or misleading information disseminated via social media on a certain topic or set of related topics. METHODS: U-MAS is a platform-independent ecosystem developed in Python that leverages the Twitter V2 application programming interface and the Elastic Stack. The U-MAS expert system has 5 major components: data extraction framework, latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) topic model, sentiment analyzer, misinformation classification model, and Elastic Cloud deployment (indexing of data and visualizations). The data extraction framework queries the data through the Twitter V2 application programming interface, with queries identified by public health experts. The LDA topic model, sentiment analyzer, and misinformation classification model are independently trained using a small, expert-validated subset of the extracted data. These models are then incorporated into U-MAS to analyze and classify the remaining data. Finally, the analyzed data are loaded into an index in the Elastic Cloud deployment and can then be presented on dashboards with advanced visualizations and analytics pertinent to infodemiology and infoveillance analysis. RESULTS: U-MAS performed efficiently and accurately. Independent investigators have successfully used the system to extract significant insights into a fluoride-related health misinformation use case (2016 to 2021). The system is currently used for a vaccine hesitancy use case (2007 to 2022) and a heat wave-related illnesses use case (2011 to 2022). Each component in the system for the fluoride misinformation use case performed as expected. The data extraction framework handles large amounts of data within short periods. The LDA topic models achieved relatively high coherence values (0.54), and the predicted topics were accurate and befitting to the data. The sentiment analyzer performed at a correlation coefficient of 0.72 but could be improved in further iterations. The misinformation classifier attained a satisfactory correlation coefficient of 0.82 against expert-validated data. Moreover, the output dashboard and analytics hosted on the Elastic Cloud deployment are intuitive for researchers without a technical background and comprehensive in their visualization and analytics capabilities. In fact, the investigators of the fluoride misinformation use case have successfully used the system to extract interesting and important insights into public health, which have been published separately. CONCLUSIONS: The novel U-MAS pipeline has the potential to detect and analyze misleading information related to a particular topic or set of related topics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Big Data , Artificial Intelligence , Ecosystem , Fluorides , Communication
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239567

ABSTRACT

Loneliness has been linked to morbidity and mortality across the lifespan. Social media could reduce loneliness, though research on the relation between social media and loneliness has been inconclusive. This study used person-centered analyses to elucidate the inconsistencies in the literature and examine the possible role technology barriers played in the relation between social media use and loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (n = 929; M age = 57.58 ± 17.33) responded to a series of online questions covering demographics, loneliness, technology barriers, and social media use (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.) across a range of devices (e.g., computer, smartphone, etc.). A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify distinct profiles of social media use, loneliness patterns, and age. Results yielded five distinct profiles characterized that showed no systematic associations among age, social media use, and loneliness. Demographic characteristics and technology barriers also differed between profiles and were associated with loneliness. In conclusion, person-centered analyses demonstrated distinct groups of older and younger adults that differed on social media use and loneliness and may offer more fruitful insights over variable-centered approaches (e.g., regression/correlation). Technology barriers may be a viable target for reducing loneliness in adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness , Pandemics , Fruit , Social Isolation
19.
Jamba ; 15(1): 1416, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239208

ABSTRACT

During coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the term 'infodemic' was used to depict the abundance of information about COVID-19 on social media that may overwhelm users, as well as misinformation about the virus because of the lack of authentication of information posted on social media. Both the World Health Organization and United Nations have warned that infodemics can become a severe threat to health care if misinformation on social media is not addressed in a timely manner. The objective of this study was to develop a conceptual framework that can be used to mitigate misinformation about the COVID-19 infodemic on social media. A structured literature review of purposively sampled scholarly publications from academic databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria chosen were scholarly papers that investigated infodemics on social media during the COVID-19 pandemic in the past 4 years, which were analysed using thematic and content analysis. The conceptual framework used Activity Theory as the theoretical foundation. The framework identifies a set of strategies and activities for both social media platforms and users to mitigate misinformation on social media during a pandemic. This study, therefore, recommends that stakeholders utilise the developed framework on social media to reduce the spread of misinformation. Contribution: Based on the literature review, there are negative health outcomes during a social media infodemic because of the spread of misinformation on social media. The study concluded that by implementing a set of strategies and activities identified through the framework, health information can be managed on social media to improve health outcomes.

20.
J Technol Behav Sci ; : 1-11, 2023 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239175

ABSTRACT

Objective: The closure of schools and other educational institutes around the world has been one of the consequences of the COVID-19 and has resulted in online teaching. To facilitate online teaching, there has been an increase in the use of smartphones and tablets among adolescents. However, such enhancement in technology use may put many adolescents at the risk of problematic use of social media. Consequently, the present study explored the direct relationship of psychological distress with social media addiction. The relationship between the two was also assessed indirectly via the fear of missing out (FoMO) and boredom proneness. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 505 Indian adolescents aged 12 to 17 years, studying in grades 7 to 12. Standardized tools (with some modifications to suit the context of the present study) were used to collect data. Results: The results showed significant positive associations between psychological distress, social media addiction, FoMO, and boredom proneness. Psychological distress was found to be a significant predictor of social media addiction. Moreover, FoMO and boredom proneness partially mediated the relationships between psychological distress and social media addiction. Discussion: The present study is the first to provide evidence for the specific pathways of FoMO and boredom proneness in the relationships between psychological distress and social media addiction.

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