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1.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 84(2-B):No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2169547

ABSTRACT

The present study is a mixed-method analysis on the effects of COVID-19 on families of low socio-economic status (SES) in regards to the challenges they are facing as well as their ability to meet their family needs. Participants were families that qualified for participation in the Success Program (SP) based on their financial situation who completed a post-program survey in 2019 (N=217) and another survey about COVID-19 in 2020 (N= 230-508, depending on the analysis). Results suggest that the major challenge families in the program experienced during the pandemic was remote learning, followed by isolation, and various financial concerns. Furthermore, participants reported their major changes in employment due to COVID-19 to be relating a loss of a job and receiving a pay cut or a reduction in working hours. Further, results suggest that participants with lower ability to provide for their families? basic needs in the past had a significantly lower average ability to provide for their families? needs during the pandemic. Understanding the challenges these families are facing due to COVID-19 can aid researchers develop future programs that are responsive to their needs in the event that a similar pandemic or global issue occurs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 84(3-A):No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2168548

ABSTRACT

This study emphasizes formal and informal reading development, race, and socioeconomic status as significant components of the lived experiences of four low socioeconomic Black/Brown second- and third-graders who struggled with reading. The research acknowledges historical progression of the American public education system, exploring peer-reviewed literature to examine the four components of the study's conceptual framework: race, socioeconomics, formal reading instructional practices, and informal reading exercises, as influences of the lived reading experiences of struggling readers. Set in Baltimore, Maryland, the researcher used qualitative methodology to gather data to develop narratives of the elementary-aged participants, illuminating their lived formal and informal reading experiences as struggling readers. The data collection process, being completed during the global COVID-19 pandemic, added dimension to the thoughts, feelings, and concerns of the participants. Using semi-structured interviews and home observations, the purpose of the study was to humanize poor Black/Brown struggling readers by presenting their voices to educational stakeholders against the backdrop of Critical Race Theory. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
International Journal of Exercise Science ; 15(7):1680-1691, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2167813

ABSTRACT

International Journal of Exercise Science 15(7): 1680-1691, 2022. Physical activity has significantly declined during the COVID-19 pandemic. Declines in physical activity have correlated with increased levels of perceived stress, though studies examining physical activity and stress have failed to account for critical confounds. The present study aims to determine whether physical activity independently predicts perceived stress in students attending private four-year universities. Physical activity, socioeconomic status, resilience, gender, and perceived stress data were collected from 85 students and used in a multiple linear regression analysis. The regression model accounted for 43.5% of the variance in perceived stress (R2 =.462, p <.001). Total physical activity significantly and inversely predicted perceived stress (β = –.229, p =.007) in students irrespective of other covariates. Socioeconomic status, resilience, and gender also independently and significantly predicted perceived stress. Findings should be leveraged by university staff to promote psychological well-being and wholistic health initiatives incorporating physical activity as a primary and modifiable component. © 2022, Western Kentucky University. All rights reserved.

4.
Journal of Henan Normal University Natural Science Edition ; 49(10):16-20, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2207187

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 epidemic on socio-economic status of rural communities in the Udon Thani province of Thailand. Method: A total of 1050 participants were approached to partake in a cross-sectional online survey and share their experiences regarding the ongoing epidemic. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data.

5.
Latin American Economic Review ; 31, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2206860

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes mobility patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic for 8 large Latin American cities. Indicators of mobility by socioeconomic status (SES) are generated by combining geo-referenced mobile phone information with granular census data. Before the pandemic, a strong positive association between SES and mobility is documented. With the arrival of the pandemic, in most cases, a negative association between mobility and SES emerges. This new pattern is explained by a notably stronger reduction in mobility by high SES individuals. A comparison of mobility for SES decile 1 vs decile 10 shows that, on average, the reduction is 75% larger in the case of decile 10. According to estimated lasso models, an indicator of government restrictions provides a parsimonious description of these heterogeneous responses. These estimations point to noticeable similarities in the patterns observed across the cities. We also explore how the median distance traveled changed for individuals that travel at least 1 km (the intensive margin). We find that the reduction in mobility in this indicator was larger for high-SES individuals compared to low-SES individuals in 6 out of 8 cities analyzed. The evidence is consistent with asymmetries in the feasibility of working from home and in the ability to smooth consumption under temporary income shocks. © 2022, Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas A.C. All rights reserved.

6.
Perspectives in Education ; 40(4):296-311, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2206484

ABSTRACT

The digital divide and the low socio-economic status of many South African school communities, including rural Limpopo, the site of this research study, created an immediate and urgent need to transform teaching and learning during the unprecedented Covid-19 global pandemic. Within this context, this study demonstrated the importance of technology and digitisation in building future-ready schools. The literature study clarified the requirements of a neuroleader as a future-fit leader and used the theoretical framework of neuroleadership to define and explain future-fit leadership. Insights for this article were derived from 10 school leaders in rural Limpopo primary schools. The data was collected using WhatsApp voice notes, which were converted into narratives for each of the principals. Digital stories of each school were also used. The phenomenological approach was adopted to better understand the lived experiences of these principals. Thereafter, the data was analysed using thematic analysis in order to identify themes or patterns in the narratives. The main findings emphasised the necessity of neuroleadership in a future-fit leader. Finally, more research is required to investigate the idea of creating entirely digital rural schools with a rotating schedule that alternates between days of in-person instruction and days of online instruction.

7.
African Journal of Development Studies ; 11(1):273-273–286, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2205887

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which started in December 2019, is one of the greatest challenges currently facing the world. It has adversely affected various sectors of the world, including the transportation system and the movement of individuals. To curb the spread of the disease, governments of various nations, including South Africans state, have taken various steps and measures that include movement restrictions, border closure, massive testing, contact tracing and quarantines. In the absence of a face-to-face interview or data collection measures due to COVID-19 safety measures, the study took its data from social media observations and online secondary sources (official gazette), while the analysis is descriptive. The study analysed the various effects of COVID-19 on African migrants and their mobility in South Africa, along with the various income sources and remittance challenges. Finally, the study avers that the wellbeing and welfare of migrants should be taken into consideration during the pandemic.

8.
Journal of Global Health Reports ; 6(e2022034), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2205656

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has dismantled many long-established systems in society. Distance learning has rapidly replaced traditional classes at school. Keeping all other activities open, educational institutions were closed first to contain COVID-19 transmission when the number of cases started to rise, causing a massive adverse impact on education and students' well-being. Students of lower socio-economic classes are dealing with the worst consequences as they are not able to afford the means of online schooling, especially in low- and middle-income countries like Bangladesh.

9.
Engineering Journal of Wuhan University ; 54(9):866-873, 2021.
Article in English, Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-2203865

ABSTRACT

Exploring the temporal and spatial clustering characteristics of the new type of corona virus pneumonia(corona virus disease 2019, COVID-19) in Hubei Province and the socio-economic influencing factors have essential reference value for epidemic prevention and control. This paper conducted a spatiotemporal cluster analysis of the COVID-19 epidemic data in Hubei Province. According to the clustering results, different epidemic development stages were divided. Spearman correlation analysis was used to analyze the economic and social factors affecting the epidemic development in Hubei Province (except Wuhan City). The results of spatiotemporal cluster analysis showed that the first level spatiotemporal cluster area was Wuhan City from January 31 to February 20, 2020, and the relative risk was 29.08. The second level spatiotemporal cluster areas were Xiaogan, Suizhou, Xiantao, Jingzhou, Jingmen, Yichang, Tianmen, and Qianjiang cities from January 31 to February 6, 2020, and the average relative risk was 1.60. Relative risk(RR) can quantitatively reflect the degree of epidemic risk in a region, help classify risk levels, allocate resources rationally, and formulate epidemic prevention measures. Exploring the socio-economic factors affecting the spread of the epidemic in stages has a great significance to studying the spread of the epidemic. Population density, gross domestic product(GDP) per capita, the proportion of Wuhan's immigrant population, and the intensity of travel within the city have an important impact on the spread of the epidemic. Per capita GDP is the main factor affecting the incidence rate of the epidemic. During the rapid development period, the proportion of the immigrant population and the intensity of travel in Wuhan are important indicators. The "primary transmission" of close contact between the incoming population and the local population in Wuhan plays a major role in the spread of the epidemic. The population density and the proportion of the immigrant population in Wuhan during the outbreak period are the important influencing factors of the epidemic. The community family gathering transmission is the main transmission mode of the epidemic at this stage. In the process of epidemic prevention and control, targeted measures should be implemented according to the differences of epidemic transmission modes in different periods, such as strengthening the publicity of epidemic prevention and control in the early stage of the epidemic, improving personal awareness of epidemic prevention, paying attention to the prevention and control of the imported population, and controlling population flow. In the middle and late stages of the epidemic, we should focus on preventing and controlling local transmission, strengthening the prevention and control of community and gathering activities, maintaining social distance in public places, and effectively preventing the rebound of the epidemic.

10.
Nursing & Residential Care ; 24(12):1-3, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2203787

ABSTRACT

Aysha Mendes discusses the ongoing crisis in the social care sector.

11.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 71(1):229-234, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2201786

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This introductory study aims to analyze the association of serum vitamin D3 levels with recently detected myopia in Indian children following home confinement post-COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Children aged 5-15 years who had not attended physical school in the past 1 year and visited the ophthalmology department with various ocular symptoms were divided into two groups: the myopic group with recently detected myopia and the non-myopic group with ocular ailments other than myopia. All children underwent basic ophthalmic evaluation and a general physical examination. Blood samples were collected for serum vitamin D3 levels. A pretested questionnaire inquiring about the duration of exposure to a digital screen, outdoor activities, and socioeconomic status was filled out for all children. RESULTS: The mean serum vitamin D3 level in the myopic group was 28.17 ± 15.02 ng/dl in comparison to 45.36 ± 17.56 ng/dl in the non-myopic group (P value < 0.05). Linear regression of the data establishes that myopia is associated with hypovitaminosis D3 (OR- 13.12, 95% CI 2.90-50.32, a P value of 0.001). The correlation between spherical equivalent and vitamin D3 levels was significant (Pearson correlation value: 0.661). In the myopic group, 63.3% of children had screen use >6 hours against 43.3% of children in the non-myopic group. In the myopic group, 33.3% of the children had an outdoor activity duration of <2 hours against 6.6% of children in the non-myopic group. CONCLUSION: This study proposes hypovitaminosis D3 as a strong factor associated with the development of myopia in children. Although it is a preliminary study, it suggests that the trial for vitamin D3 supplementation in young children to delay or cease the development of myopia is warranted.

12.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199214

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted the global economy, resulting in a substantial increase in inequality. There is a need to understand need dissatisfaction in this context, its group differences, and its consequences on support for anti-pandemic behaviors. MethodsUsing data from a survey round of the Chinese Social Mentality Survey from 21 April to 26 May 2022, 6,022 participants aged between 18 and 70 years (M = 32.27;SD = 8.74;men = 46.76%) from 29 provinces of Mainland China were included in the study. Results1) Need dissatisfaction was negatively related with support for anti-pandemic behaviors and was completely mediated by attribution and local government satisfaction. 2) Internal/external attribution acted as a double-edged sword: they were negatively/positively related with support for anti-pandemic behaviors, while they became positively/negatively related with support for anti-pandemic behaviors via the mediation of local government satisfaction. 3) People who were unemployed and in the subjectively middle class reported higher need dissatisfaction and less support for anti-pandemic behaviors compared to their counterparts. 4) Social class moderated the relationship between need dissatisfaction and internal attribution: when needs were dissatisfied, participants with higher income and subjective social class tended to attribute more internally. DiscussionThis study contributes to the attribution theory and social identity theory in the context of major global public health events and provides practical implications for promoting behavioral compliance in the context of COVID-19. In particular, facilitating a positive interaction between the public and local governments may be helpful to create a shared identity and, ultimately, prevent and control the pandemic together.

13.
Public Health ; 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165779

ABSTRACT

Objectives We determined the age and sociodemographic distribution of COVID-19 cases between January and September 2020 to identify the group with the highest incidence rates at the beginning of the second wave in England. Study Design We undertook a retrospective cohort study design. Methods SARS-CoV-2 cases in England were linked with area-level socioeconomic status indicators using quintiles of the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). Age-specific incidence rates were stratified by IMD quintile to further assess rates by area-level socioeconomic status. Results Between July and September 2020, SARS-CoV-2 incidence rates were highest amongst those aged 18 to 21 years, reaching rates of 213.9 (18-19 years) and 143.2 (20-21 years) per 100,000 population by week ending 21 September 2022. Stratification of incidence rates by IMD quintile evidenced that, despite high rates observed in the most deprived areas of England amongst the very young and older age groups, the highest rates were observed in the most affluent areas of England amongst the 18- to 21-year-olds. Conclusions The reversal of sociodemographic trend in COVID-19 cases in England for those aged 18 to 21 years at the end of the summer of 2020 and beginning of the second wave showed a novel pattern of COVID-19 risk. For other age groups, rates remained highest for those from more deprived areas, which highlighted persisting inequalities. Combined, this demonstrates the need to reinforce awareness of COVID-19 risk for young people, particularly given the late inclusion of the 16-17-year age group for vaccination administration, as well as continued efforts to reduce impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations.

14.
Influenza & Other Respiratory Viruses ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2161654

ABSTRACT

Background Methods Results Conclusions Prior to the introduction of vaccines, COVID‐19 hospitalizations of non‐institutionalized persons in Connecticut disproportionately affected communities of color and individuals of low socioeconomic status (SES). Whether the magnitude of these disparities changed 7–9 months after vaccine rollout during the Delta wave is not well documented.All initially hospitalized patients with laboratory‐confirmed COVID‐19 during July–September 2021 were obtained from the Connecticut COVID‐19‐Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network database, including patients' geocoded residential addresses. Census tract measures of poverty and crowding were determined by linking geocoded residential addresses to the 2014–2018 American Community Survey. Age‐adjusted incidence and relative rates of COVID‐19 hospitalization were calculated and compared with those from July to December 2020. Vaccination levels by age and race/ethnicity at the beginning and end of the study period were obtained from Connecticut's COVID vaccine registry, and age‐adjusted average values were determined.There were 708 COVID‐19 hospitalizations among community residents of the two counties, July–September 2021. Age‐adjusted incidence was the highest among non‐Hispanic Blacks and Hispanic/Latinx compared with non‐Hispanic Whites (RR 4.10 [95% CI 3.41–4.94] and 3.47 [95% CI 2.89–4.16]). Although RR decreased significantly among Hispanic/Latinx and among the lowest SES groups, it increased among non‐Hispanic Blacks (from RR 3.2 [95% CI 2.83–3.32] to RR 4.10). Average age‐adjusted vaccination rates among those ≥12 years were the lowest among non‐Hispanic Blacks compared with Hispanic/Latinx and non‐Hispanic Whites (50.6% vs. 64.7% and 66.6%).Although racial/ethnic and SES disparities in COVID‐19 hospitalization have mostly decreased over time, disparities among non‐Hispanic Blacks increased, possibly due to differences in vaccination rates. [ FROM AUTHOR]

15.
D + C, Development and Cooperation ; 48(7/8):34-34, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2157156

ABSTRACT

The socioeconomically diverse group of individuals known as the middle class is situated between the top class and the lower class. Small and medium sized company owners, professionals, government employees, and skilled workers make up the majority of the middle class. These individuals share certain social traits and beliefs, such as a commitment to hard work, thriftiness, and personal responsibility. Nevertheless, the middle class has a wide range of cultural, social, and educational traits. Given the variety of the middle class, a single measure of their ability to buy things best describes them. Progressive economic growth has elevated a number of households into the middle class throughout time. A Pew Research Center analysis states that, on average, 54 million more individuals joined the middle class each year between 2011 and 2019. According to the research, the global middle class would consist of around 132 billion people in 2020, or 17.1% of the world's population. The middle class has significantly grown, particularly in emerging nations. However, the Covid-19 epidemic has halted the expansion of the middle class globally. The COVID-19 pandemic has also split the middle class, separating those who work in the public sector, receive government pensions, own small businesses, work for large corporations, or have retired from the private sector and have good future security plans. Those who work in industries like pharmaceutical, information technology, and healthcare, which are least affected by restrictions and lockdowns, are also affected. These two segments of the middle class, government employees with advanced degrees who can work from home and make a living and blue collar workers who are unable to do so are currently going through separate stages of life.

16.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2151822

ABSTRACT

Objective: We investigated telehealth usage for individuals with chronic conditions by neighborhood-level socioeconomic status (SES) during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We split the population of 2.3 million commercially insured adults in the United States with at least one chronic condition in claims into four quartiles of SES using address of residence. After balancing groups on baseline characteristics, we examined telehealth and total outpatient evaluation and management (E&M) visits from March 2020 to February 2021. Results: Quartile 4 (highest SES) had more telehealth visits per person (0.054-0.100 more visits over each 3-month period) and a higher percentage of visits that were telehealth (1.8-5.9 percentage points higher) than other quartiles. Quartile 4 had higher levels of total outpatient E&M use throughout the year. Differences in telehealth between Quartiles 1 and 3 were small. Conclusions: Commercially insured individuals in the highest SES quartile had higher use of telehealth and total E&M visits than other quartiles.

17.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(11): e38357, 2022 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In-person, evidence-based, peer-facilitated chronic disease self-management programs have been shown to be effective for individuals from a variety of backgrounds, including rural and minority populations and those with lower socioeconomic status. Based in social learning theory, these programs use group processes to help participants better manage their chronic disease symptoms and improve their quality of life. During the pandemic, these in-person programs were forced to rapidly transition to remote delivery platforms, and it was unclear whether doing so increased disparities within our rural population. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this analysis were to ascertain self-management program enrollment and completion characteristics between 2 remote delivery platforms, as well as determine the individual level characteristics that drove enrollment and completion across delivery modes. METHODS: We analyzed enrollment and completion characteristics of 183 individuals who either enrolled in a self-management workshop delivered through a web-based videoconference (VC) system or through a traditional, audio-only conference call (CC) offered by our health care network between April and December 2020. Chi-square tests of association were used to describe the characteristics of and differences between groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant predictors of enrollment and completion. RESULTS: Those who enrolled in the VC platform were significantly likelier to be younger and college educated than those who enrolled in the CC platform. Those who completed a program, regardless of delivery mode, were likelier to be older and college educated than those who did not complete a program. Multivariate analyses indicated that of those enrolled in the CC platform, completers were likelier to not be enrolled in Medicaid. Among those enrolled in the VC platform, completers were older, college graduates, female, and likelier to have reported poorer health than those who did not complete the program. CONCLUSIONS: The transition of self-management programs to remote delivery modes, particularly to those that rely on VC platforms, revealed that certain demographic groups may no longer be able or willing to access the service. Efforts need to be made to increase engagement in remote self-management workshops. In addition, equivalent quality services that do not rely on a digital platform must continue to be offered in order to promote health equity.

18.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 6(6): 605-617, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2131838

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate rates and identify factors associated with asymptomatic COVID-19 in the population of Olmsted County during the prevaccination era. Patients and Methods: We screened first responders (n=191) and Olmsted County employees (n=564) for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from November 1, 2020 to February 28, 2021 to estimate seroprevalence and asymptomatic infection. Second, we retrieved all polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19 diagnoses in Olmsted County from March 2020 through January 2021, abstracted symptom information, estimated rates of asymptomatic infection and examined related factors. Results: Twenty (10.5%; 95% CI, 6.9%-15.6%) first responders and 38 (6.7%; 95% CI, 5.0%-9.1%) county employees had positive antibodies; an additional 5 (2.6%) and 10 (1.8%) had prior positive PCR tests per self-report or medical record, but no antibodies detected. Of persons with symptom information, 4 of 20 (20%; 95% CI, 3.0%-37.0%) first responders and 10 of 39 (26%; 95% CI, 12.6%-40.0%) county employees were asymptomatic. Of 6020 positive PCR tests in Olmsted County with symptom information between March 1, 2020, and January 31, 2021, 6% (n=385; 95% CI, 5.8%-7.1%) were asymptomatic. Factors associated with asymptomatic disease included age (0-18 years [odds ratio {OR}, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.1] and >65 years [OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.0-2.0] compared with ages 19-44 years), body mass index (overweight [OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44-0.77] or obese [OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.57-0.62] compared with normal or underweight) and tests after November 20, 2020 ([OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.71] compared with prior dates). Conclusion: Asymptomatic rates in Olmsted County before COVID-19 vaccine rollout ranged from 6% to 25%, and younger age, normal weight, and later tests dates were associated with asymptomatic infection.

19.
Journal of Business Economics ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2129067

ABSTRACT

Networks play a vital role for entrepreneurs in overcoming crises. The most vulnerable to crises are those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. However, we know less about the role of socioeconomic status in entrepreneurial networking. This study investigates whom entrepreneurs call in case of emergency. We develop hypotheses on how entrepreneurs’ socioeconomic status influences models of networking agency in situations of economic threat. The results of a pre-registered randomized experiment in the COVID-19 context conducted with 122 entrepreneurs from the US indicate that entrepreneurs in higher socioeconomic status positions activate contacts to serve their own goals (i.e., independent networking agency) when facing an economic threat. In contrast, and counter-intuitively, entrepreneurs of lower socioeconomic status are more likely to support others when facing an economic threat (i.e., interdependent networking agency). Exploring the evolving network structure, our explorative post-hoc analyses suggest that entrepreneurs activate closer networks (i.e., higher density and stronger ties) under threat. The study discusses the implications of these findings for the theory of entrepreneurial networking in general and network responses to crises in particular. © 2022, The Author(s).

20.
Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology ; 15(1):3942-3959, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2125507

ABSTRACT

The deep roots of street vending as a profession run deep in our society. The recent COVID 19 outbreak has caused the majority of street vendors' businesses to be disrupted. They are suffering from poverty and unemployment and Seeking for a better life, people migrate. These sellers, who are from the lower rungs of society, do a variety of tasks. unable to work in the formal sector due to a lack of opportunity, education, or skill, and hence ended up working in the shadow economy in the informal sector with no job stability and a constant sense of insecurity. The goal of this research study is to focus on the effects of nationwide lockdown on street vendors and the adverse effect on their lifestyle. The study emphasises the importance of understanding their problems and how to tackle problems, as well as their socioeconomic level, in order to improve the economy's cause. The study conducted on 100 street vendors by Survey method used structured questionnaire and interview schedule and used statistical tools like Descriptive Statistics, Independent sample T-test, one way Anova, Percentage analysis the study revealed that there is a high adverse effect of Covid-19 on street vendors and low level of cope up strategy used and there is a high adverse effect on female street vendors compared to male street vendors during pandemic. And more awareness should be given to street vendors about Registration under NASVI.

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