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Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617069

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly affected the lives of young people and increased the risks for deteriorated health and widening health gaps. Aim: The aim is to analyse the associations between socioeconomic position and worry triggered by the pandemic and their associations with psychosomatic problems. Methods: From December 2020 to March 2021, 3068 16-17 years old students in Sweden completed a questionnaire about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their schooling and everyday life. The response rate was 32 %, and the data were therefore weighted based on sociodemographic factors to take account of potential bias caused by the non-responses. During the spring semester of 2020, around two-thirds of the students also responded to questions about their psychosomatic health. Multinomial logistic regression was applied to analyse the associations between socioeconomic position (parental education) and worry about different personal and family issues. Binary logistic regression was used to analyse the association between worry and psychosomatic problems. Results: The association between socioeconomic position and worry showed a consistent pattern. Across almost all worry themes, the odds of experiencing worry often or always was higher for students with lower educated parents compared to higher educated parents. The odds for having to worry often/always about family finances was four times higher among students in the former group than the latter, controlling for sex. The magnitude of the association was about the same for worry about parental unemployment. In addition, also worry about personal and parental illness caused by COVID-19 showed strong associations with socioeconomic position. Worry was also clearly associated with students' psychosomatic health. Students who often or always experienced worry were more likely to report psychosomatic problems. Worries for personal and parental illness and family finances showed the highest odds ratios, controlling sex and parental education. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that worry related to COVID-19 about personal and family issues during the pandemic are socially structured. The socioeconomic position is associated with worry in similar ways that are common for health and health-related behaviors. Negative impacts of the pandemic are more common among students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds compared to higher ones. In addition, the significant associations between different worry themes and psychosomatic problems among students are noticeable. While the current study does not allow for conclusions about causality, the results indicate that experiences of worry during the pandemic may increase the risk of deteriorated mental health and inequalities among young people.

2.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617066

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: In March 2020, approximately 57 million children were affected by massive school closures in the wake of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Many child advocates expressed concerns about the impact of physical school closures and transition to virtual learning on school-aged children's mental health and well-being, particularly those who utilized resources, such as counselling or special education, within the school system. This systematic review was done to identify a) the effect and impact of school closures on the mental health of children in grades K-12, if any, and b) to guide future research on the topic. Methods: A systematic review focused on published articles addressing the effect that COVID-19 related school closures and transition to virtual learning had on school-aged children's and adolescents' mental health. Inclusion criteria included: human studies, scholarly papers, school-aged children, SARS-CoV-2 research, mental health impacts, an article written in English, and research-based in the United States. Exclusion criteria included: not human studies, studies not available in English, individuals over 18 years old, and SARS-CoV or MERS-CoV research. The search was conducted between March 20, 2021, and April 18, 2021. Articles were further screened utilizing the PRISMA flow diagram. Once screened, included articles were reviewed by one member of the research team and a PICO-style analysis was used for each article. After the initial review, a total of 11 articles were included in this systematic review. Learning Points Discussion: We identified several areas of a child's life that school closures limited access to, such as reduced-cost meals, mental health services, and special education. Since the school closures and subsequent transition to online schooling, these resources became unavailable or limited by virtual technology. Children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and marginalized communities were particularly vulnerable to negative mental health changes due to school closures and decreased access to school-based resources. These individuals belonging to a lower socioeconomic class are more likely to have inadequate computers to utilize in-home learning, have more unstable internet connections, and are less likely to have a caregiver that can stay home to help with their distanced learning. This research will be vital in understanding any adverse effects on children and shaping the future development of school-based programs and their funding.

3.
Journal of the Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences ; 20(4):271-275, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1579436

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of insomnia in adults received at medical wards of Liaquat University Hospital, Jamshoro, during the Covid-19 pandemic METHODOLOGY: This cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted from February to July 2020, on 200 patients belonging to various educational and socio-economic backgrounds received at Liaquat University Hospital, Jamshoro. The sampling technique was nonprobability, consecutive. The inclusion criteria were males and females above the age of 18 years while the exclusion criteria were individuals with sleep-disordered breathing, prior history of sleep disturbance, and psychiatric illness. This study was funded by the authors. A questionnaire was designed to record the data, including the demographics, educational and job status, and score on Athens Insomnia Scale. The collected data was analyzed on SPSS 20. RESULTS: The study included 108 males (54%) and 92 females (46%) over the age of 18 years. Seventysix individuals (38%) said their sleep quality has worsened during the pandemic, including difficulty initiating sleep in 29, difficulty staying asleep in 22, and 25 having vivid dreams. Out of these, 68% were females and 32% were males, 124 respondents (62%) did not face the above-mentioned problems but 74 (37%) did confirm going to bed later at night and sleeping for a longer duration, while 50 (25%) did not notice any change in their sleeping pattern. CONCLUSION: The Covid-19 pandemic has upturned lives in several ways, including the disruption of sleeping patterns and increased prevalence of insomnia in patients received at medical wards of Liaquat University Hospital, Jamshoro.

4.
Pediatric Diabetes ; 22(SUPPL 30):81, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1570999

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020 diabetes outpatient clinics were closed and consultations suspended due to the restrictions imposed by authorities in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine in Brazil was then urgently officialized. Considering that the majority of our patients come from a low socioeconomic background, the only alternative of communication was through a free mobile app via cell phone. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction and the effectiveness of care delivered by teleconsultations via cell phone in this population. Methods: This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, completed using Google forms, offered to every patient/carer from the Pediatric Diabetes Outpatient Clinic of Santa Casa de São Paulo who received telemedicine care during this period. Complementary data were obtained from patients' electronic medical records. Results: In 12 weeks (between March and June 2020), from a total of 154 appointments, 83%(n=88) of patients were attended via asynchronous teleconsultations using a mobile app, 16%(n=17) were in-person and 31.2%(n=48) did not attend the consultation. The great majority of patients had their insulin dose adjusted (87.6%;n=85). From those who answered the questionnaire (87%;n=77), 93%(n=72) approved the telemedicine consultation and 59% said that glycemic control improved afterward. There were also economic benefits and less waste of time reported. Only 3 patients declared that they did not feel safe without face-to-face care. 60% declared they would like to continue alternating presential with online consultations after the end of the pandemic. Conclusions: During COVID-19 pandemics, the transition to telemedicine was associated with patients' satisfaction and efficacy in treatment adjustments. Considering the socioeconomic characteristics of this population, telemedicine via mobile app was a good option for offering diabetes care during a period of isolation.

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