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1.
13th International Conference on E-Education, E-Business, E-Management, and E-Learning, IC4E 2022 ; : 345-350, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1840623

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented crisis in schools globally, posing challenges for children with exceptionalities. Government policies during the pandemic necessitate the inclusion of people with special needs, as no one should be left behind. The researchers explore the Philippine laws governing inclusive education and the safety protocols that should be taken in the online sphere. Two legal consultants were presented with a hypothetical problem in the subject, Technology and Livelihood Education, which involves life skills activities. This paper explores safety in planning school activities, given the shift to online learning and the special needs of atypical students. This research has found that it is vital that prior home-school agreements, proper home-school communication, and efforts to carry out one's role under loco in parentis must be maintained to enable safe inclusive education to continue in the online sphere. © 2022 ACM.

2.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(7-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837443

ABSTRACT

In the spring of 2020, nearly every school aged student and K-12 teacher across the United States was forced to participate in remote educational activities online, prompting an unexpected departure from the status quo in public education. This was a result of government mandated social distancing practices, as a mitigation strategy for combating the global pandemic induced by the novel coronavirus. Most school districts were compelled to repurpose their daily practices by rapidly planning to ascertain resources for the implementation of an emergency remote education initiative. These unprecedented events presented many challenges for educators, especially given most had no formal training for conducting online instructional delivery utilizing various technologies. Special education teachers in particular confronted a unique set of challenges when considering how to support the complex needs of diverse learners. This included student support for engagement with access to technology, knowledge of various applied technological pedagogical skills, teacher preparation, technical training, ongoing professional support, interactions with stakeholders, and individual social emotional well-being. The purpose of this study was to determine how special education teachers perceived various aspects of their experiences, when teaching remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey was designed to measure these perceptions containing aligned items to the domains of the technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) framework. The COVID-19 Special Education Teacher Survey (C-SETS) was a 42 item questionnaire set on a 5-point Likert scale that contained an additional open-ended question. It was administered online and completed by 280 participants, across 46 states, primarily via a social media platform. While the results demonstrated that special education teachers overall were technically skilled, had increased communication with parents/caregivers, and gained skills for future practices, there was a significantly insufficient level of preparation, a deficit with various pedagogical skills using technology, less collaboration with IEP team members, inconsistent student engagement, varying access to technology, a lack of technical training, ongoing professional development and support, contributing to social emotional stress, anxiety and fatigue. Aspects of these findings were particularly evident in historically under resourced districts and those that did not participate in technology infrastructure initiatives, where an overwhelming majority of the statistically significant differences, with the exception of respondents' level of educational attainment, were attributed to school characteristics. Implications for future teacher preparation, technical training, ongoing professional development, and best practices are presented. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(7-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837286

ABSTRACT

There are many different teaching technologies for neurotypical students, but students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may require online education media and Computer Based Interventions (CBIs) to thrive. For the purposes of this study CBIs are defined as a set of assistive interventions and technologies that are large and diverse based around technologic programs and relevant tools to support individuals with ASD. While designing CBIs, there must remain a core requirement of consideration for the way those with ASD learn and perceive things differently in order to enhance their learning. The evaluation of existing tools as well as the lived experiences of those that use them is also essential to systematically capture multiple aspects of online teaching as well as good design in order to effectively adapt to those needs. Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic as well as the development and expansion of online teaching and learning, the need for adopted online CBI designs for individuals with ASD has brought to light a need to better accommodate the needs of children with disabilities. However, there is a lack of existing CBIs to address the needs of students with ASD in online learning environments. Therefore, the aim of this research is to investigate existing CBIs to find potential gaps and pitfalls with recommendations the researcher can possibly make at the conclusion of the study for additional designs which could help address essential learning needs. These begin by considering the challenges and experiences with CBIs as observed by instructors that help provide a clearer overview of circumstances reflecting needs for better and more germane designs. This phenomenological study (Creswell, 2018;Astalin, 2013;Moustakas, 1995) will investigate the lived experiences of special education teachers who have been required to utilize CBIs to teach students with ASD in online environments in the midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Seven special education teachers will be interviewed to obtain shared themes through similar teaching experiences, and challenges as well as an understanding of both teacher and student needs as seen through their lens. This study relies on the special education teacher's constructive perceptions of the experiences of students with ASD with online learning CBIs as a core component, along with alterations to those tools they feel are needed to address and evaluate current approaches and effectiveness to learning used in online classroom settings. Following are the four key contributions of this study: 1. A critical overview of existing CBIs available for teaching students with ASD and ways of evaluating them. 2.Evaluating experiences of special education teachers teaching students with ASD, especially in the utilization of CBIs. 3. Recommendations to be made regarding available CBIs beneficial to teaching students with ASD. 4. An in-depth discussion on special education teachers' assessments is used successfully to evaluate CBIs to address or minimize challenges with CBIs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(7-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837221

ABSTRACT

Throughout special education history, students with disabilities have been denied appropriate services and excluded from their general education peers. While the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that all students with disabilities ages 3-21 have access to a Free and Appropriate Education (FAPE) in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), IDEA does not mandate that students have an active role in the planning and development of their FAPE. Instead, IDEA merely requires that students get invited to attend their IEP meeting at age sixteen. Previous research examines the degree to which older students attend IEP meetings;however, scarce research is available which analyzes the inclusion of students in the overall IEP process (goal development, progress monitoring, etc.). For this study, sevenparticipants (4 middle school special education teachers and 3 parents of middle school students receiving special education services) were interviewed regarding the successes and barriers to student inclusion in the IEP process and the acceptability/feasibility of utilizing a selfdetermination intervention to promote participation in the IEP process. Additionally, participants were interviewed about the educational impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Three mainconcepts were established from participant interviews: mandates guide student engagement in the IEP process, lack of self-determination instruction in the classroom, and perceived competence impacts student inclusion. Results are discussed in the context of implications for special education policy, education, and training. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(7-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1824134

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study analyzes the effects that RENEW, a person-centered goal planning model, has on students with disabilities that are in an alternative school setting. Students in sixth through twelfth grade participated in this study to determine if RENEW can affect students' awareness of post-secondary options and assist with post-high school planning. In analyzing students' progress, the researcher utilized results of the AIR Self-Determination Scale, DIBELS assessments, and school-wide behavior data during students' participation in the RENEW initiative. In addition, the researcher used results of a Likert scale survey given to school personnel in order to examine how RENEW was implemented at the school. RENEW assisted students with completing post-high school plans by illuminating goals, correlating achievable steps towards those goals, and developing support systems to aid in reaching these goals. Although this research was implemented during the COVID-19 Pandemic, the alternative school implemented the RENEW intervention with fidelity and produced positive changes within the youth that participated in the initiative. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

6.
The High School Journal ; 105(1):5-16, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824126

ABSTRACT

While the student population in public education is becoming more diverse, the representation of teachers of color remains low. With over half the student population in the United States considered as non-white, and only 20% of teachers identifying as teachers of color, it is imperative to examine the ways in which education professionals are addressing teaching and learning in a way that is inclusive of culturally diverse populations. Gloria Ladson-Billings (1994) developed her culturally relevant pedagogy framework nearly 30 years ago, and though rarely discussed in special education, her approach is critically important to the field. This article calls on teacher educators to engage future special education teachers in ways that support their implementation of CRP as an ongoing framework. In order to achieve this, we focus on the effective characteristics of culturally relevant special education teachers, and on creating culturally relevant special education teacher programs in higher education.

7.
Ozel Egitim Dergisi ; 23(1):133-164, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1801666

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In this study, it was aimed to reveal the distance special education interventions carried out for students with different special needs and their families in Turkey during the restriction period due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic through expert perspectives. Findings: According to the results of the study, it was observed that distance education-based interventions for students with special needs and their families were provided by official, private institutions and individuals along with the rapid transition to distance education in Turkey. Discussion: It is predicted that the results of the study may help to draw a forward-looking road map in planning special education interventions in different countries, especially in Turkey. In response to the lockdown conditions, the special education practice in Turkey has become one of the good examples in the process of transition.

8.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-333478

ABSTRACT

Policy decisions made in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic have negatively affected almost every aspect of the lives of people with disabilities in ways that go largely unnoticed by the general public. This is, sadly, consistent with much of the history of people with disabilities. But these COVID-19-related decisions deserve attention—they shine a bright spotlight on the thinness of our commitment to the ideals of equality under the law for people with disabilities. These ideals have strong expression in civil rights laws like the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and Supreme Court decisions like Olmstead v. L.C., but when push comes to shove, in crises like the current pandemic, people with disabilities are once again relegated to less than equal status. This essay explores three areas in which the pandemic has had a disproportionately negative impact on people with disabilities: health care, education, and employment.

9.
SSRN; 2021.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-333475

ABSTRACT

Communication is important for collaboration between parents and teachers of children with autism (CWA);gap in communication creates lack of trustworthiness. Our work explores the reasons behind the communication challenges and the opportunities to reduce the miscommunication between parents and teachers of CWA. We conducted the study during COVID-19 pandemic when CWA parent-teacher interaction changed due to the adoption of online education. The in-depth qualitative study involves n = 10 participants, including both stakeholders. We found personalized communication as well as maintaining privacy and accountability while communicating using contemporary technologies remains a challenge. This motivated us to develop an Android-based application, ‘Shondhi’. This study enhances the nuances of parent-teacher collaboration by providing them a personalized tool that specifically focuses on the needs of parents and teachers of CWA.

10.
International Journal of Action Research ; 17(3):244-267, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1793090

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the practitioner and author of this practice in action took the initiative to carry out apiece of action research, by running abakery sales project with Semai indigenous students. She found that running this project online and remotely was less successful than anticipated, due to the lack of physical proximity and issues with internet connectivity. Thus, in this practice in action, the resulting action research is discussed qualitatively and narratively, asking the following question: how can the practitioner enhance her practice as aspecial education teacher of Specific Vocational Skills (Bread Making), to improve the employability of Semai indigenous students through abakery sales project?The bakery sales project not only exposedstudents to the work environment, but also enabled the practitioner to improve her content knowledge and pedagogy, especially with regard to developing meaningful lessons during the COVID-19 pandemic. © 2021, Verlag Barbara Budrich. All rights reserved.

11.
Humanid. Inov. ; 8(61):90-103, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1790306

ABSTRACT

This research brings an investigation directed to special educators from the state education network in Santa Maria-RS, Brazil, in order to perceive how these subjects understand the emergency remote teaching, how they are carrying out this work directed to AEE and what are the challenges encountered in this path. The research method, from basic nature and qualitative approach, was developed by means of a structured questionnaire aimed at special educators. With the results of these questionnaires and the reflection on the educators perceptions about emergency remote teaching and the work that has been carried out, it was realized that the biggest challenges found in emergency remote teaching situations is the lack of access by students and the families' difficulties in helping the students.This result leads to a reflection on how social inequality and lack of appreciation of the teacher can directly reflect on the quality of emergency remote teaching.

12.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(5-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1790297

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this basic qualitative study was to better understand how compassion fatigue affects special educators serving in K-8 therapeutic day schools working with students with behavioral and emotional disorders (EBD) in order to reduce teacher turnover in this population. A great amount of research exists in the body of knowledge regarding compassion fatigue and health care providers. Research on compassion fatigue and educators, especially special education teachers, has slowly begun to enter the research world. This research set out to study compassion fatigue in special education teachers working specifically with students with EBD in therapeutic day school settings. Six participants from two different sites were interviewed using face-to-face interviews, either in-person or via Zoom due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Observations were also conducted to confirm the responses given in the interviews. Through that research, it was determined that teachers in this environment were perceived to have symptoms of compassion fatigue and had thoughts of leaving their position. These teachers stayed in their profession due to the need to service their students but experienced a great deal of stress and exhaustion. Two main components of their stress were a negative work environment and an unsupportive administrative team. Further research is recommended to examine the training and professional development involved with special education teachers working in therapeutic day schools. Further research should also focus on novice teachers working with students with EBD and the onset of compassion fatigue. Lastly, further research should be conducted on best practices for working with students with EBD within a therapeutic day school. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

13.
Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits ; 16(1):1-20, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787127

ABSTRACT

This explanatory sequential mixed-methods study sought to describe the implementation process of AT/AAC from school to home during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the extent to which AT/AAC was used, how AT/AAC was used, and what, if any, support the school systems provided. A researcher-designed survey was completed by 104 special educators and 45 parents. Seventeen follow-up interviews were conducted with educators and parent participants. Results of the study demonstrated the importance of clear communication, explicit expectations and procedures for AT/AAC use, and collaboration among stakeholders if AT/AAC implementation is to be as effective as possible. © ATIA 2022.

14.
Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Educativos ; 52(1):0_1,215-239, 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1786631

ABSTRACT

Palabras clave: aislamiento educativo, educación especial, edad preescolar, problemas en el desarrollo, atención educativa en línea The educational isolation caused by the Covid-19 pandemic has consequences in the teaching and learning process of preschool children with special needs, their parents, and teachers. [...]we created and applied online semi-structured interactive interviews for children, parents, and teachers in special education from public institutions. The study participants were ten preschool children with special needs, ten parents, and 25 special education teachers from Tlaxcala, Mexico. The conclusions establish that all preschool children wish to return to a face-toface modality of education and special attention, which corresponds to the needs of psychological development of this age.

15.
NHSA Dialog ; 25(1):1, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1766622

ABSTRACT

Early childhood education programs in the United States shifted to online instruction due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Early childhood educators faced many challenges around instruction, student engagement, and strategies that would support families during this time. As educators grappled with trying to implement practices that would be effective online, they also struggled with lower levels of self-efficacy. The present study explored how student engagement impacted teaching and learning and particularly how administrative and family support impacted teachers' sense of self-efficacy. Implications for effective early childhood teaching strategies and the structures that need to be in place to support teachers' self-efficacy will be discussed.

16.
NHSA Dialog ; 25(1):37, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1766621

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, several early childhood education programs in the United States and around the world were forced to shift to online instruction. While virtual learning was found to be challenging for all age groups, this mode has been especially challenging for early childhood educators. The present study explored the challenges that teachers faced when adjusting their early childhood education practices to an online format during the COVID-19 health crisis and also explored those activities that teachers found most effective. Furthermore, this study explored the role of online teaching in teachers' sense of self-efficacy and assessed whether support from families and program administration played a role in teacher self-efficacy. Lessons for the role of online education in early childhood, with implications for practice, are discussed. As online instruction becomes more prominent in all areas of education, the lessons learned during the pandemic should prove informative long after the crisis is overcome.

17.
Sociation ; 21(1):21, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1766519

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, disabled students were vulnerable not just to the virus, but disruptions in education as schools shifted to remote delivery. Using Jackson and Mazzei's thinking with theory methodology, this qualitative study centers the voices of disabled students and their lived experiences with access and inclusion in higher education, before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. We identified the social model of disability as our theory to "plug" into interviews. Results indicate that disabled students turned to self-accommodations during COVID-19, creating DIY accessibility. The lack of required outside meetings allowed many disabled students to better focus on their health and education by avoiding physically taxing activities. Furthermore, interviews revealed that disabled students see disability as a commonplace event, similar to work or family commitments, and advocate for a reimagining of how we frame fairness in higher education. Although student experiences with pandemic learning and accessibility varied, nearly all participants expressed a desire to keep the flexibility and grace they experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic, and advocated for an ethic of care for all students as most schools return to full, "normal," education. Based on the interviews, we provide suggestions for how to increase accommodations and access in the post-COVID-19 classroom.

18.
Sociation ; 21(1):4, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1766509

ABSTRACT

Children with disabilities rely on access to special education services and accommodations, physical, occupational, and speech therapies, and medical interventions. However, these accommodations are not provided equally across all students. The COVID-19 pandemic brought these disparities to light, as untested forms of at-home, virtual, and hybrid learning were implemented. Limited in-person learning affects students with disabilities, as many cannot participate fully in these modifications. While parents have long fought for services and accommodations for their children, alternative educational delivery became the norm during the pandemic. This study examines how K-12 education was delivered to students with disabilities during the pandemic, the benefits and challenges these modalities created, and how we can implement future changes to improve educational access for students who require special education. Interviews with teachers and parents were conducted to understand educational impacts on students. Findings address these modalities' positive and negative aspects and their impacts on educational outcomes using a social vulnerability framework. This research informs K-12 policy and recommends we consider how accommodations can assist students during a national health crisis and how they can be utilized in times of stability to decrease social vulnerability.

19.
Sociation ; 21(1):41, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1766491

ABSTRACT

This paper is an exploration of disability justice in higher education in a post-COVID era. First, I use autohistoriateoría, a lineage of autoethnography, to weave a story of my struggles with an invisible disability as a student and as a faculty member with the existing scholarship. Second, I extensively situate my intersectional identity as a queer, disabled Latina to situate my argument as to why crips need online options for education. I then critique the gatekeeping of educational programs that can provide financial liberation for marginalized community members. Lastly, this paper challenges the assumption that online education is not rigorous.

20.
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies ; 16(1):115, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1765990

ABSTRACT

From March 2019 to November 2020 the Liverpool Hope University Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) and the Carleton University Disability Research Group (CUDRG) co-hosted a cross-Atlantic seminar series, Disability Futurity: Interdisciplinary Anticipations of a Non-normative Tomorrow. Chaired by David Bolt in Liverpool and Ryan Patterson in Ottawa, speakers hosted at each institution were connected live to audiences at the other. That format had to change in light of Covid-19, which did have a positive side as the entirely online seminars were more accessible and reached an even broader audience than could ever have attended in person. Here, Patterson focuses on those seminars that were hosted at Carleton University or chaired digitally by the CUDRG.

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