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1.
Curr Oncol ; 29(10): 7794-7801, 2022 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071266

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. The standard curative treatment is surgical resection, but the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic disease apart from radiotherapy is currently based on cemiplimab. Cemiplimab has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of advanced and metastatic cSCC in clinical trials, although real-world data are still limited. We present four cases of cSCC, which showed a tremendous response to cemiplimab-one patient achieved complete response and three of them achieved partial response. Immunotherapy with cemiplimab, a recently approved PD1 inhibitor, is an important addition to the cutaneous oncology therapeutic options that may be considered in patients with advanced disease not amenable to surgery or radiotherapy. In all four cases, the patients postponed visits to the doctor because of the fear of SARS-CoV-2 infection or for administrative and organizational reasons declared difficult access to doctors caused by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Skin Neoplasms , Humans , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Pandemics
2.
Front Oncol ; 12: 966011, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065606

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) strongly affects health care activities in countries around the world. The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have also been involved, and elderly head and neck squamous carcinoma is one of them. This study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on elderly patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in our center. Methods: This retrospective study analyzed the clinical characteristics of 400 HNSCC patients over 65 years of age, calculated their treatment interruption rates, and compared the time of delayed diagnosis. Results: The rate of elderly patients with HNSCC with a delayed diagnosis was higher in the "during COVID-19 pandemic" group (DCOV19 group) than in the "during COVID-19 pandemic" group (BCOV19 group), and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.0017). There was a substantial difference in the rate of treatment interruption between the two groups (p=0.002). Conclusions: This is the first study to explore the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on visits and treatment interruptions in elderly patients with HNSCC. The current impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HNSCC treatment has resulted in reductions and delays in diagnosing cancer and providing treatment.

3.
Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery ; 167(1 Supplement):P201, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064416

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Access to specialty care is challenging in rural health environments, and this has been compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic. Routes to establishing care for head and neck cancer patients are especially important. We sought to quantify our referral patterns and processes to identify opportunities for optimization. Method(s): Retrospective review was performed of patients with initial head and neck tumor board presentation between January 1, 2020, through December 31, 2021. Assessed time points were date of referral, biopsy, pathological diagnosis, imaging order, imaging obtained, and initial presentation at head and neck tumor board. Result(s): A total of 429 patients were included. Squamous cell carcinoma (n=350, 81.6%) made up the majority, and most common primary sites were oropharynx (27.4%), oral cavity (20.3%), larynx (16.9%), and cutaneous (16.5%). At time of referral, 37.6% of patients had biopsy proven diagnosis. Average time to tumor board was 22 days, and significantly greater in those undiagnosed at referral (29 vs 14 days). Distance to provider did not correlate with time to tumor board. The period since the onset of the COVID crisis did not appear to affect access to care once in our system. However, there was evidence that patients presented with advanced locoregional disease during COVID-19. Conclusion(s): This study creates an approach to map access to care, evaluating critical time points and opportunities to expedite multiple steps that initiate therapy for head and neck cancer. There are both external (rural geography and the COVID-19 pandemic) and internal aspects that may pose barriers to access. Identification of these barriers allows for improved timely access to care in this susceptible population.

4.
Chest ; 162(4):A2163, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060904

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Systemic Diseases with Deceptive Pulmonary Manifestations SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Case Reports PRESENTED ON: 10/18/2022 12:25 pm - 01:25 pm INTRODUCTION: Fat embolism is a syndrome that can occur during orthopedic procedures or fractures of the long bones, especially the femur and tibia. It can affect multiple organs, including the brain, skin, and lungs, causing the triad of altered mentation, petechiae, and hypoxemia. Here, we present a case of a 54-year-old woman at risk for graft versus host disease (GVHD) who presented with dyspnea a few weeks after an orthopedic procedure. Initial chest radiograph was notable for parenchymal infiltrates, and she was initially treated with antibiotics without improvement. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old woman with a history of leukemia, stem cell transplantation years ago, GVHD (skin liver, ocular, oral, joints (not lung), with clinical and cytogenetic remission underwent total hip arthroplasty. Two weeks later, she developed lethargy and dyspnea and presented to the emergency department. She was found to have an elevated WBC of x19.5 k/ul (normal 4.1-9.3k/uL) with a left upper lobe consolidation on the chest radiograph (Figure 1). She was treated empirically for pneumonia and discharged with a 7-day course of levofloxacin. Despite completing the course of antibiotics, her dyspnea worsened, and she presented to the emergency department two weeks later with worsening hypoxemia. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) with patchy consolidations in a broncho-vascular distribution (Figure 2). She was negative for COVID-19, Influenza A, B and Legionella urinary antigen. The differential diagnosis included infection and GVHD among others. She underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The Gram stain and the culture did not suggest an infection. Pathology from BAL returned significant for reactive bronchial and squamous cells with lipid-laden macrophages. She was started on steroids. Her clinical status improved dramatically, and she was eventually discharged. At a 3-month follow-up her symptoms had improved. Her CT scan also showed significant improvement (Figure 3). DISCUSSION: Our case highlights the successful diagnosis of fat embolism in the lungs in a patient with complicated medical history. Fat embolism usually presents as ground glass opacities. However, the diagnosis was more challenging in this case due to a significant time lapse between her surgery and her presentation to the hospital. She also lacked the other common signs of fat embolism including altered mentation and skin changes. Therefore, other etiologies, such as GVHD, bacterial or viral infection were initially strongly considered. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome condition should still be suspected despite a delay from the initial surgery. Diagnosis in immunocompromised patients requires a detailed workup to rule out other etiologies. Reference #1: Johnson, M. J., & Lucas, G. L. (1996). Fat embolism syndrome. Orthopedics, 19(1), 41-49. Reference #2: Newbigin, K., Souza, C. A., Torres, C., Marchiori, E., Gupta, A., Inacio, J., … & Peña, E. (2016). Fat embolism syndrome: state-of-the-art review focused on pulmonary imaging findings. Respiratory medicine, 113, 93-100. Reference #3: Swiatek, K., Kordic, G., & Jordan, K. (2018). An Unlikely Presentation of Fat Embolism Syndrome. Chest, 154(4), 686A. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Raheel Anwar No relevant relationships by Boris Medarov

5.
Chest ; 162(4):A2083, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060896

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Case Reports of Procedure Treatments Posters SESSION TYPE: Case Report Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 12:45 pm - 01:45 pm INTRODUCTION: Foreign body aspiration can affect ventilation-oxygenation dynamics causing significant morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Patient presentation can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening hypoxia. A thorough history and physical examination helps in narrowing differential diagnosis and provision of timely management. A myriad of complications can occur from aspirated Foreign body including recurrent pneumonia, lung abscess, obstructive emphysema, and death. Here we present a case of a patient with recurrent pneumonia from a chronically aspirated foreign body. CASE PRESENTATION: 37-year-old male with past medical history of a recent COVID-19 infection and bronchus intermedius endobronchial mass (squamous metaplasia on biopsy 2009) who presented with fever, chest pain, worsening dyspnea. Initial workup was consistent with severe sepsis. A CT chest showed complete collapse, cavitation in right lower lobe and presence of right bronchus stent. Patient was treated with IV fluids and antibiotics during the hospitalization. He underwent bronchoscopy for airway examination and bronchoalveolar lavage. Airway exam showed a large endobronchial mass in the bronchus intermedius. Endobronchial biopsies were taken, followed by tissue debulking using flexible forceps and cryoprobe. A yellow plastic foreign object was then visualized dislodged in the right lower lobe. This was successfully removed with grasping forceps. Patient had to be extubated and be reintubated to remove foreign object in one piece as it did not fit the endotracheal tube. Post debulking, bronchus intermedius and right lower lobe were patent and procedure was completed. Our patient responded well to treatment he was ultimately transitioned to oral antibiotics and discharged home with outpatient follow up. Repeat bronchoscopy 6 weeks later showed normal airways. DISCUSSION: Our case illustrated the importance of thorough investigation while treating patients with recurrent pneumonia, and this sometimes should include bronchoscopy with airway exam. In our case a bronchoscopy was done several years ago, however the foreign body was not identified as the cause of the endobronchial lesion. A lingering foreign body in the long run has significant morbidity as seen in our case despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics patient continued to have recurrent post obstructive pneumonias. Bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in definitive diagnosis and management of foreign body. Since the refinement of bronchoscopy and debulking, the rate of mortality from foreign body aspiration has been remarkably reduced. CONCLUSIONS: In summary patients with history suggestive of potential foreign body aspiration presenting with recurrent pneumonias at a particular anatomical location should prompt physicians to perform diagnostic bronchoscopy, which remains the gold standard for diagnosing of foreign body aspiration Reference #1: Foreign Body Aspiration Natan Cramer;Noel Jabbour;Melissa M. Tavarez;Roger S. Taylor. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Maria Abril No relevant relationships by Bilal Bangash No relevant relationships by Imran Tarrar

6.
Chest ; 162(4):A1720-A1721, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060854

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Lung Cancer Imaging Case Report Posters 2 SESSION TYPE: Case Report Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 12:45 pm - 01:45 pm INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia typically presents with ground-glass and consolidative pulmonary opacities, atypically small cavities may be seen in severe cases. In patients with cavities persisting beyond 12 weeks, an underlying malignancy is a worrisome concern. We present a case of a 39-year old female without significant risk factors for pulmonary malignancy who was found, surprisingly, to have a cavitating adenocarcinoma in the setting of COVID-19 Pneumonia. CASE PRESENTATION: A 39 year old obese African American female, never smoker, with co-existing metabolic syndrome presented to our institution with a four day history of productive cough (without hemoptysis), body aches, fever and fatigue. She denied weight loss or loss of appetite. No known family history of malignancy. She tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. She was clinically stable, hence discharged home with recommendations for quarantine and supportive care. She returned the following day with worsening dyspnea. Her chest radiograph noted a supra-hilar opacity with central lucency, Chest CT revealed wedge-shaped ground-glass and consolidative density in the right lower lobe and a 3.8 x 4.1 cm cavitary right upper lobe mass with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. She received parenteral antibiotic therapy and underwent infectious and autoimmune workup, which was negative. Repeat CT imaging, approximately three months post discharge, revealed persisting cavitary lesion and enlarging mediastinal lymphadenopathy. She underwent Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy with biopsy and fine needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes (stations 7 and 4R) via endobronchial ultrasound. Biopsy results and fine needle aspiration of lymph nodes revealed adenocarcinoma with tumor cells being positive for TTF-1 and negative for CK20, CDX2, GATA3, PAX8 and Synaptophysin. Next generation sequencing reported several variants including EGFR and Tp53, there was also noted amplification of CDK4 and MDM2. PDL-1 was negative. DISCUSSION: A cavity is a gas-filled space, seen as a lucency or low-attenuation area, within a nodule, mass, or area of parenchymal consolidation. Underlying etiologies are typically classified as infectious, autoimmune and malignant. Cavities are atypical findings on CT imaging in patients with viral pneumonias, including SARS-CoV-2. Those cavities persisting beyond 12 weeks are typically classified as being chronic, with malignancy a key concern in these patients. The most common type of primary cavitary lung cancer is squamous cell carcinoma, in fact Primary Pulmonary Adenocarcinomas are unlikely to cavitate. Treatment options, depending on the presence of targetable mutations, include concurrent chemoradiation, chemoimmunotherapy or oral targeted agent. CONCLUSIONS: Though an atypical presentation, Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma may present as a cavitary lesion, particularly in the presence of persisting or enlarging lymphadenopathy. Reference #1: Gafoor K, Patel S, Girvin F, Gupta N, Naidich D, Machnicki S, Brown KK, Mehta A, Husta B, Ryu JH, Sarosi GA, Franquet T, Verschakelen J, Johkoh T, Travis W, Raoof S. Cavitary Lung Diseases: A Clinical-Radiologic Algorithmic Approach. Chest. 2018 Jun;153(6):1443-1465. doi: 10.1016/j.chest.2018.02.026. Epub 2018 Mar 6. PMID: 29518379. Reference #2: Radiological Society of North America Expert Consensus Document on Reporting Chest CT Findings Related to COVID-19: Endorsed by the Society of Thoracic Radiology, the American College of Radiology, and RSNA Scott Simpson, Fernando U. Kay, Suhny Abbara, Sanjeev Bhalla, Jonathan H. Chung, Michael Chung, Travis S. Henry, Jeffrey P. Kanne, Seth Kligerman, Jane P. Ko, and Harold Litt Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging 2020 2:2 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Mark Bowling, value=Consulting fee Removed 04/02/2022 by Mark Bowling No relevant relationships by Mark Bowling, value=Consulting fee Removed 04/02/2022 by Mark Bowling No releva t relationships by Mark Bowling, value=Consulting fee Removed 04/02/2022 by Mark Bowling No relevant relationships by Sulaiman Tijani

7.
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science ; 63(7):3148-A0043, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2057434

ABSTRACT

Purpose : Despite an increasing incidence of skin cancer over the last decade, studies have reported a decline in the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer during the COVID19 pandemic. We performed a retrospective cohort study using a large population-based cohort from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to determine how the pandemic has affected tumor size and morbidity in veterans with periocular non-melanoma skin cancer. Methods : Electronic health records from all VHA sites were accessed through the VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure (VINCI). Data were stored in the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) model and queried via SQL Server. ICD-10 and current procedural terminology codes were used to identify patients who received Mohs surgery for periocular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) between 08/01/2018 and 09/10/2021. A combination of structured algorithms and manual review were used to extract patient demographics, lesion characteristics, and surgical outcome at three time points, ie. pre-COVID, early, and late COVID. Unpaired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. Results : Patient characteristics were similar between pre- and post-COVID cohorts in terms of gender, age, race, and tumor type. The average number of Mohs periocular surgeries performed per week were 23.1% (7.31 vs 5.62) and 13.1% (7.49 vs 6.51) lower in the early and later pandemic, respectively, compared to similar pre-COVID timeframes by month (Figure 1). Mean lesion size (maximum diameter) was 1.35 cm larger post-COVID compared to pre-COVID (95% CI 0.19 2.51, P=0.022);however, the defect size remained similar (Figure 2). Stratifying by tumor type, the same trends were noted in BCC, particularly early in the pandemic. However, mean SCC lesion and defect sizes did not vary over time. Conclusions : Periocular Mohs surgery rates declined in the COVID pandemic across VHA. Lesions were larger particularly in the earlier phase of the pandemic for BCC. Future analyses using this cohort will attempt to determine if telehealth and travel time were associated with distinct outcomes.

8.
World J Clin Oncol ; 13(8): 725-728, 2022 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056017

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has marked the beginning of a new pandemic named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The World Health Organization has announced it as a health emergency that is of international concern. The disease has been reported to cause respiratory illness, pneumonia and even hinder the immunity of an individual. Individuals with disturbed immune responses have been found to be quite susceptible to this viral infection. Oral cancer patients are also at high risk in this pandemic situation and might encounter severe detrimental outcomes. Angiotensin receptors, documented in studies as the path of entry of this virus, are highly expressed in the epithelial cells of oral mucosa, making the group of individuals with oral cancers even more vulnerable. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer is another potential target for SARS-CoV-2. An exhaustion of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 cell receptors leads to protumoral effects, whereas a downregulation of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer leads to antitumoral effects. Thus, it causes a variation of the biological behavior of the tumor. This article focusses on the molecular mechanisms, effects and patho-physiology of COVID-19 in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The different molecular changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma in the background of COVID-19 will modify various environmental factors for this pathology and have an effect on the carcinogenesis process. Understanding the behavior of the tumor will help plan advanced treatment strategies for oral squamous cell carcinoma patients in the background of COVID-19.

9.
Case Reports in Oncology ; 15:848-853, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2053478

ABSTRACT

Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that renders patients susceptible to congenital anomalies, bone marrow failures, leukaemia, and solid malignancies. FA is caused by the loss of function of at least one gene in the FA/BRCA biological pathway, which is involved in DNA repair. Patients with FA have an increased risk of developing head and neck cancer, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Due to susceptibility of head and neck cancer at a very young age, relatively poor survival rate, low tolerance to oncologic interventions, and complexity of treatments, strict follow-up is mandatory to detect any changes or recurrence of SCC in the head and neck region in FA patients. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, but adjuvant therapy should be instituted when needed. This short report describes a rare case of lower lip SCC in FA and its management. It also highlights the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare practices. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Case Reports in Oncology is the property of Karger AG and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science ; 21(4):676-684, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043413

ABSTRACT

Background: Impacts of primary oncology surgical procedure can impede restoration objectives. Restoring oral function, comfort and aesthetics is a challenge due to limitations in the restorative treatment options. Methodology: Literature review on the responsibilities, role of maxillofacial prosthodontist, materails and retentive aids used for prosthesis, classification of maxillofacial prostheses, recent advancements in MFP and Workflow for the fabrication of obturator prostheses in the COVID-19 pandemic scenario. Case report on the fabrication of Holllow bulb definitive obturator during pandemic crisis. A 47 years old male patient reported for post-surgical evaluation in maxillary posterior region of oral cavity. The patient had partial maxillectomysurgical procedure of squamous cell carcinoma in the palate 5 years back. To replace the gap created, the patient was using interim obturator. He had facial asymmetry and collapse. Prosthodontic rehabilitation with one piece closed hollow bulb obturator was planned & subsequently fabricated for the patient. For our case considering the feasibility & ease of manipulation, heat activated acrylic resin was used for this particular patient for rehabilitation. The method described is easy, simple, time saving & economical. Bulb portion was hollow & made of heat cure resin, so weight was less & less chances of tissue irritation. Results: With the Covid-19 infection protocol measures taken definitive obturator was given to the maxillectomy patient to restore aesthetics, function and comfort as well. After insertion of prostheses mastication, deglutition and phonetics were improved. Breathing problems were resolved and aesthetics was improved. Conclusion: A simplified technical approach for the treatment of a patient with palatal defect of and other supportive structure has been presented in Covid-19 situation following the described infection prevention protocols. The technique presented offers a method of obtaining a detailed impression of the defect and promptly provides the patient with a light weight, easyto-use and flexible tissue-tolerant obturator.

11.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 12(10)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043625

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020, routine CT examination was recommended to hospitalized patients at some hospitals and discovered lung cancer patients at an early stage. This study aimed to investigate the detection efficacy of routine CT examination on early diagnosis of lung cancer, especially on pathological characteristics. METHODS: The epidemic of COVID-19 outbreak in January 2020 in China, and routine CT examination was recommended to hospitalized patients in June 2020 and ended in July 2021. Based on the time points, we compared the diagnosis efficacy between three periods: pre-period, peri-period, and the period of routine CT examination. RESULTS: During the period of routine CT examination, more early stages of lung cancer were detected and the tumor size was reduced to 2.14 cm from 3.21 cm at pre-period (p = 0.03). The proportion of lung adenocarcinoma and early stage adenocarcinoma was increased by 12% and 30% in the period of routine CT examination, with referral to the pre-period of CT examination (p < 0.05). A total of 61% of diagnosed patients had the wild type of TP53 gene during the period of routine CT examination, compared to 45% of patients at the pre-period of CT examination (p = 0.001). The median Ki-67 index was 15% among patients diagnosed at the period of routine CT examination and increased to 35% at the pre-period of CT examination (p < 0.001). The period of routine CT examination was associated with a 78% higher probability of detecting an early stage of adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.78, 95%CI 1.03, 3.08) but no significant association was observed for squamous cell carcinoma. From the pre-period to the period of routine CT examination, the proportion of female patients and non-smoking patients increased by 57% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Routine CT examination could detect more lung cancer at an early stage, especially for adenocarcinoma, and detect patients with less aggressive features. Further studies were warranted to confirm the findings.

12.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S1050, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041544

ABSTRACT

Background: The value of increased HER2 gene copy number (GCN) in NSCLC is unclear. In this study we defined its frequency and characterized a cohort of patients harboring it. Methods: Patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC enrolled in the Gustave Roussy MSN study (NCT02105168) between Oct. 2009 and Feb. 2016 were screened by FISH (positivity defined as HER2 GCN to centromeres ratio ≥ 2) and tested for other molecular alterations. Descriptive analyses of clinical-pathological data were performed, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: HER2 FISH tested positive in 22 of 250 screened patients (9%). Median age was 60 years (range 47-80), 68% (n=15) were male, 91% (n=20) were current or former tobacco smokers (median exposure 47 pack-year), 64% (n=14) had adenocarcinoma, 18% (n=4) squamous cell and 18% (n=4) large cell carcinoma. 91% (n=20) had an ECOG PS of 0 or 1. Stage IV with extra-thoracic involvement was the most common clinical presentation (64%, n=14). Overall, 95% of patients (n=21) had 1 or 2 metastatic sites at diagnosis (bone 32%, lung 27%, nodes 18%, liver 18%, brain 18%). In 9 patients (41%) 12 concurrent molecular alterations were detected: 5 KRAS mutation (3 G12C, 1 G12D, 1 G61H), 2 HER2 exon 20 insertion, 1 EGFR exon 19 deletion, 1 BRAF V600E mutation, 1 ALK rearrangement, 1 FGFR1 and 1 MET amplification. 18 patients received first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, with 33% (95% CI 16-56) objective response rate and 83% (95% CI 61-94) disease control rate. After a median follow-up of 28 months (95% CI 23-45), median PFS and OS were 5.9 (95% CI 3.4-11.0) and 15.3 (95% CI 10.3-NR) months, respectively. Median PFS was longer in patients with higher GCN. As further line of treatment, 5 patients received trastuzumab: 4 in combination with chemotherapy and 1 as monotherapy, with 1 stabilization of disease as best response. 3 patients received nivolumab (1 partial response and 1 stable disease) and 3 a targeted therapy (anti ALK, EGFR, BRAF). Conclusions: Increased HER2 GCN was found in 9% of patients with unresectable NSCLC, was not correlated to particular clinical characteristics, but frequently occurred with other molecular alterations. Its clinical actionability and the correlation with protein expression deserve further characterization. Clinical trial identification: NCT02105168. Legal entity responsible for the study: Gustave Roussy. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: M. Tagliamento: Other, Personal, Other, Travel grants: Roche, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Takeda, Eli Lilly;Other, Personal, Writing Engagements, Honoraria as medical writer: Novartis, Amgen. E. Auclin: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen, Sanofi. E. Rouleau: Financial Interests, Institutional, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, Roche, Amgen, GSK;Financial Interests, Institutional, Invited Speaker: Clovis, BMS;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding, Data base: AstraZeneca. A. Bayle: Non-Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, Principal/Sub-Investigator of Clinical Trials: AbbVie, Adaptimmune, Adlai Nortye USA Inc, Aduro Biotech, Agios Pharmaceuticals, Amgen, Argen-X Bvba, Astex Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca Ab, Aveo, Basilea Pharmaceutica International Ltd, Bayer Healthcare Ag, Bbb Technologies Bv, BeiGene, BicycleTx Ltd, Non-Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: AstraZeneca, BMS, Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK, INCA, Janssen Cilag, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, drug supplied: AstraZeneca, Bayer, BMS, Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK, MedImmune, Merck, NH TherAGuiX, Pfizer, Roche. F. Barlesi: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly Oncology, F. Hoffmann–La Roche Ltd, Novartis, Merck, Mirati, MSD, Pierre Fabre, Pfizer, Sanofi-Aventis, Seattle Genetics, Takeda;Non-Financial Interests, Principal Investigator: AstraZeneca, BMS, Merck, Pierre Fabre, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. D. Planchard: Financial I terests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, BMS, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Samsung, Celgene, AbbVie, Daiichi Sankyo, Janssen;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: AstraZeneca, Novartis, Pfizer, priME Oncology, Peer CME, Samsung, AbbVie, Janssen;Non-Financial Interests, Principal Investigator, Institutional financial interests: AstraZeneca, BMS, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Daiichi Sankyo, Sanofi-Aventis, Pierre Fabre;Non-Financial Interests, Principal Investigator: AbbVie, Sanofi, Janssen. B. Besse: Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: 4D Pharma, AbbVie, Amgen, Aptitude Health, AstraZeneca, BeiGene, Blueprint Medicines, Boehringer Ingelheim, Celgene, Cergentis, Cristal Therapeutics, Daiichi Sankyo, Eli Lilly, GSK, Janssen, Onxeo, Ose Immunotherapeutics, Pfizer, Roche-Genentech, Sanofi, Takeda, Tolero Pharmaceuticals;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Chugai Pharmaceutical, EISAI, Genzyme Corporation, Inivata, Ipsen, Turning Point Therapeutics. L. Mezquita: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Takeda, AstraZeneca, Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche, BMS, AstraZeneca, Takeda;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant, SEOM Beca Retorno 2019: BI;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant, ESMO TR Research Fellowship 2019: BMS;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant, COVID research Grant: Amgen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Invited Speaker: Inivata, Stilla. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

13.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S904-S905, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041538

ABSTRACT

Background: CSCC is highly immune-responsive;a prior pilot study demonstrated a high rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) or major pathologic response (MPR, ≤10% viable tumor), using cemiplimab anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) therapy in the neoadjuvant setting. Here, we present the primary analysis of a confirmatory, open-label, multicenter, Phase 2, single-arm trial of neoadjuvant cemiplimab in pts with resectable Stage II–IV (M0) CSCC. Methods: Pts received cemiplimab 350 mg IV q3W for up to 4 doses before surgery. The primary endpoint was pCR rate per independent central pathologic review (ICPR). Key secondary endpoints included MPR rate per ICPR, objective response rate (ORR;complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]) per RECIST v1.1, investigator-assessed pCR and MPR, safety and tolerability. Results: At data cutoff date of 01 Dec 2021, 79 pts were enrolled (67 male;median age 73.0 yrs [range, 66.0–81.0];ECOG performance status 0 (n=60) and 1 (n=19) with stage II (n=5), III (n=38), or IV(M0) (n =36) disease;62 pts received all 4 doses (median number of doses given (Q1:Q3), 4 (4:4);70 pts underwent surgery. The study met its primary endpoint: pCR was observed in 40 (50.6%) pts (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.1–62.1%). MPR was observed in an additional 10 (12.7%) pts (95% CI, 6.2–22.0%). ORR was 68.4% (95% CI, 56.9–78.4) (5 CR, 49 PR, 16 stable disease, 8 progressive disease (PD), 1 non evaluable. Reasons 9 pts did not have surgery: 3 responders declined surgery, 2 lost to follow-up or noncompliance, 2 had inoperable PD, 2 due to AE. Fourteen (17.7%) pts experienced Grade ≥3 AE. Four pts died due to AEs: 1 exacerbation of cardiac failure, 2 myocardial infarctions, and 1 COVID-19 pneumonia. The most common AEs regardless of attribution (all grades) were fatigue (30.4%), rash maculo-papular (13.9%), diarrhea (13.9%) and nausea (13.9%). Conclusions: The pCR + MPR of 63.3% by ICPR in pts with Stage II–IV (M0) CSCC is the highest observed in a multicenter anti-PD-1 neoadjuvant monotherapy study for any solid tumor type. The safety profile of neoadjuvant cemiplimab is consistent with previous anti-PD-1 monotherapy experience. Ongoing follow-up will describe disease-free survival. Clinical trial identification: NCT04154943. Editorial acknowledgement: Medical writing support was provided by John G Facciponte, PhD, of Prime, Knutsford, UK, funded by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Sanofi. Legal entity responsible for the study: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Sanofi. Funding: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Sanofi. Disclosure: N. Gross: Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: PDS Biotechnology, Shattuck Labs and Genzyme;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: PDS Biotechnology, Shattuck Labs and Genzyme. D.M. Miller: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Castle Biosciences, EMD Serono, Merck KGaA, Merck Sharpe & Dome, Pfizer, Regeneron, Sanofi Genzyme;Financial Interests, Personal, Ownership Interest: Checkpoint Therapeutics;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Kartos Therapeutics, NeoImmune Tech, Inc., Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. N. Khushanlani: Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Bristol Myers Squibb, HUYA Bioscience International, Merck, Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Celgene, Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: EMD Serono, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Genentech, AstraZeneca (data safety monitoring committee), Merck, Array Biopharma, Jounce Therapeutics, Immunocore, Bristol Myers Squibb, HUYA Bioscience International;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, honoraria: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Bellicum Pharmaceuticals, Mazor Robotics, Amarin, Transenetrix. V. Divi: Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Genentech. E.S. Ruiz: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Genentech, Leo Pharmaceuticals, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi;Financial Int rests, Personal, Advisory Role, consulting fees: Genentech, Leo Pharmaceuticals, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Member of the Board of Directors: Checkpoint Therapeutics. E.J. Lipson: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Advisory board and consulting fees: Bristol Myers-Squibb, Eisai, Genentech, Immunocore, Instil Bio, MacroGenics, Merck, Natera, Nektar Therapeutics, Odonate Therapeutics, OncoSec, Pfizer, Rain Therapeutics, Regeneron, Sanofi;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Bristol Myers Squibb, Merck, Regeneron. F. Meier: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Travel support, speaker’s fees or advisor’s honoraria: Bristol Myers Squibb, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novartis, Pierre Fabre, Roche and Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Novartis and Roche. P.L. Swiecicki: Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Ascentage Pharma, Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Prelude Therapeutics, Elevar Therapeutics, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. J.L. Atlas: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi, and Bristol Myers Squibb. J.L. Geiger: Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Alkermes, Debio, Merck, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Roche/Genentech;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Exelixis, Merck and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. A. Hauschild: Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Other, Institutional grants, speaker’s honoraria and consultancy fees: Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novartis, Pierre Fabre, Provectus and Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, Institutional grants and consultancy fees: EMD Serono, Philogen and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: OncoSec Medical. J.H. Choe: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Exelixis, Coherus Biosciences, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. B.G.M. Hughes: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: AstraZeneca, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eisai, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Pfizer and Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Amgen. S. Yoo: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. K. Fenech: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. M.D. Mathias: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. H. Han: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. M.G. Fury: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. D. Rischin: Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Genentech, Sanofi, Kura Oncology, Roche, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Merck KGaA, Bristol Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, ALX Oncology;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Merck Sharp & Dohme, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline, Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck Sharp & Dohme, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline, Bristol Myers Squibb. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

14.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics ; 114(3):e610-e611, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2036128

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second most common skin cancer with an incidence of 1 million cases per year in the US. While the surgical cure rate for CSCC is >95%, some patients have high risk of recurrence as assessed by immune status, primary disease stage, extent of nodal involvement, presence of extracapsular extension, and prior treatment. Postoperative radiation therapy (RT) is recommended for these patients, but relapse with locoregional recurrence or distant metastases may still occur. C-POST is evaluating the efficacy of cemiplimab as adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk CSCC. Here, we provide a summary of the most recent study protocol amendment. C-POST is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter Phase 3 study to evaluate cemiplimab as adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk CSCC, based on surgical and clinicopathologic findings, who completed surgery and postoperative RT (minimum total dose 50 Gy, within 10 weeks before randomization) (NCT03969004). Patients with at least one of the following high-risk features are eligible: (1) nodal disease with (a) extracapsular extension and at least one node ≥20 mm or (b) at least three lymph nodes positive on surgical pathology report, regardless of extracapsular extension;(2) in-transit metastases;(3) T4 lesion;(4) perineural invasion;and (5) recurrent CSCC with at least one other risk factor. Patients with CSCC involvement in at least three lymph nodes (feature 1b) were added to the eligibility criteria, as this group was found to be at similar risk of CSCC recurrence as the initially planned study population. Protocol amendment now allows patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who are not on active treatment to be enrolled. The study has two parts. In Part 1 (blinded), patients are randomly assigned 1:1 to receive cemiplimab 350 mg or placebo intravenously every 3 weeks for 12 weeks, followed by cemiplimab 700 mg or placebo every 6 weeks for 36 weeks. In optional Part 2 (unblinded), patients in the placebo arm who experience disease recurrence and patients in the cemiplimab arm who experience disease recurrence ≥3 months after completion of 48-week treatment in Part 1 are eligible to receive open-label cemiplimab 350 mg Q3W for up to 96 weeks. The trial is expected to enroll 412 patients from about 100 sites in North and South America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific regions. Key primary objective is to compare disease-free survival;secondary objectives include evaluating overall survival, freedom from locoregional relapse, and distant relapse with adjuvant cemiplimab versus placebo in patients with high-risk CSCC. This study is once again open for enrolment following interruptions owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not applicable (trial in progress) Not applicable (trial in progress) [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics is the property of Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

15.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics ; 114(3):e308-e309, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2036099

ABSTRACT

Severe oral mucositis (SOM;gr 3–4 on the WHO scale) occurs in about 70% of patients receiving chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Current treatment approaches focus primarily on symptoms. (Elad 2020) Avasopasem (AVA;GC4419) is an investigational selective dismutase mimetic that rapidly converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, potentially interrupting SOM development. (Riley 2007, Sonis 2001) In a phase 2 study, AVA vs placebo reduced SOM duration, incidence, and severity (gr 4 incidence) in patients with locally advanced HNC undergoing CRT (Anderson 2019), prompting initiation of the phase 3 ROMAN study (NCT03689712). The objective of the phase 2 EUSOM open-label trial was to assess the feasibility (safety and efficacy) of a vasospasm in European patients receiving CRT for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In EUSOM (NCT04529850), patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic HNC in Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, Spain and Switzerland received AVA 90 mg IV before each daily fraction (2.0–2.2 Gy, M–F) of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT;60–72 Gy over appx. 7 weeks), with investigator's choice of cisplatin 100 mg/m2 q3wks x 3 or 40 mg/m2 weekly x 6–7. WHO grade of OM was assessed twice weekly through IMRT then weekly for 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was safety. SOM incidence, severity (gr 4), and duration were secondary endpoints. N=38 enrolled, 37 (median age 61 [range 45–79];81% male) received ≥1 dose of AVA, 33 received ≥ 60 Gy IMRT and ≥ 5 wks AVA (per protocol). Primary tumor: oral (n=15), oropharyngeal (n=20), or other (n=2). AVA median duration of exposure was 6.7 weeks. Median cumulative IMRT dose was 69.3 Gy (range 14–74). Mean cumulative cisplatin dose was 245.5 mg/m2 and 212.3 mg/m2, respectively, for patients receiving q3w (11/37) and weekly (26/37) schedules;91% and 58%, respectively, received ≥200 mg/m2. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) were lymphopenia, nausea, leukopenia, and anemia. Hypotension occurred in 19% (n=7, 3 gr 3) and was the most frequent AVA-related AE (n=5). Serious AEs (N=18;49%) included pneumonia (n=3), COVID-19 (n=2), and hypotension (n=2, 1 AVA-related leading to AVA discontinuation). SOM efficacy for the full and per protocol population (≥60 Gy RT and ≥25 infusion of AVA;n=33) are shown in the table. The AE profile observed in EUSOM was comparable to published data and suggested that vasospasm was well tolerated in these patients. SOM incidence appeared lower than historic expectations. Funder Galera Therapeutics, Inc. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics is the property of Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(9):XD01-XD04, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033406

ABSTRACT

Pandemic was new experience for entire humanity. Medical fraternity was no exception. The cases of mucormycosis were on the rise during the second wave of the pandemic. Presented here are two cases which were combination of two diseases, one of which was squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck region and other one was sinonasal mucormycosis. Both patients were diabetics and had history of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection in past. Our literature search doesn't reveal any previously reported cases of this rare combination. There were certain challenges in management. Both diseases were lethal and treatment of one cannot be prioritised over other. Challenges in managing those cases were, reconstruction planning, perioperative management and postsurgery adjuvant therapy. In absence of previous experience to treat this combination or any literature available new treatment protocol were formulated. Cases were discussed in multidisciplinary team meetings and treatment plans were formulated. Mucormycosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma both were operated and reconstructed in same sitting. In one patient revision endoscopic debridement had to be done. Amphotericin B was started once diagnosis was confirmed. Patients were followed-up on weekly basis during first month and imaging was done every 15 days. Both patients had satisfactory recovery without any sign of progression of mucormycosis. Adjuvant radiation was given in both cases at appropriate time. At follow-up both patients were free from disease for six months. From these unique experiences it can be recommended that combination of sinonasal mucormycosis and squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck is very rare. Both diseases can be treated simultaneously. Excision and reconstruction can be done in single sitting. There is no need to delay or avoid adjuvant radiation. Multidisciplinary team approach is the key for treatment.

18.
Journal of Thoracic Oncology ; 17(9):S225, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031515

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Definitive chemoradiaotherapy (dCRT) is an option for patients with lung cancer who are medically inoperable or have unresectable locally advanced disease. The local recurrence rate after dCRT is 30% and the prognosis is poor. Salvage surgery, or surgical resection of recurrent disease following dCRT, is one therapeutic option, however, optimal therapy for locoregional recurrences or residual disease is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of salvage lung resection. Methods: This is a single centre retrospective database review. Patients eligible for the study received definitive chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both followed by salvage pulmonary resection for local recurrence or residual disease. Patient characteristics and outcomes were examined. Results: Sixteen patients (11 male, 5 female) out of 201 that met the inclusion criteria treated between January 2017 and August 2020 were identified with a median follow-up time of 21 months (Q1, Q3 8-37.5). The median patient age was 68. All 16 patients received radiation, 7 of whom received less than 59 Gy and 9 received greater than 59 Gy. The rationale for dCRT varied as 6 patients had disease considered to be unresectable, 5 patients were originally considered to be medically inoperable, 4 patients had a preference for non-surgical management initially, and 1 patient pursued dCRT due to uncertainty of surgical options due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The median time from radiotherapy to surgery was 22 months (Q1, Q3 14.25-27.5). The extent of salvage resections differed as 5 patients had wedge resections, 4 had lobectomies, and 5 patients had more than one lobe resected. No pneumonectomies were preformed. Two resections were aborted in the operating room due to upstaging at the time of resection. The final pathology was 9 adenocarcinomas, 5 squamous cell carcinomas, 1 adenosquamous carcinoma and 1 non-malignant (nodular fibroblastic scarring with surrounding focal organizing pneumonia). Median procedure time was 3h10.5m. Adhesions were noted in 12 cases (75%). Ninety-day mortality was 0%. Overall survival at most recent follow-up was 75% (12 patients). Conclusions: Salvage pulmonary resection after dCRT can be performed with low morbidity and mortality rates and is a good option for treatment of recurrent or residual disease after dCRT. Keywords: Early stage lung cancer treatment, Salvage pulmonary resection, Definitive chemoradiaotherapy

19.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB73, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031379

ABSTRACT

Background: Delays due to COVID-19 impacted dermatology. Two Italian studies found significant decreases in melanoma diagnosis (MM) during the lockdowns, while a predicted growth model of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) found delaying excision results in significant tumor upstaging. Objective: We hypothesized that the COVID-19 lockdown increased tumor severity and postoperative morbidity of MM and cSCC. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of all newly diagnosed MM and cSCC treated with Mohs surgery during 2019 (pre-lockdown) and 2020 (post-lockdown) period. We collected data on the number of cases, tumor characteristics, extent of surgery, and time to treatment. Results: Our analysis (n = 554) found no significant difference in the number of cases of cSCC or MM between the 2 years (P =.675), the preoperative size of cSCCs or MMs (P =.68, P =.786), cSCC cases with flap or graft repairs (P =.076), or cSCC cases with aggressive histologic features (P =.243). There were significantly fewer days from biopsy to surgery in 2020 for MM (27.6 days compared with 23.8 days;P =.041) and cSCC (41.5 days compared with 33 days;P =.037);however, there were significantly more multistage Mohs surgeries for cSCC in 2020 (39 versus 69;P =.005). Conclusion: The COVID-19 lockdown resulted in a significantly increased number of multistage Mohs surgeries for the treatment of cSCC. For both cSCC and MM, the lockdown did not impact the number of cancers treated, the size of the tumors, the complexity of the repairs, or the presence of aggressive histology, while it did positively impact time to treatment.

20.
J Pers Med ; 12(8)2022 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although telemedicine emerged more than 100 years ago, the recent pandemic underlined the role of remote assessment of different diseases. The diagnoses of cutaneous conditions, especially malignant lesions, have placed significant stress on the fast-track pathway for general practitioners (GPs), dermatologists, and plastic surgeons. The aim of the study was to compare (pre- and during the pandemic) the ability of professionals to face the challenge. METHODS: The study was composed of 1943 consecutive patients (mean age 61.9 ± 18.3, 53.8% female) assessed by GPs, face-to-face (988 patients, 50.8%, between October 2019 and March 2020) and by virtual (video/photo) visits (955 patients, 49.2%, between March 2020 and October 2020) for skin lesions, and referred to secondary care via the two-week wait pathway for suspected skin malignancy. RESULTS: The two groups had similar primary skin malignancies identification rates (24.3% vs. 22.1%, p = 0.25). The virtual visits identified squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) better than face-to-face consultations (p = 0.04), but identified basal cell carcinoma less-well (BCC, p = 0.02), whereas malignant melanoma (MM) was equally identified in the two groups (p = 0.13). There was no difference in the median breach time (days) of the two-week wait pathway (12, IQR = 6 vs. 12, IQR = 5, p = 0.16) in the two groups. Virtual assessments (by GPs) of skin lesions suspected of malignancy, and referred via the two-week wait pathway, increased the probability of diagnosing SCC by 42.9% (p = 0.03), while for malignant melanomas, face-to-face and virtual consultations were alike (p = 0.12). CONCLUSIONS: The equivalent outcomes in the management of skin cancers (SCC, MM) via the two-week pathway through virtual consultations and face-to-face appointments underline the role of telemedicine as a reliable alternative to face-to-face assessments.

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