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1.
Hospital Employee Health ; 41(7):1-4, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1929171

ABSTRACT

The healthcare community is pushing back against OSHA adopting a more flexible final COVID-19 rule that could change with public health guidelines. The agency is finalizing its Emergency Temporary Standard to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19.

2.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 836950, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928448

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the highly infectious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) renders a huge physical and psychological risk to the public, especially to the medics. Additionally, self-leadership has proven to improve self-efficacy and mediate tension, such as nervousness and depression. Therefore, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to explore the association of self-leadership with acute stress responses (ASRs) and acute stress disorders (ASDs) in medics during the COVID-19 epidemic. Methods: Self-reported online questionnaires were administered, and 627 participants were finally included. The data were analyzed using the univariate analysis and the logistical regression model to identify whether self-leadership and sociodemographic and epidemic characteristics were associated with mental health, including ASRs and ASDs. Results: Initially, 790 medics responded. Of these, 627 remained after excluding for invalid questionnaires and those with a substantial amount of missing data. Therefore, the participation validity rate was 79.37%. Frontline medical staff (ß = 0.338; p < 0.001), possibility of infection among people around the medic being mild (ß = 0.141; p < 0.001), subjective estimation of epidemic duration being 3-6 months (ß = 0.074; p < 0.05), self-sets (ß = -0.022; p < 0.001), self-punishment (ß = 0.229; p < 0.001), belief hypothesis and evaluation (ß = -0.147; p < 0.05), and successful foresight (ß = 0.105; p < 0.05) were statistically significant with ASRs. Marital status [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =1.813; 95% CI (1.141, 2.881); p = 0.012], being a frontline worker [AOR = 25.760; 95% CI (14.220, 46.667); p < 0.001], visiting Hubei in the previous 14 days [AOR = 3.656; 95% CI (1.500, 8.911); p = 0.004], self-punishment [AOR = 1.352; 95% CI (1.180, 1.548); p < 0.001], and self-dialogue [AOR = 1.256; 95% CI (11.063, 1.483); p = 0.007] were the risk factors for ASD. Conversely, having frontline medical staff in one's family [AOR = 0.523; 95% CI (0.297, 0.923); p = 0.025], self-sets [AOR = 0.814; 95% CI (0.715, 0.826); p = 0.002], and belief hypothesis and evaluation [AOR = 0.796; 95% CI (0.672, 0.943); p = 0.038] were the protective factors. Conclusion: The special working environment of the COVID-19 epidemic resulted in ASR and ASD. Notably, findings revealed a positive association between ASR symptoms and frontline medical staff, the subjective estimation of epidemic duration, self-punishment, and successful foresight. Nevertheless, marital status, having visited Hubei in the previous 14 days, and self-dialogue were the risk factors accounting for ASD symptoms. Surprisingly, having frontline medical staff in one's family, self-sets, and belief hypothesis and evaluation had potential benefits for ASD symptoms.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924231

ABSTRACT

New York City (NYC) was an epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in broad economic, social, and emotional consequences in the lives of individuals. The current study examined associations between pandemic-related stressors and adverse mental health symptoms among NYC parents/caregivers. Community-based participatory research was used to develop a survey, and logistic regression models were utilized to assess associations between factors including disruptions in child routines and remote learning, and parent-reported symptoms of stress, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Some 91.0% of parents reported stress and 41.2, 26.6, and 33.7% reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD, respectively. Most parents (87.6%) reported cancellation of at least one child activity. Of the parents, 60.3% reported that their children participated in remote learning and the majority (70.3%) reported feeling overwhelmed by it. Having more cancelled child activities was associated with higher odds of reported mental health symptoms, with not being able to play outside associated with higher odds of anxiety (1.80 (1.26, 2.58), p = 0.001), depression (1.93 (1.29, 2.91), p = 0.002), PTSD (1.64 (1.13, 2.39), p = 0.009), and stress (2.34 (1.27, 4.44), p = 0.008). Feeling overwhelmed by remote learning was also associated with higher odds of all four outcomes. Pre-existing mental illness, lower resilience scores, and lower socioeconomic status emerged as additional factors associated with symptoms of mental illness. These findings highlight the importance of resources to minimize adverse psychological effects among vulnerable families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
4.
Minerva Psychiatry ; 63(2):104-110, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1918286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Paramedical personnel are in direct contact with COVID-19 patients and function in a high-stress environment, contributing to the development of psychological distress. The present study aimed to examine levels of stress, anxiety, and depression among prehospital paramedics caring for suspected and confirmed COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 72 prehospital emergency centers (city and road) affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Scielices, Kerman, Iran. Using the standard DASS-21 Questionnaire, levels of stress. anxiety, and depression were assessed in paramedics (N.=254). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (Mean, SD, frequency, percentage) and analytic statistics such as Kolmogorov-Smimov, Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS 20 (IMB, Armonk. NY, USA). RESULTS: The mean scores for depression (6.30 +/- 4.91). stress (8.71 +/- 1:4.73) and anxiety (5.32 +/- 5.23) in paramedical personnel were at moderate levels. A significant difference was observed when considering level of education, work experience, work position and duty hours per month (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pre-hospital professionals arc more exposed to numerous stressors, including the emotional strain of direct patient care. dangerous working conditions, and a higher workload as compared with other occupations, especially during this pandemic. Periodic mental health assessment of paramedics can play an important role in improving the quality of services provided to their communities, particularly during challenging times.

5.
JAMA Health Forum ; 3(6):e222299-e222299, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1905750
6.
Annals of Clinical Psychiatry ; 33(2):101-107, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887700

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). To address this issue, it is essential to determine levels of anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress, and sources of stress, and to identify subgroups of HCWs at a higher risk of adverse mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of symptoms of mental illness in HCWs in the area surrounding Detroit, Michigan. The online survey included questions about demographics, health and clinical factors, and sources of stress. Several tools were used to assess psychiatric symptoms among HCWs, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item assessment, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5. The adequacy of personal protective equipment, patient resources, and training for highly contagious diseases were rated. Results: The sample (N = 129) was predominantly female (51.2%) and White (65.9%), with 30.2% screening positive for clinical follow-up to assess anxiety, 20.9% for moderate to severe depression, and 16.3% for elevated traumatic stress. Differences were found by self-reported psychiatric diagnosis and chronic conditions, and role on treatment teams. Conclusions: Frontline HCWs demonstrate high levels of stress and trauma symptoms. Timely screening and accommodations may be needed during health care crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 845741, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865469

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 survivor's population is often associated with a long term impact on mental and psychological health. Recent included studies have also stated affliction of mental health due to fear of virus and preventive policies among the college students. Objectives: The research was conducted to find the psychological and mental impacts of SARS-CoV-2 affliction among the students' survivors in the university. Methods: The study design of the experiment was cross-sectional, sampling technique was non probability and sampling method being applied was convenience sampling. IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 was used for analyses. Descriptive data was examined and results were showed as mean and standard deviations, percentages, frequencies for continuous variables of IES-R scale (Intrusion, Avoidance, and Hyperarousal) using the total sample of n = 34. Results: Out of 34 only 24 student survivors responded to the online survey post COVID-19 recovery, with an overall participation level of 71%. Grading was given for the total IES-R score which was subdivided into a predefined range. Out of 24 participants, 9 (38%) participants showed the symptoms of mild (n = 2)-severe (n = 7) psychological impacts. On correlation of factors total IES-R score and taste and sense of smell were moderately correlated. The ordinal regression for complete loss of sense of taste and smell was also significant. Conclusion: The results from IES-R evaluation clearly outlines the presence of psychological sequels post recovery of COVID-19 episodes among the young college survivors. Complete loss of sense of smell and taste may be an indicator of psychological sequelae as compared to reduce sense of smell.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Students , Survivors/psychology
8.
Heliyon ; 8(5): e09446, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851162

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2020, the Peruvian state introduced quarantine as a measure to control the spread of SARS-CoV-2. It has been suggested that being in quarantine is associated with the development of symptoms of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The present study aims to explore the factors associated with the development of PTSD in a post-quarantine context due to COVID-19 in medical students. Objectives: To evaluate the factors associated with the development of post-quarantine PTSD symptoms in medical students from a Peruvian university. Methods: Analytical cross-sectional study. The objective will be developed after the lifting of the quarantine in Peru. Medical students enrolled during the 2020-01 academic cycle of the Peruvian University of Applied Sciences will be included. To collect the outcome variable (PTSD), the Impact of Event Scale - Revised (IES-R) will be used. The associated factors will be collected through a form that will be validated by experts and piloted in the field. The crude and adjusted coefficients will be calculated, using bivariate and multivariate linear regression models, respectively. We will use the "manual forward selection" technique to obtain a final model with minimally sufficient fit. After each model comparison and decision, multicollinearity will be evaluated with the variance inflation factor and matrix of independent variables. Results: Not having health insurance, having relatives or close friends who contracted the disease and having a lower family income are factors associated with PTSD in the post-quarantine context of the COVID-19 pandemic in medical students at a Peruvian university. Conclusions: Clinical evaluation is important for medical students with a high probability of having PTSD symptoms. We recommend conducting a longitudinal study to identify causality and other unstudied factors related to PTSD.

9.
Enferm Clin ; 32(2): 92-102, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788059

ABSTRACT

Aim: To analyse the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in nursing staff and the variables that may contribute to its development. Method: Cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire given to nurses, nursing assistants and nursing supervisors in June 2020. It included sociodemographic, mental health, occupational, COVID-19 related variables, Modified Risk Perception Scale (modified RPS) score, Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS) score for the assessment of PTSD. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: Of the 344 participants, 88.7% were women and 93.6% cared for infected patients; 45.9% had PTSD (DTS≥40). The variables associated with PTSD were previous PTSD symptoms (OR=6.1, 95% CI [2.68-14.03]), death of a family member or friend due to COVID-19 (OR=2.3, 95% CI [1.22-4.39]), and higher scores on the modified RPS (OR= 1.1, 95% CI [1.07-1.31]). Higher BRS scores were associated with a lower risk of PTSD (OR=0.4, 95% CI [0.31-0.68]). Conclusions: The prevalence of PTSD in nursing staff is high, mainly in professionals with previous PTSD symptoms, family members or friends deceased from COVID-19, high risk perception and/or low resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
10.
Non-conventional in French | International HTA Database, Grey literature | ID: grc-753846

ABSTRACT

Objectives:The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, where the infection can be asymptomatic or result in coronavirus 2 disease (COVID-19), was declared an international public health emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. The prolonged pandemic and health measures aimed at reducing its spread are having different economic, social, health and psychological consequences for the entire population. Beyond the general population, those infected with the virus are more likely to experience a range of effects on their physical and psychological health. The Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS) therefore asked the Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS) to produce a state-of knowledge report on screening tools for psychological symptoms, the best nonpharmacological practices for reducing such symptoms, and the practices to be avoided in individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition. Conclusions:RESULTS: With regards to tools for screening and monitoring psychological symptoms, no scientific studies were found that present validated tools for individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition or, more broadly, for individuals in the acute phase of COVID-19. However, five clinical practice guidelines on post-COVID-19 conditions present various tools which could be relevant with such clientele, including tools commonly used to screen for anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress. There is also a consensus among the experts consulted to the effect that psychological symptoms should be screened and monitored in individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition, the same way as physical and cognitive symptoms. However, these experts are faced with the absence of specific screening and monitoring tools for psychological symptoms in this particular patient population and the lack of psychosocial professionals with the necessary skills to manage them. No scientific studies on nonpharmacological practices for reducing psychological symptoms in individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition were found. However, six scientific studies on the effectiveness of practices to reduce psychological symptoms of individuals in the acute phase of COVID-19 were considered. Among these studies, eleven nonpharmacological practices aiming to reduce psychological symptoms of individuals in the acute phase of COVID-19 were evaluated. When described, these practices are based mainly on 1) the cognitive-behavioural approach, 2) relaxation/meditation activities, and 3) individual psychological care. These practices can be self-administered or carried out by different professionals (a physician, nurse or psychologist). They are generally provided over a brief period of time, and the sessions are short. In general, the use of practices aimed at reducing anxiety symptoms or depressive symptoms seems to be effective for individuals in the acute phase of the infection. However, with the current state of scientific knowledge, we are unable to rule on the effectiveness of practices for reducing posttraumatic stress symptoms in individuals in the acute phase of infection. Moreover, three clinical practice guidelines recommend providing psychological support, as needed, at all stages of the follow-up for post-COVID-19 conditions. The clinical practice guidelines also recommend that psychological services for symptoms of anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress be provided to individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition and moderate to severe psychological symptoms. No publication has reported practices to avoid in the management of psychological symptoms in persons with a postCOVID-19 condition. CONCLUSION: With the current absence of scientific studies specific to individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition, the findings of this report are based on the literature more broadly concerning people infected with COVID-19 to identify screening and monitoring tools for psychological symptoms and nonpharmacological practices for reducing them. Therefore, the work done in this state-of-knowledge report does not allow to rule on the generalizability of the findings to individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition. It should also be noted that little information on the management of psychological symptoms is currently presented in the clinical practice guidelines on post-COVID-19 conditions. As well, the analysis of the perspectives shared by psychosocial and medical experts during consultations makes it possible to document issues relating to the management of psychological symptoms in individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition. However, these consultations do not allow to claim the saturation of the perspectives. Despite certain limitations, this state-of-knowledge reports is a source of information for health and social services network personnel about the screening and monitoring tools and nonpharmacological practices currently in use, and about the issues encountered by stakeholders. Unfortunately, the knowledge from the literature and the consultations is limited, which makes it difficult to recommend tools and practices for managing psychological symptoms associated with post-COVID-19 conditions. Beyond the scientific monitoring for new publications on the subject, further work is needed to determine whether certain tools and practices for individuals with common mental disorders or chronic illnesses could be adapted and used to meet the needs of those with a post-COVID-19 condition. Methods:A synthesis of the available scientific and experiential knowledge was conducted through 1) a literature review (scientific articles and clinical practice guidelines) and 2) consultations with nine medical and psychosocial experts involved with individuals with a post-COVID-19 condition.

11.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1096-1104, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784697

ABSTRACT

AIM: To analyse the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examine its related factors among nurses who worked during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Daegu, South Korea. BACKGROUND: Nurses are a high-risk population for PTSD, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was conducted to identify the nursing work environmental factors that should be addressed to reduce PTSD. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, 365 nurses were enrolled. Their characteristics (intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, and COVID-19-related) and PTSD Checklist-5 scores were analysed. RESULTS: The average PTSD score was 14.98 ± 15.94, and 16.5% of the participants had a high risk of PTSD. Nurses were more likely to have PTSD if they were married (odds ratio = 3.02, p = .013) and when nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses were low (odds ratio = 3.81, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The nursing work environment was found to be associated with PTSD. Therefore, interventions are necessary to increase nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support for nurses to reduce the risk of PTSD among nurses. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Effective professional and social support and interventions to improve nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses are needed to reduce PTSD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
12.
Nurse Leader ; 20(2):127-133, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1778377

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has created serious emotional distress for health care workers. Staffing shortages and a fraught political landscape have made it more challenging for health care organizations to honor their core values, whereas burnout, PTSD, and moral injury have made it more difficult, if not impossible, for caregivers to live up to their personal values. This article describes the problem and presents 7 recommendations for health care leaders.

13.
Int Braz J Urol ; 48(3): 512-547, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775505

ABSTRACT

AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether there is an interaction between the COVID-19 pandemic, demographic characteristics and erectile/sexual (E/S) function in individuals from Latin America. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study which included Latin American individuals over 18 years old, recruited through social media and interviewed between July and August 2020 by online surveys (Google Forms) in Portuguese and Spanish languages. The E/S function was evaluated through the following questionnaires: Simplified International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI); while post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic was assessed through the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R). The data was analyzed by T Student, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, with significance determined by the Wald test (p<0.05), using the R software v4.0. RESULTS: Out of the 2016 individuals that responded to the survey, 1986 were included and 743 of them presented E/S dysfunction. PTSD occurrence was greater among people with E/S dysfunction when compared to those without E/S dysfunction, in the total score (males: IES-R=26.54[±19.17] and females: IES-R=35.92[±19.25]) and also in the three domains. It was found that those who do not live with a partner were 74% more likely to have E/S dysfunction, but living with a partner during the pandemic had a greater impact on E/S function. CONCLUSION: A negative interaction between the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and erectile/sexual function of the Latin American population was observed, with greater implications among the individuals who live with their partners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Erectile Dysfunction , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Erectile Dysfunction/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics
14.
East Asian Arch Psychiatry ; 32(1): 5-10, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766172

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to examine the rates of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after hospital discharge among COVID-19 survivors and to determine the associated risk factors. METHODS: Adult COVID-19 survivors discharged from hospitals between March 2020 and March 2021 were asked to complete a questionnaire at 4 weeks after discharge. The Chinese version of the 22-item Impact of Event Scale - Revised (IES-R) was used to measure symptoms of PTSD. The 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess symptoms of major depressive disorder. The 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) was used to measure symptoms of generalised anxiety disorder. The rates of anxiety, depression, and PTSD among discharged patients were determined, as were associations between psychosocial factors and outcome measures and predictors for moderate-tosevere symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD. RESULTS: 96 men and 103 women aged 18 to 81 years returned the completed questionnaire. 12.1% to 20.1% of them reported symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, or depression. Higher symptom severity was associated with higher perceived life threat, lower emotional support, lower disease severity upon admission, and longer hospital stay. Women had more PTSD symptoms than men, particularly when knowing someone under quarantine. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 survivors with higher perceived life threat, lower emotional support, lower disease severity upon admission, and longer hospital stay were associated with higher severity of symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression. Timely intervention should provide to at-risk survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/complications , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Survivors , Young Adult
15.
Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res ; 27(2): 106-111, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760965

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can result from direct or indirect contact with traumatic events. The current study aimed to evaluate PTSD and its related factors in nurses caring for COVID-19 patients. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive correlational study. Using convenience sampling methods, 395 nurses were enrolled in the study. The study instruments included demographic information, Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and General Health and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Data were analyzed using the Pearson correlation test, t-test, ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean (SD) age and work experience of the participants were 33.79 (6.74) years and 9.47 (6.47) years, respectively. Most nurses (86.60%) experienced PTSD. Multiple linear regression results showed general health (R 2 = 0.51, p = 0.001), job insecurity (R 2 = 0.51, p = 0.042), decision latitude (R 2 = 0.51, p = 0.037), and high age (R 2 = 0.51, p = 0.049) to be associated with an increase in PTSD, and having high social support (R 2 = 0.51, p = 0.043) was associated with a decrease in PTSD in nurses. Conclusions: Nurses have experienced high levels of PTSD after the fatal outbreak of COVID-19 disease. Stressful conditions associated with an increased likelihood of this disorder should be identified, and coping skills such as decision latitude (control) and social support should be strengthened to prevent the symptoms of this disorder in nurses.

16.
Acta Paul. Enferm. (Online) ; 35: eAPE03232, 2022. tab
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1754303

ABSTRACT

Resumo Objetivo Analisar a prevalência estimada do Transtorno do Estresse Pós-Traumático em profissionais emergencistas e seus fatores relacionados. Métodos Estudo analítico, transversal, exploratório com abordagem quantitativa, realizado em serviços de referência no atendimento a urgências e emergências em saúde e em serviços de segurança e proteção pública com condutores socorristas, enfermeiros, técnicos/auxiliares de enfermagem, médicos, policiais e bombeiros militares. Foram analisados dados provenientes de dois instrumentos. As classificações da Escala do Impacto do Evento - Revisada foram relacionadas com as variáveis sociodemográficas, profissionais e de aspectos relativos ao evento potencialmente traumático coletadas na amostra, e foi levantada a prevalência dos eventos potencialmente traumáticos. Resultados Participaram 338 profissionais, 31,07% apresentaram escores compatíveis com provável diagnóstico da psicopatologia. Apresentaram escores correspondentes ao agravo 39,67% dos profissionais de segurança e 20,78% dos de saúde. Os profissionais de segurança tiveram prevalência 48% superior na apresentação de escores compatíveis com o diagnóstico do transtorno. Como fatores relacionados, foram identificados os eventos potencialmente traumáticos prevalentes na amostra, usualmente relativos a situações com risco de morte, e estratégias de enfrentamento, que apontaram relação significativa com os escores do transtorno, como o afastamento de situações semelhantes, o suporte psicológico e reavaliação das situações. Conclusão O risco encontrado foi relativamente alto quando comparado a outros estudos brasileiros; situações envolvendo risco à vida foram prevalentes e as estratégias de enfrentamento com relações significativas se encontraram nos participantes que optaram pelo afastamento, suporte psicológico e reavaliação das situações potencialmente traumáticas.


Resumen Objetivo Analizar la prevalencia estimada del trastorno del estrés postraumático en profesionales de emergencias y los factores relacionados. Métodos Estudio analítico, transversal, exploratorio con enfoque cuantitativo, realizado en servicios de referencia en la atención a urgencias y emergencias de salud y en servicios de seguridad y protección pública con conductores socorristas, enfermeros, técnicos/auxiliares de enfermería, médicos, policías y bomberos militares. Se analizaron los datos provenientes de dos instrumentos. Se relacionaron las clasificaciones de la Escala del Impacto del Evento - Revisada con las variables sociodemográficas, profesionales y de aspectos relativos al evento potencialmente traumático recopiladas en la muestra. Además, se estudió la prevalencia de los eventos potencialmente traumáticos. Resultados Participaron 338 profesionales, el 31,07 % presentó puntuación compatible con un probable diagnóstico de la psicopatología. El 39,67 % de los profesionales de seguridad y el 20,78 % de los de salud presentaron puntuación que correspondía al empeoramiento. Los profesionales de seguridad tuvieron una prevalencia 48 % superior en la presentación de puntuación compatible con el diagnóstico del trastorno. Como factores relacionados, se identificaron los eventos potencialmente traumáticos prevalentes en la muestra, normalmente relativos a situaciones con riesgo de muerte, y las estrategias de afrontamiento que indicaron una relación significativa con la puntuación del trastorno, como el evitar situaciones semejantes, el apoyo psicológico y la revaluación de las situaciones. Conclusión El riesgo encontrado fue relativamente alto en comparación con otros estudios brasileños. Las situaciones con riesgo de vida fueron prevalentes. Se observaron estrategias de afrontamiento con relaciones significativas en participantes que optaron por el distanciamiento, el apoyo psicológico y la revaluación de las situaciones potencialmente traumáticas.


Abstract Objective To analyze the estimated prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in emergency professionals and its related factors. Methods Analytical, cross-sectional, exploratory, quantitative study performed in reference services in urgent and emergency care in health and services of public safety and protection with emergency service drivers, nurses, nursing technicians/assistants, physicians, police officers and firefighters. Data from two instruments were analyzed. The classifications of the Event Impact Scale - Revised were related to sociodemographic and professional variables and to those of aspects related to the potentially traumatic event collected in the sample. The prevalence of potentially traumatic events was estimated. Results Participation of 338 professionals, of which 31.07% had compatible scores with a probable diagnosis of the psychopathology, and 39.67% of security professionals and 20.78% of health professionals had scores corresponding to the disorder. Security professionals had a 48% higher prevalence of compatible scores with diagnosis of the disorder. The potentially traumatic events prevalent in the sample were identified as related factors, usually the situations with risk of death and coping strategies, which showed a significant relationship with scores of the disorder, such as distancing from similar situations, psychological support and reassessment of situations. Conclusion The risk was relatively high when compared to other Brazilian studies; situations involving risk to life were prevalent and the coping strategies with significant relationships were found in participants who chose distancing, psychological support and reassessment of potentially traumatic situations.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Emergencies , Laboratory and Fieldwork Analytical Methods , Evaluation Studies as Topic
17.
Caring for the Ages ; 23(2):1-15, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1729596
18.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-5, 2021 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707669

ABSTRACT

A research initiative was launched during the initial coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak by 3 New York metropolitan area institutions. Collaborators recruited community members and patients from previous research studies to examine COVID-19 experiences and mental health symptoms through self-report surveys. The current report descriptively presents findings from the initial survey characterized by both community and clinical cohorts, and discusses challenges encountered with rapid implementation. The clinical cohort exhibited higher rates of symptoms of mental health difficulties (depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) as compared to the community cohort. COVID-19 positivity rates were similar among both groups and lower than the national average. While both groups reported low rates of job loss, community members reported higher rates of financial difficulty resulting from the pandemic. Findings indicate the need for further collaborative research on the mental health impact of COVID-19.

19.
British Journal of Healthcare Assistants ; 16(2):96-99, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1688245

ABSTRACT

The article presents the discussion on monitoring mental health for healthcare frontline workers having risk of post-traumatic stress disorder. Topics include debilitating cost to sufferers, changing the ability for managing the emotions, increasing suicidal thoughts, or harmful behaviours;and PTSD being a stress-related disorder commonly occurring after the sufferer experiences or witnessing a lifethreatening traumatic event.

20.
Salud UNINORTE ; 37(3): 569-582, sep.-dic. 2021. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1675304

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN Objetivo: Este estudio descriptivo-correlacional analizó la relación entre la comunicación familiar y el estrés percibido durante la pandemia de COVID-19 en Colombia. Método: Participaron 800 colombianos entre 18 y 91 años (Media = 33,91; Desviación estándar = 15,75) que respondieron, con previo consentimiento informado, a tres instrumentos confiables: Escala de Comunicación Padre e Hijo (PACS), Escala de Estrés Percibido (EEP-10) y la Escala de Preocupaciones Estresantes en la Pandemia de COVID-19 (EPEP). Resultados: Los hallazgos revelan altos niveles de estrés negativo al principio y al final de la cuarentena debido a preocupaciones económicas, laborales, familiares y de salud. La comunicación familiar demostró ser un predictor significativo del estrés. En ese sentido, encontramos específicamente que la comunicación abierta entre los miembros del hogar se asocia con una reducción del estrés negativo (r = -,103***). En cambio, cuando la comunicación en casa está mediada por ofensas frecuentes (β = ,719***) y se combina con preocupaciones de salud (β = ,723***) y convivencia familiar (β = ,657***), aumenta predictivamente el estrés negativo alto hasta en un 37,9% de la varianza total. Conclusión: Estos hallazgos instan a fortalecer el diálogo familiar y las estrategias de afrontamiento colectivo para disminuir el estrés y aprender a manejar mejor las preocupaciones en este contexto pandémico rodeado de miedos e incertidumbres. Al final brindamos recomendaciones desde el campo de la psicología y la comunicación en salud para enfocar las acciones preventivas contra el estrés alto o crónico.


ABSTRACT Objective: This descriptive-correlational study analyzed the relationship between family communication and perceived stress during the Covid-19 pandemic in Colombia. Methods: Te participants were 800 Colombians, between 18 and 91 years old (Mean = 33,91; Standard Deviation = 15,75), who responded with prior informed consent to three reliable instruments: Parent-Child Communication Scale (PACS), Perceived Stress Scale (EEP-10), and the Scale of Stressful Concerns in the Covid-19 Pandemic (EPEP). Results: Findings revealed high levels of negative stress at the beginning and end of quarantine that had to do with economic, work, family, and health concerns. Family communication proved to be a significant predictor of stress. In that sense, it was observed that open communication between household members is associated with a reduction in negative stress (r = -,103***). However, when communication at home is mediated by frequent offenses (β = ,719 ***), and is combined with health concerns (β =. 723 ***), and family coexistence (β =, 657***), it increases predictively high negative stress by up to 37.9% of the total variance. Conclusions: these findings suggest strengthening family dialogue and collective coping strategies to reduce stress and learn to better manage concerns in this pandemic context surrounded by fears and uncertainties. Finally, recommendations from the fields of psychology and communication in health are given to focus on preventive actions against high or chronic stress.

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