Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 2.080
Filter
1.
J Hosp Infect ; 121: 39-48, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966846

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Registered nurses perform numerous functions critical to the success of antimicrobial stewardship, but only 63% of pre-registration nursing programmes include any teaching about stewardship. Updated nursing standards indicate that nurses require antimicrobial stewardship knowledge and skills. AIM: To explore the delivery of key antimicrobial stewardship competencies within updated pre-registration nursing programmes. METHODS: This study had a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected between March and June 2021. FINDINGS: Lecturers from 35 UK universities responsible for teaching antimicrobial stewardship participated in this study. The provision of antimicrobial stewardship teaching and learning was inconsistent across programmes, with competencies in infection prevention and control, patient-centred care and interprofessional collaborative practice taking precedent over competencies pertaining to the use, management and monitoring of antimicrobials. Online learning and teaching surrounding hand hygiene, personal protective equipment and immunization theory was reported to have increased during the pandemic. Only a small number of respondents reported that students shared taught learning with other healthcare professional groups. CONCLUSION: There is a need to ensure consistency in antimicrobial stewardship across programmes, and greater knowledge pertaining to the use, management and monitoring of antimicrobials should be included. Programmes need to adopt teaching strategies and methods that allow nurses to develop interprofessional skills in order to practice collaboratively.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Education, Nursing , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing/methods , Humans , United Kingdom
2.
Radiotherapy and Oncology ; 170:S866-S867, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967467

ABSTRACT

Purpose or Objective The Canadian Medical Association recently acknowledged that physician health remains a significant threat to the viability of Canada’s health care system. A 2014 survey reported a 44% prevalence of burnout among American oncologists. The purpose of this survey was to determine the national prevalence of burnout and document work engagement among Canadian radiation oncologists. Materials and Methods Between November 2019 and March 2020 (pre COVID pandemic), online questionnaire was distributed electronically to 333 Canadian radiation oncologists, across 49 centers, through the National Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology office mailing list. The survey included 62 questions determining job engagement, and validated burnout scale The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (22 questions). Results 241 of the 333 surveyed Canadian radiation oncologists (72%) completed the questionnaire and were included in this analysis. Responses to the MBI showed that 15% of radiation oncologist met the strict criteria for burnout (i.e. negative scores in all 3 domains: exhaustion, depersonalization, and low accomplishment). Another 60% scored negative in at least one of the three burnout domains. Using the more commonly reported definition of burnout (negative scores in either exhaustion and/or depersonalization), 44% of Canadian radiation oncologist were burnt out. Only 25% had positive scores in all 3 domains and were fully engaged in their work. The full burnout syndrome varies with the provinces and was the highest in British Columbia (22% ) and lowest in Quebec (3%). The responses to work engagement questions revealed a significant concerns regarding inefficiency in work flow (50%), heavy workloads (>50%), a poor work life balance (68%), lack of control over the work environment (47%) and lack of recognition from administrators (45%). 48% perceive the atmosphere at their primary work area as “chaotic and hectic”. Within the last 3 years, 41% had considered leaving their institution to work elsewhere and 51% were considering reducing their full-time equivalent (FTE). Reassuringly, 80% reported a sense of overall ability to provide high quality care and a 59% feel they have a supportive network of colleagues, 80% are willing to try something new. The top 4 strategies identified by respondants aimed to improve worklife quality were (1) more support staff at work, (2) more efficient care models, (3) more resources for patients, and (4) lighter workloads for physicians. Conclusion The survey shows that only 25% of the Canadian radiation oncologist is fully engaged in their work, 15 % meet the strict criteria for burnout and 44% meet the more commonly used burnout criteria. With the rising incidence of cancer and complexity of care, there is an urgent need for change, leverage the enthusiasm to “try something new”, and develop appropriate strategies to improve the wellbeing of the oncology work force.

3.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-1083-S-1084, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967408

ABSTRACT

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease with repeated relapses and remissions, and it is considered that IBD patients had more than a little conflict between the threat of COVID-19 infection by visiting the doctor and the anxiety about their own disease by postponing the visit. We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the anxiety and behavioral changes of Japanese IBD patients. Methods: We collected questionnaires from 3032 IBD patients aged 16 years or older attending 31 facilities in Japan between March 2020 and June 2021. The primary endpoint was anxiety felt by IBD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: The median age was 44 years;43.3% of the participants were female. 60.6% of the participants was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and 39.4% with Crohn’s disease (CD), and the median disease duration was 10 years. Regarding IBD medications, about 80% of the patients were taking 5-ASA, followed by thiopurine (31.4%), biological agents (47.4%), and less than 10% of the patients were taking steroids or budesonide. 37.7% of participants reported that they were in clinical remission, whereas 35.6% were in mild and 19.3% were in moderate activity. The questionnaires were collected throughout the middle of the second wave to the end of four waves of COVID19 in Japan. The mean VAS score is 5.1±2.5 during this pandemic, which indicated moderate anxiety. The most frequent causes of anxiety were the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection by visiting hospital, the risk of infection by IBD itself, and the risk of infection by IBD medication. Factors associated with anxiety are women, housewives, time to visit hospital, transportation by train, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and nutritional therapy. The results of the questionnaire survey on medical visits showed that about 90% of the patients went to the hospital and received treatment as scheduled. During this pandemic, 97.5% of the patients continued oral medication and injections as physicians indicated. Most of participants felt the need for a family doctor and primarily sought guidance, and information regarding SARS-COV-2 from television or internet news. 35.6% of the patients were given information about prevention of SARS-COV-2 by their physicians. 42.6% of the patients received an explanation about the continuation of medication from their physicians. Conclusion: Japanese IBD patients had moderate disease-related anxiety. The percentage of patients with a behavioral change was small. Based on the content of anxiety obtained in this study, we should continue to proactively inform patients about infectious diseases such as SARS-COV2 and the accompanying accurate information related to IBD management, thereby relieving their anxiety. (Figure Presented)

4.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-685, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967364

ABSTRACT

Background With the COVID-19 pandemic there was an acute drop in procedural volume for trainees, highlighting the need and potential of simulation-based training (SBT). Prior to the pandemic, the uptake of simulation was poorly categorized and inconsistent across programs despite the variety of endoscopic simulators available. We aimed to evaluate the current state of endoscopy training internationally in the wake of the pandemic as perceived by trainees. Methods This cross-sectional study utilized a survey composed of 21 questions eliciting demographic data, COVID-19-related training experiences, and experience with SBT. This survey was distributed internationally (USA, Canada, EU, Philippines, Singapore) to gastroenterology trainees between August 2021 to October 2021. Results The questionnaire was completed by 182 fellows, with 55 (30.2%) from the USA and 127 (69.8%) from other countries. Of the respondents, 79.1% were fellows during the first year of the pandemic. A majority (69.2%) found endoscopy training in general to be negatively impacted. Of those who reported a negative impact from the pandemic, 75.0% attributed it to a decline in endoscopic volume, 40.0% to institutional/regional guidelines, 25.0% to a shortage of personal protective equipment. Overall, 47.2% of respondents believed COVID-19 will negatively affect their endoscopic proficiency upon fellowship completion. A total of 71 respondents (39.0%) had experienced SBT before or during fellowship, with 27 from the USA (49.1% of respondents from USA) and 44 from other countries (34.6% of respondents from other countries). In the USA, 63.0% had used virtual reality (VR), 37.0% mechanical models, and 37.0% animal models compared to 47.7% VR, 68.2% mechanical models, and 27.3% animal models in other countries. Respondents agreed that SBT was most helpful with developing technical skills such as ergonomic handling, torque steering, and fine tip control. A majority (52.1%) found SBT appropriate to their level of training. Respondents believed increased access to SBT (43.7%) and mentored training (54.9%) would improve the experience. Conclusion While current data supports the use of SBT early in training, the cumulative uptake of SBT across programs before and during the COVID-19 pandemic remained low. In the USA and abroad, fellows perceive a negative impact of COVID-19 on their training and proficiency upon graduation. Compared to other countries, the USA had higher utilization of VR and lower utilization of mechanical models. Decrease in endoscopic volume was reported as the main factor negatively impacting endoscopic training. This survey highlights the potential benefit of SBT with low case volumes and further prospective evaluation of SBT in achieving endoscopic competence. (Table Presented)

5.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-477, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967316

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID pandemic has markedly increased the adoption of telehealth. Patient satisfaction with telehealth may vary with the age and locale of the patient including the distance from the medical center and the setting the patient resides in (rural vs. urban). University of Utah Health is uniquely positioned to assess patient satisfaction in this transition due its very large geographic referral area from the continuum of the rural-urban settings. Aims: Compare pre-pandemic in-person visits to post-pandemic telehealth and in-person visits. Explore the temporal and spatial effect of a post-pandemic telehealth visits. Methods: Exceptional patient experience (EPE) surveys were sent to all patients after ambulatory care visits and consists of 8 questions. Possible responses ranged from Very Poor to Very Good on 5point scale. Survey responses were stratified by type of visit (in-person or telehealth), distance from medical center, rural vs. urban, age and time before and after start of COVID pandemic. Summary statistics of the response variables by pre pandemic in-person visit and post pandemic telehealth were done. We fitted a linear regression model adjusting for age and gender using the Covariate Balancing Propensity Score Estimation. Scores for entire institutional cohort and department of Gastroenterology were compared. Percentages reported are patients responding “Very Good.” Results: EPE scores were compared from in person pre-pandemic (11/01/18-2/28/20) to telehealth post-pandemic (04/1/20-12/31/20) with a transitional month of March (3/20) excluded. This included 235,227 returned surveys (14.0% response rate) of which 140,438 (GI 1852) were in person pre-pandemic and 87,135 (GI 1114) were telehealth post-pandemic. The entire cohort including GI patients reported greater satisfaction with in-person compared to telehealth visits with greatest % differences in “Overall assessment” and “Likelihood to recommend”. The other 6 questions showed similar scores between in-person and telehealth visits, but also favored in-person (Table 1, p<0.01 for all comparisons). Younger (£40) GI patients had higher scores for telehealth compared in person visits (p<0.03). The temporal effect of post-pandemic GI telehealth visits over time showed significantly higher scores of “ease of scheduling an appointment” “Likelihood to recommend” and “staff work together” in December compared to April (p<0.001) The spatial effect of a post-pandemic GI telehealth visits showed significantly lower scores for all questions for rural areas over micro/metropolitan for telehealth (p<0.001). Conclusion: All patients including GI patients preferred in person to telehealth visits though satisfaction was high with both. Younger GI patients preferred telehealth visits. Satisfaction with telehealth increased over time from the start of the pandemic.(Table Presented)

6.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-288-S-289, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967279

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims: COVID-19 infection can affect nearly every organ system including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. GI symptoms such as nausea, pain and diarrhea are common and may be due to infection and/or increased stress and isolation from the pandemic. It is well known that stress affects GI function and sensation, particularly in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of the study was to elucidate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on GI symptoms. Methods: An international online survey (Alchemer) was available via the International Foundation of GI Disorders (IFFGD) website from August 11, 2021- November 17, 2021. There were 57 questions exploring demographics, GI symptom/disorder classification, care delivery, administration and perceptions of COVID-19 vaccination, and health experiences during the pandemic. No compensation was provided for survey completion and patients were able to selectively answer questions, with some questions not analyzed for this report. Results: Survey data was included from 210 patients with GI symptoms (mean age 47.7 yrs, 83% female, 80% Caucasian). Participants' primary GI conditions included 36% IBS, 26% gastroparesis, 6% constipation, and 9% acid reflux (figure 1). Seventy percent reported the pandemic impacted their GI health and nearly 3 out of 4 (73%) reported increased pandemic-related anxiety or depression. COVID-19 was diagnosed in 40 (19%) participants. Nearly 3 out of 4 (74%) experienced new or worsening GI symptoms after a COVID-19 diagnosis. Almost a third (30%) with COVID-19 were diagnosed with post-infection (PI) IBS and 38% were diagnosed with a new GI disorder other than PI-IBS. New GI diagnoses after COVID-19 included gastroparesis (53%), GERD (13%), and diarrhea (7%) (figure 2). Prior to diagnosis of PI-IBS, 58% did not have a GI diagnosis. Almost half (46%) of patients reported new acid reflux symptoms after COVID-19. Almost 3 out of 4 patients (72%) with COVID-19 noticed changes in digestion and/or bowel movements. More than two thirds (67%) noted COVID-related GI symptoms lasted >3 months. Nearly 3 out of 4 (72%) patients felt their GI symptoms were harder to manage after COVID-19. Conclusions: Our results highlight the significant burden of GI illness imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 exacerbated existing GI conditions, increased anxiety and depression, and led to a wide range of new GI issues, led by but not limited to PI-IBS. New diagnoses of upper GI disorders including gastroparesis and GERD were surprisingly common. Further prospective studies to validate these observations and understand their pathogenesis are warranted. (Figure Presented) Figure 1: Participants primary gastrointestinal condition or disorder prior to the COVID- 19 pandemic. (Figure Presented) Figure 2: New GI disorders diagnosed after being diagnosed with COVID-19

7.
Research in Transportation Business & Management ; : 100865, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1967090

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the relevance of goods delivery in urban areas. However, this activity often generates negative environmental impact and several technologies have been proposed in recent years to reduce it, thus forming a complex innovation landscape characterized by different levels of maturity and effects on the City Logistics (CL) system. This complexity causes a deep uncertainty over the future of CL. This paper aims to tackle this uncertainty by forecasting the future of a set of CL technologies. A Delphi survey has been submitted to experts of this field to achieve a stable consensus over 33 projections related to 7 CL technologies for the year 2030. Results show that real-time data collection will help the coordination process between stakeholders, engendering an increased awareness over the value of using logistics data as well as its potential drawbacks. Moreover, experts share a positive attitude towards the expansion of Parcel Lockers, which should be monitored by public authorities to avoid a negative impact on land use. Finally, technologies such as drones and crowd-logistics have drawn the lowest level of consensus due to their lower level of maturity, which arouse the necessity to further explore several issues such as legal and technical barriers.

8.
Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry ; 63:S103-S104, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1966677

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite training in consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry representing a core requirement for general residency training in psychiatry, there is significant variation in the structure, timing, length, setting, and educational components for residents in programs throughout the country. The last official survey of CL training in residency was conducted by the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry (ACLP) in 2010 with responses from 92 residency programs across the country (Heinrich 2013). Based on the results of that survey, recommendations were issued by the ACLP in 2014 concerning best practices for residency training in CL psychiatry (Heinrich 2014). Methods: Members of the ACLP Residency Education Subcommittee designed an updated survey based on the survey tool used in 2013. In addition to questions about the structure of residency training, we also asked questions about CL fellowships and their relationship to the CL experience of residents attending structures on CL services, learners from other health professions, educational content, and modifications made during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following exemption by the Partners Institutional Review Board, we distributed the survey in anonymous and confidential format through RedCap to 273 adult psychiatry residency program directors using the American Medical Association’s FREIDATM database. Program directors were instructed that they could complete the survey themselves or forward to relevant faculty. Results: We will discuss the results of the survey including the response rate;distribution of programs in terms of geography, size and focus;length, timing, structure and setting of CL rotation;presence and role of fellows and other learners;model of attending staffing;educational and didactic components;and modifications made in the setting of COVID-19. Discussion: Based on the findings, we anticipate a discussion of trends in residency CL education over the past decade. Specifically, we anticipate focus on earlier CL training, novel training patterns, CL rotations spread across multiple years, increasing focus on outpatient CL experiences, and increased learners and other staff on services. The topic is of immediate relevance to training in CL psychiatry and thus to developing careers in CL psychiatry, a meeting theme. Conclusion: We expect these findings will provide important information for issuing an updated set of guidelines for CL training in residency for the next decade. References: 1. Heinrich TW, Schwartz AC, Zimbrean PC, Lolak S, Wright MT, Brooks KB, Ernst CL, Gitlin DF. “Recommendations for training psychiatry residents in psychosomatic medicine.” Psychosomatics 2014;55:438-449. 2. Heinrich TW, Schwartz AC, Zimbrean PC, Wright MT;Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine's Residency Education Subcommittee. The state of the service: a survey of psychiatry resident education in psychosomatic medicine. Psychosomatics. 2013 Nov-Dec;54(6):560-6. doi: 10.1016/j.psym.2013.07.005.

9.
Canadian Journal of Statistics ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1966033

ABSTRACT

Serology tests for SARS-CoV-2 provide a paradigm for estimating the number of individuals who have had an infection in the past (including cases that are not detected by routine testing, which has varied over the course of the pandemic and between jurisdictions). Such estimation is challenging in cases for which we only have limited serological data and do not take into account the uncertainty of the serology test. In this work, we provide a joint Bayesian model to improve the estimation of the sero-prevalence (the proportion of the population with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies) through integrating multiple sources of data, priors on the sensitivity and specificity of the serological test, and an effective epidemiological dynamics model. We apply our model to the Greater Vancouver area, British Columbia, Canada, with data acquired during the pandemic from the end of January to May 2020. Our estimated sero-prevalence is consistent with previous literature but with a tighter credible interval.

10.
Arzneimitteltherapie ; 40(5):151-152, 2022.
Article in German | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1965507
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 316: 114759, 2022 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1967019

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had many negative consequences, one of which was the increase of loneliness. We aimed to explore associations between sociodemographic, work-related, home-related, and COVID-19-related characteristics and increased feelings of loneliness among adults living in the United States (US). We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data from The Quickly Understanding Impacts of COVID-19 Study (The QUICk Study) collected from May to October 2020 using online surveys completed by a sample of adults living in the US. We used chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression to identify characteristics associated with increased loneliness. The study sample included 577 adults living in the US. Approximately 37% of the sample reported feeling lonelier than usual over the past month. Younger age, sexual minority status, lower education level, depression, living alone, part-time employment status, and student employment status were significantly associated with increased feelings of loneliness. Depression, younger age, and living alone remained significantly associated with increased feelings of loneliness in the multivariable logistic regression analysis. In the US, young adults, adults with depression, and adults who live alone may have been more likely to experience increased feelings of loneliness during the early COVID-19 pandemic.

12.
Environ Sci Policy ; 136: 717-725, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966558

ABSTRACT

The long-term nature of climate policy measures requires stable social legitimacy, which other types of crises may jeopardize. This article examines the impact of the COVID-19 fear on climate change beliefs based on an autumn 2020 population survey in the Member States of the European Union and the United Kingdom. The results show that deep COVID-19 concerns increase climate change concerns, awareness, and perceived negative impacts of climate change. These effects are more robust among the lower educated Europeans. On the country level, strict governmental measures are also linked to deep climate change concerns. In contrast to the experience following the 2008 recession, the findings show that a secondary crisis can positively impact climate attitudes, which is a promising result for policy actions.

13.
eNeurologicalSci ; 28: 100418, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966554

ABSTRACT

Background: The clinical course, comorbidity, and management of symptoms after the acute phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain controversial. Methods: This was a descriptive case series study, examining the characteristics of patients with longstanding symptoms related to COVID-19 who visited our outpatient clinic between 1 June and 31 December 2021. We analyzed patients' background, chief complaints, clinical course after COVID-19 onset, and clinical examination results. Results: A total of 90 patients with a mean age of 39.8 years were confirmed as having long COVID. The median time between diagnosis of COVID-19 and visiting our clinic was 66.8 days, and 89 patients (98.9%) were unvaccinated. Depression was the most common comorbidity (nine patients, 10.0%). The most common chief complaint was disturbance of smell and/or taste (35, 38.9%), followed by memory disturbance (22, 24.4%) and fatigue (29, 31.1%). Head MRI was performed for 42 (46.7%) patients, and the most common finding was sinusitis (four patients). Olfactory testing was conducted in 25 patients (27.8%) using a T&T olfactometer, and 14 patients (56%) had mild olfactory impairment. Of the five odors in the T&T, recognition of ß-phenylethyl alcohol was most impaired. Conclusions: This study describes the basic characteristics of long COVID in Japan. It suggests that long COVID is complex because it results in a wide range of symptoms.

14.
Eat Behav ; 46: 101660, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966501

ABSTRACT

Research suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is negatively impacting mental health, with rates of eating disorder referrals in particular rising steeply during the pandemic. This study aimed to examine 8-month changes in body image and disordered eating during the COVID-19 pandemic, and explore whether any changes were moderated by gender, age, or eating disorder history. This study used a longitudinal survey design in which 587 adults living in the UK (85 % women; mean age = 32.87 years) completed assessments every two months over five timepoints from May/June 2020 to January/February 2021. Measures included body esteem, disordered eating, and psychological distress. Mixed effect models showed small but significant improvements in body esteem and disordered eating symptoms from May/June 2020 to January/February 2021. These improvements were independent of changes in psychological distress, and did not vary by gender, age or eating disorder history. Whilst poor body image and disordered eating may have been elevated in the early period of the pandemic, this study suggests improvements, rather than worsening, of these outcomes over time. This may reflect adaptation to this changing context.

15.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; : 101137, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The management of obstetric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to human-to-human transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) requires unique considerations. Many aspects of labour and delivery practice required adaptation in response to the global pandemic and were supported by guidelines from the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists. The adoption and adherence to these guidelines is unknown. METHODS: Participating centres in "Quality of Recovery in Obstetric Anaesthesia study - a multicentre study" (ObsQoR) completed an electronic survey based on the provision of services and care related to COVID-19 in October 2021. The survey was designed against the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists COVID-19 guidelines. RESULTS: One hundred and five of the 107 participating centres completed the survey (98% response rate representing 54% of all UK obstetric units). The median [IQR] annual number of deliveries among the included sites was 4389 [3000-5325]. Ninety-nine of the 103 (94.3%) sites had guidelines for the management of peripartum women with COVID-19. Sixty-one of 105 (58.1%) had specific guidance for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Thirty-seven of 104 (35.6%) centres restricted parturient birthing plans if a positive diagnosis of COVID-19 was made. A COVID-19 vaccination referral pathway encouraging full vaccination for all pregnant women was present in 63/103 centres (61.2%). CONCLUSION: We found variability in care delivered and adherence to guidelines related to COVID-19. The clinical implications for this related to quality of peripartum care is unclear, however there remains scope to improve pathways for immunisation, birth plans and VTE prophylaxis.

16.
Economy of Region ; 18(1):159-174, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964812

ABSTRACT

The issue of universal basic income (UBI) has been gaining importance due to the growth of precarious employment, unemployment and inequality in the context of the development of digital technologies, especially considering the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. The article first presents the generalised and systemised reasoned opinions of Russian experts on UBI in order to examine its potential impact on employment. The initial research data resulted from a survey of different groups of Russian experts conducted by the authors. This information was supplemented by the results of various mass surveys. It was revealed that a significant part of Russian experts have concerns that UBI can negatively affect work incentives and labour supply. The systematisation of expert assessments allowed the research to create scenarios of the potential impact of UBI on population employment and work incentives, formal and informal employment, the ratio between paid and unpaid work, working and free time, the quality of leisure time. The study findings can be used as information and analytical support for the state policies aimed at improving the level and quality of life of the population, as well as making decisions on the appropriateness of UBI tools (including in Russia). Future research will examine in detail the impact of universal basic income on the labour market parameters, taking into account socio-demographic factors. © 2022 Institute of Economics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

17.
Journal of Education and Health Promotion ; 11(1):204, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The trainee teacher seems to be more and more faced with frustration and stress during the training phase, caused by accumulation of requirements and duties, making them susceptible to the risk of burnout. The purpose of this work is to study the academic burnout of trainee teachers at the Rabat-Sale-Kenitra region's Regional Center for Education and Training Professions during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven hundred thirty-nine trainee teachers responded to a self-questionnaire comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey scale in its French validated version, as well as stress factors during the academic year 2020-2021. Both inferential and descriptive methods of data analysis were used to represent the effect of sociodemographic variables on burnout levels during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: In agreement with the literature, most of trainee teachers show moderate and high levels of academic exhaustion;the main stressors presented are financial instability and training overload, and the level of study influences the scale of burnout among trainee teachers. CONCLUSION: The result of this study can serve as a predictor of academic burnout among Moroccan trainee teachers. © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

18.
Frontiers in Education ; 7, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1963419

ABSTRACT

Although many school districts made efforts to provide instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic (including in-person, remote, and blended/hybrid options the length of instruction time and delivery models have varied from district to district. This disruption in education has been projected to result in a significant learning loss, which may be particularly profound for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, leading to widening opportunity gaps. However, there is limited empirical data that can provide important contextual background for understanding the impact of the pandemic on student learning. Therefore, we conducted a national survey with a random sample of 582 elementary school teachers to understand the instructional changes that occurred, the amount of academic content instruction provided to students, and teachers perceptions of the learning supports needed and provided to students during the 2020–2021 school year. Results indicated that most teachers relied on alternative forms of instruction and experienced changes in delivery models but reported low instructional effectiveness. Compared to typical years, teachers reported significant decreases in curriculum coverage;the number of students who received needed interventions, and students who were ready to transition to the next grade level during the 2020–2021 school year. Teachers also reported greater impacts on instruction for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Follow-up analyses using prior school achievement data corroborated the findings that higher school achievement was associated with smaller impacts on student learning and delivery of instruction. Copyright © 2022 Namkung, Goodrich, Hebert and Koziol.

19.
Cureus ; 14(6): e26255, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964585

ABSTRACT

Introduction Risk perception is the key component of many health behavior changes. This study identified the deliberative sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk perception among young females during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its implication on their willingness to lifestyle change in the Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia. This cross­sectional study using self­administered online questionnaires was conducted to reach a total of 797 female university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results Eighty-six percent of participants showed moderate SCD risk perception, with a mean score of 20.4±4.4. Ninety-six percent of participants had ≥1 established SCD risk factor. A family history of cardiovascular disease and SCD was the most commonly reported risk factor (75.5%), followed by physical inactivity (75.4%). Nearly 60% of participants showed a high willingness to change personal lifestyle behaviors, however, the presence of risk factors did not significantly enhance their willingness tochange in order to control these risk factors. Conclusions This study identifies the deliberative SCD risk perception among young Saudi women and raises the need for preventive health care programs that enhance healthy behaviors among students at high risk, to minimize cardiovascular diseases and fatalities.

20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963983

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between the flexibility of work schedule arrangements and well-being among full-time workers prior to and after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in South Korea. METHODS: Data from the fifth 2017 and sixth 2020-2021 Korean Working Conditions Survey, including a final sample of 45,137 participants (22,460 males; 22,677 females), were used. Multiple logistic regression was performed to establish the association between schedule arrangement types and the 5-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index. RESULTS: The study found an association between flexible schedule arrangements and good well-being in 2017: "little flexibility" (odds ratio (OR), 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-1.48), "moderate flexibility" (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.28-1.71), and "high flexibility" (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.06-1.72). During COVID-19, only workers with "high flexibility" were likely to have good well-being (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.88), while the association between well-being and "low flexibility" (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.96-1.17) and "moderate flexibility" types (OR, 0.66; 95% CI 0.59-0.75) decreased. This study found that flexible working hours may contribute to better well-being among full-time workers. However, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on working conditions and employee well-being should be addressed while setting working hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Female , Humans , Male , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL