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1.
J Technol Behav Sci ; 6(4): 567-571, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243699

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Telehealth has been identified as an efficient and safe way of increasing access to healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding providers' perceptions of telehealth usage in rural communities may help other communities understand barriers and concerns related to implementation, during and post-pandemic. This study aimed to (a) examine rates of telemedicine use among rural providers, (b) determine whether changes in telehealth use in this group were associated with provider confidence and perceived usefulness of technology, (c) compare these providers' perceptions of the "usefulness" of technology prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and (d) examine barriers to implementation and use of telehealth within a rural sample. METHOD: Six-hundred eighty-six medical providers working at a rural Pennsylvania teaching hospital and associated satellite clinics were surveyed anonymously. Surveys included the Perceived Usefulness of Technology Scale and questions to identify barriers that prohibited the use of telehealth. FINDINGS/RESULTS: Of 136 respondents, 86% reported no prior experience using virtual technology for patient encounters. Use of telehealth care increased by 34% following the pandemic. Provider confidence in his/her/their abilities was positively associated with increased use of telehealth and perceived usefulness of technology. Provider-identified barriers to implementation included necessity of physical exams and lack of technological literacy. CONCLUSIONS: Both medical providers and patients continue to face various barriers to seamless integration of care. Devising ways to increase self-confidence and efficacy for use of telehealth among providers might be an additional way to increase telehealth use.

2.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X21990997, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242243

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The emergence of COVID-19 and its ensuing restrictions on in-person healthcare has resulted in a sudden shift towards the utilization of telemedicine. The purpose of this study is to assess patient satisfaction and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for individuals who underwent follow-up for shoulder surgery using telemedicine compared to those who received traditional in-person clinic follow-up. METHODS: Patients who underwent either rotator cuff repair or total shoulder arthroplasty during a designated pre-COVID-19 (traditional clinic follow-up) or peri-COVID-19 (telemedicine follow-up) span of time were identified. PROMs including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons standardized assessment form, the three-level version of the EQ-5D form, the 12-Item Short Form survey, and a modified version of a published telemedicine survey were administered to participants six months post-operatively via phone call. RESULTS: Sixty patients agreed to participate. There was no significant difference between the pre-COVID-19 and peri-COVID-19 groups in patient satisfaction with their follow-up visit (p = 0.289), nor was there a significant difference in PROMs between the two groups. In total, 83.33% of the telemedicine group and 70.37% of the in-person clinic group preferred traditional in-person follow-up over telemedicine. DISCUSSION: In a cohort of patients who underwent telemedicine follow-up for shoulder surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic, there was no difference in patient satisfaction and PROMs compared to traditional in-person clinic follow-up. This study indicates that while the majority of participants preferred face-to-face visits, patients were relatively satisfied with their care and had similar functional outcome scores in both groups, despite the large disruption in healthcare logistics caused by COVID-19.

3.
Global Spine J ; : 21925682211022311, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241963

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, anonymous, international survey. OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the rapid adoption of telemedicine in spine surgery. This study sought to determine the extent of adoption and global perspectives on telemedicine in spine surgery. METHODS: All members of AO Spine International were emailed an anonymous survey covering the participant's experiences with and perceptions of telemedicine. Descriptive statistics were used to depict responses. Responses were compared among regions. RESULTS: 485 spine surgeons participated in the survey. Telemedicine usage rose from <10.0% to >39.0% of all visits. A majority of providers (60.5%) performed at least one telemedicine visit. The format of "telemedicine" varied widely by region: European (50.0%) and African (45.2%) surgeons were more likely to use phone calls, whereas North (66.7%) and South American (77.0%) surgeons more commonly used video (P < 0.001). North American providers used telemedicine the most during COVID-19 (>60.0% of all visits). 81.9% of all providers "agreed/strongly agreed" telemedicine was easy to use. Respondents tended to "agree" that imaging review, the initial appointment, and postoperative care could be performed using telemedicine. Almost all (95.4%) surgeons preferred at least one in-person visit prior to the day of surgery. CONCLUSION: Our study noted significant geographical differences in the rate of telemedicine adoption and the platform of telemedicine utilized. The results suggest a significant increase in telemedicine utilization, particularly in North America. Spine surgeons found telemedicine feasible for imaging review, initial visits, and follow-up visits although the vast majority still preferred at least one in-person preoperative visit.

4.
International Archives of Health Sciences ; 10(1):7-13, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20245174

ABSTRACT

Aims: During the pandemic of COVID-19, the sudden change in traditional health-care providing systems, clinicians experience some positive and negative aspects of the approach. This study evaluates the clinician's satisfaction and experience with the use of teleconsultation provided during the pandemic of novel coronavirus and their willingness to continue telehealth after the pandemic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted online during the peak pandemic of COVID-19 in Pakistan through Google Forms questionnaire from 115 health consultants on different disciplines and recruited through social media. The questionnaire contains 15 questions regarding clinician's satisfaction, quality of treatment, and intention to continue providing telehealth services after the pandemic. Descriptive and inferential statistics were obtained by analyzing the data using SPSS software version 20, USA. Results: One hundred and fifteen consultants, 28 males and 87 females participated in the study, in which 62% were found to have an average and 34% at a high level of satisfaction. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant difference among different medical specialists in the continuation of telehealth services after the pandemic of COVID-19 (P = 0.003) and its recommendation to friends and family (P = 0.02) with high mean rank in endocrinologist and dermatologist. Conclusions: A great number of participants reported a good response for the continuation in telemedicine services in their daily routine even after the pandemic situation. However, there is an urgent need to find the solution for the difficulties and drawbacks faced by health-care providers.

5.
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences ; 70(Supplement 1):108, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244795

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This scoping review aimed to determine whether the COVID-19 pandemic influenced any modifications to patient selection methods or prioritisation and services provided by proton therapy centres. Method(s): This review was conducted based on the PRISMA methodology and Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review guidelines.1,2 A literature search was performed in Medline, Embase, Web Of Science and Scopus as well as grey literature. Keywords including "COVID-19" and "Proton Therapy" were used. Articles published from 1 January 2020 in English were included. In total, 138 studies were identified of which 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. A scoping review design was chosen to capture the full extent of information published relating to the aim. Result(s): Six of 14 articles included statements regarding treatment of COVID-19 patients. Three publications recommended deferred or alternative treatment, two indicated to treat urgent/emergency patients and one reported continuous treatment for infectious patients. Recurring impacts on PT provision included more frequent use of alternative therapies, reduced referrals, delayed treatment starts and CT simulation, change in treatment volume and staffing limitations due to pandemic restrictions. Consequently, telehealth consults, remote work, reduction in patient visitors, screening procedures and rigorous cleaning protocols were recommended. Discussion/Conclusion: Few publications detailed patient selection or workflow methods used during the pandemic. Further research is needed to obtain more detailed information regarding current global patient selection methods in proton therapy, collecting this data could aid in future planning for proton therapy in Australia.

6.
Pharmaceutical Technology ; 47(5):14-15, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244571
7.
Emerging Practices in Telehealth: Best Practices in a Rapidly Changing Field ; : 41-61, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244526

ABSTRACT

Prior to the public health emergency (PHE), there were efforts to advance telemedicine. The hurdles posed by reimbursement were one of the elements limiting its expansion. Billing rules varied pre PHE between private and governmental payers. The major billing changes during PHE sustained the health care system and provided access to care. Anticipated changes in billing post PHE will determine the future of telehealth. The aim of the chapter is to provide an overview of fundamentals of telehealth billing. First, we will focus on providing a basic understanding of all key stake holder payers, and the telehealth billing code system. Subsequently, we will outline telehealth services and coverage prior to and during the PHE. Finally, we attempt to review a sample of the current bills introduced to congress, shaping the future post PHE. © 2023 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

8.
2022 OPJU International Technology Conference on Emerging Technologies for Sustainable Development, OTCON 2022 ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244379

ABSTRACT

Remote healthcare is a well-accepted telemedicine service that renders efficient and reliable healthcare to patients suffering from chronic diseases, neurological disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, sensory organs, and other ailments. Artificial intelligence, wireless communication, sensors, organic polymers, and wearables enable affordable, non-invasive healthcare to patients in all age groups. Telehealth services and telemedicine are beneficial to people residing in remote locations or patients with limited mobility, rehabilitation treatment, and post-operative recovery. Remote healthcare applications and services proved to be significant during the COVID-19 pandemic for both patients and doctors. This study presents a detailed study of the use of artificial intelligence and the internet of things in applications of remote healthcare in many domains of health, along with recent patents. This research also presents network diagrams of documents from the Scopus database using the tool VOSViewer. The paper highlights gap which can be undertaken by future researchers. © 2023 IEEE.

9.
Diabetic Medicine ; 40(Supplement 1):181, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243905

ABSTRACT

The recent Covid-19 pandemic has created many challenges and barriers in healthcare, which includes the treatment and management of patients with type 2 diabetes (Robson & Hosseinzadeh, 2021). The purpose of this Evidence-Based Project (EBP) project is to evaluate the effectiveness of type 2 diabetes management through telehealth and answers the following PICOT question: In patients with diabetes type 2 who have difficulties with medical visit compliance (P), will the telehealth platform (I), compared to patient's previous visit HbA1c (C) improve the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) diagnostic marker (O) over a 12-week period(T)? An extensive literature search of five databases was performed, citation chasing, and a hand search yielded fourteen pieces of evidence ranging from level I to VI (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2019). The pieces of evidence selected for this project support the evidence that telehealth implementation is as effective as the "usual care" or in-person visits to treat type 2 diabetes. The John Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice (JHNEBP) model was selected. Patients with a HbA1c of greater than 6.7% have been asked to schedule two six-week telehealth visits. During the live video visit, a review of medications, and diabetes self-management education (DSME) will be conducted. Participants will be provided with education to promote lifestyle modifications. The visits will be conducted through an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system that is Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant. A paired t-Test will be used with the data collected from the pre-and post-HbA1c. Improve the management of type 2 diabetes with the incorporation of telemedicine in primary care. Research supports the need to further expand the use of telehealth in primary care, to improve patient outcomes and decrease co-morbidities related to type 2 diabetes.

10.
Value in Health ; 26(6 Supplement):S404-S405, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243876

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of considering Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) in healthcare research. Administrative claims databases are widely used for research, but often lack SDoH data or sufficient transparency in how these data were obtained. This study describes innovative methods for integrating SDoH data with administrative claims to facilitate health equity research. Method(s): The HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRD) contains medical and pharmacy claims from a large, national US payer starting in 2006 and includes commercial (Comm), Medicare Advantage (MCare), and Medicaid (MCaid) populations. The HIRD includes individually identifiable information, which was used for linking with SDoH data from the following sources: national neighborhood-level data from the American Community Survey, the Food Access Research Atlas, and the National Center for Health Statistics' urbanicity classification;and member-level data on race/ethnicity from enrollment files, medical records, self-attestation, and imputation algorithms. We examined SDoH metrics for members enrolled as of 05-July-2022 and compared them to the respective US national data using descriptive statistics. We also examined telehealth utilization in 2022. Result(s): SDoH data were available for ~95% of currently active members in the HIRD (Comm/MCare/MCaid 12.5m/1m/7.6m). Socioeconomic characteristics at the neighborhood-level differed by membership type and vs. national data: % of members with at least a high-school education (90/88/84 vs. 87);median family income ($98k/$76k/$70k vs. $82k);% of members living in low-income low-food-access tracts (9/14/18 vs. 13);urban (57/52/47 vs. 61). At the member-level, the % of White Non-Hispanics, Black Non-Hispanics, Asian Non-Hispanics, and Hispanics were 61/6/5/6 (Comm), 76/12/2/2 (MCare), and 45/26/5/19 (MCaid). Imputation contributed 15-60% of race/ethnicity values across membership types. Telehealth utilization increased with socioeconomic status. Conclusion(s): We successfully integrated SDoH data from a variety of sources with administrative claims. SDoH characteristics differed by type of insurance coverage and were associated with differences in telehealth utilization.Copyright © 2023

11.
Journal of Psychiatric Nursing ; 14(1):59-69, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20243639

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of telehealth interventions used in anxiety management during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane, Science Direct, Web of Science, ProQuest Central, and Google Scholar databases were searched. A total of 7 studies were included, 3 of which were randomized controlled trials and 4 of which were quasi -ex-perimental designs, published between January 2020 and May 2021. Results: For telehealth interventions in anxiety management, although mixed methods were also used, it was ob-served that online video conferencing (WeChat, SpinChat), telephone calls providing telenursing and tele-education, internet-based integrated intervention, and voice recording were effective. The time allocated for interventions and training included 5 sessions, including sessions of at least 15-20 minutes, and a total of 24 sessions, including sessions of 45-60 minutes at most. Conclusion: According to the studies, telehealth interventions during the pandemic were effective in reducing the anxiety levels of systemic sclerosis patients, patients diagnosed with COVID-19, pregnant women, and vulnerable indi-viduals, like mothers with preschool children with autism and people supported by charities.

12.
Early Intervention in Psychiatry ; 17(Supplement 1):180, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243274

ABSTRACT

Qualitative methods are used to capture stakeholder perspectives within learning healthcare systems (LHS), but there is a need to specify methods that balance rigour and pragmatic approaches to inform quality improvement (QI). Utilizing examples from two QI projects within the OTNY LHS, we illustrate methods and strategies that build team capacity and flexibility to respond to an evolving LHS. Method(s): Qualitative methods were tailored to fit each project's timelines and goals, to inform both practice and research. Tools to facilitate rapid cycle feedback included interview/focus group summary templates, aggregate summaries that synthesize findings by stakeholder group, case matrix templates for rapid extraction and systematic categorization of data along topic areas, and dissemination materials adapted for stakeholder audience and project phases. Strategies to maintain rigour included processes for data reduction and interpretation, a multi-disciplinary approach for analysis, frequent consensus-based meetings, data triangulation, and member checks. Result(s): Rapid cycle approaches yielded interim results that reshaped research questions or identified critical gaps. Case summary analysis exploring the impact of COVID-19 revealed limited information on telehealth challenges amongst OTNY participants, necessitating a shift in recruitment and interview focus. For another project, analytic methods were sequenced to rapidly inventory suggestions from interview summaries on how to enhance OTNY practice to better address racism, while subsequent thematic analysis of transcripts captured participants' experiences of racism for context. Challenges included concurrent alignment of data collection and analysis, tailoring summary templates to maximize utility for rapid analysis, and maintaining flexibility to respond to evolving findings and LHS stakeholder input. Conclusion(s): The diverse methods and strategies illustrated by these projects offer guidance for balancing.

13.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 8(3), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240988

ABSTRACT

Objective: With the explosion in the use of telehealth technologies, it is essential to address the challenges in global telehealth inequity in order to create a path to healthcare equality. To this end, this research paper focuses on investigating telehealth as it relates to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on healthcare inequality, telehealth inequity, and the continued vulnerabilities with increased demand in implementation. Study Design: A set of voluntary questions were e-mailed to active members of the IEEE-SA (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association) Transforming the Telehealth Paradigm: Sustainable Connectivity, Accessibility, Privacy, and Security for all. The interview answers were analyzed via deductive thematic analysis organized into higher themes and theme-specific codes. Setting: The country of residence varied among individuals who are the IEEE-SA Telehealth program members. These continents included: North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Participants: Global healthcare leaders who are active members of the IEEE-SA Transforming the Telehealth Paradigm: Sustainable Connectivity, Accessibility, Privacy, and Security for all participated. The occupations of these individuals ranged from a variety of areas within the healthcare domain, such as physicians, scientists, and public health experts. Main outcome measure: Qualitative data obtained voluntarily from global healthcare leaders participating in the IEEE-SA Transforming the Telehealth Paradigm: Sustainable Connectivity, Accessibility, Privacy, and Security for all. Results: The major themes that emerged from the participants' responses included: telehealth infrastructure and access, digital literacy and user interface, government regulations, and telehealth legislation. Conclusions: Telehealth has the power to decrease healthcare disparities, thus getting closer to achieving health equity. However, there are three significant common global barriers to the implementation of telehealth: infrastructure, digital literacy, and government regulations. Because the results were based on interviewer responses, the conclusions acknowledged how the background of respondents, including career and education, influenced their experiences and, thus, the responses. Suggestions for change in reducing barriers to telehealth accessibility are detailed in this research. These suggestions were derived from respondents and focused on the global barriers to implementation. To reduce these barriers, changes in political health policy, patient health education, health provider telemedicine support, and in regulation for telemedicine are suggested. Limitations in our research project included a small sample size and the ensuing lack of representation from more geographical regions.

14.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 236(5 Supplement 3):S83-S84, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240803

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since COVID-19 spurred transitions from in-person to virtual telehealth visits, Press Ganey scores across adult specialties have shown improved patient satisfaction. The impact of telehealth on the pediatric surgery population, however, has not been characterized. This study aims to evaluate telehealth feasibility in pediatric surgery by examining Press Ganey surveys from the largest pediatric surgery telehealth group in the US. Method(s): Demographics were extracted from medical records of patients evaluated by general pediatric surgeons at a tertiary pediatric center from January to September of 2019 and 2021. Customized Press Ganey results were compared between in-person and telehealth patients. Ratings were categorized as satisfied (good, very good) or not satisfied (very poor, poor, fair). Analysis was performed using two-sample t-test or Fisher's Chi- Squared test. Result(s): In 2019, 7,965 (99.9%) patients were evaluated in-person and 3 by telehealth. In 2021, 8,454 (77%) were evaluated in-person and 2,514 (23%) by telehealth. Telehealth patients were more likely to no-show (11.2% vs 6.1%,p<0.01) and leave without being seen (1.4% vs 0.02%,p<0.01). Spanish speakers attended more in-person visits than telehealth (14% vs 8%,p<0.001). In 2021, telehealth patients reported greater satisfaction with providers and greater likelihood of recommending their provider. Conclusion(s): This study demonstrates improvement in patient satisfaction with telehealth implementation in a large pediatric surgery cohort. However, our data suggest that there may be access to care issues that can be optimized. Lessons from this study may be translated to other surgical disciplines and used to improve access to care and patient satisfaction.

15.
Nephrology News & Issues ; 37(5):30-30, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-20240475
16.
Neuromodulation ; 26(4 Supplement):S133, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240103

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion stimulation (SCS and DRG) are standard of care in chronic neuropathic pain. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it was critical to arrange postoperative care. Furthermore, the disparity between travel times and transportation options could influence the decision on seeking healthcare. Lacking financial resources could enhance this issue. Telehealth is usually restricted to video conferences, without interfering with implanted medical devices. Now, there exists a platform for remote programming of those devices. It is accessible via smartphones and allows direct contact between a patient and their doctor. Method(s): We initiated a pilot study for evaluating the performance of remote care in patients with SCS or DRG stimulation. We plan the enrollment of 20 patients, 10 each in the retrospective and the prospective group. Retrospective data has been collected from on-site programmed patients in our outpatient clinic in a large registry study. Prospective data is being collected under the new standard of care in the remotely programmed patients. We assess ten scores and categories to evaluate the status preoperatively, at implantation, and the postoperative course. The postoperative data are assessed in the context of video conferences for remote programming. 12 months after implantation, a final video conference is scheduled. In both groups, the same stimulation systems are used. Result(s): The study is ongoing. In the retrospective group (n=8), the mean duration of the programming appointment including waiting time was 43 minutes and the mean travel time 71 minutes (mean travel distance 106km with corresponding costs). So far, 5 patients have been enrolled for remote programming. Measured with the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire, their overall satisfaction with the system is high. In the Patient Global Impression of Change Scale 6 months after implantation, the retrospective group has a mean of 5 and the prospective group of 6 points. Considering the Visual Analog Scale, there was an improvement in both groups between the baseline and follow-up (in the retrospective group from mean 8 to 5 and in the prospective group from mean 8 to 2). Conclusion(s): The general convenience with the remote programming is high. Compared to the retrospective group, the patients do not experience a lack of efficacy of their stimulation. The use of remote programming offers various advantages, e.g., no travel times nor costs that allow simplified and more frequent programming. Especially in a pandemic or in case of travel limitations it is a very helpful tool. Disclosure: Mareike Mueller, MD: None, Andrea Dreyer: None, Phyllis McPhillips, RN: None, Guilherme Santos Piedade, MD: None, Sebastian Gillner, MD: ABBOTT: Consulting Fee:, Boston Scientific: Consulting Fee:, Philipp Slotty, MD: None, Jan Vesper, MD,PhD: Abbott: Consulting Fee:, Abbott: Fees for Non-CME/CE Services (e.g. advisor):, Medtronic: Fees for Non-CME/CE Services (e.g. advisor):, Boston Scientific: Consulting Fee:, Medtronic: Consulting Fee:, UniQure: Fees for Non-CME/CE Services (e.g. advisor):, ABBOTT: Consulting Fee:, Abbott: Speakers Bureau:, ABBOTT: Consulting Fee: Self, ABBOTT: Speakers Bureau: Self, ABBOTT: Contracted Research: Self, Boston Scientific: Consulting Fee: Self, Boston Scientific: Contracted Research: SelfCopyright © 2023

17.
Early Intervention in Psychiatry ; 17(Supplement 1):181, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239964

ABSTRACT

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, OnTrackNY teams provided coordinated specialty care (CSC) in a radically shifted environment. This presentation describes adaptations to OnTrackNY's model implemented during the pandemic. Method(s): OnTrackNY providers were recruited to participate in indepth, qualitative interviews conducted using phone and video platforms. The project team co-developed the qualitative interview guides with OnTrack Central trainers for each of the six team member roles. A coding team used the FRAME to identify the top three role-based adaptations to the OnTrackNY model from transcripts of qualitative interviews. Result(s): Twenty-three providers (n = 3-4 providers per role) discussed challenges and adaptations of providing CSC services during the pandemic. Use of telehealth was a major adaptation applied across all roles. Adaptations to outreach included narrowing community outreach to inpatient and emergency settings, increasing communication with referral sources, increasing contact with newly referred participants and families. Peer specialist adaptations include conducting physically-distanced groups, discussing current events and expanding online resources for engagement. SEES adaptations included monitoring evolving employment opportunities, conducting mock job interviews remotely, and supporting online learning. Adaptations to PCP/RN roles included sending equipment home for monitoring heath, changing methods and frequency of administering medication, and providing education regarding COVID-19 and vaccination. Adaptations to the Primary Clinician role included increasing informal 'check-ins', using screen sharing to complete assessments and safety plans, and addressing increased stress due to the pandemic. Conclusion(s): Adaptations to CSC were common with providers most frequently making changes to format and setting of care delivery and content modifications. Future work will examine implications of adaptations and OnTrackNY fidelity indicators.

18.
Value in Health ; 26(6 Supplement):S302-S303, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239589

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To provide an overview of trends in the current evidence landscape of products and services in development that support remote patient monitoring (RPM) and remote therapeutic monitoring (RTM), given the release of new billing codes for RPM and RTM by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2019. Method(s): A focused literature review was conducted in PubMed. Articles published between January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2023 were eligible for inclusion if reported technologies were classified as RPM (defined as the collection and interpretation of physiologic data digitally stored and/or transmitted by patients and/or caregivers to qualified health care professionals) or RTM (defined as the use of medical devices to monitor a patient's health or response to treatment using non-physiological data), following CMS definitions. RPM and RTM technologies included hardware, software, telehealth, and blockchain applications. Articles were then categorized using a semi-automated software platform (AutoLit, Nested Knowledge, St. Paul, MN) based on disease area, study design, intervention, and outcomes studied. Result(s): Of the 673 records screened, 245 articles were included. Observational studies (19.6%) were the most common study design, followed by systematic or focused literature reviews (11.0%) and narrative reviews (10.6%). The most common disease areas included cardiology (25.7%), coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19;13.9%), and diabetes (9.4%). The most frequent clinical, non-clinical, and patient-reported outcomes were symptom monitoring (20.8%), all cause readmission and hospitalization rates (both 7.3%), and patient experience (7.8%), respectively. Conclusion(s): CMS policy and coding practices for RPM and RTM are evolving, and this trend is likely to continue into the future. This review provides details on the current evidence trends associated with RPM/RTM technologies. Evidence development of RPM and RTM should be assessed as evidence needs for coverage and reimbursement may receive increased payer management.Copyright © 2023

19.
Emerging Practices in Telehealth: Best Practices in a Rapidly Changing Field ; : 209-224, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20239397

ABSTRACT

Over the past several years the perception of telehealth – and its role in healthcare delivery – has changed dramatically. Previously limited to just a few use cases including low-acuity virtual urgent care and chronic outpatient disease management, telehealth now plays some role in virtually every medical specialty and has seen considerable growth in technologies beyond the simple video visit. In this chapter, we highlight the forces that have driven telehealth's rapid growth and adoption. First, we discuss the evolution of the telehealth landscape in the years leading up to the COVID‐19 pandemic, including increasing consumer demand for virtual services, the emergence of new payment models that promote telehealth use, advancements in technical capabilities, and new structures that enabled reimbursement of digital health activities. Then we cover advancements in telehealth directly related to the pandemic and important considerations for continued growth including provider workflow integration, accessibility and equity, and clarity around reimbursement. Finally, we discuss technological innovations and new modes of care delivery – such as digital therapeutics and virtual-first health plans – that are likely to enhance the sophistication and expand the role of telehealth services over the coming years. © 2023 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

20.
Value in Health ; 26(6 Supplement):S322, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239129

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Several populations are at greater risk of severe COVID-19 due to inadequate responses to COVID-19 vaccines. Many of these individuals, and their caregivers, continue practicing varying degrees of social isolation to avoid SARS-CoV-2 infection. Following the end of lockdowns, the behaviors and impacts of continued isolation on the quality-of-life of high-risk populations remain poorly understood. This study describes the main avoidance and protective behaviors and ongoing impacts experienced by adults and caregivers of adults at high-risk of severe COVID-19. Method(s): Four virtual focus groups (April-July 2022) were conducted with individuals at high-risk of severe COVID-19, or caregivers, recruited via a convenience sample from patient panels. A discussion guide of open-ended questions was prepared based on COVID-19 guidance documents and a literature review. For qualitative analyses, an inductive approach was used for behaviors, deductive for impacts. A pre-defined codebook was updated throughout as needed. Salient concepts were defined as those mentioned by >=30% of participants or in every focus-group session. Result(s): Fourteen participants were interviewed (12 patients, 2 caregivers). Participants highlighted continued behaviors greatly impacting their quality-of-life. Avoidance behaviors (staying home, avoiding bystanders, avoiding shopping facilities and gatherings, using delivery services, family protection [43%-64%]) and protective behaviors (masking [79%], vaccination [57%]) were reported. Negative impacts included family relationship impacts (71%), collapse of social relationships (57%), difficulties accessing healthcare (43%), anxiety, fear, loneliness and depression (36%-50%), and impacts on employment/finances (36%). Positive impacts included the advent of telehealth (57%) and recognizing family importance (36%). Lack of trust in authority (57%) and hoarding of medications (36%) were negative general impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted. Concepts reported by patients and caregivers were similar. Conclusion(s): Individuals at high-risk of severe COVID-19 and their caregivers maintained avoidance and protective behaviors similar to those reported during lockdowns. This study highlights the continued burden experienced by high-risk populations.Copyright © 2023

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