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1.
International Conference on Transportation and Development 2022, ICTD 2022 ; 4:173-181, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2062378

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic had a significant effect on traffic volumes;the closures lead to a change in travel patterns and driver behaviors. This study evaluates the trip generation associated with commercial properties that remained open using a before, during, and post-pandemic lockdown approach. The study identified an anomaly in trip generation during the height of the pandemic pertaining to a specific commercial property type, where trips increased by 12% and 56% in the AM and PM periods. The results during the post-pandemic period were found to remain elevated at a rate of 8% to 36% higher in the AM and PM periods, and indicate a lasting change in driver behavior. This change should be considered when conducting future traffic studies or using data collected during the pandemic. An adjustment factor was also developed to adjust data collected during the pandemic and current post-pandemic lockdown times. © ASCE. All rights reserved.

2.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Business Excellence ; 16(1):906-917, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1997413

ABSTRACT

It is widely recognized that the tourism and travel industry was among the most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Even in this context, the tourism sector has proven its strength to recover and adapt to the new tourist perceptions and behaviours, which have led to changes in travel patterns, resulting new travel trends. There is concern in the scientific literature for the topic of travel trends in terms of identifying them and finding solutions for tourism recovery. The research methodology of this paper is based on content analysis and the main purpose is to answer the question, what are the travel trends during the COVID-19 pandemic? The results of the research are derived from the perspective of the world's leading online travel agencies. In this study, several travel trends were identified during the COVID-19 pandemic, the main ones being domestic travel, tourists' preference for bookings with flexible cancellation terms, buying holidays shortly before the departure date, choosing destinations and locations where safety and health measures are valued, opting for shorter trips and moving towards more sustainable tourism. The authors consider that the contribution of this study in the field of tourism is represented by the actuality of the topic analysed.

3.
Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect ; 15: 100668, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984174

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic marked a global disruption of unprecedented scale which was closely associated with human mobility. Since mobility acts as a facilitator for spreading the virus, individuals were forced to reconsider their respective behaviors. Despite numerous studies having detected behavioral changes during the first lockdown period (spring 2020), there is a lack of longitudinal perspectives that can provide insights into the intra-pandemic dynamics and potential long-term effects. This article investigates COVID-19-induced mobility-behavioral transformations by analyzing travel patterns of Berlin residents during a 20-month pandemic period and comparing them to the pre-pandemic situation. Based on quantitative analysis of almost 800,000 recorded trips, our longitudinal examination revealed individuals having reduced average monthly travel distances by ∼20%, trip frequencies by ∼11%, and having switched to individual modes. Public transportation has suffered a continual regression, with trip frequencies experiencing a relative long-term reduction of ∼50%, and a respective decrease of traveled distances by ∼43%. In contrast, the bicycle (rather than the car) was the central beneficiary, indicated by bicycle-related trip frequencies experiencing a relative long-term increase of ∼53%, and travel distances increasing by ∼117%. Comparing behavioral responses to three pandemic waves, our analysis revealed each wave to have created unique response patterns, which show a gradual softening of individuals' mobility related self-restrictions. Our findings contribute to retracing and quantifying individuals' changing mobility behaviors induced by the pandemic, and to detecting possible long-term effects that may constitute a "new normal" of an entirely altered urban mobility landscape.

4.
Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management ; 16, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1954242

ABSTRACT

Background: After coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic, movement restrictions were implemented across sub-Saharan Africa. There has been much speculation on what the long-term impacts on urban transport might be. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to identify the revealed and future travel impacts of the pandemic. Method: To pursue this aim, evidence was compiled from two sources: secondary big data;and a ( n = 15) two-wave Delphi panel survey of experts in the region. Results: It is predicted that longer-term impacts will take the form of: reduced travel by, and accessibility for, low-income households residing in peripheral locations because of decreased welfare;reduced transport service availability;operator reduction (particularly amongst unsubsidised formal operators);increased remote activity participation for a minority of better resourced households with white-collar workers;and disrupted trip distributions as the mix of city-centre land use changes in response to business attrition in economic recession rather than to disrupted bid rents. Conclusion: The major impact of the pandemic is likely to be on welfare, rather than on trip substitution. There is a need, therefore, to focus policy on the mitigation of these impacts and, more particularly, on ways of measuring changes in transport disadvantage and exclusion so that reliable data are available to inform mitigation strategies. The mitigation strategies considered should include investment in affordable ‘digital connectivity’ as a means of complementing accessibility from physical proximity and mobility. The pandemic also highlights the need to develop more robust transport planning practices to deal with uncertainty.

5.
6th International Conference on Transportation Information and Safety, ICTIS 2021 ; : 1443-1447, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1948786

ABSTRACT

Carbon emission is largely reduced during the COVID-19 due to the lockdown. However, the accurate impact in the personal transport sector after the epidemic is still not clear. To accurately measure the travel pattern variation effects on utility factor of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV s) due to COVID-19, travel pattern, charging pattern, and utility factors (UF) are compared in a typical city based on actual travel data before and after the pandemic. The result shows that the number of trips and the daily vehicle kilometers travelled decreased significantly during the pandemic while the average daily travel mileage increased quickly after the pandemic and is only 9% lower than that before the pandemic. Some consumers even travel longer with personal vehicles to avoid possible health risks from public transportation. The electricity utility factor after the pandemic is 0.022 larger compared to that before the pandemic due to the variation of travel patterns, a 60-km-range PHEV has a pre-pandemic standard UF of 0.745 and a post-pandemic standard UF of 0.767. Besides, the actual UF is 15% smaller compared to the standard UF due to the actual charging frequency in reality. © 2021 IEEE.

6.
Tourism Review of AIEST - International Association of Scientific Experts in Tourism ; 77(4):1219-1233, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1909172

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This paper aims to examine key parameters of scholarly context and geographic focus and provide an assessment of theoretical underpinnings of studies in the field of social media and visitor mobility. This review also summarised the characteristics of social media data, including how data are collected from different social media platforms and their advantages and limitations. The stocktake of research in this field was completed by examining technologies and applied methods that supported different research questions.Design/methodology/approach>This literature review applied a mix of methods to conduct a literature review. This review analysed 82 journal articles on using social media to track visitors’ movements between 2014 and November 2020. The literature compared the different social media, discussed current applied theories, available technologies, analysed the current trend and provided advice for future directions.Findings>This review provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the research to date on tourist mobility analysed using social media data. The diversity of scales (with a dominant focus on the city-scale), platforms and methods highlight that this field is emerging, but it also reflects the complexity of the tourism phenomenon. This review identified a lack of theory in this field, and it points to ongoing challenges in ensuring appropriate use of data (e.g. differentiating travellers from residents) and the ethics surrounding them.Originality/value>The findings guide researchers, especially those with no computer science background, on the different types of approaches, data sources and methods available for tracking tourist mobility by harnessing social media. Depending on the particular research interest, different tools for processing and visualization are available.

7.
Virus Outbreaks and Tourism Mobility: Strategies to Counter Global Health Hazards ; : 225-240, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1891271

ABSTRACT

According to the current body of literature published, the outbreak of coronavirus is estimated to have an immense influence both on the supply and demand sides of the tourism industry. The lockdown and the risk of disease has in/directly forced consumers to respond to their regular life patterns in general and consumption patterns in tourism, travel and hospitality operations in particular. Consumers have mostly begun using online shopping platforms for varying reasons, and online platforms have become a great opportunity for businesses to transform their regular operations and collect the individualized data of consumers across the globe. On the other hand, the service providers have had a short break in their operations by thinking about different ways on how to respond to possible changes both in production and consumption patterns. For instance, passengers, particularly those who are elderly and less risk aversive, are less likely to board on flights and take cruise tours in the short term. Using own cars instead of benefiting from car rental services, on the other hand, have appeared to be an alternative way of travelling to short-haul destinations. As a result, this chapter aims to provide a generic discussion of how the coronavirus is likely to influence the services operated by the aviation industry. The chapter, to a greater extent, benefits from the results of existing conceptual/empirical studies, media news as well as the reports of various international organizations such as UNWTO and IATA. © 2021 by Emerald Publishing Limited.

8.
Sustainability ; 14(10):5906, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871490

ABSTRACT

Access to adequate and appropriate transport options enables older people to continue as thriving community participants, to reach services and to maintain social connections. While transport needs are diverse, and tend to change over time, there is little information on current and future transport patterns, and the awareness, acceptance and adoption of new technologies. A national online survey was administered to current drivers in Australia. A sample of 705 drivers provided information on available travel modes and use of these modes, awareness of in-vehicle technologies and future use of vehicle technologies. The findings revealed high use of private vehicles, walking and taxis but little use of other travel modes (bicycles, motorcycles, rideshare, community services and public transport). Age, gender and residential location influenced the availability and use/potential use of some transport options. Overall awareness of in-vehicle technologies was generally low and particularly so amongst older and female participants. There was some appetite to use emerging technologies in the future. The findings inform the development of effective strategies and initiatives aligned with healthy ageing and wellbeing targets, increased sustainability, resilience and connectedness, creation of healthier travel choices and healthier environments to promote acceptance and use of a range of transport options and uptake of safer vehicles equipped with in-vehicle technologies to ultimately enhance safe and sustainable mobility of older road users.

9.
5th IEEE Conference on Energy Internet and Energy System Integration, EI2 2021 ; : 3025-3030, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1806894

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many governments around the world to implement strict lockdown measures and order citizens to stay at home, which has caused a major change in travel patterns. This study leveraged electric vehicle charging big data in Hefei, Anhui Province, China to estimate electric vehicle charging demand in the absence of the COVID-19 pandemic using multi-layer perceptron model, which quantified the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, we employed the vector autoregressive model to investigate the dynamic relationships between the changes in charging demand and various explanatory factors. The results suggest that the daily average charging demand in Hefei decreased by 78.3% compared to the predicted value during the pandemic. Furthermore, according to the variance decomposition and impulse response function analysis, national confirmed COVID-19 cases play a dominant role in reducing charging demand. The number of daily hospitalizations and Migration Scale Index also have significant and robust effect on the decrease in charging demand. The Air Quality Index and Baidu Index are susceptible to external factors and do not have a direct impact on the change in charging demand. Findings support a better understanding of changes in travel behavior during the pandemic and provide policy makers with references to deal with similar events. © 2021 IEEE

10.
Case Studies on Transport Policy ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1800117

ABSTRACT

The many benefits of cycling, such as eco-friendliness, low cost, health benefits, and efficiency in congested areas, had encouraged governmental strategies to promote it, triggering a global growth of bike-sharing systems (BSS). In this line, it is important to avoid service termination by assessing the evolution, identifying drawbacks and success factors, that could be determinant on the system’s future. Nonetheless, in many cases, subjective and objective information regarding BSS was not collected nor compared. In this study, we analyse the evolution of Madrid’s pioneer electric system, by combining the subjective data of three surveys, conducted since 2014 to 2019, with objective data from the service operator. The insights extracted shed light on the key factors determining the system’s success, and its influence on travel behaviour. Results suggest that the user profile of the young early adopters evolved to middle-aged workers. Strong maintenance campaigns and network expansions improved bikes availably and user satisfaction. Slope of the streets is one of the lowest importance factors, whereas pedelec assistance the highest. It is likely to believe that there is a relationship between both, suggesting that electric assistance encourages cycling in a hilly city like Madrid. Transferable experiences to other cities evolving from traditional to e-BSS could be valuable, like the results suggesting that the introduction of an electric BSS is a potential trigger for bicycle adoption in dense urban environments. In addition, that subscribers tend to reduce the use of private car while increase cycling. This longitudinal analysis offers valuable policy implications, like those related with bike maintenance, network extension, and measures focused on keeping the new subscribers of the COVID-19 post-lockdown.

11.
Sustainability ; 13(6):3052, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1792542

ABSTRACT

Combined bus rapid transit and buses in a dedicated bus lane (CBBD) is a measure that bus rapid transit (BRT) operators implement to reduce overlapping routes between BRT and fixed-route buses. The CBBD measure can combine the passengers of both systems on the same route, which helps increase passenger demand for the BRT, and reduce fuel consumption and emissions from utilizing the exclusive lanes for the combined route. However, the CBBD could affect some bus and BRT passengers in terms of either losing or gaining travel time-saving benefits depending on their travel pattern. This research proposed a methodology to determine the travel distance initiating disadvantage for BRT passengers (DDB) to justify the potential success of the CBBD operations. The number of passengers gaining a benefit from the CBBD was sensitive to the distance between the CBBD stops and the operational period of the CBBD. The CBBD reform would be beneficial to transit agencies to improve the travel time of passengers and be able to promote environmental sustainability for the public transportation system in urban cities.

12.
Front Big Data ; 5: 822889, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742210

ABSTRACT

Understanding the patterns of human mobility between cities has various applications from transport engineering to spatial modeling of the spreading of contagious diseases. We adopt a city-centric, data-driven perspective to quantify such patterns and introduce the mobility signature as a tool for understanding how a city (or a region) is embedded in the wider mobility network. We demonstrate the potential of the mobility signature approach through two applications that build on mobile-phone-based data from Finland. First, we use mobility signatures to show that the well-known radiation model is more accurate for mobility flows associated with larger Finnish cities, while the traditional gravity model appears a better fit for less populated areas. Second, we illustrate how the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic disrupted the mobility patterns in Finland in the spring of 2020. These two cases demonstrate the ability of the mobility signatures to quickly capture features of mobility flows that are harder to extract using more traditional methods.

13.
Transp Res Part A Policy Pract ; 159: 55-73, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740223

ABSTRACT

With the arrival of COVID-19 in the Netherlands in Spring 2020 and the start of the "intelligent lockdown", daily life changed drastically. The working population was urged to telework as much as possible. However, not everyone had a suitable job for teleworking or liked teleworking. From a mobility perspective, teleworking was considered a suitable means to alleviate travel. Even after the pandemic it can (continue to) reduce pressure on the mobility system during peak hours, thereby improving efficiency and level of service of transport services. Additionally, this could reduce transport externalities, such as emissions and unsafety. The structural impact from teleworking offers opportunities, but also challenges for the planning and operations of public transport. The aim of this study is to better understand teleworking during and after COVID-19 among train travellers, to support operators and authorities in their policy making and design. We study the telework behaviour, attitude towards teleworking, and future intentions through a longitudinal data collection. By applying a latent class cluster analysis, we identified six types of teleworkers, varying in their frequency of teleworking, attitude towards teleworking, intentions to the future, socio-demographics and employer policy. In terms of willingness-to-telework in the future, we distinguish three groups: the high willingness-to-telework group (71%), the low willingness-to-telework group (16%), and the least-impacted self-employed (12%). Those with high willingness are expected to have lasting changes in their travel patterns, where especially public transport is impacted. For this group, policy is required to ensure when (which days) and where (geographical) telework takes place, such that public transport operators can better plan and operate their services. For those with low willingness, it is essential that the government provides tools to companies (especially in education and vital sector) such that they can be better prepared for teleworking (mostly during but also after the pandemic). Employers on the other hand need to better support their employees, such that they stay in contact with colleagues and their concentration and productivity can increase.

14.
25th International Conference of Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies: Sustainable Mobility, HKSTS 2021 ; : 401-409, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1695816

ABSTRACT

Until the COVID pandemic occurred city tourism has been one of the fastest growing industries in the last years and understanding travel patterns of tourists inside cities becomes for many cities important as it constitutes a substantial amount of daily trips. Kyoto, Japan, is a prime example for this as there were 53 million tourists visiting the city in 2019. To understand tourists' travel patterns different data sources need to be exploited as their behavior is less captured with traditional surveys. In this research we use data obtained from the “Arukumachi Kyoto” application, a mobile app that allows travelers to plan their public transport trips in Kyoto and is aimed at tourists. Around 6000 users have given their consent for their search data as well as their GPS traces to be stored. We focus our analysis on users for which we obtain several fairly regular location information. We first describe the biases and overall distribution of trips in the city obtained from the data as well as dominant tour patterns. We then employ a Markovian analysis to describe the movement between 37 touristic areas in the city. A basic model is improved by obtaining time specific transition probabilities. If no more records are observed during a day a tour is considered as entering an absorbing state. We furthermore discuss advances such as overcoming the fact that we miss visits due to irregular and not frequent enough GPS records as well as the potential for alternative analysis methods. © 2021 Proceedings of the 25th International Conference of Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies, HKSTS 2021: Sustainable Mobility. All Rights Reserved.

15.
23rd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction , HCII 2021 ; 13097 LNCS:11-25, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1565298

ABSTRACT

The application of human factors and ergonomics in transportation is an example of human-automation interaction. Since the year 2020, the covid-19 pandemic has become an emerging factor that interacts with transportation from epidemiological and ergonomic perspectives. This study aims at capturing the emerging trends of covid-19 related human factors in transportation through conclusions from a systematic literature review of relevant publications. Analyses of content and bibliometrics were accomplished by using tools such as VOS Viewer, Citespace, Harzing, and MaxQDA to establish the findings of emerging trends in this field. Key findings from these analyses are: (1) Since the start of the covid 19, countries over the world have administered a variety of travel-related controls in an attempt to contain or slow down the spread of the virus both domestically and internationally. (2) The enforced travel restrictions not only impacted the spread of the pandemic but also transformed people’s activity and travel patterns into a new form. (3) The altered activity and travel patterns further brought changes in transportation policy design, air quality control, and industry disruptions. (4) The pandemic has motivated people to adopt new HCI technologies, and some previously HCI technologies are being challenged because of the pandemic mitigation policies. © 2021, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

16.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 926(1), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1556770

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 has caused many changes and one of the changes is in people’s travel patterns. Travel patterns have potentially related to environmental factors. The patterns in an urban environment can affect the liveability increase and the planning in urban areas. The change of travel pattern data is necessary for transportation planners and policymakers in providing safe transportation during the pandemic. Therefore, forecasting travel patterns is particularly essential to plan a better environment to reduce the spread of COVID-19. This study tries to forecast travel patterns during the COVID-19 period in Province of Bangka Belitung using the Community Mobility Report provided by Google. In this study, a time series model is necessary to predict future mobility. The model used in this research is exponential smoothing. The results find that the prediction of travel patterns for each trip destination experiences a fluctuating trend. The prediction for going to retail and recreation, grocery stores and pharmacies, parks, and transit stations tends to increase. Otherwise, the prediction of travel patterns for going to workplaces and residential decreases. Furthermore, the results of this study are feasible to plan a better environment to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

17.
Int J Health Geogr ; 20(1): 46, 2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551210

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since early March 2020, the COVID-19 epidemic across the United Kingdom has led to a range of social distancing policies, which resulted in changes to mobility across different regions. An understanding of how these policies impacted travel patterns over time and at different spatial scales is important for designing effective strategies, future pandemic planning and in providing broader insights on the population geography of the country. Crowd level data on mobile phone usage can be used as a proxy for population mobility patterns and provide a way of quantifying in near-real time the impact of social distancing measures on changes in mobility. METHODS: Here we explore patterns of change in densities, domestic and international flows and co-location of Facebook users in the UK from March 2020 to March 2021. RESULTS: We find substantial heterogeneities across time and region, with large changes observed compared to pre-pademic patterns. The impacts of periods of lockdown on distances travelled and flow volumes are evident, with each showing variations, but some significant reductions in co-location rates. Clear differences in multiple metrics of mobility are seen in central London compared to the rest of the UK, with each of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland showing significant deviations from England at times. Moreover, the impacts of rapid changes in rules on international travel to and from the UK are seen in substantial fluctuations in traveller volumes by destination. CONCLUSIONS: While questions remain about the representativeness of the Facebook data, previous studies have shown strong correspondence with census-based data and alternative mobility measures, suggesting that findings here are valuable for guiding strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect ; 8: 100255, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-907059

ABSTRACT

Various measures were recommended or imposed by the governments to control the spread of COVID-19. Travel behaviors are significantly influenced due to such measures. However, people have various travel needs ranging from grocery shopping to work. This study examines the changes that occurred in travel behavior due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected through an online questionnaire survey that included questions on trip purpose, mode choice, distance traveled, and frequency of trips before and during COVID-19. 1203 responses were collected from various countries around the world. Results explained that trip purpose, mode choice, distance traveled, and frequency of trips for the primary travel were significantly different before and during the pandemic. Further, the majority of trips were made for shopping during the pandemic. There was a significant shift from public transport to private transport and non-motorized modes. People placed a higher priority on the pandemic related concerns while choosing a mode during the pandemic as compared to the general concerns. Gender, car ownership, employment status, travel distance, the primary purpose of traveling, and pandemic-related underlying factors during COVID-19 were found to be significant predictors of mode choice during the pandemic. Outcomes of this study could be useful in transport planning and policymaking during pandemics based on the travel needs of people. In particular, government authorities could utilize such knowledge for planning smart and partial lockdowns. Service providers, e.g., taxi companies and retailers, could use such information to better plan their services and operations.

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