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1.
J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect ; 12(4): 7-13, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081653

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome is a life-threatening condition associated with elevated inflammatory markers and multiple organ injury. A diagnosis of exclusion, it has been reported after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (SARS-CoV-2) in children and adults; recently it has been described in some post-COVID-19 vaccinated individuals. The prognosis with supportive care and immunomodulatory therapy is good, although some individuals may require treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU). Here we report a case of a 58-year-old man who developed multi-organ failure after receiving the second dose of the Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. He required critical organ support in the ICU. An extensive workup was done to rule out alternative infectious and inflammatory processes. Following a period of gradual in-hospital convalescence, our patient made a full recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensively described case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine in an adult over 50 years of age.

3.
J Clin Med ; 11(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in patients with COVID-19, however, its mechanism is still controversial, particularly in ICU settings. Urinary proteinuria profile could be a non-invasive tool of interest to scrutinize the pathophysiological process underlying AKI in COVID-19 patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study between March 2020 and April 2020. All patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and without end-stage kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy before ICU admission were included. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and risk factors for AKI and to describe its clinical and biological characteristics, particularly its urinary protein profile. RESULTS: Seventy patients were included; 87% needed mechanical ventilation and 61% needed vasopressor during their ICU stay; 64.3% of patients developed AKI and half of them needed dialysis. Total and tubular proteinuria on day 1 were higher in patients with AKI, whereas glomerular proteinuria was similar in both groups. The main risk factor for AKI was shock at admission (OR = 5.47 (1.74-17.2), p < 0.01). Mortality on day 28 was higher in AKI (23/45, 51.1%) than in no-AKI patients (1/25, 4%), p < 0.001. Risk factors for 28-days mortality were AKI with need for renal replacement therapy, non-renal SOFA score and history of congestive heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: AKI is common in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in ICU; it seems to be related to tubular lesions rather than glomerular injury and is related to shock at ICU admission.

4.
Biomolecules ; 12(2)2022 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686604

ABSTRACT

The onset of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as a pandemic infection, has led to increasing insights on its pathophysiology and clinical features being revealed, such as a noticeable kidney involvement. In this study, we describe the histopathological, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural features of biopsy-proven kidney injury observed in a series of SARS-CoV-2 positive cases in our institution from April 2020 to November 2021. We retrieved and retrospectively reviewed nine cases (two pediatric and seven adults) that experienced nephrotic syndrome (six cases), acute kidney injury (two cases), and a clinically silent microhematuria and leukocyturia. Kidney biopsies were investigated by means of light microscopy, direct immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. The primary diagnoses were minimal change disease (four cases), acute tubular necrosis (two cases), collapsing glomerulopathy (two cases), and C3 glomerulopathy (one case). None of the cases showed viral or viral-like particles on ultrastructural analysis. Novel and specific histologic features on kidney biopsy related to SARS-CoV-2 infection have been gradually disclosed and reported, harboring relevant clinical and therapeutic implications. Recognizing and properly diagnosing renal involvement in patients experiencing COVID-19 could be challenging (due to the lack of direct proof of viral infection, e.g., viral particles) and requires a proper integration of clinical and pathological data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Kidney Diseases/complications , Kidney Diseases/virology , Kidney/injuries , Kidney/virology , Adolescent , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biopsy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Italy , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/ultrastructure , Kidney Diseases/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
5.
Nephrol Ther ; 17(4): 203-207, 2021 Aug.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316598

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease caused by the RNA virus SARS-CoV-2. It is characterised by an attack mainly affecting the respiratory system. There is renal involvement which is characterised by three main types of damage, acute tubular necrosis occurring in the most severe cases, proximal tubulopathy which is a prognostic marker of the disease and segmental and focal hyalinosis occurring in a genetically predisposed terrain. The pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2 renal involvement is not yet defined. The direct role of the virus is debated, whereas the cytokine storm and the hypoxic and thrombotic complications seem more important. The long-term outcome of the renal damage appears to be quite good. Long-term follow-up will allow us to say whether the renal damage is part of the long COVID.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/complications , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/virology , Kidney Tubular Necrosis, Acute/virology , Biopsy , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Kidney/pathology
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