Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 119
Filter
1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2016, 2022 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108760

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study investigated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of Vietnamese university students regarding COVID-19. METHODS: A validated questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha = 0.71) was used to survey 1,025 students. A convenience sampling method was used for recruiting students from April to May 2022. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum test/Dunn test for multiple comparisons were employed to compare students' KAP scores between two groups and among three groups or more, respectively. Factors associated with students' COVID-19 KAP scores were determined via univariate and multivariate linear regression models. Variables in the multivariate linear regression models were chosen using the Bayesian Model Averaging method in R software version 4.2.0. RESULTS: A majority of students had good knowledge (75.61%), positive attitudes (98.24%), and good practices toward COVID-19 (94.93%). Regarding the COVID-19 knowledge, the proportions of students who knew that mosquito bites and exposure to/eating wild animals would not lead to COVID-19 infection were not high (47.22 and 34.34%, respectively). More importantly, 70.34% of students thought that vitamins and minerals could help prevent or cure COVID-19. Antibiotics were the first choice for COVID-19 treatment of 438 students (42.73%). Nearly half of students (48.0%) bought antibiotics to keep at home in case of COVID-19 infection. The average KAP scores of medical students (19.97 ± 3.99, 45.10 ± 3.94, 9.72 ± 1.78) and females (18.67 ± 4.44, 44.79 ± 3.79, 9.36 ± 1.84) were significantly higher than those of non-medical students (16.48 ± 4.37, 43.33 ± 4.03, 8.68 ± 1.87) and males (17.01 ± 4.55, 42.79 ± 4.39, 8.77 ± 1.97), respectively (p < 0.001). Older students were more likely to have good knowledge and practices than the younger ones (p < 0.001). In addition, students using websites of the World Health Organization/the Ministry of Health and scientific articles to seek COVID-19 information were significantly associated with higher KAP scores when compared with those not using these sources (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.00139, respectively). CONCLUSION: Students' KAP scores significantly varied by age, sex, major, and sources of COVID-19 information. Although many students had sufficient knowledge, positive attitudes, and good preventive practices toward COVID-19, additional education and training strategies are paramount, especially for non-medical students and males.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Vietnam/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Anti-Bacterial Agents
2.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):119-121, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067746

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the concerns of university students regarding COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: A Cross-Sectional online survey was conducted among student population living in different socio-economical areas of Karachi. Information was gathered on their age, gender, education level, occupation status, area of residence, and knowledge about lockdown due to Covid-19. These variables were examined according to the socio-economic status of the area where students reside. Results: A total of 200 subjects above 20 years were interviewed out of which data was analyzed for 160 subjects. The majority of students were between the ages of 20-25 years, females, Muslims, and unemployed. According to 86.9% of students COVID- 19 can be prevented by avoiding contact and almost 74.4% students were in favor of lockdown further 37.5% students wanted no gaps between lockdowns. In this study, 31.3% spent time using phones while 15% spent time reading while 22% of the students spent their time in physical activity. Almost 66.3% of students did not develop any psychological problems. About 77.5% did not face any financial problems. Conclusion: Most of the respondents were in favor of lockdown as COVID-19 spread can be prevented by avoiding contact. Study highlighted COVID-19 lockdown had no effect on mental health of the respondents. This study will help in creating awareness regarding lockdown. It will enlighten new arenas for public health experts and stakeholders to develop new strategies, and interventions and predict a preparedness program plan for future Pandemic.

3.
Jordan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences ; 15(3):365-377, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067669

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic COVID-19 requires collaborative teamwork by all healthcare professionals including Pharmacists who could help in combating epidemic diseases by providing several pharmaceutical services. Nevertheless, public perception of pharmacist's role in providing health service is controversial Methods: A cross-sectional web-based design validated survey of 25 items was used to explore patients' opinion about pharmacist's ability to provide different health services during COVID-19 pandemic. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to evaluate the best model for the questionnaire. The association between different demographic variables and awareness about pharmacist's role was evaluated using Pearson correlation, Mann-Whitney u test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Result(s): A total of 668 persons participated in the study. The mean (SD) of the respondent questionnaire scores was 97.1 (12.6) and the possible maximum score was 115 (12.9). Higher awareness score was associated with increased age, female gender, lower educational level, living out of Amman the capital, being college or university student or being employed in medical field. Conclusion(s): The positive public perception toward pharmacist role shown in the present study enlighten the need to expand pharmacist role to be more engaged in providing different health services during the disaster or normal conditions. Copyright © 2022 DSR Publishers/The University of Jordan. All Rights Reserved.

4.
Jordan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences ; 15(3):355-364, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067668

ABSTRACT

Objective: The study aims to evaluate the impact of distance education on Pharmacy, Pharm.D and postgraduate students' satisfaction and its associated factors during COVID-19 pandemic. Method(s): A cross-sectional web-based survey was distributed online for Pharmacy, Pharm.D and postgraduate Diploma and Master Students across Jordanian universities. Expiratory factor analysis (EFA) and Cronbach's alpha were conducted to examine the validity and the internal consistency of the survey, respectively. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), Chi square test and t-test were conducted to evaluate the variables associated with students' satisfaction with distance learning. Result(s): A total of 860 students completed the survey. The EFA generated a three-factor model including positive impact, negative impact and general impact. The mean scores of the factors were 2.84 (SD=1.03), 2.78 (SD=0.92) and 2.34 (SD=1.22) respectively. Several factors were associated with students' level of satisfaction with distant learning including gender, nationality, university type and field of study. Conclusion(s): Distance education had negative impact on Pharmacy and Pharm.D. students' satisfaction, which opens the doors for the necessity to improve the distance education for university students. Variables including gender, nationality, university type and field of study were associated with students' level of satisfaction. Copyright © 2022 DSR Publishers/The University of Jordan. All Rights Reserved.

5.
Anales de la Facultad de Medicina ; 83(3), 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067357

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The COVID-19 pandemic, the lockdown, and suspension of activities were important psychological stressors. University students are a vulnerable population for high stress levels. Objective. To determine the levels of psychological stress and identify associated factors in the student population of a peruvian public university. Methods. Cross-sectional observational study. We applied an online survey on characteristics related to university studies and the 13-item Global Perception of Stress Scale (PSS-13). The questionnaire was applied in the framework of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. High stress was considered to be those students with a score above the 75th percentile. We compared the mean scores of the PSS-13 according some students characteristics with the Student’s t-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test. In addition, multivariate analyses was performed to recognize factors related to high stress. Results. 2647 university students participated in this study. 1566 (59.2%) were female. The age of the students was 21 years (IQR: 19 – 23). The stress score was 27.6 ± 7.1. The variables related to high level of stress were female sex, university academic year, having pending courses, chronic illness, and worrying about the future. Conclusions. During the first wave of COVID-19, university students presented high levels of stress. Being a woman, the academic year, having pending courses, chronic illness and worrying about the future are risk factors for presenting a high level of stress in a state university in Peru.

6.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(9):5712-5726, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067300

ABSTRACT

This aim of carrying this study was to assess the impact of social media on academic performance on university students. In this study a survey of 12 questions was issued to 150 students with 75 of the students coming from Daystar University and 75 respondents from the University of Kurukshetra. In the study we found that most of the student prefer using WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook respectively in Daystar and University of Kurukshetra. The study also found out that Mobile phone is the most widely used device to access social media platforms. The more the hours the more the number of students that uses social media. Based on the finding we can see there are more students who spend more than 3 hours using social media than those who spend less than 30 minutes on social media. Social media is also very impactful on the academic performance respondents gave responses like: "social media makes learning more interactive;social media decreases academic activities and concentration in class;social media helps in the completion of class work easily;social media assists in gaining skills not taught in class;social media deceases academic activities and concentration;and social media helps in the access of academic materials." Among these responses, positive responses rank high making social media an impactful platform to academic performance. Copyright © 2022, Anka Publishers. All rights reserved.

7.
Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine ; 20(3):252-257, 2020.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067158

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemics, universities take responsibility for the health of their students and epidemic control. Our urgent recommendation focuses on four key questions of emergency management in universities following rigorous evidence-based approaches and provides timely suggestions to university managers, academic faculties and student affairs managers. We recommend universities during the COVID-19 epidemics should: 1) suspend offline lectures;2) provide proper health education on the disease;3) encourage face masks, however oppose using N95 masks on the campus;4) encourage hand hygiene and provide sanitizing products on the campus. Copyright © 2020 West China University of Medical Science. All rights reserved.

8.
Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ; 16(4) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067099

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic of COVID-19 quarantined most of the world's population, which severely impacted daily life, especially academic activities. Objective(s): This study aimed to evaluate the sleep quality before and during COVID-19 quarantine and its relationship with family social support among university students. Method(s): This cross-sectional study was performed on 283 university students in Mashhad in 2020. A web-based questionnaire, including demographic information, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and Procidano Perceived Social Support from Family (PSS-Fa) questionnaires were sent to all students. Result(s): The prevalence of PSQI > 5 among students before the quarantine was 80.6% and reached 82.7% during the quarantine. The mean score of PSQI before the quarantine was 10.00 +/- 4.30 and reached 12.30 +/- 5.53 during the quarantine (P-value < 0.001). PSQI score before and during quarantine showed a significant inverse correlation with the PSS-Fa score. The sleep quality in those who did not leave quarantine at all was significantly higher than in those who did. Conclusion(s): This study shows decreased sleep quality in the students during the quarantine. In addition, students with more family social support had higher sleep quality, which could indicate the high impact of family social support on the students' quality of life. Copyright © 2022, Author(s).

9.
Int J Educ Res ; 116: 102081, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061264

ABSTRACT

Burnout symptoms are prevalent among university students. This study examined students' understudied profiles of burnout symptoms and their relation to procrastination, dropout intentions, and study- and life satisfaction. We used cross-sectional data from two online-studies conducted in Germany in April 2020 amid the COVID-19 pandemic (N study1 = 597, N study2 = 857). Latent profile analyses indicated three profiles in both studies: (1) well-functioning, (2) moderately exhausted-inefficacious, and (3) burned-out. Most students belonged to Profiles 1 and 2 with low to moderate burnout symptoms. Students in Profile 3 reported the highest symptoms, most procrastination, strongest dropout intentions, and lowest study- and life satisfaction. The distinct profiles broaden knowledge about intra-individual differences in students' burnout experiences and underpin the need for tailored interventions.

10.
Australian Journal of Primary Health ; 28(4):xxxvi, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2058136

ABSTRACT

Background: Covid-19 has created unique challenges for clinical research, partly due to changes in how patients are seen in general practice and the introduction of telehealth. There were also competing demands on general practitioners (GPs) who were managing the pandemic and specifically the vaccination roll out. Our research team was funded by an RACGP Grant in 2020 to conduct a study to develop and test a GP-Practice nurse team-based model of care for Mandarin speaking international students seeking sexual and reproductive healthcare. The study ran over 2021 and the early part of 2022. Aim(s): To highlight the challenges and lessons learnt in conducting clinical research during 2020/21. Method(s): The researchers will describe their experience of conducting a clinical research study during Covid-19, specifically in the context of recruiting international university students. Finding(s): Over the course of conducting the study for 18 months, there was progress moving forward and then steps backwards, akin to a game of snakes and ladders. Challenges encountered included: * Recruiting Mandarin speaking international students, when a significant proportion had returned home or were unable to enter Australia due to border control policies * Competing clinical demands due to the pandemic, including the management of Covid-19 positive patients, significant practice resources dedicated to the vaccination roll out and staff rostering changes due to illness * Prolonged lockdowns, which affected clinical practice and the ability to complete patient consultations as part of a research project * The Mandarin speaking project officer returning overseas. Implications: Despite the challenges experienced, the study was completed. This involved ongoing review and adaptation of expectations including pushing back timelines, requesting extensions relating to the Research Grant, reducing patient recruitment numbers and translating a face-to-face focus group to an online environment across two countries. It was a stressful but insightful experience for the researchers.

11.
International Medical Journal ; 27(5):521-526, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2058127

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study sought to determine the level of knowledge, practices and barriers towards the COVID-19 infection prevention strategies among University Students in Northern Jordan. Design(s): This study adopted a descriptive quantitative design. Material(s) and Method(s): The researcher administered a survey to 501 participants, who were University Students in Northern Jordan. Categorical data was then analyzed using three statistical tools of SPSS (v 25);descriptive statistics, spearman's cor-relation and linear regression analysis. Result(s): Participants reported proper knowledge scores (84.4%), proper adherence to general hygiene (89.2%) hand hygiene (87.7%), and respiratory hygiene (80.8%) practices regarding COVID-19 infection prevention strategies. Lack of personal pro-tective equipment and the inconvenience of staying at home are the leading barriers to stopping the spread of COVID-19. Gender, marital status, level of education and age have a statistically significant impact (p < .05) on the participants knowledge towards the overall prevention of the corona virus spread. Discussion(s): This study reports outcomes that correlate with some previous quantitative research studies regarding level of knowledge. However, level of knowledge does not consistently correlate with the practice. Conclusion(s): The university students in Northern Jordan exhibit sufficient knowledge and reliable attitude regarding the prevention of COVID-19. Copyright © 2020 Japan Health Sciences University & Japan International Cultural Exchange Foundation.

12.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(10): 1065-1071, 2022 Aug 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041949

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The growing number of human monkeypox cases worldwide illustrates the importance of early detection, prevention, management and quick action from healthcare authorities. The WHO confirmed a hundred of Monkeypox cases worldwide and disclosed Monkdypox as a worldwide emergency situation OBJECTIVES: To assess the knowledge about human monkeypox' source, signs/symptoms, transmission, prevention and treatment among Al Ain university students in the UAE. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to assess Al Ain University students' knowledge of Human Monkeypox. A validated questionnaire was distributed to students between lectures. The respondents' knowledge of human Monkeypox was assessed by 21 questions that examined the participants' knowledge of Monkeypox as follows: 5 items examined knowledge of the source, definition, and incubation time; 2items assessed the mechanism of transmission of human Monkeypox, 7 items assessed the signs and symptoms; 7 items assessed the preventative measures; and 6 items assessed the treatment modalities. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the factors influencing respondents' knowledge of human Monkeypox among university students. RESULTS: A total of five hundred and fifty-eight (558) students participated in the study. The average knowledge score was 70.1%, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 68.9 - 71.3. Of the total participants, 111 (19.9%) had poor knowledge about human Monkeypox, 320 (57.3%) had moderate knowledge, and 127 (22.8%) had good knowledge. The results of the statistical modelling showed that Old age (OR 0.681; 95% CI 1.005-1.016), female gender (OR 1.26; 95% CI 0.813 -0.961), participants from medical colleges (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.13 -1.32) having a history of human chickenpox infection (OR 2.6; 95% CI 2.3-2.9) and receiving information on human Monkeypox during education (OR 1.14; 95% CI 1.05-1.2) were strong determinants for good knowledge about human Monkeypox. CONCLUSION: knowledge of Monkeypox among the participants is relatively low, particularly regarding the epidemiology, symptoms and treatments. Therefore, increasing knowledge of Monkeypox will be key to enhancing the capacity to respond to human monkeypox cases and to relay pertinent data to a disease surveillance system.

13.
2nd International Conference on Computing Advancements: Age of Computing and Augmented Life, ICCA 2022 ; : 44-52, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2020425

ABSTRACT

The primary objective of this study is to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on a representative sample of Bangladeshi uni- versity students. The study conducted a cross-sectional approach including HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and CAS (Coronavirus Anxiety Scale), obtaining sufficient data to evaluate the correlation between COVID- 19 Lockdown lifestyle and psychological impact on the students. The CAS (Coronavirus Anxiety Scale), Anxiety and Depression models were constructed to predict individuals' psychotic state, and an indisputable interpretation process has been consummated to assemble sufficient results. The study conducted an unequivocal evaluation to observe the crucial socio and environmental factors associated with young age, low socioeconomic position, gender, scholastic lifestyle, immobility, solitary, academic and occupational impediments. © 2022 ACM.

14.
Psychosomatic Medicine ; 84(5):A62, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003489

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has led to the emergence of an altered society. Cumulative and individual stressors may lead to a time of crisis for students over time. Considering the detrimental impacts that stress may have, proper attention should be given to various mental and physical health issues. During this pandemic, there has been a high prevalence of anxiety and depression and serious impairments in mental and physical health. Previous studies suggest that certain psychosocial factors, such as optimism and positive affect, serve as valuable resources for mental and physical health during times of stress. However, the associations between optimism and positive affect with mental and physical health outcomes during the pandemic are yet to be investigated. This study aims to investigate these associations. We hypothesized that greater levels of optimism and positive affect would be associated with lower levels of depression, anxiety, and physical health symptoms during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. 293 university students were recruited to complete an online questionnaire in the spring of 2020. Longitudinal data was collected from participants every two months after, for a total of five assessments. Students self-reported their optimism, positive affect, anxiety, depression, and physical health levels. Multilevel modeling was used to test associations. Results indicated that greater optimism and positive affect were associated with fewer depressive symptoms, lower anxiety, fewer physical health symptoms, and better self-reported physical health (ps < 0.05). When testing optimism and positive affect together, both were associated with depressive symptoms, but only optimism was associated with anxiety (ps < 0.05). When entered together in the model, optimism and positive affect were not significantly associated with physical symptoms or self-reported physical health (ps > 0.05). Results suggest optimism and positive affect may serve as resources during COVID-19, and there are overlaps in their effects on health. Further investigations could create and implement effective health interventions that promote optimism and positive affect.

15.
Psychosomatic Medicine ; 84(5):A56, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003476

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have reported increased rates of mood and anxiety disorders in COVID-19 patients after acute illness, possibly resulting from inflammation, which is linked to depression and childhood trauma. Increased rates of anxiety and depression have also been observed at the population level following past viral outbreaks (e.g. SARS-CoV-1, MERS) and pandemic associated stress could also impact mental health. Thus, the present study compared depression, anxiety, and perceived stress scores in university students who tested positive for COVID-19 to those who never contracted the disease, and to scores prior to the pandemic. Methods: University students completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, and perceived stress before (N=150) and during (N=334) the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic sample also completed measures of COVID-19 positivity, symptoms, and recovery. One third of the sample tested positive for COVID-19 (N=109). Three x (pre-pandemic, COVID-19 positive, COVID-19 negative) x two (male, female) ANOVAs examined differences in depression, anxiety, and perceived stress. A two (COVID-19 positive, COVID-19 negative) x two (male, female) ANOVA compared PTSD severity. Results: There were significant group effects for depression (F(1,477)=3.06, p=.048, partial η2=.013), anxiety (F(1,477)=3.03, p=.049, partial η2=.013), and perceived stress (F(1,376)=5.62, p=.004, partial η2=.029). Post-hoc analyses indicated that depression and anxiety were higher in the COVID-19 positive (all p's <.034) and negative (all p's <.042) groups compared to the pre-pandemic sample, but did not differ across the pandemic samples (all p's >.584). In contrast, perceived stress was higher in the pre-pandemic group compared to those who were COVID-19 positive (p=.033) and negative (p=.011). PTSD severity did not differ between the COVID-19 positive and negative groups (p=.645). Females were more depressed (p=.036), anxious (p<.001) and stressed (p=.006) than males but did not differ in PTSD severity (p=.305). Discussion: These results suggest that rates of depression and anxiety have increased during the pandemic regardless of COVID-19 positivity. Reduced stress during the pandemic may reflect reduced extracurricular commitments due to university activity restrictions. Future research should examine if these results generalize beyond university students.

16.
Japanese Journal of College Mental Health ; 4:124-127, 2021.
Article in Japanese | Ichushi | ID: covidwho-2003419
18.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2022 Aug 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000811

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate university students' risk perception, protective measures, and general health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Turkey. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 1920 university students. The data were collected through an online questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 56.6% of the students considered their risk of being infected with the COVID-19. The number of measures taken by students was lower than expected. Students' increased anxiety perceived individual risk level, insufficient social support perceptions, and their perceptions of the current pandemic more serious than previous epidemics affect the number of measures they take. Students had sleep and study problems, and suicidal thoughts in the social isolation period. Sex, studying in medicine, anxiety related to COVID-19, feeling unconfident in coping with the pandemic, social support, were determined to be risk factors regarding general health, sleep and study problems, and suicidal thoughts. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study showed that the measures taken by university students were insufficient and the precautions were affected by many factors. It was determined that their health was adversely affected by the pandemic. University administrations and decision-makers should consider the risk factors to improve the students' experiences in such pandemics and emergencies.

19.
Archivos Venezolanos de Farmacologia y Terapeutica ; 41(4):264-270, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1997973

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In recent years, the use of computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones has experienced a constant in-crease, and even more so, the health emergency caused by COVID-19 has caused a significant increase in the amount of connection time to said devices. because the teaching mo-dality changed from face-to-face to virtual. Objective: To determine the prevalence and sociodemo-graphic variables associated with computer visual syndrome (VIS) in Peruvian university students during the COVID-19 health emergency. Materials and methods: The research had a quantitative approach;the design was non-experimental and the tran-sectional descriptive type. The sample was made up of 215 students from the professional career of Education to whom the Computer Syndrome Questionnaire (SVI-Q) was applied, an instrument with acceptable levels of reliability and validity. Subsequently, the responses were systematized and ana-lyzed using the SPSS® software. Results: It was determined that there is a high prevalence of SVI and that some sociodemographic variables such as gender, age group, time of exposure to digital devices, as well as having a pre-existing eye disease were significantly associated with said prevalence (p<0.05). Conclusions: It is necessary to promote the application of preventive strategies, such as the 20-20-20 rule, and to im-prove ergonomic conditions, such as the use of adequate seats, anti-glare screens and brightness adjustment to re-duce the prevalence. and symptoms associated with IVS.

20.
Terapia Psicologica ; 40(1):23-26, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1997911

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the physical activity and psychological health of university students. Objective: To analyze the physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic and its association with subjective well-being and mental health in university students in Chile. Method: Cross-sectional study in a sample of 469 students from different Chilean universities (67.4% women, M = 21.7 SD = 2.45 years). The physical activity, subjective well-being and mental health was measured. Results: Students who maintained a physically active behavior before and during the pandemic presented higher subjective well-being (men: P = 0.020;and women p <0.0001) than those who were physically inactive before and during the pandemic (women M = 4, 84, SD = 1.64;men M = 4.46, SD = 1.27). Women who became physically inactive during the pandemic had fewer negative affective experiences than women who were inactive before the pandemic (F(3,293)=3.118, p=0.026). Mental health symptoms were reported less frequently in physically active than inactive students. Conclusions: Students who were physically active before and during the pandemic showed better indicators of subjective well-being and mental health than those who were physically inactive or became physically inactive during the pandemic. Physical activity should be promoted in higher education, due to its potential protective effect in managing psychological consequences during a pandemic crisis.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL