Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 34
Filter
1.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816940

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic had enormous consequences in Brazil and worldwide. Patients with cancer affected by COVID-19 are at a higher risk of developing complications and worse outcomes compared to a non-cancer population, particularly the ones on active systemic treatment. Considering the COVID-19 high transmissibility in asymptomatic and presymptomatic patients, we sought to determine the prevalence of COVID-19 infection in patients with solid cancers receiving systemic therapy in a Brazilian public health hospital. Furthermore, we interrogated if socioeconomic status (SES) was associated with prevalence. Methods: Consecutive asymptomatic patients undergoing treatment for solid tumors at the chemotherapy and infusion center of Hospital de Base were enrolled. Patients were prospectively tested for SARS-CoV2 RNA real-time polymerase chain reaction with nasal and oropharyngeal swabs immediately prior to treatment. A socioeconomic survey was performed prior to testing. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics were summarized in means, medians, and proportions. Results: From October 6 to 13, 2020, 148 asymptomatic patients were identified. Of those, 41 were excluded (16 had hematological malignancies, 15 declined testing, 10 were not on active systemic treatment) leaving 107 eligible patients. The mean age of the population was 58 years-old (SD± 12.6);55% were female and 90% were self-identified as White. The most common cancer sites were gastrointestinal tract (37%) and breast (25%). Most patients had metastatic disease (62.9%) and were on a anticancer treatment involving chemotherapy (62.9%). Regarding to SES, 70% of our population had either primary school or were illiterate as their highest educational level. In terms of monthly income, 88% had a personal income inferior to U$390 and 92% a household income inferior to U$585. Of 107 patients tested, only one (0.9%) was positive for COVID-19. This is a 48 years-old man living in an urban area, with primary school educational level and a monthly personal income inferior to U$390. Conclusion: Despite a high prevalence of COVID19 in Brazil, our cohort demonstrated a low prevalence of COVID19 (0.9%) amongst asymptomatic patients with cancer. We hypothesize that patients with cancer, independently of their SES, are aware of the increased risk of developing severe disease and are adherent to physical distancing, masking, and hygiene measures. LF and BB are co-senior authors.

2.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816932

ABSTRACT

Background: Food insecurity can negatively impact adherence to and receipt of high-quality cancer care. The purpose of the study was to (1) compare the prevalence of COVID-19 associated food insecurity among cancer survivors to adults without a history of cancer and (2) examine determinants associated with COVID-19 related food insecurity among cancer survivors. Methods: We used nationally-representative data from the COVID-19 Household Impact Survey (n = 10,760), collected at three time points: April 20-26, May 4-10, and May 30-June 8 of 2020. Our primary exposure was cancer survivor status, based on participant's self-report of a cancer diagnosis (n=854, 7.1%). Primary outcomes of food insecurity were categorized on how often (response options: often true, sometimes true, never true) participants reported the following: “We worried our food would run out before we got money to buy more” or “The food that we bought just didn't last, and we didn't have money to get more”;respondents were categorized as food insecure if they chose often true or sometimes true. We also examined use of food pantry assistance or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits during the pandemic period;respondents were also categorized as food insecure if they received or applied for these benefits. We compared reported food insecurity among cancer survivors to other U.S. adults using Chi-square tests. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to identify demographic determinants of food insecurity among cancer survivors. Results: Thirty-two percent of cancer survivors were food insecure. Cancer survivors aged 30-44 years and those aged ≥60 were more likely to report being food insecure compared to respondents without a history of cancer in the same age categories (30-44 years, 59.9% versus 41.2% p = 0.01, ≥60 years 27.2% versus 20.2%, p = 0.01). Cancer survivors without a high school diploma were more likely to report food insecurity compared to adults without a high school diploma and no history of cancer (87.0% versus 64.1%, p = 0.001). In examining determinants of food insecurity among cancer survivors, adults aged 45-49 years when compared to those ages ≥60 (aPR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.03), adults with no high school diploma (aPR = 2.63, 95% CI 1.53-4.50) or a high school degree (aPR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.08-3.49) compared to those with a baccalaureate or above, adults with an annual household income <$30,000 (aPR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.15-4.07) compared to those earning ≥$100,000, and cancer survivors in rural areas (aPR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.07-2.12) compared those living in urban areas were more likely to report being food insecure. Uninsured cancer survivors (aPR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.46-3.92) and those on Medicaid (aPR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.40-3.17) were more likely to report being food insecure than their counterparts. Conclusions: Food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic is vast but varies considerably among cancer survivors and adults without a history of cancer. Among cancer survivors, differences in food insecurity were observed by age, SES, and area of residence.

3.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816930

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer survivors often experience financial hardship due to high costs associated with cancer treatment. Our objective was to (1) identify determinants of financial hardship, and to (2) evaluate the impact of financial hardship on mental health symptoms among cancer survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We used nationally representative data from the COVID-19 Household Impact Survey collected at three-time points: April 20-26, May 4-10, and May 30th -June 8 th of 2020. Our primary exposure was cancer survivor status, based on participant's self-report of a cancer diagnosis (n=854, 7.1%). We defined financial hardship using the following question: “Suppose you have an unexpected expense that costs $400. Based on your current financial situation, how would you pay for this expense?” Respondents were categorized as experiencing financial hardship if they chose the following options: I wouldn't be able to pay for it right now;sell something;use a payday loan, deposit advance, or overdraft;borrow from a friend or family member. Chi-square (χ2 ) tests were used to compare reported financial hardship among cancer survivors to other U.S. adults. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to identify determinants of financial hardship among cancer survivors. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate associations of financial hardship on mental health symptoms of cancer survivors. Results: Eighteen percent of cancer survivors reported experiencing financial hardship. Cancer survivors aged 30-44 (44.8%) and 45-59 years (25.9%) more frequently reported financial hardship compared to adults without cancer (23.4%, 16.7%, respectively, χ2p<0.05). Compared to cancer survivors aged 60+ years, those aged 18-29 (aPR: 2.54, 95% CI;1.51-4.28), 30-44 (aPR:3.41, 95% CI:2.26-5.16), and 45-59 years (aPR:3.66, 95% CI:2.26-5.16) were more likely to experience financial hardship. Cancer survivors on Medicaid (aPR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.16-2.66) were more likely to experience financial hardship compared to their counterparts. Compared to those without a high school degree, cancer survivors with some college education (aPR: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.18-0.47) and with a ≥Baccalaureate degree (aPR:0.05, 95% CI: 0.02- 0.14) were less likely to experience financial hardship. Rural cancer survivors had 61% higher prevalence of financial hardship compared to urban residents (aPR: 1.61, 95% CI:1.00-2.58), however, suburban residents were less likely to experience financial hardship compared to cancer survivors living in urban areas (aPR: 0.65, 95% CI:0.44-0.98). Cancer survivors who experienced financial hardship were more likely to report feeling depressed (aOR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.39-5.56), lonely (aOR: 3.06, 95% CI: 1.39-6.72), and hopeless (aOR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.36-7.37) 3-7 days during the last 7 days. Conclusion: Lower SES measures and younger age were determinants of experiencing financial hardship among cancer survivors. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a high burden of mental health symptoms among cancer survivors experiencing financial hardship.

4.
Atmospheric Environment ; 277, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1797154

ABSTRACT

Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are key precursors of tropospheric ozone (O3) together with volatile organic compounds (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO). Since O3 has positive radiative forcing and is harmful to human health, the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of NOx is thought to be beneficial from the perspectives of climate change and air pollution in principle. However, there have been discussions contending that the reduction of NOx emissions is not necessarily beneficial for the mitigation of climate change and improvement of air quality, since 1) it decreases the atmospheric mixing ratio of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which increases the atmospheric lifetime of methane (CH4), and 2) O3 formation is VOC-limited in urban areas and the decrease of NOx emission would increases urban O3 by facilitating the NO titration effect. In order to scrutinize such discussion, literature review have been made on the temporal variations of the increasing rate of tropospheric CH4 in the last 30 years, and on urban/rural O3 issues related to the NOx-limited/VOC-limited regime. Based on the review, it may be concluded that the variation of emissions of CH4 itself paly a dominant role, and the variation of consumption rate by OH play a minor role for the recent variation of CH4. It has been suggested that NOx and NMVOC should be reduced simultaneously in order to avoid the adverse effect on climate change mitigation. From the review on policy-related discussion of NOx-limited and VOC-limited O3 formation, the increase of O3 by the decrease in NOx emissions has generally been seen in winter and nighttime when photochemical production is minimal, and the higher percentile or diurnal maximum mixing ratios of O3 in summer tends to decrease with the decrease in NOx emissions. We suggested that the NOx-limited/VOC-limited approach is not appropriate as a long-term policy guideline for ozone control, since it is unreasonable that NOx reduction is not recommended when ambient NOx levels are high, while further NOx reduction is recommended only when the VOC/NOx ratio gets high after NOx control has been achieved based on other policy principle. Simultaneous reduction of NOx and NMVOC would be beneficial for reducing global, regional, and urban O3 to alleviate climate change and human health impacts. The ultimate reduction of anthropogenic emissions of NOx can be envisioned toward a denitrified (de-NOx) society along with a decarbonized (de-CO2) society.

5.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(3):LC20-LC25, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1780258

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mental health and well-being is as important as physical health during pregnancy. But the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused more anxiety and stress among pregnant women. The augmented levels of anxiety and stress may have detrimental effects on antenatal women. Anxiety and depression in pregnancy can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes like increased risk of abortions, preterm labour and even foetal deaths. Aim: To assess the anxiety and stress levels among pregnant women attending a tertiary care hospital in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala during the COVID-19 pandemic and to determine the associated factors. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 348 pregnant women attending a tertiary care teaching hospital in Thiruvananthapuram District in Kerala during the period October and November 2020 using a validated tool, Pandemic Anxiety Stress Scale for pregnant women. Higher scores indicating higher perceived anxiety stress with a maximum score of 60, categorised as normal, mild, moderate and severe with score between 0-14, 15-29, 30-44, and 45-60, respectively. Qualitative variables were expressed in frequency and percentage. Multivariate logistic regression was done to determine the factors associated with anxiety and stress. The p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mild anxiety and stress were seen in 160 (45.98%) pregnant women, 89 (25.57%) had moderate and 7 (2.01%) had severe anxiety and stress, 92 women had no anxiety. A total of 145 (41.67%) pregnant women were scared of vertical transmission to their baby. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that residents in urban area and pregnant women with other co-morbidities associated with pregnancy were the two significant factors (p<0.05) associated with anxiety-stress. Conclusion: About one-fourth of pregnant women had moderate or severe level of anxiety and stress. Antenatal women with pregnancy related diseases and those living in urban area had more anxiety and stress during pandemic. Measures need to be taken by health system to address the mental health of pregnant women.

6.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 6(1):1131-1134, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1772278

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in patients with COVID-19. Study Design:Cross-sectional study Place and Duration:Conducted at department of Medicine, Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH),Peshawer and Avicenna Teaching Hospital, Lahorefor the duration from July 2020 to December 2020. Methods: There were one hundred and fifteen patients of both genders had coronavirus disease were included in this study.Patients ranged in age from 25 to 80 years.After obtaining informed written permission, we collected detailed demographic information on all of the registered patients, including their age, gender, BMI, educational attainment and place of residence. All of the patients had their blood tested for corona disease using RT-PCR. After screening positive (fasting capillary glucose >100 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl) and each sixth consecutive negative (fasting capillary glucose <100 mg/dl) subjects, the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was administered. The SPSS 23.0 software was used for analyzing of data. Results:Included patients had mean age 59.4±12.55 years with mean body mass index 29.12±11.76 kg/m2. There were 70 (60.9%) male patients and 45 (38.1%) females. Majority of the patients were illiterate 65 (56.5%) and 49 (42.6%) patients were from urban areas. Most common co-morbidities were hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. We found 62 (53.9%) patients had diabetes mellitus in which majority of the cases were pre-existing. Frequency of impaired glucose tolerance was found among 26 (22.6%) cases in which majority of the cases had pancreatic cancer. 28 (24.4%) cases had intubation. Overall mortality was found among 18 (15.3%) cases. Conclusion:This research found that people with diabetes and poor glucose metabolism are more likely to have severe Covid-19. A previously undiagnosed symptom of primary infection has been linked to a disorder in glucose metabolism. Pathways through which SARS-CoV-2 affects glucose metabolism must be investigated if disease aetiology is to be fully understood.

7.
Medicine and Pharmacy Reports ; 94(4):440-448, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1771863

ABSTRACT

Background. Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has become a major global problem. There is an urgent need to measure the knowledge of the disease among health science students who can play an active role in pandemic control. The research was conducted to examine COVID-19 knowledge among medical and dental students in a Nepalese medical college, compare the knowledge to other studies in the literature and identify educational needs of students who may be involved in treating COVID-19 patients. Methods. The cross-sectional study was performed during the third week of June among first to final year medical and dental students. As the country was in lockdown, a structured online questionnaire was used. The responses obtained were entered into IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows and the normality of the data checked using onesample Kolmogorov Smirnov test. The demographic parameters were tabulated, and total score compared among different subgroups of participants. The frequency of different measures mentioned by respondents were also noted. Results. More than half of the participants were females (59.6%). Nearly half 282 (49.8%) belonged to age group 21-23 years. The majority 415 (73.5%) were undergraduate medical and 150 (26.5%) were undergraduate dental students. The largest number of respondents, 140 (24.9%), were from the second year of study and 344 (60.9%) were from urban areas. The median total score was 20 and the interquartile range 4. The maximum possible score was 29. The scores among students belonging to different years of study were significantly different (p=0.006). Total scores were not significantly different among other subgroups. Conclusions. The knowledge of the participants was good. Deficiencies in knowledge were noted in certain areas and these should be addressed through an educational intervention. One of the challenges is the rapid evolution of our knowledge about this condition, which may require regular refresher sessions. Similar studies can be undertaken in other medical colleges in the country and in nursing and pharmacy colleges.

8.
Embase; 2021.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-331149

ABSTRACT

This reflective opinion article arises from our experience conducting interviews with refugee women attending ante-natal and post-natal services in an urban setting in Kenya in the context of COVID‑19. First, we explain the research context in light of the study objectives. We reflect on the methodological challenges we faced, including researcher’s positionality, and argue that conducting research within the refugee context during the pandemic is unique, therefore research design must reconsider inclusive methodologies tailored to the uniqueness of refugees’ experience in order to obtain useful data. Second, we discuss these challenges in light of our experiences and the implications for addressing the gaps we identified, with particular emphasis on the ways in which professionals working with refugee communities in the context of a pandemic can build trust and obtain meaningful and uncompromised data. Lastly, we provide recommendations for researchers conducting similar research.

9.
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements ; 14(1):107, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1757021

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthy lifestyle, which are keystones in management of chronic cardiac patients, could be challenged during the lockdown. Purpose: In patients with Chronic coronary syndrome (CCS) or congestive heart failure (CHF), to evaluate the impact of the place of residence during the Covid-19 lockdown on lifestyle behaviours. Methods: Randomly selected subjects among 250 patients with CCS (from RICO survey) and 150 patients with CHF (from a HF clinic) were invited to answer to a phone-call questionnaire during the 1st COVID-19 lockdown. Urban zone was defined as ≥ 2000 inhabitants. Psychological distress was assessed by Kessler-6 score. Results: 344 questionnaires were fit for analysis (220 CCS and 124 CHF), including 66.6% male, with median (IQR) age at 70(59-78) y (Table 1). Rural location of lockdown residence was frequent (53%), and associated with less lifestyle impairment (i.e. decrease in physical activity and increase in screen-time). In contrast, patients living in urban area felt more often cramped and had a higher psychologic distress. Conclusions: During the 1st lockdown, chronic cardiac subjects from rural areas reported less unhealthy behaviors and lower rate of psychological impairment. These data may help to implement preventive action targeting urban patients.

10.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S301, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746596

ABSTRACT

Background. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has revealed socioeconomic and healthcare inequities in the US. With approximately 20% of the population living in rural areas, there are limitations to healthcare access due to economic constraints, geographical distances, and provider shortages. There is limited data evaluating outcomes associated with SARS-CoV-2 positive patients treated at rural vs. urban hospitals. The aim of the study was to evaluate characteristics and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients treated at rural vs. urban hospitals in the US. Methods. This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort analysis of adult (≥ 18 years) hospitalized patients from 241 US acute care facilities with >1 day inpatient admission with a discharge or death between 3/6/20-5/15/21 (BD Insights Research Database [Becton, Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ]), which includes both small and large hospitals in rural and urban areas. SARS-CoV-2 infection was identified by a positive PCR or antigen during or < 7 days prior to hospital admission. Descriptive statistics were completed. P value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Overall, 42 (17.4%) and 199 (82.6%) of hospitals were classified as rural and urban, respectively. A total of 304,073 patients were admitted to a rural hospital with 12,644 (4.2%) SARS-CoV-2 positive. In comparison, a total of 2,844,100 patients were treated at an urban hospital with 132,678 (4.7%) SARS-CoV-2 positive. Patients admitted to rural hospitals were older compared to those treated at an urban hospital (65.2 ± 17.3 vs. 61.5 ± 18.7, P=0.001) (Table 1). Patients treated at an urban facility had significantly higher rates of ICU admission, severe sepsis, and mechanical ventilation. ICU length of stay was significantly longer for patients admitted to an urban hospital compared to a rural hospital (8.1 ± 9.9 vs. 6.1 ±7.2 days, P=0.001) (Table 2). No difference in mortality was observed. Conclusion. In this large multicenter evaluation of hospitalized patients positive for SARS-CoV-2, there were significant differences in patient characteristics. There was no observed difference in mortality. These findings are important in evaluating the pandemic's impact on patients in rural and urban healthcare settings.

11.
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases ; 28(SUPPL 1):S31, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1722439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID19 pandemic has introduced new challenges to the diagnosis and management of pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Many patients have had limited access to their providers through telemedicine and may choose to delay non-emergent treatment for fear of risking exposure in healthcare settings. Additionally, the “hygiene hypothesis” would suggest that decreased microbial exposure secondary to social isolation may result in greater incidence of new IBD diagnoses and worsened exacerbations of preexisting disease, particularly in urban populations. We hypothesize that these factors resulted in worsened disease status upon admission. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients with IBD admitted to a tertiary care center before the onset of the COVID19 pandemic (01/01/18 - 03/01/20) and during the pandemic (03/01/20 - 08/01/21). All patients ≤18 yrs old who were admitted for a flare or new diagnosis of IBD were included. Variables collected included: demographics, admission indication, length of stay, laboratory markers of disease severity, surgical or endoscopic procedures performed during admission, and new treatments started on discharge. Data were analyzed using paired ttests. Study was IRB approved. RESULTS: The pre-COVID (N=50) and during-COVID (N=52) populations were similar in regard to demographic and clinical characteristics. More patients during-COVID19 underwent major surgical interventions (11.5% vs. 0%, p=0.007), and were started on biologic therapies or steroids (38.5% vs. 26%, p=0.09 and 11.5% vs. 0%, p=0.007 respectively). Length of stay was also increased during-COVID (5.5 days vs. 4.9 days, p=0.3). UC patients admitted during-COVID exhibited more severe thrombocytosis (483 vs. 419, p=0.2) while CD patients admitted during-COVID exhibited more severe anemia (10.7 vs. 11.6, p=0.1) and hypoalbuminemia (2.7 vs. 3.1, p=0.04). Although not significant, more patients during-COVID were admitted from urban areas (63.5% vs. 56%, p=0.2). DISCUSSION: Increased length of stay and incidence of major surgical interventions and biologic therapy initiation suggest that pediatric patients admitted for a flare or new diagnosis of IBD during the COVID19 pandemic experienced worsened disease severity. More severe thrombocytosis, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia upon admission supports this correlation. We hypothesize that many families chose to delay presentation given fear of exposure to COVID19. Furthermore, partial department closures may have led to delays in seeing patients in-person and ultimately admission. Lastly, we suspect that during-COVID fewer patients were admitted from rural areas given they experienced less emotional stress and physical isolation than their urban peers. Uninterrupted exposure to farm animals and peers at school may have had a protective effect on microbiome balance and stress level.

12.
European Heart Journal ; 43(SUPPL 1):i224, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1722400

ABSTRACT

Background: World is facing Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic since December 2019. [1, 2]. COVID-19 has significantly decreased the influx of patients presenting with cardiovascular diseases at hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the difficulties faced by patients in visiting the cardiac outpatient department during COVID-19 era and to assess the awareness regarding telemedicine and wiliness to adopt if offered in future. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out on patients presenting to the outpatient department in a National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases. Data was collected after verbal consent from patients. The collected data was entered using IBM SPSS version 21, mean ± SD was calculated for continuous variables and frequency and percentages were calculated for the categorical variables. Results: A total of 404 patients were interviewed, 42% female and 58% male with 77.5% from urban areas and 22.5% from rural areas. A total of 32.1% patients presented with shortness of breath, 28.8% with chest pain and 19% with palpitations. Regarding cardiovascular diagnosis 69.5% had ischemic heart disease, 38.3% had hypertension, 29.3% suffered from heart failure and 10.3% had valvular heart disease. A total of 26.7% visited the emergency room during the pandemic, 81.9% were compliant with medication and only 66% were compliant with a healthy lifestyle. A total of 52.8% patients found it difficult to attend the out patients department due to limited appointments, 24% due to limited mobility due to lockdown, 18.2% due to financial issues, 14.2% due to fear of acquiring infection from the hospital. Regarding telemedicine, 11.2% of the patients were aware of it and only 4.5% had previously used it, with 41.3% patients willing to opt for telemedicine in future. Regarding barriers to usage of telemedicine, a total of 40.7% of patients had no access to internet, 32.7% did not have a smart device and 11.6% were afraid of being diagnosed incorrectly. Conclusion: It was found that distancing measures, lockdowns and restricted mobility of the masses has made it difficult for patients to visit the clinics which has led to patients visiting the emergency room. Telemedicine awareness was found to be limited, however many patients were willing to adopt provided their limitations can be overcame. (Figure Presented).

13.
Documents d'Analisi Geografica ; 68(1):139-166, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1698933

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic was the worst public, economic and social health crisis in Spain since the Civil War. This virus caused thousands of deaths and hundreds of thousands of infections, with Catalonia and Madrid as the most affected territories. A first exploratory analysis shows, with the scarce reliable data available so far, that this pandemic has had a special impact on urban areas with higher population density and pollution levels, while rural areas, despite having a much higher at-risk population and a much more precarious healthcare system, have proven to be much more resilient to coronavirus expansion. All this opens the door to revaluing the importance of the rural environment as an analytical category and as a space for opportunities and life in the face of present and future pandemics and not just problems and crises. © 2022, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. All rights reserved.

14.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 41(1): 4, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700597

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic was the weakening of the community's economic condition. The weak economy of the community will have an impact on household food security. This study aims to determine food security in the COVID-19 pandemic situation and the impact of the pandemic on food security in urban and semi-urban areas. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a total sample of 517 people who live in urban (Jakarta) and semi-urban (Depok) areas. The research data was collected online and purposively through Posyandu cadres who have access to family/community. Food security was measured using HFIAS (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale) method, while impact of COVID-19 pandemic was categorized into two categories: impacted (reduced income and laid off) and less impacted (not reduced income and laid off). Data analysis used the Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: There were 65.0% of households with various level of food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the multivariate analysis showed that family income during the COVID-19 pandemic (AOR = 4.2; CI = 2.7-6.7), the type of impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, i.e., reduced income and stopped working (AOR = 2.6; CI = 1.6-4.1), and the age of the respondent (AOR = 1.7; CI = 1.1-2.5) were significantly related to household food security during the pandemic after being controlled by husband's work status. Households with lower income had 4 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those with higher income. Heavily impacted households (through reduced income and stopped working) had 3 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those who did not. Additionally, we found that households with younger respondent (< 31 years old) had 2 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those older counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted household food security in both urban and semi-urban areas through worsening employment status and income condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Food Security , Food Supply , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Journal of Medicine (Bangladesh) ; 23(1):42-47, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1690470

ABSTRACT

Purpose of the Project To examine the change in telehealth use growth during the COVID-19 pandemic with non-elderly patients in Bangladesh Methods Using patients of age between 18-64 from residents in and outside Dhaka, this study analyzed telehealth visits, and all health care procedures from 2019-2021. The inflection point of interest was March 2020, the month when the COVID-19 pandemic was officially declared as a national emergency. Analyses were controlled for age, gender, and socioeconomic index.We used DiD approach to see the growth in telehealth use and then performed logistic regression to evaluate the association between any telehealth use and patient characteristics. Results There were more than 3000 observations in the analysis, where more than 60% were female. The percentage of females did not decrease after the inflection point. The onset of the pandemic was associated with an increase in telehealth usage in Dhaka relative to outside Dhaka (DiD estimate 0.07;95% CI,-0.77-0.62). The mean telehealth visits in Dhaka after March 2020 was 33% higher than outside Dhaka per person-year. The mean (SD) of Dhaka and outside Dhaka were 1.69 (7.03) and 1.48 (7.62) respectively. Interpretations Overall, telehealth use was associated with the youngest age group of 18-34, living in more urban areas and living in areas of higher socioeconomic status. Conclusion In this study, we found a significant decrease to in-person services and a rise in telehealth visits.

16.
Annales Universitatis Mariae Curie-Sklodowska. Sectio B ; 76:203-222, 2021.
Article in Polish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1687626

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to present previous experiences of tourism cities in reducing the negative impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the local tourism economy. The article is based on literature review, which starting point was a World Tourism Cities Federation report on urban tourism during COVID-19 pandemic. The authors argue and discuss the proposed instruments of actions and tools supporting the tourism sector at the urban level, both in the phase of first responses to the outbreak, and in next stage of the pandemic, which is aimed at rebuilding and revitalizing tourism in the city. © 2021 Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej w Lublinie. All rights reserved.

17.
Safety and Health at Work ; 13:S53, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1676959

ABSTRACT

Migrant workers, including internal migrants who move from rural to urban areas searching for employment, face multiple barriers in accessing health and other services, in particular occupational health. The Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the need for coordinated responses by countries and regions that include pandemic preparedness, public health interventions, lockdowns, economic support (food relief, etc) and vaccinations. Disease transmission controls and restrictions due to stringent border management, vaccination certificates and testing have hit migrant workers hard. The health, economic needs and mobility of migrants due to the pandemic may be overlooked in the overall Covid-19 response. The social and working conditions of migrants make them vulnerable to Covid-19. The decline in remittances and lack of employment has negative consequences for their families and communities. Interventions, with Covid-19 messaging appropriately to migrant worker needs, access to health services including vaccinations, and accommodation and food security assistance are important. Mental health needs are crucial due to their precarious work, living conditions and lack of family support. Trade unions and large employers may support workers through workplace Covid-19 interventions. Migrant workers in SMEs and domestic workers are at risk of unemployment due to their employers becoming unemployed or transmission risk fears. Multilateral instruments to protect migrant worker rights should be incorporated into country responses to Covid-19 and future epidemics and disasters to save lives and livelihoods including those of migrant workers.

18.
Sustainability (Switzerland) ; 14(3), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1674780

ABSTRACT

Running surrounded by nature at night, often with limited contact with other people, is one of the safest physical activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this article is to determine what motivates night recreational runners and to analyse the differences between men and women according to age, and also to see whether the fact of having had COVID-19 or not matters when it comes to athletes’ motivation behind participating in runs. Runners were also asked about participating in cities or out-of-town events in terms of verifying the cleanliness of the air before running, using masks or running in green areas. 233 individuals in total participated in this descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional study. The questionnaire uses the division of motives used in the Marathon Motivation Scale (MOMS) and a number of additional questions on environmental factors. Overall, the main motivation that drives night-time runners is health orientation, weight concern, personal goal achievement, psychological coping, life meaning and self-esteem. The research also showed higher scores for health orientation, recognition, psychological coping, life meaning and self-esteem among runners who had had COVID-19 than runners who had not had the virus. In addition, respondents clearly indicated that night running makes it easier to fall asleep and improves the quality of sleep. Most runners rated their mental health as being good, did not run in the morning despite better air levels, did not choose running events outside the urban area and did not check the air quality index before running. Therefore, it will be important for coaches, event organisers and other professionals to consider athletes’ age, gender, whether they have had COVID-19 and runners’ approaches to eco-attitudes when trying to understand their reasons for participating in different sports or leisure events, especially those that focus on a priority in shaping environmental attitudes. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

19.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 15(12):3745-3748, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1668122

ABSTRACT

Objective: The main purpose of this study is to compare the mortality between health workers and general population infected with coronavirus disease. Study Design: Comparative/Retrospective study Place and Duration: Study was conducted at Medicine and Gastroenterology department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad for duration of six months from 1st January 2021 to 30th June 2021. Methods: In this study 250 patients of both genders with coronavirus infection were presented. Age of the patients was between 18-70 years. Informed written consent was taken from all the cases for baseline details including age, sex, body mass index, socio-economic status and residency. Included patients were both symptomatic and asymptomatic to disease. Among 250 cases 125 patients were in the general population included in group I while other 125 cases were health workers included in group II. Patients were admitted to the hospital and examined for recovery. Outcomes among both groups were assessed and compared in terms of ICU admission, ventilation requirement and rate of mortality. We used the SPSS 25.0 version to analyze complete data. Results: In group I, 65 (52%) patients were males and 60 (48%) cases were females with mean age 47.66±8.87 years and in group II, 70 (56%) were males and 55 (45%) females with mean age 27.66±8.87. Mean BMI in group I was 25.11±8.33 kg/m2 and in group II, body mass index was 22.32±7.54 kg/m2. Majority of the patients i.e 73 (58.4%) in group I had poor socio economic status but in group II 50 (40%) cases had poor economic status. Majority of the cases among both groups were from urban areas 75 (60%) and 85 (64%). 48 (38.4%) were symptomatic in group I and 53 (42.4%) were in group II. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and heart disease were the most common comorbidities. Frequency of ICU admission, ventilation requirement and mortality was significantly higher in general population 19 (15.2%), 24 (19.2%), 14 (11.2%) as compared to health workers 6 (4.8%), 7 (5.6%) and 5 (4%) with p value < 0.05. Conclusion: We concluded in this study that the severity of pandemic disease among general population was higher because of less use of preventive measures as compared to health workers and frequency of deaths, ICU admission and use of invasive ventilation in general population were also very high.

20.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 15(12):3741-3744, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1668121

ABSTRACT

Objective: Main purpose of this study is to determine the effects of pandemic disease COVID-19 on first and second trimester pregnancies. Study Design: Cross-sectional/Descriptive study Place and Duration: Study was conducted at Gynae and Obs department of Jinnah International Hospital, Abbottabad for duration of 10 months from January to October, 2021. Methods: Total ninety pregnant women of ages 18- 35 years were presented in this study. All the presented women had pandemic disease COVID-19. Women had first and second trimester pregnancies. Patients' age, body mass index, parity, education status, socio-economic status and residency were calculated after taking informed written consent. Chi square and t-test was performed to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Outcomes were assessed in terms of stress, depression among mothers and low birth weight of infants, perinatal death, preterm delivery, and C-section. Data was analyzed by SPSS 23.0 version. Results: Among 90 pregnant women 40 (44.4%) patients had first trimester pregnancies and 50 (55.6%) females had second trimester pregnancies. Mean age of the patients was 29.16±6.34 years and had mean BMI 22.13±5.16 kg/m2. Majority of the patients 52 (57.8%) had parity primipara. 44 (48.9%) patients were educated and majority of the patients were financially weak 62 (68.9%). 55 (61.1%) females were from urban areas. 54 (60%) females were symptomatic and 36 (40%) were asymptomatic. Frequency of depression among females was 68 (75.6%) and depression was found in 61 (67.8%) cases. Low birth weight was found in 22 (24.4%) cases, prevalence of preterm delivery was among 38 (42.2%) cases, number of C-section among cases was 47 (52.2%). Perinatal death was found in 7 (7.8%) cases. Majority of the patients with infants were instantly discharged after delivery 75 (83.3%) and 8 patients were admitted because of severity of pandemic disease. Conclusion: We determined in this study that Covid-19 among females with trimester first and second pregnancies were highly affected and had severity of psychotic disorders at start of disease but had lower adverse outcomes with low perinatal mortality. Majority of the females were recovered and discharged safely after delivery.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL