Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 49
Filter
1.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(6)2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884437

ABSTRACT

No available vaccine against COVID-19 had yet been proven for 12-17-year-olds in Egypt during the study period. This is the first study to assess Egyptian parents' intentions and associated factors in relation to vaccinating their children with COVID-19 vaccines. A cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted between 17 October and 17 November 2021, via social media platforms. The target group was parents with children aged 12-17 years. Parents' intention to vaccinate their children and factors associated with vaccinating their children, reasons for not intending to vaccinate their children, and circumstances whereby the parents would change their mind were recorded. Among the 1458 parents recruited, 65.6% were planning to vaccinate their children. The main concerns were fear of the vaccine's side-effects (68.3%) and conspiracy theories (18%). The factors associated with parents' intention to vaccinate their children were mother's older age (40-49 years: aOR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.05-1.99; ≥50 years: aOR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.16-3.75), high family income (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.41-2.79), and children with a history of chronic conditions (aOR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.25-3.25), while higher mother's education level was negatively associated (aOR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.64). A comprehensive health education program regarding vaccinating children with COVID-19 vaccines is highly recommended for parents, particularly for young and highly educated mothers, to enhance children vaccination rate when the vaccine becomes available.

2.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 49: 102369, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882560

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccination represents an important strategy to mitigate COVID-19 related morbidity and mortality by protecting against severe forms of the disease and reducing hospitalization and death rates. In this sense, the objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of Vaccination Intention (VI) against COVID-19 in Latin America and Caribbean (LAC). METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with a comprehensive search strategy for the following databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. A random-effect model meta-analysis was carried out using observational studies assessing the intention to vaccines against COVID-19 in LAC countries. The Clopper-Pearson method was used to estimate 95% Confidence Intervals. The quality assessment was developed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale adapted for cross-sectional studies. A subgroup analysis by study location and a sensitivity analysis were developed. RESULTS: Nineteen cross-sectional studies were included. Five meta-analyzes were performed according to the target population of the included studies. The VI in the general population of LAC was 78.0% (95%CI: 74.0%-82.0%). The VI for non-pregnant women was 78.0% (95%CI: 58.0%-99.0%), for elderly population was 63.0% (95%CI: 59.0%-69.0%), for pregnant women was 69.0% (95%CI: 61.0%-76.0%) and for health-personnel was 83.0% (95% CI: 71.0%-96.0%). The sensitivity analysis for general population meta-analysis that included only low risk of bias studies showed a 77.0% VI (95%CI: 73.0%-82.0%) and for non-pregnant women, 85.0% VI (95%CI: 79.0%-90.0%). CONCLUSION: Despite the high prevalence of VI in general population found in our study, VI prevalence from elderly people and pregnant women are lower than other population groups and overall population.

3.
Data Brief ; 43: 108365, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881912

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has had an immense impact on humanity in every aspect of life. Governments around the world have mandated movement restrictions, including in the Moroccan government, in which unfortunately the pandemic continues to propagate and causes serious problems for public health and economic activities in the Kingdom. As a major factor in the fight against the spread of COVID-19, the Moroccan government has undertaken major efforts to ensure the availability of the COVID-19 vaccines for all citizens. These valuable efforts resulted in initiation of the vaccination campaign, which started on February 14, 2021. As vaccination was voluntary, identifying the factors promoting citizen's intention to take the vaccine against COVID-19 may help government to take additional precautions to address the propagation of COVID-19, and ensure a return to normal life. Hence, this data article aims to identify factors influencing the Moroccan citizens to get a vaccine for COVID-19. The data were collected using an online questionnaire among Moroccan citizens. In addition, the Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling technique was adopted in order to analyze the collected dataset.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847293

ABSTRACT

As a promising approach to stop the escalation of the pandemic, COVID-19 vaccine promotion is becoming a challenging task for authorities worldwide. The purpose of this study was to identify the effective sources for disseminating information on the COVID-19 vaccine to promote individuals' behavioral intention to take the vaccine. Based on the Health Belief Model (HBM), this study illustrated the mechanism of how COVID-19 information acquisition from different sources was transformed into vaccination intentions via health beliefs. Using an online survey in China, the structural equation model results revealed that perceived benefits and cues to action were positively associated with COVID-19 vaccination intentions, and perceived barriers were negatively related to the intentions. However, perceived susceptibility and perceived severity had no significant relationships with the intentions. Moreover, the findings unveiled differences in the effects of acquiring information via multiple sources among traditional media, new media, and interpersonal interactions. Notably, new media and interpersonal interactions were more salient in promoting vaccination intention via health beliefs, compared with traditional media. The findings from this study will benefit health officials in terms of utilizing different information sources in vaccine programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Intention , Vaccination
5.
J Community Health ; 2022 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844425

ABSTRACT

Vaccine refusal by even a small subset of the population can undermine the success of the vaccination campaigns which are currently underway worldwide. The goal of this study was to identify determinants of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine. More precisely, it aimed at examining whether socioeconomic factors, levels of mistrust toward authorities, perceived scientific consensus, and perceived severity of COVID-19 can predict vaccination intentions against COVID-19. Vaccination intentions included being ready to get vaccinated, contemplating vaccination, and not considering vaccination. A sample of 399 individuals from New Brunswick, Canada, completed an online survey in March and April 2021. Results revealed that participants who declared they would probably get vaccinated were more likely to report lower levels of mistrust toward authorities, as well as higher perceived scientific consensus and perceived severity of COVID-19, compared to those who did not intend to get vaccinated or remained unsure. Strategies to guide healthcare professionals in assisting their patients in making the best healthcare decision for their family and themselves are discussed.

6.
Z Gesundh Wiss ; : 1-25, 2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826568

ABSTRACT

AIM: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyse gender differences in COVID-19 vaccination intentions. SUBJECT AND METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science and PsycInfo were searched (November 2020 to January 2021) for studies reporting absolute frequencies of COVID-19 vaccination intentions by gender. Averaged odds ratios comparing vaccination intentions among men and women were computed. Descriptive analyses of the studies were reported. RESULTS: Sixty studies were included in the review and data from 46 studies (n = 141,550) were available for meta-analysis. A majority (58%) of papers reported men to have higher intentions to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Meta-analytic calculations showed that significantly fewer women stated that they would get vaccinated than men, OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.28 to 1.55). This effect was evident in several countries, and the difference was bigger in samples of health care workers than in unspecified general population samples. CONCLUSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis found lower vaccination intentions among women than men. This difference is discussed in the light of recent data on actual vaccination rates in different countries. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s10389-021-01677-w.

7.
Int J Health Sci (Qassim) ; 16(1): 10-16, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1824473

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Vaccination is one of the most significant public health achievements of humanity. However, a significant portion of the population remains hesitant about vaccine safety, efficacy, and necessity. This study aimed to determine COVID-19 vaccination intention and factors affecting their decision among the general population in the Kurdistan region, Iraq. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted online during (April-May 2021), and a total of 1171 participants provided complete and valid answers were enrolled. Data collection was done through online questionnaire through Google Forms. We used binary regression analysis to identify factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention. RESULTS: The majority (53.6%) of the participants were female. Willingness to accept COVID-19 vaccine was low (33 %) of the participants. We found that vaccine hesitancy/resistance was high which was evident for (32%) and (34.9%) of surveyed populations, respectively. Vaccination intention may associate with age, education, and occupation. Furthermore, several factors were associated with hesitancy/resistance: Adverse effects of the vaccine and loss of family members during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the study participants refused or were hesitant to have the COVID-19 vaccine, so that Governments and health authorities should improve communication and increase trust.

8.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(5)2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820453

ABSTRACT

Children under the age of 5, will likely all be offered vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 soon. Parental concerns over vaccination of children are long standing and could impede the success of a vaccination campaign. In the UK, a trusted source to inform vaccination choices is the NHS website. Here we used a randomized controlled experiment of framing effects in NHS information content for COVID-19 and flu with 550 mothers under the age of 5. We compared both vaccination offers following two commonly used frames in vaccination informational campaigns: alerting to the risks of no vaccination for the child itself vs. those in their community. We find that vaccination intention was twice as high when risks to the child are emphasized, relative to risks to the community. Exploratory analyses suggest that these effects may differ between white and non-white mothers. Whilst communication directed at adult vaccination against COVID-19 generally focuses on risks of infecting others, communication about vaccination of children may benefit from emphasizing risks to the children themselves. This pattern is in line with flu vaccination research from pre-COVID-19 times.

9.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(3)2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818223

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy is a major barrier to achieving large-scale COVID-19 vaccination. We report trends in vaccination intention and associated determinants from surveys in the adult general population in Greece. Four cross-sectional phone surveys were conducted in November 2020 and February, April and May 2021 on nationally representative samples of adults in Greece. Multinomial logistic regression was used on the combined data of the surveys to evaluate independent predictors of vaccination unwillingness/uncertainty. Vaccination intention increased from 67.6% in November 2020 to 84.8% in May 2021. Individuals aged 65 years or older were more willing to be vaccinated (May 2021: 92.9% vs. 79.5% in 18-39 years, p < 0.001) but between age-groups differences decreased over time. Vaccination intention increased substantially in both men and women, though earlier among men, and was higher in individuals with prograduate education (May 2021: 91.3% vs. 84.0% up to junior high). From multivariable analysis, unwillingness and/or uncertainty to be vaccinated was associated with younger age, female gender (in particular in the April 2021 survey), lower educational level and living with a child ≤12 years old. Among those with vaccine hesitancy, concerns about vaccine effectiveness declined over time (21.6% in November 2020 vs. 9.6% in May 2021, p = 0.014) and were reported more often by men; safety concerns remained stable over time (66.3% in November 2020 vs. 62.1% in May 2021, p = 0.658) and were reported more often by women. In conclusion, vaccination intention increased substantially over time. Tailored communication is needed to address vaccine hesitancy and concerns regarding vaccine safety.

10.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-10, 2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764371

ABSTRACT

The goal of our study was to examine the intention to get vaccinated using predictors from the 5C Model of vaccination attitudes, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Health Belief Model (HBM). Between August and November 2020, an online survey was delivered to 1428 participants in the UK and Germany (mean age = 40.6; 57% women), assessing socio-demographic and health factors, general vaccination attitudes, TBP and HBM variables, and COVID-19 vaccination intention. Vaccination intentions did not differ by country or survey period. Predictors of intention with the highest explanatory power in a relative weight analysis were confidence, collective responsibility (5C) perceived behavioral control, social norms, attitudes (especially negative affect & TPB cognitions), and perceived benefits (HBM). Women reported lower intention, although the effect size was small. Predictors from the TPB and HBM were effective to explain the intention to receive COVID-19 vaccines over and above socio-demographic variables, health-related factors and general vaccination attitudes. The results are interpreted in the context of current vaccination campaigns. Messages promoting sense of autonomy and control over the decision to get vaccinated, approval from significant others and reassurance that getting vaccinated will not be associated with fear or other negative feelings are important facilitators of vaccine uptake.

11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760615

ABSTRACT

This large-sample study of three Chinese societies-Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong-demonstrates the importance of media exposure for people's vaccination intentions during the COVID-19 pandemic. By employing two constructs (i.e., perceived susceptibility and severity) in the health belief model (HBM), the study identifies significant indirect effects of media exposure on individuals' vaccination intention in all three Chinese societies. That said, media trust negatively moderated the path from perceived severity to vaccination intention in Mainland China and Taiwan. In these two societies, the higher an individual's trust in media, the less influence of perceived severity on his/her vaccination intention. It suggests that the level of trust in media is a contextual factor in explaining individuals' decision-making on health issues. Generally, the combination of the HBM and media trust has been proven to be useful for understanding individuals' vaccination intentions. These findings provide practical considerations for governmental agencies, public institutions, and health campaign designers to promote vaccination in the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Female , Health Belief Model , Humans , Male , Vaccination
12.
Health Psychology Report ; 10(1):31-36, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1744759

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND In France, despite fear-based communication by the authorities and the media, vaccination against COVID-19 has received little support from the population. For a young population often convinced that severe forms of the disease affect older people, we hypothesized that communication based on the idea of love would be more effective than communication based on fear of vaccination. PARTICIPANTS AND PROCEDURE In a convenience online French sample (N = 480, Mage = 19.4), vaccination intention was asked after fear priming, love priming, no love/prejudice priming, or a control condition. Participants also reported their fear of vaccination against COVID-19, and the recommendation they would make regarding vaccination of a loved/unloved person. RESULTS Vaccination intention was higher in the love condition than in the fear and no love/prejudice conditions. Surprisingly, fear of vaccination was lower in participants who were presented with fear-inducing questions. CONCLUSIONS Implications of these results are discussed in relation to the fear of vaccination and the transpersonal value of the idea of love. The results suggest that COVID-19 is experienced as a threat both to oneself and to those one loves most. Therefore, calls for fear in the media and on social networks seem less likely to motivate a young population to vaccinate than the reminder of intense emotional ties to loved ones.

13.
Data Brief ; 40: 107811, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719601

ABSTRACT

In the context of the COVID-19 response, this study presents an illustrated dataset to examine trust, COVID-19 risk perception, COVID-19 vaccination perception, subject norms, social media and intention to vaccinate among Vietnamese. Our questionnaire was conducted in Vietnamese and then translated into English and distributed to respondents through email and Facebook from June to July 2021, gathering 329 responses. Participation was voluntary, and participants were allowed to withdraw from the survey at any time. Data analysis was carried out using the SPSS 24.0 and Smart PLS 3.0 software packages following data cleansing and coding. The data summarizes respondents' socio-economic and demographic characteristics, and Statistical techniques were deployed to assess the validity and reliability of scales relating to COVID-19 vaccination intention in Vietnam. Additionally, these data will contribute to the existing literature about COVID-19 vaccination perceptions and intention to vaccinate among Vietnamese.

14.
Acta Psychol (Amst) ; 225: 103550, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The successful control of the COVID-19 pandemic depends largely on the acceptance and uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine among the public. Thus, formative research aiming to understand and determine the causes of weak and/or positive vaccination intentions is vital in order to ensure the success of future and current vaccination programmes through the provision of effective, evidence-based health messaging. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was completed by a sample of Irish (N = 500) and UK (N = 579) citizens using the online platform 'Qualtrics'. Participants completed a questionnaire battery comprised of health, attitudes/beliefs, influences, and behavioural intention measures. Demographic information was also assessed. RESULTS: Results highlighted similar rates of vaccine intention among both samples; where a total of 76.8% Irish respondents, and 73.7% of UK respondents indicated that they intended to be immunized if the government advised them to take the COVID-19 vaccine. Overall, 23.2% of Irish respondents reported being vaccine hesitant or vaccine resistant, while a rate of 26.3% of UK respondents reported vaccine hesitancy or resistance. Univariate analysis highlighted that both gender and age played a significant role in vaccine intention, with women under age 30 reporting higher rate of vaccine hesitancy. Multivariate analysis revealed that significant correlates of vaccine acceptance included peer influence, GP influence, civic responsibility, perceived benefit, and positive vaccination attitudes. Those who reported vaccine resistance and hesitancy were more likely to have less positive vaccination attitudes and perceive higher vaccination risk. DISCUSSION: The current sociodemographic and psychological profiles of vaccine resistant and hesitant individuals provide a useful resource for informing health practitioners in the UK and Ireland with the means of enhancing pro-vaccine attitudes and promoting vaccination uptake. The current research shows indications of associations between distrust in the vaccine itself and vaccine hesitancy and resistance. Thus, to effectively design and deliver public health messages that ensures the success of vaccination uptake, it is likely that governments and public health officials will need to take actions to garner trust in the safety of the vaccine itself. Additionally, campaigns to decrease hesitancy and resistance in the COVID-19 vaccine may benefit in targeting altruism to increase willingness to get vaccinated against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intention , Ireland/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
15.
Front Psychol ; 12: 783374, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674378

ABSTRACT

Government communication has been playing an important role in mass vaccination to conduct the largest vaccination campaign of the world for COVID-19 and to counter vaccine hesitancy. This study employs the health belief model to examine the association between government communication and the COVID-19 vaccination intention. A survey of Chinese adults (N = 557) was conducted in March 2021, and partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to estimate the multi-construct relationships. The findings indicate that government communication has both direct positive association with vaccination intention and indirect association with vaccination intention through the mediation of perceived severity, benefits, and barriers. Multi-group comparisons suggest that individuals from private sectors are more easily mobilized to receive COVID-19 vaccination by government communication than those from public sectors. Similarly, the correlation between government communication and the vaccination intention of individuals with a good health status was stronger than that of those with a poor health status. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are further discussed.

16.
J Behav Med ; 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669878

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have shown that self-affirmation increases acceptance of a message and motivates health behavior change. The present study investigated whether self-affirmation increases the acceptance of persuasive messages on COVID-19 vaccines and promotes vaccination intention. A total of 144 participants were randomly assigned to the self-affirmation (n = 72) or control (n = 72) groups before reading a persuasive message on COVID-19 vaccines. The results revealed that the self-affirmation group showed significantly higher acceptance of persuasive information on COVID-19 vaccines than the control group. Additionally, the self-affirmation group also showed significantly higher post-experiment vaccination intention than the control group. Mediation analysis indicated that increased acceptance of persuasive information significantly mediated the beneficial effects of self-affirmation on post-experiment vaccination intention. The present study demonstrated that self-affirmation could be an effective strategy for increasing the acceptance of persuasive messages on COVID-19 vaccines and promoting vaccination intention.

17.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(2)2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667377

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against COVID-19 is regarded as one of the most promising interventions to control the pandemic. This study aimed to examine whether adult attachment affects an individual's COVID-19 vaccination intention and whether this relationship is mediated by help-seeking style and professional help-seeking behavior. A total of 401 Chinese adults participated in this online cross-sectional survey. The questionnaires for adult attachment (Depend, Close, and Anxiety), help-seeking style (dependency, autonomy, and avoidance), professional help-seeking behavior, and COVID-19 vaccination intention were rated on five-point or seven-point Likert scales, with satisfactory reliability (Cronbach's α values were all >0.80). Structural equation modelling was used to construct path models based on the above elements. Higher scores in the Depend (Effect = 0.047, SE = 0.018, 95% CI = [0.019, 0.093]) and Close dimensions of attachment (Effect = 0.028, SE = 0.014, 95% CI = [0.007, 0.065]) predicted a stronger dependency-oriented help-seeking style, which thus predicted greater vaccination intention. Higher scores in the Close dimension (Effect = 0.007, SE = 0.004, 95% CI = [0.001, 0.018]) and lower scores in the Anxiety dimension of attachment (Effect = -0.003, SE = 0.002, 95% CI = [-0.008, -0.001]) predicted a stronger autonomy-oriented help-seeking style and further predicted more professional help-seeking behaviors, which promoted greater COVID-19 vaccination intention. The results of this study indicate that help-seeking moderates the relationship between adult attachment and COVID-19 vaccination intention. Guiding help-seeking behavior for individuals with different attachment styles may be an entry point for improving COVID-19 vaccination intention.

18.
Am J Health Promot ; 36(4): 710-713, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625274

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to apply and extend the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict intention to take a COVID-19 vaccine. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Online. SAMPLE: Adult US residents recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk (n = 172). MEASURES: Intention to take a COVID-19 vaccine (outcome variable), demographic variables (predictors), standard TPB variables (perceived behavioral control, attitude, and subjective norm; predictors), and non-TPB variables (anticipated regret, health locus of control, and perceived community benefit; predictors). ANALYSIS: Hierarchical linear regression predicting intention to take a COVID-19 vaccine, with demographic, standard TPB, and non-TPB variables entered in regression models 1, 2, and 3, respectively. RESULTS: The extended TPB model accounted for 72.5% of the variance in vaccination intention (p < .001), with perceived behavioral control (ß = .29, p < .001), attitude (ß = .23, p = .043), and perceived community benefit (ß = .23, p = .020) being significant unique predictors. CONCLUSION: Despite the relatively small and non-representative sample, this study, conducted after COVID-19 vaccines were widely available in the USA, demonstrated that perceived behavioral control was the most robust predictor of intention to take a COVID-19 vaccine, suggesting that the TPB is a useful theoretical framework that can inform effective strategies to promote vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
19.
Int J Data Sci Anal ; 13(4): 287-298, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623284

ABSTRACT

During a global health crisis, people are exposed to vast amounts of information from a variety of sources. Here, we assessed which information source could increase knowledge about COVID-19 (Study 1) and COVID-19 vaccines (Study 2). In Study 1, a US census matched sample of 1060 participants rated the accuracy of a set of statements and then were randomly assigned to one of 10 between-subjects conditions of varying sources providing belief-relevant information: a political leader (Trump/Biden), a health authority (Fauci/CDC), an anecdote (Democrat/Republican), a large group of prior participants (Democrats/Republicans/Generic), or no source (Control). Finally, they rated the accuracy of the initial set of statements again. Study 2 involved a replication with a sample of 1876 participants and focused on the COVID-19 vaccine. We found that knowledge increased most when the source of information was a generic group of people, irrespective of participants' political affiliation. We also found that while expert communications were most successful at increasing Democrats' vaccination intentions, no source was successful at increasing Republicans' vaccination intention. We discuss these findings in the context of the current misinformation epidemic. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s41060-021-00307-8.

20.
Comput Human Behav ; 130: 107176, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611655

ABSTRACT

This research proposes and tests an integrated model to explain how information overload influence vaccine skepticism and vaccination intention. In addition, this research investigates the effectiveness of using a celebrity endorsement strategy in promoting vaccination and compares its effectiveness with other endorsement types. A survey study (Study 1) was conducted to examine the mechanism underlying the impact of the COVID-19 vaccine information overload on vaccine skepticism that, subsequently, affects vaccination intention. It also examined the moderating role of celebrity endorsement trustworthiness. The results indicate that information overload positively influenced vaccine skepticism through cyberchondria and perceived risk of the vaccine, which subsequently reduces vaccination intention. The negative effect of vaccine skepticism on vaccination intention was weakened by the celebrity endorsement that was considered trustworthy. A follow-up experimental study (Study 2) was performed to compare the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement with other endorsement types (i.e., government official and medical expert endorsements). The results showed that the celebrity endorsement was more effective in mitigating the negative effect of vaccine skepticism on vaccination intention compared to government official and medical expert. The findings provide practical insights into how governments can minimize people's vaccine skeptical views and increase their vaccination intentions.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL