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1.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(12): 2565-2566, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245600

ABSTRACT

Adult vaccination is an accepted part of health care and diabetes care. In spite of evidence regarding the efficacy and utility of vaccination in preventing disease, we continue to encounter vaccine hesitancy and vaccine skepticism. As physicians, it is our duty to encourage the public to get vaccinated. In this article, we create a simple framework which helps assess the barriers to vaccine acceptance, and create bridges to overcome vaccine hesitancy and skepticism. We use an interesting mnemonic, NARCO, to remind ourselves, and our readers, of the appropriate hierarchy of interviewing related to vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Vaccination Hesitancy , Adult , Humans , Health Facilities , Memory , Vaccination , Primary Health Care
2.
East Mediterr Health J ; 29(4): 232-235, 2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245497
3.
Cytometry A ; 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245395

ABSTRACT

There is a global concern about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines associated with platelet function. However, their long-term effects on overall platelet activity remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by image-based single-cell profiling and temporal monitoring of circulating platelet aggregates in the blood of healthy human subjects, before and after they received multiple Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) vaccine doses over a time span of nearly 1 year. Results show no significant or persisting platelet aggregation trends following the vaccine doses, indicating that any effects of vaccinations on platelet turnover, platelet activation, platelet aggregation, and platelet-leukocyte interaction was insignificant.

4.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244371

ABSTRACT

Herein, we report the case of a 67-year-old man with severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) mRNA vaccine breakthrough infection during immunosuppressive therapy for connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). The patient received glucocorticoids combined with tacrolimus (TAC) as maintenance therapy. His serum anti-SARS-CoV-2-IgG antibody levels were extremely low at the onset of COVID-19 pneumonia, even after the second dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine (BNT162b2). After treatment for COVID-19 pneumonia, the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2-IgG antibodies increased. These results indicated a lack of the ability to produce neutralizing antibodies from immune cells despite the booster vaccination. Therefore, we suggest that advanced age patients with CTD-ILD receiving immunosuppressive therapy with polypharmacy require consistent personal protection, vaccination of close caregivers, increased awareness, and booster vaccination. Moreover, we recommend that TAC should be withdrawn for a while after vaccination under controlled conditions.

5.
Front Immunol ; 13: 864718, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244339

ABSTRACT

mRNA based vaccines against COVID-19 have proven most successful at keeping SARS-CoV-2 pandemic at bay in many countries. Recently, there is an increased interest in heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategies for COVID-19 to maintain antibody responses for the control of continuously emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VoCs) and to overcome other obstacles such as supply shortage, costs and reduced safety issues or inadequatly induced immune-responses. In this study, we investigated the antibody responses induced by heterologous prime-boost with vaccines based on mRNA and virus-like particles (VLPs). The VLP-based mCuMVTT-RBM vaccine candidate and the approved mRNA-1273 vaccine were used for this purpose. We find that homologous prime boost regimens with either mRNA or VLP induced high levels of high avidity antibodies. Optimal antibody responses were, however, induced by heterologous regimens both for priming with mRNA and boosting with VLP and vice versa, priming with VLP and boosting with mRNA. Thus, heterologous prime boost strategies may be able to optimize efficacy and economics of novel vaccine strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
6.
Clin Exp Med ; 2022 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243610

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is key in mastering the COVID-19 pandemic. Data on attitudes towards and safety of the SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccines in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are limited. A post-vaccination cross-sectional survey was conducted to obtain data on attitudes towards and safety of the SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccines in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. A post-vaccination cross-sectional survey was conducted in 188 patients with SLE and in 190 healthy controls who had received at least one dose of SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine to find out post-vaccination adverse event (AE) or SLE flares. A total of 188 patients with SLE and 190 healthy controls vaccinated with the two-dose regimen SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine were enrolled in the study. The two groups were matched in age, sex, medical background, income, and education level. All the SLE patients were in disease remission or with low disease activity with a median age of 35 years, a sex constituent ratio of 87.4% female, and a median disease duration of 4 years. SLE patients had much more concerns about vaccination safety (44.7% vs. 15.8%, P < 0.001), and were much less willing to get vaccinated (57.4% vs. 88.4%, P < 0.001). SLE patients had more mild adverse events after the first vaccine dose (43.6% vs. 25.3%, P = 0.008), and less mild adverse events after the second vaccine dose (19.8% vs. 34.9%, P = 0.024), compared with healthy controls. The AEs were minor and there were no serious or major adverse events in both groups. In patients with SLE, the post-vaccination disease activity remained stable. One previously undiagnosed female progressed into symptomatic SLE after one week of vaccination. Although SLE patients had concerns about the safety of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, the inactivated vaccination was safe in patients with stable SLE.

7.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 2022 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243392

ABSTRACT

The direct causes of dermatomyositis, a common autoimmune disease, have not yet been accurately identified, but several studies have linked this condition to various patient-associated and environmental factors, such as viral infections and area of residence. In the present report, we describe our experience with a patient presenting with anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) antibody-positive dermatomyositis, which developed after vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This patient was simultaneously diagnosed with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-positive slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes (SPIDDM); her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) test revealed that she expressed the DRB1*04:05 allele. This is important as this genotype is known to increase susceptibility to both anti-MDA5 antibody-positive dermatomyositis and type I diabetes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of dermatomyositis complicated by SPIDDM identified after COVID-19 vaccination against COVID-19 and presenting with an underlying susceptible genotype. The patient's genetic predisposition may also be important for the development of autoimmune disease after COVID-19 vaccination.

9.
Clin Epidemiol Glob Health ; 12: 100875, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240557
10.
Children (Basel) ; 9(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237629

ABSTRACT

A 17-year-old male was referred to the emergency room with sharp abdominal pain, pallor, sweating, and vomiting 12 h after the administration of his first Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). He had abdominal pain, an increase in serum lipase value of > 3 times the upper limits of normal, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings consistent with acute mild pancreatitis (AP). He was started on treatment with fluid therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain management, after which he recovered rapidly and was discharged on the fourth day after hospitalization. The available data are difficult to interpret as AP is a relatively frequent disease, but its occurrence after vaccination seems extremely rare. Although it is a rare event, AP should be considered after COVID-19 vaccination, especially in those exhibiting abdominal tenderness and vomiting, which should be promptly treated and adequately investigated.

11.
Psychol Med ; : 1-3, 2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236339

ABSTRACT

In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of prestige-based incentives (vaccination of an expert scientist/president/politician/celebrity/religious leader), conformist incentives (vaccination of friends and family) and risk-based incentives (witnessing death or illness of a person from the disease) for increasing participants' chances of getting vaccinated with respect to their coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine intention. We conducted a cross-cultural survey using demographically representative samples from the UK (n = 1533), USA (n = 1550) and Turkey (n = 1567). The most effective incentives in all three countries were vaccination of an expert scientist, followed by vaccination of friends and family members and knowing someone dying from the disease. Vaccination of an expert scientist was significantly more effective at increasing vaccine intention than any other incentive. Vaccine incentives, regardless of the incentive type, were much less effective for those who originally refused the COVID-19 vaccine than for those who were hesitant to receive the vaccine. Although the percentage of vaccine-hesitant participants was highest in Turkey, the mean effectiveness scores of incentives were also the highest in Turkey, suggesting that an informed vaccine promotion strategy can be successful in this country. Our findings have policy applicability and suggest that positive vaccination messages delivered by expert scientists, vaccination of friends and family and risk-based incentives can be effective at increasing vaccine uptake.

12.
Med.lab ; 26(4): 383-389, 2022. Tabs, ilus
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20242196

ABSTRACT

La enfermedad por coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 que surgió en el año 2019 (COVID-19), ha obligado al rápido desarrollo de vacunas para prevenir su propagación e intentar controlar la pandemia. Dentro de las vacunas desarrolladas, las primeras en ser aprobadas con una tecnología nueva en el campo de la vacunación, fueron las vacunas basadas en ARNm (ácido ribonucleico mensajero), que lograron tasas de efectividad cercanas al 95 % para la prevención de la enfermedad COVID-19 grave. Los eventos adversos comunes son reacciones locales leves, pero ha habido varios informes de pacientes que desarrollaron tiroiditis subaguda y disfunción tiroidea después de recibir la vacuna contra SARS-CoV-2. Este artículo presenta dos casos de tiroiditis subaguda poco después de recibir la vacuna contra COVID-19


The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease which emerged in 2019 (COVID-19), has forced the rapid development of vaccines to prevent the spread of infection and attempt to control the pandemic. Among the vaccines developed, one of the first to be approved with a new technology in the field of vaccination, was the mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid) vaccine, with rates of effectiveness close to 95% for the prevention of severe COVID-19 disease. Common adverse events are mild local reactions, but there have been some reports of patients developing sub-acute thyroiditis and thyroid dysfunction after receiving the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. This article presents two case reports of subacute thyroiditis shortly after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Thyroiditis, Subacute/chemically induced , Thyrotoxicosis/chemically induced , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/adverse effects , Thyroiditis, Subacute/diagnosis , Thyroiditis, Subacute/drug therapy , Thyrotoxicosis/diagnosis , Thyrotoxicosis/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Goiter/chemically induced
13.
Braz. J. Pharm. Sci. (Online) ; 59: e21769, 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20240963

ABSTRACT

Abstract Currently, mucosal vaccine administration has stood out as an easier and non-invasive application method. It can also be used to induce local and systemic immune responses. In the COVID-19 pandemic context, nasal and oral vaccines have been developed based on different technological platforms. This review addressed relevant aspects of mucosal vaccine administration, with emphasis on oral and nasal vaccinations, in addition to the importance of using nanotechnology-based delivery systems to enable these strategies.

14.
Med.lab ; 26(4): 375-381, 2022. ilus
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20234396

ABSTRACT

Uno de los efectos secundarios encontrados en pacientes con antecedente de vacunación por COVID-19, especialmente con la vacuna Pfizer-BioNTech, es la aparición de múltiples adenopatías hiperplásicas, principalmente en los ganglios linfáticos axilares, supraclaviculares e infraclaviculares ipsilaterales al sitio de vacunación. Presentamos el caso de una paciente femenina de 33 años, con aparición de masa dolorosa supraclavicular izquierda, quien una semana antes había sido vacunada con la primera dosis de la vacuna Pfizer-BioNTech en región deltoidea izquierda. Los hallazgos citológicos fueron sugestivos de una enfermedad linfoproliferativa, y el estudio histopatológico reveló linfadenopatía reactiva con proliferación de inmunoblastos B activados, secundaria a la vacunación contra COVID-19. Aportamos a la literatura con la caracterización de los hallazgos histopatológicos de la linfadenopatía posvacunación contra COVID-19. Es importante que los médicos tratantes y radiólogos estén familiarizados con este diagnóstico diferencial, para brindar recomendaciones adecuadas basadas en un seguimiento a corto plazo, en lugar de realizar biopsias, intervenciones y conductas inmediatas innecesarias en el manejo de los pacientes


One of the side effects found in patients with a history of vaccination for COVID-19, especially with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, is the appearance of multiple hyperplastic adenopathies, mainly axillary, supraclavicular and infraclavicular lymph nodes ipsilateral to the vaccination site. We present the case of a 33-year-old female patient, with the appearance of a painful left supraclavicular mass, who was vaccinated a week earlier with the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in the left deltoid region. The cytological findings were suggestive of a lymphoproliferative disease, and the histopathological study revealed reactive lymphadenopathy with proliferation of activated B immunoblasts, secondary to vaccination against COVID-19. We contribute to the literature with the characterization of the histopathological findings of COVID-19 post-vaccination lymphadenopathy. It is important for treating physicians and radiologists to be familiar with this differential diagnosis, in order to provide appropriate recommendations based on short-term follow-up, instead of performing unnecessary immediate biopsies or interventions in patient management.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , Lymphadenopathy/diagnosis , Lymphadenopathy/pathology
15.
Eur J Gen Pract ; : 1-9, 2022 Dec 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In manufacturers' trials, vaccination against COVID-19 proved to be safe and effective. The officially reported frequency of vaccine adverse events (VAEs) in Poland is lower than that declared by the manufacturers. The anti-vaccination activists questioned the trustworthiness of official data. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to explore the real-life prevalence of VAEs in general practice settings and the factors that may influence it. METHODS: In this pragmatic, mixed prospective and retrospective study, patients vaccinated against COVID-19 between May and October 2021 in three GP practices in Krakow, Poland, were enrolled. Their demographic (age, sex, level of education) and clinical data (weight and height, smoking status, history of allergies, COVID-19 and chronic diseases) were collected. Then, they were interviewed about VAEs they experienced. RESULTS: Out of 1530 patients invited to participate, 1051 (69%) agreed and were eligible for analyses. Only 8.8% did not report any VAE. Pain at the injection site was the most frequently reported reaction (800, 76.2%). The most prevalent systemic ones were excessive fatigue/lethargy (527, 50.6%), sleep/circadian rhythm disturbances (433, 41.6%) and headache (399, 38.3%). Fifty required medical assistance - 39 experienced presyncope (3.7%) and 11 loss of consciousness (1.1%). Only two others were hospitalised. Females, younger adults, those with higher education and with a history of COVID-19 reported systemic VAEs more frequently, while those who were older and obese were less likely to report local reactions. CONCLUSION: Although more than 90% of patients vaccinated against COVID-19 in general practice settings may experience VAEs, in short-term observation, the vast majority are localised and mild.

16.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240739

ABSTRACT

The global outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 has prompted the rapid spread and development of vaccines to prevent the spread of the disease. COVID-19 vaccine has demonstrated excellent efficacy in reducing morbidity and severity of the disease, and most adverse reactions are very minor. However, some patients have been reported to develop autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, myocarditis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and vasculitis, following COVID-19 vaccination. Herein, we present a case of polyarteritis nodosa with epididymitis following COVID-19 mRNA vaccination. The patient's initial symptoms were fever and testicular pain, and magnetic resonance imaging showed epididymitis. He was diagnosed as having polyarteritis nodosa with epididymitis and treated with high-dose prednisolone, with a good clinical outcome.

17.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240572

ABSTRACT

IgA vasculitis is generally triggered by infectious causes, but it has also been reported after immunization with various vaccines. Herein, we report two cases of IgA vasculitis after receiving the first or second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech BNT16B2b2 mRNA vaccine. Two men, aged 22 and 30 years, developed palpable purpura on the extremities and arthritis. One patient also complained of fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed mild leukocytosis and slightly elevated C-reactive protein level, although platelet count and coagulation profile were within normal levels in both cases. Proteinuria and microhematuria were seen in one patient. Skin biopsies were performed in both patients and revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The deposit of IgA and C3 was shown on immunofluorescence studies in one patient. Both patients were diagnosed with IgA vasculitis and treated with prednisolone, and their symptoms resolved within 1 week after initiation of treatment. The COVID-19 mRNA vaccine could trigger IgA vasculitis; however, a coincidence cannot be ruled out.

18.
Mod Rheumatol Case Rep ; 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240296

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines have been widely used and have been shown to be effective in combating the pandemic. However, various side effects have been reported following vaccination. For instance, a condition called "shoulder injury related to vaccine administration" (SIRVA) is characterized by shoulder pain and limited range of motion after intramuscular injection of a vaccine into the deltoid muscle of the shoulder. Despite an increase in SIRVA cases, the exact incidence of the disease is unclear, and there are a few reports of SIRVA about the COVID-19 vaccine. Here, we report a rare case of an 83-year-old woman who was diagnosed with calcification in her left shoulder one year ago and developed calcific tendinitis after receiving an mRNA vaccine for COVID-19 (Pfizer-BioNTech). Radiographs showed calcification of the supraspinatus tendon, and magnetic resonance images showed continuous inflammatory findings from the subdeltoid bursa to the subacromial bursa. We treated the patient with celecoxib and acetaminophen, and she recovered after about two months. In order to prevent SIRVA, the presence of shoulder joint disease should be carefully asked during a pre-vaccination assessment. The puncture point should be chosen with the median point of the deltoid muscle or the anterior-posterior axillary line as landmarks, because the more cephalad the puncture position, the greater the chance of causing SIRVA.

19.
Infect Dis Now ; 52(8S): S7-S8, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238432

ABSTRACT

Heterologous prime boost vaccination is a primary vaccination with different vaccines, most often from different vaccine platforms. It combines the immunological properties of the different vaccines and thereby induces humoral, cellular and, in some cases, mucosal response. For Covid prevention, it has been used in primary vaccination, due to safety issues and in boosters. We have evaluated some articles reporting on the results of this type of vaccine, and demonstrating its usefulness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization, Secondary/methods , Vaccination/methods
20.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236901

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A succession of cases have reported flares of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) after vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), raising concerns. We aimed to investigate the impact of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on disease activity in patients with AOSD. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled clinically inactive AOSD patients visiting the outpatient clinics of our department. The patients received SARS-CoV-2 vaccines (BBIBPCorV, Sinopharm, Beijing, China) voluntarily. The occurrence of relapse in the participants was recorded during the follow-up period and a propensity score matching (PSM) method was used to compare the relapse rates between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. Localized and systemic symptoms were assessed in the vaccinated patients. RESULTS: A total of 122 patients with inactive AOSD were included, of which 49.2% (n = 60) voluntarily received the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. The relapse rate did not increase significantly in vaccinated patients in comparison with unvaccinated patients (after PSM: 6.8% versus 6.8%), and no relapse occurred within one month after vaccination. No obvious adverse reactions were reported in 75.0% of the participants, and none of the patients reported severe reactions. CONCLUSION: Increased disease activity or relapse following vaccination with inactivated SARS-CoV-2 were rare in patients with inactive AOSD. Local and systemic adverse reactions were found to be mild and self-limiting. These safety profiles of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with AOSD may assist in eliminating vaccine hesitancy and increase the vaccination rate against SARS-CoV-2.

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