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1.
2nd FTAL Conference Sustainable Smart Cities and Regions, FTAL 2021 ; 3116, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1824299

ABSTRACT

The term Smart associated to cities and communities is commonly referred to a broad concept involving vehicles, humans, environment and services. In this paper we focus on a Smart solution dedicated to a specific reality, where humans are the main actors. We propose LiveSmart-CAMPUS, an intelligent system whose main goal is to improve the life quality of students, collaborators and visitors within a physical university campus. The system will enable the management of physical distancing and the optimization of shared spaces occupancy, for a safe return to work and academic environment, during the Covid post-pandemic time. We present in this paper the LiveSmart-CAMPUS application, a mobile application developed on top of the LiveSmart global solution, and envisioned for the campus community and visitors which allows them to obtain location based, calendar and time based, and users interests' based information. The presented application will give the possibility to the LiveSmart system to collect users mobility data, allowing the monitoring and the prediction of no latency information on expected rooms and corridors occupancy levels. People who tested the applications reported its usefulness in improving their comfort and their life quality within the campus spaces. © 2021 Copyright for this paper by its authors

2.
Universidad y Sociedad ; 14(2):201-210, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1823857

ABSTRACT

Given the fact that being healthy implies the adequate functioning in all areas of an individual’s life and not only the absence of disease, attention has begun to focus on enhancing those positive or salutogenic factors in the individual in order to achieve greater wellbeing and thus a better quality of life. Among the main areas of application are educational institutions, in which the main subjects of intervention are students and family members, where the teaching staff seems to be the one that has received the least attention from researchers. This last point takes on greater relevance, since currently this group has been strongly affected by the health crisis of COVID-19, where not only the daily demands of the position count, but also the discomforts of private life and the sudden adaptation to new modalities has been able to generate a highly susceptible context for physical and mental discomfort. Therefore, the present work makes a brief proposal to increase positive factors using cognitive-behavioral and positive psychology techniques in a universal-selective-indicated intervention to favor positive psychological functioning in teachers. © 2022, University of Cienfuegos, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez. All rights reserved.

3.
Osteopathic Family Physician ; 13(3):27-30, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822741

ABSTRACT

OFPs and other health care professionals experience increased rates of stress, anxiety, fatigue and burnout in the face of pandemics. Historically, this has been observed with other pandemics, such as the influenza pandemic, HIV/AIDS, SARS, H1N1, Ebola virus disease and, more recently, COVID-19. Research about physician wellbeing during prior pandemics has informed recent practices and provides more guidance on how larger health care entities can provide for employees and how physicians can care for themselves. Here, we explore best practices for emotional/spiritual wellbeing, physical wellbeing, maintaining a healthy family life and wellness during a virus outbreak.

4.
Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal ; 24(2), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822740

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is a great challenge among healthcare workers, especially nurses, due to their more frequent and closer contact with patients. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate anxiety, depression, and their causes among nurses with COVID-19 infection in different wards of a hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out between February 1st to October 30th, 2020, among all nurses with COVID-19 infection in different wards of Imam Khomeini Hospital (university hospital), Tehran, Iran. The nurses were contacted by phone, and data were collected using a self-administered, valid, structured questionnaire consisting of sociodemographic characteristics and clinical symptoms. Psychological complications, including anxiety and depression levels, were assessed and their association with other sociodemographic variables was also evaluated. Results: A total of 158 nurses were entered into the study, out of which 112 (70.2%) cases were females. Among all participants, 72.8% and 42.4% of the subjects reported anxiety and depression, respectively. The frequency of moderate to severe anxiety was significantly greater in women than in men (P<0.001). The infected nurses who worked in low-risk departments experienced a greater proportion of moderate to severe depression (P=0.004). In addition, the most prevalent reason for anxiety and depression was found to be the fear of infecting family members. Conclusion: Nurses bear a significant psychological burden during the COVID-19 pandemic, markedly when they get infected and experience clinical symptoms. Therefore, the government and other staff should provide some facilities and supportive administrative work for reducing anxiety and depression and improving nurses' psychological health.

5.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(4):ZC28-ZC34, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822594

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had not only developed as a key challenge to public health all around the world but also instigated physical and mental constraints on the health care professionals especially on the education of dental students with the sudden switch from traditional teaching methods to e-learning platforms thereby shutting all means of clinical experiences. Aim: To assess the effects of lockdown on clinical practice among undergraduate dental students in Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was done among undergraduate dental students in Tamil Nadu, India, from June 1, 2021 to July 1, 2021, using convenience sampling method to yield a total of 510 responses for a self-administered online questionnaire that aimed at evaluating the consequence of lockdown on clinical practice. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0 was used to analyse the data. Results: A total of 510 responses (mean age: 21.72±2.2827 years;323 female and 187 male) were analysed in the present study. Majority of the students felt that COVID-19 lockdown had a negative impact on clinical exposure. Inspite of following infection control measures, only 35.1% of students felt imperative to practice during pandemic. With over 82.7% of patient flow reduced due to fear of disease spread. 85.1% revealed being stressed in completing clinical quota in a short duration. Further questions on prospects in improvising their clinical knowledge;showed 45% recommending e-workshops, 29.4% opting for video demonstration followed by 22.2% on exposure to Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to compensate for the loss of clinical practice. Conclusion: New teaching protocols have to be adopted taking into account the changing aspects of the pandemic to improve their wellbeing, overcome mental stress and to enhance the sustainability of dental education. Focus on video demonstrations, lectures provoking their clinical reasoning, simulations on phantom heads and conducting workshops enhancing preclinical skills as well as following appropriate safety protocols must be implemented.

6.
Frontiers in Pharmacology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822401

ABSTRACT

Beginning from December 2019, widespread COVID-19 has caused huge financial misfortunes and exceptional wellbeing emergencies across the globe. Discovering an effective and safe drug candidate for the treatment of COVID-19 and its associated symptoms became an urgent global demand, especially due to restricted information that has been discharged with respect to vaccine efficacy and safety in humans. Reviewing the recent research, olive leaves were selected as a potential co-therapy supplement for the treatment and improvement of clinical manifestations in COVID-19 patients. Olive leaves were reported to be rich in phenolic compounds such as oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, and luteolin-7-O-glucoside and also triterpenoids such as maslinic, ursolic, and oleanolic acids that have been reported as anti–SARS-CoV-2 metabolites in recent computational and in vitro studies. In addition, olive leaf extract was previously reported in several in vivo studies for its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, immunomodulatory, and antithrombotic activities which are of great benefit in the control of associated inflammatory cytokine storm and disseminated intravascular coagulation in COVID-19 patients. In conclusion, the described biological activities of olive leaves alongside their biosafety, availability, and low price make them a potential candidate drug or supplement to control COVID-19 infection and are recommended for clinical investigation.

7.
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy ; 13(2):61, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1821994
8.
Indian Veterinary Journal ; 98(8):9-12, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1820647

ABSTRACT

While thecovid -19 pandemic has been devastating and disrupting the normal life of people across the globe, veterinarians have crucial obligations, opportunities, and contributions to make the country self-reliant, self-sufficient and self-sustaining. They accomplish this by enhancing the health and wellbeing of animals, environment and community. They also aid in detecting and responding to zoonotic diseases, maintaining food security and water quality, and promoting wildlife and ecosystem health. Failing to seize this moment could definitely undermine public health and global security for generations. Despite the fact that the strategic modifications of the veterinary education system, client dealing as well as the trade and investment regulations implemented in the aftermath of the covid-19 pandemic has an immense prospective for progress, there are several pitfalls in this system. This must be addressed in order to face the challenge, accept the future and relinquish the opportunities to create a more sustainable profession.

9.
Asean Journal of Psychiatry ; 23(1):8, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820556

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and subsequent lockdowns impacted the mental health of numerous sociodemographic groups globally. This crisis can produce stress, overwhelm, and powerful emotions in susceptible people, especially older persons. Our study examined the relationship between well-being and fear of COVID-19 among older persons residing in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, during the pandemic. A sociodemographic survey was undertaken. Two scales are used for a month of the COVID-19 outbreak: the Mental Health Continuum Short Form (MHC-SF) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). We surveyed 158 senior citizens in Ho Chi Minh City between February and April 2021. There was no lockdown in Ho Chi Minh before the fourth wave of infection. Despite this, citizens have maintained high compliance with coronavirus prophylaxis. Sociodemographic data were described using descriptive statistics. A one-way MANOVA assessed the financial impact on older individuals' well-being. The Pearson correlation was employed to find the link between happiness and COVID-19 dread. During the COVID-19 pandemic, older persons who received various monthly allowances had statistically significant emotional and psychological well-being differences. There was no association between well-being and COVID-19 dread. The COVID-19 epidemic has disproportionately affected vulnerable groups. Older individuals are a risk population that requires material and mental care.

10.
Gedrag & Organisatie ; 34(3):305-327, 2021.
Article in Dutch | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820467

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated measures immediately caused major changes in March 2020. There are signs that these changes have a negative effect on well-being. However, some studies contradict this, particularly those among the working population. The pandemic may actually turn out favorably for some groups, distorting the overall picture. In this study, we focus on three professions in which the COVID-19 pandemic and associated measures are known to have a direct effect on their work tasks and amount of work: healthcare workers, teachers and sales workers. Using GEE analyzes, we investigated whether there is a significant decrease in well-being and a change in working conditions and to what extent the working conditions are related to well-being. The results showed that there is only a limited decrease in well-being. Only for burn- out complaints, a deterioration was found among healthcare staff and sales people. Working conditions mainly showed a favorable change in all professions, except for autonomy. Autonomy decreased in all professions. Although we did find a relationship between the examined working conditions and burn-out complaints, we cannot explain the developments in well- being by the change in working conditions.

11.
Land ; 11(4):15, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820326

ABSTRACT

The nature and impacts of living in urban settings are gaining their saliences in developed and developing countries alike, particularly during the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic. During the crisis, the wellbeing of urban society became intertwined with a so-called "new lifestyle", which involved quarantine and working in a home environment. Facing such challenges, urban gardening is deemed as an alternative intervention to enhance residents' wellbeing and the environmental sustainability of urban areas, including Indonesian cities. A preliminary study was conducted to monitor the wellbeing of urban gardening practitioners, as well as investigate the motivation and any association between gardening and wellbeing with the COVID-19 pandemic situation by analysing data from Indonesian metropolitan areas. The study utilized instruments of "satisfaction with life scale (SWLS)" and "scale of positive and negative experience (SPANE)" to investigate the subjective wellbeing of 67 respondents. Amongst others, we identified that urban gardening practitioners tend to be in positive moods and have better overall wellbeing;52.24% of the respondents were highly satisfied with their life. Furthermore, we observed a variety of motivations to start gardening, with hobby and utilization of free space as prominent reasons, followed by other motivations such as environmental benefit and aesthetic. Integrating the environmental benefits of urban gardening and the implications for an individual's wellbeing can be reflected for sustainable urban development and policies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

12.
Children & Society ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819883

ABSTRACT

Using a relational approach, we draw on repeated interviews with a group of 30 diverse children from Ontario to share and reflect on their knowledge, experiences and feelings early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Prioritising relational interdependence and relational agency, this paper illustrates our participants' embedded engagements with the pandemic and their contribution to the co-production of knowledge. We emphasise their thoughtful responses to the pandemic;their creative, self-reflexive strategies for managing a difficult time;and their advice to others. We thus prioritise children's viewpoints and emphasise their relational interconnections with others during a time that was marked by social isolation.

13.
Australian Journal of Rural Health ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819868

ABSTRACT

Objective The Australian COVID-19 Frontline Healthcare Workers study examined the prevalence and severity of mental health symptoms during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. This substudy examined the differences in psychological well-being between rural and metropolitan health care workers (HCWs). Design A nationwide survey conducted between August and October 2020. Setting and Participants Australian HCWs were recruited through multiple strategies. Main outcome measures Demographics, mental health outcomes (anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD] and burnout). Results Complete responses were included from 7846 participants, with 1473 (18.8%) in regional or remote (?rural?) areas and 81.2% in metropolitan areas. Rural participants were older, more likely to work in allied health, nursing or in health administration, and had worked longer in their profession than metropolitan participants. Levels of resilience were similar (p =?0.132), but there was significantly higher prevalence of pre-COVID-19 pandemic mental illness in the rural workforce (p <?0.001). There were high levels of current mental health issues: moderate?severe PTSD (rural 38.0%;metropolitan 41.0% p =?0.031);high depersonalisation (rural 18.1%;metropolitan 20.7% p =?0.047);and high emotional exhaustion (rural 46.5%;metropolitan 43.3% p =?0.002). Among rural participants, mental health symptoms were associated with younger age, worry about being blamed if they contracted COVID-19, fear of transmitting COVID-19 to their family, experiencing worsening relationships and working in primary care or allied health. Conclusion Despite having low COVID-19 case numbers in rural Australian health services compared with metropolitan counterparts over the course of 2020, there were widespread mental health impacts on the workforce. Rural health services need specific and flexible training, education, work policies and practices that support psychological well-being now in preparedness for ongoing or future crises.

14.
International Conference on Decision Aid Sciences and Application (DASA) ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1819801

ABSTRACT

The current research aims to examine the impact of work-life balance on work engagement, mental well-being and job performance among working women in the IT sector. We also tried to evaluate the mediate effect of mental well-being and work engagement on the direct relationship of work-life balance and job performance. The data is collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SMART PLS and Process Hayes to develop the model and to check mediation, respectively. 128 working women employees are interviewed through a structured interview using convenience sampling. All the respondents are women employees working in IT companies located in Mumbai, India. Current research suggests all the companies manage the work-life balance of working women in IT companies. In the current study, the researcher found an insignificant relationship between work-life balance and job performance. The insignificant relationship is found between work engagement, and job performance is found. A significant positive relationship is found between work-life balance and mental well-being, job performance and mental well-being, work-life balance, and work engagement. The mental well-being and work engagement is not found as a mediator in the direct relationship of work-life balance and job performance. In India, women are responsible for all the household activities;hence it is essential to manage the work-life balance of those working women. The current research is helpful to all the HR managers to frame policies that will help to maintain work-life balance and ensure high performance and low turnover intention among women employees.

15.
International Journal of Social Economics ; : 23, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1819798

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study explores the impacts of COVID-19's strictest lockdown on Vietnamese citizens' living habits, wellbeing and work-from-home effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach The study uses a survey questionnaire to gather relevant data from Vietnamese adults during the most recent, strictest lockdown in their cities/provinces since July 2021. The study employs ordinal regression and mediation models to examine the effects of the strict lockdown difficulties on the changes in living habits, wellbeing and work effectiveness of Vietnamese respondents. Findings The empirical result demonstrates that the strictest lockdown adversely affected the living habits of Vietnamese citizens, thus impacting people's wellbeing. Work-from-home lockdown difficulties led to unexpected health issues that bring produce lower working effectiveness. Originality/value This is the first study to investigate the changes in citizens' living habits, health and working conditions in adherence to Vietnam's strictest COVID-19 lockdown. This is also the first study to examine the impacts of lockdown difficulties on human wellbeing with the mediating effect of changes in living habits, and the influence of work-from-home lockdown difficulties on work effectiveness, with the mediating effect of lower wellbeing based on the literature. Our study suggests solutions to improve Vietnamese people's health and working productivity during and after a strict lockdown.

16.
Anesthesiology Clinics ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1819424
17.
Progress in Nutrition ; 24(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1819019

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected day-to-day life and is changing how people eat and even how they exercise, as many individuals have developed a passive sedentary lifestyle. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on dietary quality and physical activity among Saudi adults. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 738 adults in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The modified Dietary Quality Score (DQS) and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) were used in this study. Results: In total, 76% of the participants had average dietary habits, while 16% of the participants were identified as having unhealthy dietary habits. The total average amount of time performing physical activity (PA) was 2079.08 ±2454.14 minutes/week, and the highest average was for vigorous PA (1372.47 ±1665.62 minutes/week). Conclusion: The COVID-19 crisis has rapidly affected people’s daily lives, including their dietary quality and physical activity. This pandemic has had significant effects on the lifestyle, quality of life and wellbeing of individuals and societies, and it may continue to affect them in the future.

18.
Jfr-Journal of Family Research ; 34(1):1-15, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1818925

ABSTRACT

Objective: This chapter introduces the reader to the Special Issue "Family Lives during the COVID-19 Pandemic in European Societies". Background: This Special Issue analyses how families, parents, and children have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and how they have been coping with its related challenges in different societal contexts. Method: The studies collected in this Special Issue are based on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches and data that have been gathered during 2020 in a range of European countries. It covers the first lockdown period, the reopening phases, and the months thereafter. Results: The 20 contributions of this Special Issue show that families shouldered large responsibilities during the pandemic. While the pandemic did not lead to radical shifts in gendered care patterns, mothers and fathers experienced the pandemic differently, with mothers reporting higher levels of stress. Moreover, there was great heterogeneity in how different types of families and children were affected by the pandemic. Single parents and parents and children in low-income households were most strongly affected in their social and economic wellbeing. Social and economic distress are strongly interwoven, and the developments during the pandemic aggravated existing social disparities. Conclusion: This Special Issue underlines the importance of the family for the functioning of societies during times of crisis. It also shows that policy makers often adopted a too narrow view of what constitutes a family and did not adequately address family diversity in their decision making. This Special Issue furthermore emphasized that there is a danger that the pandemic will increase disparities between families. Thus, parents and their children need adequate support measures that are tailored to their needs, and that are designed to alleviate these social, economic and educational disparities.

19.
Jfr-Journal of Family Research ; 34(1):193-220, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1818921

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study investigates the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the employment situation of parents and in turn on the subjective financial well-being of families with children in Austria. Background: The pandemic had strong repercussions on the Austrian labour market. The short-time work (STW) programme covered a third of employees in the first half of 2020 and helped to maintain employment levels. We provide evidence on how an unprecedented labour market crisis of this sort and in particular the exceptionally wide use of STW had affected the employment situation of parents and the financial well-being of different types of families. Method: The study draws on register data and representative panel survey data. The latter cover 905 families with minor children and include information on the employment situation of parents and the financial well-being of families before crisis onset, three months and ten months after its onset. Results: Register data show that mothers were not more strongly affected by the labour market crisis of 2020 than childless women or fathers. According to survey data, about a third of couples with minor children experienced income losses. Despite the wide use of STW and government support to families, the share of families in financial difficulties has substantially increased, especially among those with many children and single parents, many of whom were at risk of poverty already before the crisis. Conclusion: Substantial shares of dual-earner families that had low poverty risks before the crisis were in financial difficulties in 2020. Potential spill-over effects of financial shocks on children are discussed.

20.
Jfr-Journal of Family Research ; 34(1):249-280, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1818919

ABSTRACT

Objective: This article explores the consequences of the first COVID-19 lockdown in the spring of 2020 in France on intra-family relationships and 9-year-old children's socioemotional well-being. Background: On 17th March 2020, France began a strict lockdown to contain the COVID19 pandemic, with school closures and limited outings permitted until early June. All family routines and work-life arrangements were impacted. A major concern relates to how these measures impacted family and child well-being. Method: We use data from the Elfe Sapris survey, administered during the first lockdown to about 5,000 families participating to the Etude longitudinale francaise depuis l'enfance (Elfe), a nationally representative birth cohort of children born in 2011. We analysed correlations between parents' socioeconomic and living conditions on four relational indicators: the experience of lockdown, the quality of relationships between parents and children, and between siblings, and an indicator of children's socio-emotional well-being, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results: The impact of the lockdown on family well-being was conditional on socioeconomic factors and their changes over the period. Deterioration of households' financial situation and having to work outside the home during lockdown was negatively correlated with family relationships and children's socio-emotional well-being. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest that while France's first lockdown was a relatively positive period for many households with a primary-school-aged child, we highlight that restrictions exacerbated existing difficulties for disadvantaged families.

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