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1.
Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata ; 170(8), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1961565

ABSTRACT

Originally, the 17th Symposium on Insect-Plant Relationships (SIP-17) was scheduled to take place in Leiden, The Netherlands, in July 2020. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the symposium was postponed to July 2021 and held in an exclusively online format. This exceptional edition has resulted in four strong contributions to the journal. It is with great pleasure that we now present a themed issue including the proceedings of SIP-17, supplemented with eight regular articles within the subject of insect-plant relationships.

2.
IOP Conference Series : Earth and Environmental Science ; 761(7), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1960943

ABSTRACT

The aim of this review is to investigate and identifying the possible source of virus in animals and identifying the vector media of the disease and the methods of its spread and working hard to search for a successful vaccine for immunization against infection, in addition to establishing specialized units to predict new versions of the virus in the years to come.

3.
Uttar Pradesh Journal of Zoology ; 43(10):5-16, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1929196

ABSTRACT

The current study is the reviews of the work done for pest infestation in different legume pulse grains Pulse grains have been found to have different susceptibility for the attack of pulse beetle. An insect has varied fecundity on different varieties of pulses. India is agriculture based country and agriculture is the key sector of Indian economy. Including many kharif and rabbi crops, pulses are cultivated in all parts of country. Pulse cultivation has its own significant place in agriculture as it has been considered as complimentary to cereal crop in many aspects and positioned as a second most important crop plant [1]. Study indicates 20-40% of dry matter of pulse grains is made up of beneficial dietary proteins [2]. Insufficiency of adequate amount of protein in diet may lead to protein energy malnutrition. Like poverty and hunger, to combat PEM is another great provocation for agriculture and nation. Pulse grains legumes are good source of protein and other nutrient materials. Crop plant of Arhar has its own advantage for agriculture. The leguminous plants are used in crop rotation to improve the fertility of soil as the root nodules harbor the nitrogen fixing bacteria;fixes atmospheric nitrogen to nitrogen compound about 72-350 kg/hectare/year . The current study emphasizes the different facts of pulse beetle and their infestation in arhar seed grains. About eight months of the year have been found to be susceptible for infestation;remarkable growth and development of pests continue during six months of the year. Arhar pulse grains are most suitable for pest infestation. Bold variety of arhar was identified to be the most preferred for maximum oviposition having larger and smooth surface area. Temperature suitable for oviposition was noticed between 28-370c. Developmental period was found to be of lesser duration and survival of adults was more in bold varieties as compared to the smaller variety. Developmental period was recorded as 24-30.3 days in bold legume grains and 26-32.3 days in smaller size grains. Survival of male and female insect pest was also different as male survived for 7-10.6 days and females for 8.3-12.6 days. Increased growth rate of insect population was there with the increase in temperature and humidity. Significant Weight loss, content loss and percent germination loss have been found in the pulse grains of both varieties in the current studies. Indian economy relies significantly on agriculture and loss and damage of complementary crop plant certainly affect it. At this point there is need to consider the condition of Mass poverty of India after pandemic covid -19 which has been ascertained after more than 45 years The outcome of pandemic recession is more than 2 fold increase in the number of poor from 60 million in a year to 134 million (Reports of downtoearth.org.in). Furthermore any rise in price would snatch the accessibility of the easily available protein diet from people living in indigence.

4.
Virus Evol ; 8(1): veac049, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922334

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infections cause diseases that range from mild to severe in mammals and birds. In this study, we detected coronavirus infections in 748 farmed wild animals of 23 species in Guangdong, southern China, by RT-PCR and metagenomic analysis. We identified four coronaviruses in these wild animals and analysed their evolutionary origins. Coronaviruses detected in Rhizomys sinensis were genetically grouped into canine and rodent coronaviruses, which were likely recombinants of canine and rodent coronaviruses. The coronavirus found in Phasianus colchicus was a recombinant pheasant coronavirus of turkey coronavirus and infectious bronchitis virus. The coronavirus in Paguma larvata had a high nucleotide identity (94.6-98.5 per cent) with a coronavirus of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncates). These findings suggested that the wildlife coronaviruses may have experienced homologous recombination and/or crossed the species barrier, likely resulting in the emergence of new coronaviruses. It is necessary to reduce human-animal interactions by prohibiting the eating and raising of wild animals, which may contribute to preventing the emergence of the next coronavirus pandemic.

5.
Epidemiologie et Sante Animale ; 78:1-131, 2020.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904311

ABSTRACT

This special issue contains 14 papers from the AEEMA Meeting focusing on the theme entitled "What changes for the management of animals' health crises". Topics of papers include: the management of animals' health crises and introduction to the meeting;evolution of societies perception and social acceptability of sanitary control measures;evolution of the health governance: to adapt the French health system to the new challenge;new challenges for risk management of animal health;evolution of preparedness for the management of animal disease crisis;feedback from the fipronil crisis;towards bovine tuberculosis eradication in Republic of Ireland, including European badgers' vaccination (a review);management of foot-and-mouth disease in Mauritius and Rodrigues: a vaccine strategy for eradication;health and biodiversity during anthropocene;Covid-19 and wild animals;Covid-19 and companion animals;Covid-19 and farmed animals;Covid-19 and laboratory animals;and Preventing SARS-CoV-2 transmission from animals to human beings.

6.
Pakistan Journal of Zoology ; 54(4):1899-1904, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904009

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus consists of single-stranded, enveloped and RNA virus, largest genome among all RNA viruses and has 4 proteins i.e. envelope, spike, nucleocapsid and membrane. Coronaviruses are classified into 4 genera: Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus. Betacoronavirus most probably originated from bats and the virus may have jumped to avian species and evolved as Deltacoronavirus group. The avian coronaviruses jumped among other avian species, giving rise to Gammacoronavirus from Deltacoronavirus, while Betacoronavirus may have given rise to Alphacoronavirus. It is known that SARS-CoV-2 belongs to Betacoronavirus. This most similar virus is verified in bat and Malayan Pangolin. Analysis showed that SARS-CoV-2 most probably originated by recombination of both bat and pangolin viruses. Viral protein seroconversion and viral specific nucleotide positive documented in all COVID-19 patients tested provides confirmation of a link between the presence of this virus and the disease.

7.
Veterinarski Zurnal Republike Srpske ; 21(1/2):94-106, 2021.
Article in English, Serbian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1903815

ABSTRACT

Today, pets are the source of numerous infectious diseases that can be transmitted to humans, as a result of their increasingly frequent contact. The most important viruses with zoonotic potential include rabies and influenza viruses as well as rotaviruses and noroviruses. However, the importance of individual viruses varies depending on the climate and infectious disease control systems in certain countries. Dogs, cats, and other increasingly popular types of pets can transmit bacterial zoonotic agents to humans in various ways. In addition to known pathogens such as the bacteria causing leptospirosis, salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, or brucellosis, the bacteria Pasteurella multocida and Bartonella henselae transmitted by bites or scratches are also significant in human pathology. There has been a significant increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in isolates originating from pets and the transmission of these strains between humans and animals requires special attention. Furthermore, fungi causing diseases such as sporotrichosis or dermatophytosis are linked to long-term and persistent infections in humans. The epidemiological situation caused by SARS-CoV-2, and the assumption of an interspecies jump of this virus from animals to humans, including its documented presence in domestic cats, dogs, tigers, and martens, have raised the question of the possibility of virus transmission from pets to humans. However, the current pandemic is caused exclusively by SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the human population, and these animals are not a source of infection for humans. A significant number of zoonoses originating from pets is a threat to public health, thus requiring the "One Health" approach through close cooperation between human and veterinary medicine to develop and implement effective health measures for both humans and animals. As part of responsible ownership, pet owners must be informed by veterinarians about measures to prevent infectious diseases and certain risks that are related to keeping certain species of animals.

8.
Veterinarski Zurnal Republike Srpske ; 21(1/2):5-20, 2021.
Article in English, Serbian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1903814

ABSTRACT

Due to the modern way of life, the global exchange of goods, more frequent contacts, and the closer life with pets, domestic and exotic animal species, different species are also more often exposed to various coronaviruses (CoVs). Most CoVs are species-specific and are not transmitted between different species. Many CoVs have been found to spread very rapidly after introduction into the susceptible population and have remained endemic despite vaccination attempts and other measures to prevent their spread. The majority of animal CoV are present in susceptible population and can cause from mild to a severe clinical picture of the disease, including high mortality. Very rarely strains of animal CoVs are transmitted to humans and then spread rapidly among humans like severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV-2 (SARS CoV-2). The epizootiological characteristics of coronavirus infections are a consequence of their unique characteristics that can be classified into three basic epizootiological determinants. First of all, the virus itself has its own characteristics in terms of genetic characteristics and sustainability in the environment. In relation to the second epizootiological determinant, the macro-organism, it is necessary to emphasize that coronaviruses, more often than other families of viruses, adapt to primary species o even to a new species of animal in nature. This, so-called "jumping" the species barriers, is primarily conditioned by the biology of the virus, which often changes the antigenic composition and thus not only avoids the host's immune response but also finds new species in nature for its maintenance. For thousands of years, the environment greatly contributes to the fact that coronaviruses are a companion of populations of many animal species since there are certain characteristics of the environment (third epizootiological determinant) as sharing the same ecological niche by different species of animals (and humans).

9.
Arq. Ciênc. Vet. Zool. UNIPAR (Online) ; 24(2, cont.): e2402, jul-dez. 2021.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1904128

ABSTRACT

Os coronavírus são doenças zoonóticas, e, acometem diretamente na saúde e o bem-estar dos animais, bem como dos seres humanos. O surgimento de Síndromes Respiratórias Agudas Graves produzidas por esses vírus é cada vez mais comuns no mundo. Com intuito de compreender e divulgar a ampliação das informações voltadas a esses gêneros de vírus, a presente revisão de literatura realizou avaliação das possíveis causas da internalização de fontes de alimentos não naturais aos animais silvestres, bem como o uso de animais com fonte alimentar aos humanos e as consequências da interrelação frente essas migrações. Nesse sentido é essencial compreender como esses vírus interagem e modificam sua estrutura genética. Entender a forma as quais se relacionam com os animais e como esses são usados na alimentação humana, torna possível o rastreio e estudos sobre a doença. Somente assim, será possível propor medidas atuais, e prevenir futuras doenças e pandemias.(AU)


Coronaviruses are zoonotic diseases which have direct effect on the health and well-being of both animals and human beings. The emergence of Serious Acute Respiratory Syndromes produced by viruses is increasingly common in the world. In order to understand and disseminate the expansion of information related to these genera of viruses, this work carried out an evaluation of the possible causes of the internalization of non-natural food sources to wild animals, as well as the use of animals as food source to humans and the consequences of the interrelation in the face of these migrations. In this sense, it is essential to understand how these viruses work and understand the way they relate to animals. Only after that it will it be possible to propose measures to the current pandemic and also to prevent future diseases and pandemics.(AU)


Los coronavirus son enfermedades zoonóticas, y afectan directamente la salud y el bienestar de los animales, así como de los humanos. La aparición de Síndromes Respiratorios Agudos Graves producidos por esos virus es cada vez más común en el mundo. Con el fin de comprender y difundir la expansión de las informaciones dirigidas a esos géneros de virus, este estudio con revisión de literatura evaluó las posibles causas de la internalización de fuentes alimenticias no naturales a los animales silvestres, así como el uso de animales como fuente alimenticia a los humanos y las consecuencias de la interrelación. frente esas migraciones. En ese sentido, es fundamental comprender cómo esos virus interactúan y modifican su estructura genética. Comprender la forma en que se relacionan con los animales y cómo ésos son usados en la alimentación humana. Solo entonces será posible proponer medidas actuales y prevenir futuras enfermedades y pandemias.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animal Welfare , Coronavirus , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals, Wild , Zoonoses
10.
Conservation Letters ; 15(3), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1901637

ABSTRACT

One Health is a cross‐sectoral and transdisciplinary approach that emphasizes the fundamental ways in which the health of humans, domestic and wild animals, fungi, plants, microbes, and natural and built ecosystems are interdependent. One Health approaches recognize the links between human health and a range of environmental concerns including biodiversity, climate, freshwater, food, harmful chemicals, and healthy oceans. Yet the conservation community and its broad interest in biodiversity and the natural world has been notably lacking in discussions about One Health. Partly as a result, both policy and practice have been narrowly focused on one or a few links between human and other healths, such as the human and wildlife health nexus. We provide a set of principles and components that will balance existing discussions by including the natural world and biodiversity and provide a framework for more active involvement by the conservation community. Incorporating these principles and components will enable One Health practice to guide inclusive, multidisciplinary, and cross‐sectoral efforts that consider the shared costs and benefits of human, animal, plant, and ecosystem health and help readjust humanity's pursuit of a green, just, and equitable sustainability pathway.

11.
Surveillance ; 48(4):10-24, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1887621

ABSTRACT

Exotic pest and disease investigations are managed and reported by the Ministry for Primary Industries' (MPI's) Diagnostic and Surveillance Directorate. This article presents a summary of investigations of suspect exotic and emerging pests and diseases in New Zealand during the period from July to September 2021.

12.
6th International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Data Mining, ICCIDM 2021 ; 281:211-223, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1872353

ABSTRACT

The origin of the COVID-19 pandemic lies at the wet market of Wuhan, China, which reportedly incepted from a person's consumption of a wild animal that was already infected with the disease. Since then, the virus has spread worldwide like wildfire and poses a major threat to the entirety of the human species itself. Coronavirus causes respiratory tract infections that can range from mild to lethal. This paper discusses the use of data analysis and machine learning to draw from the implications of the growth patterns of previous pandemics in general and projects that specifically predict future scenarios of COVID-19. It also compares and measures some of the present pandemic’s short- and long-span predictions with the equivalent real-world data observed during and after the said span. It also attempts to analyze how effective the lockdown has been across various countries and what India specifically must do to prevent a catastrophic outcome. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

13.
Diversity ; 14(5):343, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1872007

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of 2020, China has banned the consumption of wild animals to combat the spread of zoonoses. Most existing studies focus on the intention and behavior of wildlife consumption and their causes;however, few have looked at public willingness to resist wildlife consumption, as well as the cause and effects of such actions. In this study, a framework for an extended theory of planned behavior was constructed. Based on a 7-point Likert scale, a sample of 1194 respondents from eight provinces across China was obtained through an online survey. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze netizen behavioral intention to resist consuming wild animals and their causes to provide a reference for the implementation and optimization of relevant policies. The study model passed the goodness-of-fit test, confirming the robustness of the results. The results showed that Chinese netizens’ intention to resist consuming wild animals was moderate, with 55.19% willing to participate in activities against it, i.e., it is important to resist eating wild animals as a standard. Attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and past experience of the Chinese netizen had significant positive effects on resistance intention, i.e., (1) netizens’ current living area with severe outbreaks were more likely to resist wildlife consumption, (2) highly knowledge level netizens were more likely to resist wildlife consumption than less knowledgeable ones, and (3) lower income level had higher behavioral intentions of netizens. The findings suggest that the government must take a lead role in wildlife protection and strengthen its restrictions, laws, and regulations. The media should also be used to promote conservation and popularize a protective message in favor of wild animals. Public quality and assurance of wildlife protection should be culturally reinforced to effectively ban the illegal trade of wild animals and their products.

14.
Livestock and Animal Research ; 20(1):83-90, 2022.
Article in Indonesian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865689

ABSTRACT

Objective: To obtain information about the presence of coronavirus in bats to find potential of new disease reservoir as well as not yet reported disease reservoir in Lamongan District. This research can be used by the government as a basis for planning and evaluating disease control programs and for researchers it can be used for vaccine and drug design, viral phylogenetic, analysis of viral distribution, and viral databases.

15.
BMC Infectious Diseases ; 22:1-18, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1849334

ABSTRACT

Background Interactions between humans and animals are the key elements of zoonotic spillover leading to zoonotic disease emergence. Research to understand the high-risk behaviors associated with disease transmission at the human-animal interface is limited, and few consider regional and local contexts. Objective This study employed an integrated behavioral–biological surveillance approach for the early detection of novel and known zoonotic viruses in potentially high-risk populations, in an effort to identify risk factors for spillover and to determine potential foci for risk-mitigation measures. Method Participants were enrolled at two community-based sites (n = 472) in eastern and western Thailand and two hospital (clinical) sites (n = 206) in northeastern and central Thailand. A behavioral questionnaire was administered to understand participants’ demographics, living conditions, health history, and animal-contact behaviors and attitudes. Biological specimens were tested for coronaviruses, filoviruses, flaviviruses, influenza viruses, and paramyxoviruses using pan (consensus) RNA Virus assays. Results Overall 61/678 (9%) of participants tested positive for the viral families screened which included influenza viruses (75%), paramyxoviruses (15%), human coronaviruses (3%), flaviviruses (3%), and enteroviruses (3%). The most salient predictors of reporting unusual symptoms (i.e., any illness or sickness that is not known or recognized in the community or diagnosed by medical providers) in the past year were having other household members who had unusual symptoms and being scratched or bitten by animals in the same year. Many participants reported raising and handling poultry (10.3% and 24.2%), swine (2%, 14.6%), and cattle (4.9%, 7.8%) and several participants also reported eating raw or undercooked meat of these animals (2.2%, 5.5%, 10.3% respectively). Twenty four participants (3.5%) reported handling bats or having bats in the house roof. Gender, age, and livelihood activities were shown to be significantly associated with participants’ interactions with animals. Participants’ knowledge of risks influenced their health-seeking behavior. Conclusion The results suggest that there is a high level of interaction between humans, livestock, and wild animals in communities at sites we investigated in Thailand. This study highlights important differences among demographic and occupational risk factors as they relate to animal contact and zoonotic disease risk, which can be used by policymakers and local public health programs to build more effective surveillance strategies and behavior-focused interventions.

16.
Ecological Solutions and Evidence ; 2(e12093), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1838123

ABSTRACT

Wildlife strongly alter behaviour in response to human disturbance;however, fundamental questions remain regarding the influence of human infrastructure and activity on animal movement. The Covid-19 pandemic created a natural experiment providing an opportunity to evaluate wildlife movement during a period of greatly reduced human activity. Speculation in scientific reviews and the media suggested that wildlife might be increasing movement and colonizing urban landscapes during pandemic slowdowns. However, theory predicts that animals should move and use space as efficiently as possible, suggesting that movement might actually be reduced relative to decreased human activity. The researchers quantified space use, movement, and resource-selection of 12 GPS-collared mountain lions (eight females, four males) occupying parklands in greater Los Angeles during the Spring 2020 California stay-at-home order when human activity was far below normal. The researchers also tested the hypothesis that reduced traffic on Los Angeles area roadways increased permeability of these barriers to animal movement. Contrary to expectations that wildlife roamed more widely during pandemic shutdowns, resident mountain lions used smaller areas and moved shorter distances relative to their historical behaviour in greater Los Angeles. They also relaxed avoidance of anthropogenic landscape features such as trails and development, which likely facilitated increased travelling efficiency. However, there was no detectable change in road-crossing, despite reduced traffic volume. Our results support the theoretical prediction that animals maximize movement efficiency and suggest that carnivores incur energetic costs while avoiding humans. While mountain lions may restrict movement at the landscape level relative to barriers, they appear to increase distances moved at finer scales when avoiding human activity - highlighting the scale-dependent nature of animal responses to human disturbance. Avoiding humans can reduce direct mortality of large carnivores and is often suggested to be an important mechanism promoting coexistence in shared landscapes. However, energetic costs incurred by increased movement and space-use while avoiding human activity may have important consequences for population viability, predator-prey interactions, community structure, and human-wildlife conflict. Management providing sufficient wild prey and education regarding best practices for protection of domestic animals are important for conserving large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes.

17.
Veterinar ; 59(1):14-23, 2021.
Article in Croatian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837993

ABSTRACT

The first cases of human disease from COVID-19 were recorded in December 2019 in China, from where it spread rapidly around the world. COVID-19, the third emerging coronavirus infection in humans, is caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 virus, which can cause a severe acute respiratory syndrome in some infected individuals. Previous research has revealed the possible animal origin of SARS-CoV-2, with bats considered as natural reservoirs and pangolins as intermediate hosts. To better understand COVID-19 and more successfully control the spread, domestic and wild animals have been infected in experimental conditions. On the other hand, in some species, infections have been recorded in field conditions. Natural infections have been reported in dogs, cats, tigers, lions, and minks, who have been in contact with SARS-CoV-2 positive humans. The reverse transmission of the pathogen, from infected animals to humans, has only been recorded on intensive mink farms. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease's causative agent, drugs and vaccine trials, some experimental infections were performed on animal models, of which ferrets, rhesus macaques, and hamsters proved to be the most suitable. This article aimed to consolidate known data on the potential origin of SARS-CoV-2, its transmission to humans, infections in animals, and their significance in the epidemiology of COVID-19.

18.
South of Russia-Ecology Development ; 17(1):6-16, 2022.
Article in Russian | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1811679

ABSTRACT

Aim. Analyse available literature data about the possibility of coronavirus infection with and the severity of the course of infection in various animal species in order to evaluate the significance of this possibility in the context of preservation of the well-being of both wild and domestic animals. Discussion. SARS-CoV-2 is thought to have originated from bat CoV. The virus enters the cell by binding to the ACE2 receptor, the affinity for which differs depending on the animal species. Infected animals show viral RNA and may show clinical symptoms. It is known that the virus originated from some animals, while others may be carriers. Moreover, it can be that wild as well as domestic and farm animals are in close contact with humans. Therefore, it is advisable to conduct a study of the degree of threat to humans associated with the persistence of the virus in animal communities. Conclusion. There is ample literature on the possibility of infection in various animals. However, it is not enough to fully understand how significant is the role that animals can play in the spread of coronavirus infection among humans and how much harm it can bring to themselves.

19.
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science ; 1016(1):011001, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1806214

ABSTRACT

Intro and GoalCovid-19 pandemic teaches us that climate change impact sometimes incredibly unpredictable. Not only the increase of heat exposure or natural hazard due to extreme weather, but the emergence of new species or the mutation of microorganism due to the changing ecology may harmful for human beings and another organism. This anthropological climate change phenomenon has negatively altered the most fundamental natural resources for living organism: air, water, and soil. Air has been polluted and warming due to human activities. The quantity of freshwater keeps on depleting, while the ground water recharge intervened with chemical and biological contamination. The sustainability of soil as the natural planting media is under threat due to land use conversion and soil quality degradation. Water acidification and temperature increase have been proved to change the salinity of seawater. Those climate change sensitive exposure may affect the immune system of the living things to survive. Those conditions grow the concern for the health status of humans, crops, farmed and wild animals.Preparing immunity on living organism, especially human is a must to maintain our existence. Vaccine is vital to protect human health from emergence virus and disease which may affected by climate change. But does vaccine can against climate change itself? The 7th International Conference on Climate Change (ICCC) is focusing the discussion on the Covid-19 vaccine roles to against the climate change. Focusing and improving the climatic resilience strategies on immune system will be of considerably important to overcome the key climate change sensitive pathways, as well as to support the achievements some global goals in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).The 7th ICCC 2021 is organized by Dept. of Master Program of Environmental Science, Post Graduate School of Sebelas Maret University (Surakarta, Indonesia), collaborating with The United Graduate School of Agriculture Science (UGSAS), and Gifu University (Japan).This conference aims to accommodate the new related inspiration and innovation about how to minimize the climate change impact at present. Especially at the 7th ICCC 2021, the purpose is to formulate a comprehensive and efficient strategies on how to increase the effectiveness of Covid-19 Vaccine against the climate change. The e-poster of call for papers presented in Figure 1.List of titles Invited Speakers and Guest Editors, Virtual Conference Disclaimer, Date of conference, Location of organizer and Conference model, Location of participants and overall participant number, Committee List, The success of delivery of the conference, Chairman are available in this Pdf.

20.
Biological Conservation ; 253(78), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1797134

ABSTRACT

Invasive species are a growing concern with increasing global connectivity. Feral pigeons (Columba livia) are widespread and invasive, thus their effective control is of keen international interest. The COVID-19 pandemic has offered an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the impact of a nation-wide Circuit Breaker (restricted human activities) in Singapore on first, the abundance of the feral pigeons and three urban commensals-the Javan myna (Acridotheres javanicus), common myna (A. tristis), and house crow (Corvus splendens) in different food source types;and second, the activity budgets of feral pigeons. A significant and progressive decline in feral pigeon abundance was observed in open food centres and feeding hotspots after the Circuit Breaker was implemented. While the house crow and common myna were less affected, the Javan myna abundance increased moderately at refuse collection centres during the Circuit Breaker and decreased significantly in green spaces after the Circuit Breaker. Changes in food abundance could also predict changes in feral pigeon abundance and its effect was greatest in feeding hotspots. A greater proportion of feral pigeons was observed foraging and moving with a smaller proportion seen resting with probable consequences on their reproductive capacity. Our study also cautions against drawing inferences on biological responses due to similar social restrictions without careful consideration of other ecological factors, like average flock size and time of the day, which also affected the proportion of pigeons foraging on natural versus anthropogenic food. In summary, our results advocate a food limitation approach to control the feral pigeon populations.

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