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1.
BJOG ; 129(2): 248-255, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831883

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of Covid-19 vaccination (Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2) during the third trimester of pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective computerised database. POPULATION: Women who gave birth at >24 weeks of gestation in Israel, between January and April 2021, with full records of Covid-19 disease and vaccination status. METHODS: Women who received two doses of the vaccine were compared with unvaccinated women. Women who were recorded as having disease or a positive Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) swab during pregnancy or delivery were excluded from both study groups. Univariate analysis was followed by multivariate logistic regression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Composite adverse maternal outcomes. Secondary outcomes were vaccination rate and composite adverse neonatal outcomes. RESULTS: The overall uptake of one or both vaccines was 40.2%; 712 women who received two doses of the Covid-19 vaccine were compared with 1063 unvaccinated women. Maternal composite outcomes were comparable between the groups; however, women who received the vaccine had higher rates of elective caesarean deliveries (CDs) and lower rates of vacuum deliveries. An adjusted multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that Covid-19 vaccination was not associated with maternal composite adverse outcome (aOR 0.8, 95% CI 0.61-1.03); a significant reduction in the risk for neonatal composite adverse outcomes was observed (aOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.36-0.74). CONCLUSIONS: In a motivated population covered by a National Health Insurance Plan, we found a 40.2% rate of vaccination for the Covid-19 vaccine during the third trimester of pregnancy, which was not associated with adverse maternal outcomes and, moreover, decreased the risk for neonatal adverse outcomes. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Covid-19 vaccine during pregnancy is safe for both mother and fetus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccination , /administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Israel/epidemiology , Patient Safety , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
4.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(S 01): e129-e136, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare respiratory illness-related hospitalization (RIH) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related hospitalization (RSVH) in multiple births versus singletons, who received palivizumab during the RSV season and participated in the Canadian registry of palivizumab (CARESS). STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, observational study of infants aged <2 years recruited across 32 centers over 12 RSV seasons from 2005 to 2017. Demographic data were collected at enrolment and RIH events were recorded monthly. RESULTS: A total of 25,003 infants were enrolled of whom 6,949 (27.8%) were of multiple birth, and 18,054 (72.2%) were singletons. A significantly larger proportion of the multiple births were premature (80.2%) compared with the singleton group (56.8%). Multiples had a lower gestational age (mean ± standard deviation): 31.2 ± 3.2 versus 33.2 ± 5.5 weeks and birth weight (mean: 1,590 ± 606.8 vs. 2,069.4 ± 1068.5 g; both p < 0.0005). They were younger at enrolment (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.1 ± 6.8 months), and fewer attended daycare (1.9 vs. 4.6%), and experienced exposure to smoking (24.5 vs. 29.9%), but more lived in a crowded household (36.7 vs. 19.4%); all p < 0.0005. Multiples had a longer length of neonatal stay (51.1 ± 65.9 vs. 47.9 ± 67.8 days), and more required respiratory support (65.7 vs. 57.7%), but for shorter duration (22.6 ± 32.9 vs. 24.7 ± 40.6 days); all p < 0.001. RIH and RSVH rates (%) in multiples versus singletons were 4.7; 7.7 and 1.4; and 1.6, respectively. Cox regression showed that multiples had a lower risk of RIH compared with singletons (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.616, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.543-0.698, p < 0.0005), but not RSVH (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.57-1.02, p = 0.071). CONCLUSION: Multiple birth infants, who are known to be at greater risk for severe RSVH compared with singletons, are well protected by palivizumab, provided adherence to the monthly injection scheme is guaranteed.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Palivizumab/administration & dosage , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Pregnancy, Multiple/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , Registries , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Risk Factors
5.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 77(10): 1513-1521, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813653

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyze the cases of torsade de pointes (TdP) and related symptoms reported in association with chloroquine (CQ), hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), and azithromycin (AZT) to the World Health Organization (WHO) global database of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) for drug monitoring (VigiBase) using qualitative and quantitative pharmacovigilance approaches. METHODS: The main characteristics of the ICSRs reporting TdP with CQ, HCQ, and AZT have been summarized. Co-reported drugs with risk to cause QT prolongation have been described. Reporting odds ratios (RORs) as a measure of disproportionality for reported TdP and individual drugs have been calculated. RESULTS: One hundred seventy ICSRs reporting TdP in association with the drugs of interest were identified (CQ: 11, HCQ: 31, CQ + HCQ: 1, HCQ + AZT: 27, AZT: 100). From these, 41 (24.3%) were received during the pandemic period (December 2019 to February 2021). The median age of the patients was 63, 53, and 63 years old for CQ, HCQ, and AZT, respectively. Reports included concomitant use of other QT-prolonging drugs (CQ 25.0%, HCQ 71.2%, AZT 64.6%). A proportion of the cases were fatal (CQ 25.0%, HCQ 8.6%, AZT 16.1%). Increased disproportionality has been found for the individual drugs and TdP: CQ (ROR: 7.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.82, 12.96), HCQ (ROR: 8.49, 95% CI: 6.57, 10.98), azithromycin (ROR: 8.06, 95% CI: 6.76, 9.61). Disproportionality was also found for other related symptoms, Standardized MedDRA Query for torsade de pointes/QT prolongation (narrow): CQ (ROR: 11.95, 95% CI: 10.04-14.22); HCQ (ROR: 20.43, 95% CI: 19.13, 21.83), AZT (ROR: 7.78, 95% CI: 7.26, 8.34). CONCLUSIONS: The prescription of CQ, HCQ, and AZT should be restricted to therapeutic indications with established positive benefit/risk profile. Doctors and patients should be aware of this potential adverse reaction especially when several risk factors are present.


Subject(s)
Azithromycin/adverse effects , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Torsades de Pointes/chemically induced , Adult , Aged , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pharmacovigilance , Retrospective Studies
6.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 8: CD014962, 2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Remdesivir is an antiviral medicine with properties to inhibit viral replication of SARS-CoV-2. Positive results from early studies attracted media attention and led to emergency use authorisation of remdesivir in COVID-19.  A thorough understanding of the current evidence regarding the effects of remdesivir as a treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection based on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is required. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of remdesivir compared to placebo or standard care alone on clinical outcomes in hospitalised patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and to maintain the currency of the evidence using a living systematic review approach. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register (which comprises the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and medRxiv) as well as Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded and Emerging Sources Citation Index) and WHO COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease to identify completed and ongoing studies without language restrictions. We conducted the searches on 16 April 2021. SELECTION CRITERIA: We followed standard Cochrane methodology. We included RCTs evaluating remdesivir for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection in hospitalised adults compared to placebo or standard care alone irrespective of disease severity, gender, ethnicity, or setting.  We excluded studies that evaluated remdesivir for the treatment of other coronavirus diseases. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed standard Cochrane methodology. To assess risk of bias in included studies, we used the Cochrane RoB 2 tool for RCTs. We rated the certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach for outcomes that were reported according to our prioritised categories: all-cause mortality at up to day 28, duration to liberation from invasive mechanical ventilation, duration to liberation from supplemental oxygen, new need for mechanical ventilation (high-flow oxygen or non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation), new need for invasive mechanical ventilation, new need for non-invasive mechanical ventilation or high-flow oxygen, new need for oxygen by mask or nasal prongs, quality of life, adverse events (any grade), and serious adverse events. MAIN RESULTS: We included five RCTs with 7452 participants diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection and a mean age of 59 years, of whom 3886 participants were randomised to receive remdesivir. Most participants required low-flow oxygen (n=4409) or mechanical ventilation (n=1025) at baseline. We identified two ongoing studies, one was suspended due to a lack of COVID-19 patients to recruit. Risk of bias was considered to be of some concerns or high risk for clinical status and safety outcomes because participants who had died did not contribute information to these outcomes. Without adjustment, this leads to an uncertain amount of missing values and the potential for bias due to missing data. Effects of remdesivir in hospitalised individuals  Remdesivir probably makes little or no difference to all-cause mortality at up to day 28 (risk ratio (RR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81 to 1.06; risk difference (RD) 8 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 21 fewer to 7 more; 4 studies, 7142 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Considering the initial severity of condition, only one study showed a beneficial effect of remdesivir in patients who received low-flow oxygen at baseline (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.66, 435 participants), but conflicting results exists from another study, and we were unable to validly assess this observations due to limited availability of comparable data. Remdesivir may have little or no effect on the duration to liberation from invasive mechanical ventilation (2 studies, 1298 participants, data not pooled, low-certainty evidence). We are uncertain whether remdesivir increases or decreases the chance of clinical improvement in terms of duration to liberation from supplemental oxygen at up to day 28 (3 studies, 1691 participants, data not pooled, very low-certainty evidence).   We are very uncertain whether remdesivir decreases or increases the risk of clinical worsening in terms of new need for mechanical ventilation at up to day 28 (high-flow oxygen or non-invasive ventilation or invasive mechanical ventilation) (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.24; RD 29 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 68 fewer to 32 more; 3 studies, 6696 participants; very low-certainty evidence); new need for non-invasive mechanical ventilation or high-flow oxygen (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.98; RD 72 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 118 fewer to 5 fewer; 1 study, 573 participants; very low-certainty evidence); and new need for oxygen by mask or nasal prongs (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.22; RD 84 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 204 fewer to 98 more; 1 study, 138 participants; very low-certainty evidence). The evidence suggests that remdesivir may decrease the risk of clinical worsening in terms of new need for invasive mechanical ventilation (67 fewer participants amongst 1000 participants; RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.77; 2 studies, 1159 participants; low-certainty evidence).  None of the included studies reported quality of life. Remdesivir probably decreases the serious adverse events rate at up to 28 days (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.90; RD 63 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 94 fewer to 25 fewer; 3 studies, 1674 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). We are very uncertain whether remdesivir increases or decreases adverse events rate (any grade) (RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.27; RD 29 more per 1000, 95% CI 82 fewer to 158 more; 3 studies, 1674 participants; very low-certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based on the currently available evidence, we are moderately certain that remdesivir probably has little or no effect on all-cause mortality at up to day 28 in hospitalised adults with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We are uncertain about the effects of remdesivir on clinical improvement and worsening. There were insufficient data available to validly examine the effect of remdesivir on mortality in subgroups depending on the extent of respiratory support at baseline.  Future studies should provide additional data on efficacy and safety of remdesivir for defined core outcomes in COVID-19 research, especially for different population subgroups. This could allow us to draw more reliable conclusions on the potential benefits and harms of remdesivir in future updates of this review. Due to the living approach of this work, we will update the review periodically.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/therapeutic use , Bias , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Confidence Intervals , Disease Progression , Humans , Middle Aged , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilator Weaning
7.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256806, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808553

ABSTRACT

Scientific evidence plays an important role in the therapeutic decision-making process. What happens when physicians are forced to make therapeutic decisions under uncertainty? The absence of scientific guidelines at the beginning of a pandemic due to an unknown virus, such as COVID-19, could influence the perceived legitimacy of the application of non-evidence-based therapeutic approaches. This paper reports on a test of this hypothesis, in which we administered an ad hoc questionnaire to a sample of 64 Italian physicians during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy (April 2020). The questionnaire statements regarding the legitimacy of off-label or experimental drugs were framed according to three different scenarios (Normality, Emergency and COVID-19). Furthermore, as the perception of internal bodily sensations (i.e., interoception) modulates the decision-making process, we tested participants' interoceptive sensibility using the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). The results showed that participants were more inclined to legitimate non-evidence-based therapeutic approaches in the COVID-19 and Emergency scenarios than the Normality scenario. We also found that scores on the MAIA Trusting subscale positively predicted this difference. Our findings demonstrate that uncertain medical scenarios, involving a dramatic increase in patient volume and acuity, can increase risk-taking in therapeutic decision-making. Furthermore, individual characteristics of health care providers, such as interoceptive ability, should be taken into account when constructing models to prevent the breakdown of healthcare systems in cases of severe emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Decision Making , Drug Prescriptions , Emergency Treatment , Female , Humans , Interoception , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pharmaceutical Preparations/administration & dosage , Risk-Taking , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263155, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793533

ABSTRACT

With limited availability of vaccines, an efficient use of the limited supply of vaccines in order to achieve herd immunity will be an important tool to combat the wide-spread prevalence of COVID-19. Here, we compare a selection of strategies for vaccine distribution, including a novel targeted vaccination approach (EHR) that provides a noticeable increase in vaccine impact on disease spread compared to age-prioritized and random selection vaccination schemes. Using high-fidelity individual-based computer simulations with Oslo, Norway as an example, we find that for a community reproductive number in a setting where the base pre-vaccination reproduction number R = 2.1 without population immunity, the EHR method reaches herd immunity at 48% of the population vaccinated with 90% efficiency, whereas the common age-prioritized approach needs 89%, and a population-wide random selection approach requires 61%. We find that age-based strategies have a substantially weaker impact on epidemic spread and struggle to achieve herd immunity under the majority of conditions. Furthermore, the vaccination of minors is essential to achieving herd immunity, even for ideal vaccines providing 100% protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Epidemics , Humans , Immunity, Herd/immunology , Models, Theoretical , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination , Vaccines
9.
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol ; 322(3): R161-R169, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770007

ABSTRACT

Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is produced in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON). Peripheral AVP, which is secreted from the posterior pituitary, is produced in the magnocellular division of the PVN (mPVN) and SON. In addition, AVP is produced in the parvocellular division of the PVN (pPVN), where corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) is synthesized. These peptides synergistically modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Previous studies have revealed that the HPA axis was activated by hypovolemia. However, the detailed dynamics of AVP in the pPVN under hypovolemic state has not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the effects of hypovolemia and hyperosmolality on the hypothalamus, using AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic rats. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) or 3% hypertonic saline (HTN) was intraperitoneally administered to develop hypovolemia or hyperosmolality. AVP-eGFP intensity was robustly upregulated at 3 and 6 h after intraperitoneal administration of PEG or HTN in the mPVN. While in the pPVN, eGFP intensity was significantly increased at 6 h after intraperitoneal administration of PEG with significant induction of Fos-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons. Consistently, eGFP mRNA, AVP hnRNA, and CRF mRNA in the pPVN and plasma AVP and corticosterone were significantly increased at 6 h after intraperitoneal administration of PEG. The results suggest that AVP and CRF syntheses in the pPVN were activated by hypovolemia, resulting in the activation of the HPA axis.


Subject(s)
Arginine Vasopressin/genetics , Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/metabolism , Hypovolemia/metabolism , Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus/metabolism , Animals , Corticosterone/blood , Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/genetics , Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Genes, Reporter , Green Fluorescent Proteins/biosynthesis , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiopathology , Hypovolemia/genetics , Hypovolemia/physiopathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Male , Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus/physiopathology , Polyethylene Glycols/administration & dosage , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos/metabolism , Rats, Transgenic , Rats, Wistar , Saline Solution, Hypertonic/administration & dosage , Supraoptic Nucleus/metabolism , Supraoptic Nucleus/physiopathology , Time Factors , Up-Regulation
10.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(6): 828-838, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768952

ABSTRACT

The past two decades have witnessed the emergence of three zoonotic coronaviruses which have jumped species to cause lethal disease in humans: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and SARS-CoV-2. MERS-CoV emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and the origins of MERS-CoV are not fully understood. Genomic analysis indicates it originated in bats and transmitted to camels. Human-to-human transmission occurs in varying frequency, being highest in healthcare environment and to a lesser degree in the community and among family members. Several nosocomial outbreaks of human-to-human transmission have occurred, the largest in Riyadh and Jeddah in 2014 and South Korea in 2015. MERS-CoV remains a high-threat pathogen identified by World Health Organization as a priority pathogen because it causes severe disease that has a high mortality rate, epidemic potential, and no medical countermeasures. MERS-CoV has been identified in dromedaries in several countries in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia. MERS-CoV-2 causes a wide range of clinical presentations, although the respiratory system is predominantly affected. There are no specific antiviral treatments, although recent trials indicate that combination antivirals may be useful in severely ill patients. Diagnosing MERS-CoV early and implementation infection control measures are critical to preventing hospital-associated outbreaks. Preventing MERS relies on avoiding unpasteurized or uncooked animal products, practicing safe hygiene habits in health care settings and around dromedaries, community education and awareness training for health workers, as well as implementing effective control measures. Effective vaccines for MERS-COV are urgently needed but still under development.


Subject(s)
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Camelus/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity
11.
Bioengineered ; 12(1): 2274-2287, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769071

ABSTRACT

Xuebijing Injection have been found to improve the clinical symptoms of COVID-19 and alleviate disease severity, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study aimed to investigate the potential molecular targets and mechanisms of the Xuebijing injection in treating COVID-19 via network pharmacology and molecular docking analysis. The main active ingredients and therapeutic targets of the Xuebijing injection, and the pathogenic targets of COVID-19 were screened using the TCMSP, UniProt, and GeneCard databases. According to the 'Drug-Ingredients-Targets-Disease' network built by STRING and Cytoscape, AKT1 was identified as the core target, and baicalein, luteolin, and quercetin were identified as the active ingredients of the Xuebijing injection in connection with AKT1. R language was used for enrichment analysis that predict the mechanisms by which the Xuebijing injection may inhibit lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory response, modulate NOS activity, and regulate the TNF signal pathway by affecting the role of AKT1. Based on the results of network pharmacology, a molecular docking was performed with AKT1 and the three active ingredients, the results indicated that all three active ingredients could stably bind with AKT1. These findings identify potential molecular mechanisms by which Xuebijing Injection inhibit COVID-19 by acting on AKT1.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biomedical Engineering , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacokinetics , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Flavanones/administration & dosage , Humans , Injections , Luteolin/administration & dosage , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Maps , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/chemistry , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/drug effects , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Quercetin/administration & dosage , Signal Transduction/drug effects
16.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(8)2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758461

ABSTRACT

Viral causes of pneumonia pose constant threats to global public health, but there are no specific treatments currently available for the condition. Antivirals are ineffective when administered late after the onset of symptoms. Pneumonia is caused by an exaggerated inflammatory cytokine response to infection, but tissue necrosis and damage caused by virus also contribute to lung pathology. We hypothesized that viral pneumonia can be treated effectively if both virus and inflammation are simultaneously targeted. Combined treatment with the antiviral drug cidofovir and etanercept, which targets tumor necrosis factor (TNF), down-regulated nuclear factor kappa B-signaling and effectively reduced morbidity and mortality during respiratory ectromelia virus (ECTV) infection in mice even when treatment was initiated after onset of clinical signs. Treatment with cidofovir alone reduced viral load, but animals died from severe lung pathology. Treatment with etanercept had no effect on viral load but diminished levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including TNF, IL-6, IL-1ß, IL-12p40, TGF-ß, and CCL5 and dampened activation of the STAT3 cytokine-signaling pathway, which transduces signals from multiple cytokines implicated in lung pathology. Consequently, combined treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor and cidofovir was effective in improving clinical disease and lung pathology in ECTV-infected mice. Thus, the simultaneous targeting of virus and a specific inflammatory cytokine or cytokine-signaling pathway is effective in the treatment of pneumonia. This approach might be applicable to pneumonia caused by emerging and re-emerging viruses, like seasonal and pandemic influenza A virus strains and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cidofovir/therapeutic use , Etanercept/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cidofovir/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Therapy, Combination , Ectromelia virus/drug effects , Female , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Load/drug effects
17.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 61, 2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758178

ABSTRACT

Variants are globally emerging very quickly following pandemic prototypic SARS-CoV-2. To evaluate the cross-protection of prototypic SARS-CoV-2 vaccine against its variants, we vaccinated rhesus monkeys with three doses of prototypic SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine, followed by challenging with emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs). These vaccinated animals produced neutralizing antibodies against Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron variants, although there were certain declinations of geometric mean titer (GMT) as compared with prototypic SARS-CoV-2. Of note, in vivo this prototypic vaccine not only reduced the viral loads in nasal, throat and anal swabs, pulmonary tissues, but also improved the pathological changes in the lung infected by variants of Alpha, Beta, and Delta. In summary, the prototypic SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine in this study protected against VOCs to certain extension, which is of great significance for prevention and control of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Protection , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Anal Canal/virology , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Nasal Cavity/virology , Pharynx/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Viral Load/drug effects
18.
World Neurosurg ; 157: e357-e363, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757929

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior studies demonstrated reduced risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in neurosurgical patients secondary to prophylaxis with both heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin. The ability to monitor low-molecular-weight heparin by obtaining anti-factor Xa (anti-Xa) serum levels provides an opportunity to evaluate safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics of patients who have anti-Xa levels outside of the goal range (0.2-0.4/0.5 IU/mL) and investigate incidence of major bleeding and VTE. METHODS: A single-center, retrospective, observational study was conducted on neurosurgical patients receiving enoxaparin for VTE prophylaxis between August 2019 and December 2020. Significance testing was conducted via Fisher exact test and independent samples t test. RESULTS: The study included 85 patients. Patients were less likely to have an anti-Xa level in the goal range if they were male, had a higher weight, or were morbidly obese. Three neuroendovascular patients (3.5%) experienced a major bleed. Serum anti-Xa levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced major bleeds compared with patients who did not (0.45 ± 0.16 IU/mL vs. 0.28 ± 0.09 IU/mL, P = 0.003). Patients with a supraprophylactic anti-Xa level (>0.5 IU/mL) were more likely to experience a major bleed (P = 0.005). One VTE event occurred: the patient experienced a pulmonary embolism with anti-Xa level at goal. CONCLUSIONS: Anti-Xa-guided enoxaparin dosing for VTE prophylaxis in neurosurgical patients may help prevent major bleeding. These data suggest that a higher anti-Xa level may predispose patients to major bleeding. Further evaluation is needed to identify the goal anti-Xa level for VTE prophylaxis in this population.


Subject(s)
Enoxaparin/blood , Factor Xa Inhibitors/blood , Hemorrhage/blood , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/trends , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Anticoagulants/blood , Drug Monitoring/methods , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Hemorrhage/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/blood , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
19.
Mol Med Rep ; 25(4)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753714

ABSTRACT

Aberrant TGF­ß/Smad7 signaling has been reported to be an important mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of a number of potential anti­colitis agents on intestinal epithelial permeability and the TGF­ß/Smad7 signaling pathway in an experimental model of colitis. A mouse model of colitis was first established before anti­TNF­α and 5­aminosalicyclic acid (5­ASA) were administered intraperitoneally and orally, respectively. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histological index (HI) of the colon and the disease activity index (DAI) scores were then detected in each mouse. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemical and functional tests, including Evans blue (EB) and FITC­dextran (FD­4) staining, were used to evaluate intestinal mucosal permeability. The expression of epithelial phenotype markers E­cadherin, occludin, zona occludens (ZO­1), TGF­ß and Smad7 were measured. In addition, epithelial myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression and activity were measured. Anti­TNF­α and 5­ASA treatments was both found to effectively reduce the DAI score and HI, whilst decreasing colonic MPO activity, plasma levels of FD­4 and EB permeation of the intestine. Furthermore, anti­TNF­α and 5­ASA treatments decreased MLCK expression and activity, reduced the expression of Smad7 in the small intestine epithelium, but increased the expression of TGF­ß. In mice with colitis, TEM revealed partial epithelial injury in the ileum, where the number of intercellular tight junctions and the expression levels of E­cadherin, ZO­1 and occludin were decreased, all of which were alleviated by anti­TNF­α and 5­ASA treatment. In conclusion, anti­TNF­α and 5­ASA both exerted protective effects on intestinal epithelial permeability in an experimental mouse model of colitis. The underlying mechanism may be mediated at least in part by the increase in TGF­ß expression and/or the reduction in Smad7 expression, which can inhibit epithelial MLCK activity and in turn reduce mucosal permeability during the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.


Subject(s)
Colitis, Ulcerative/metabolism , Smad7 Protein/genetics , Smad7 Protein/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Animals , Cadherins/metabolism , Colitis, Ulcerative/chemically induced , Colon/pathology , Dextran Sulfate/toxicity , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/ultrastructure , Male , Mesalamine/administration & dosage , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Myosin-Light-Chain Kinase/metabolism , Occludin/metabolism , Peroxidase/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Zonula Occludens-1 Protein/metabolism
20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(13): e2118721119, 2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751829

ABSTRACT

SignificanceThe challenge of securing adherence to public health policies is compounded when an emerging threat and a set of unprecedented remedies are not fully understood among the general public. The evolution of citizens' attitudes toward vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic offers psychologically and sociologically grounded insights that enrich the conventional incentives- and constraints-based approach to policy design. We thus contribute to a behavioral science of policy compliance during public health emergencies of the kind that we may increasingly face in the future. From early in the pandemic, we have tracked the same individuals, providing a lens into the conditions under which people's attitudes toward voluntary and mandated vaccinations change, providing essential information for COVID-19 policy not available from cross-section data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dissent and Disputes , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Public Health Surveillance
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