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1.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 18, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175699

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of SARS-COV 2 infection (Covid-19) is challenging health systems and communities worldwide. At the individual level, the main biological system involved in Covid-19 is the respiratory system. Respiratory complications range from mild flu-like illness symptoms to a fatal respiratory distress syndrome or a severe and fulminant pneumonia. Critically, the presence of a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or its risk factors, such as hypertension or type II diabetes mellitus, increases the chance of having severe complications (including death) if infected by the virus. In addition, the infection can worsen an existing cardiovascular disease or precipitate new ones. This paper presents a contemporary review of cardiovascular complications of Covid-19. It also specifically examines the impact of the disease on those already vulnerable and on the poorly resourced health systems of Africa as well as the potential broader consequences on the socio-economic health of this region.


Subject(s)
/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/economics , Acute Coronary Syndrome/etiology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/physiopathology , Africa , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/economics , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , /economics , Cardiovascular Diseases/economics , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Economic Recession , Gross Domestic Product , Health Resources/economics , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Heart Failure/economics , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Inflammation , Myocardial Ischemia/economics , Myocardial Ischemia/etiology , Myocardial Ischemia/physiopathology , Myocarditis/economics , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Socioeconomic Factors , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/economics , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/etiology , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/physiopathology
2.
J Zhejiang Univ Sci B ; 22(4): 330-340, 2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175476

ABSTRACT

Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with hypertension infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are at increased risk of acute lung injury. However, it is still not clear whether this increased risk is related to the usage of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers. We collected medical records of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients from the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine (Hangzhou, China), and evaluated the potential impact of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) on the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients with hypertension. A total of 30 hypertensive COVID-19 patients were enrolled, of which 17 were classified as non-ARB group and the remaining 13 as ARB group based on the antihypertensive therapies they received. Compared with the non-ARB group, patients in the ARB group had a lower proportion of severe cases and intensive care unit (ICU) admission as well as shortened length of hospital stay, and manifested favorable results in most of the laboratory testing. Viral loads in the ARB group were lower than those in the non-ARB group throughout the disease course. No significant difference in the time of seroconversion or antibody levels was observed between the two groups. The median levels of soluble angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (sACE2) in serum and urine samples were similar in both groups, and there were no significant correlations between serum sACE2 and biomarkers of disease severity. Transcriptional analysis showed 125 differentially expressed genes which mainly were enriched in oxygen transport, bicarbonate transport, and blood coagulation. Our results suggest that ARB usage is not associated with aggravation of COVID-19. These findings support the maintenance of ARB treatment in hypertensive patients diagnosed with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Hypertension/drug therapy , Viral Load , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , China , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Transcriptome
5.
JAMA ; 325(11): 1074-1087, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168763

ABSTRACT

Importance: Refinement of criteria for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) may inform efforts to improve health outcomes. Objective: To compare clinical characteristics and outcomes of children and adolescents with MIS-C vs those with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Setting, Design, and Participants: Case series of 1116 patients aged younger than 21 years hospitalized between March 15 and October 31, 2020, at 66 US hospitals in 31 states. Final date of follow-up was January 5, 2021. Patients with MIS-C had fever, inflammation, multisystem involvement, and positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or antibody test results or recent exposure with no alternate diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 had positive RT-PCR test results and severe organ system involvement. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2. Main Outcomes and Measures: Presenting symptoms, organ system complications, laboratory biomarkers, interventions, and clinical outcomes. Multivariable regression was used to compute adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) of factors associated with MIS-C vs COVID-19. Results: Of 1116 patients (median age, 9.7 years; 45% female), 539 (48%) were diagnosed with MIS-C and 577 (52%) with COVID-19. Compared with patients with COVID-19, patients with MIS-C were more likely to be 6 to 12 years old (40.8% vs 19.4%; absolute risk difference [RD], 21.4% [95% CI, 16.1%-26.7%]; aRR, 1.51 [95% CI, 1.33-1.72] vs 0-5 years) and non-Hispanic Black (32.3% vs 21.5%; RD, 10.8% [95% CI, 5.6%-16.0%]; aRR, 1.43 [95% CI, 1.17-1.76] vs White). Compared with patients with COVID-19, patients with MIS-C were more likely to have cardiorespiratory involvement (56.0% vs 8.8%; RD, 47.2% [95% CI, 42.4%-52.0%]; aRR, 2.99 [95% CI, 2.55-3.50] vs respiratory involvement), cardiovascular without respiratory involvement (10.6% vs 2.9%; RD, 7.7% [95% CI, 4.7%-10.6%]; aRR, 2.49 [95% CI, 2.05-3.02] vs respiratory involvement), and mucocutaneous without cardiorespiratory involvement (7.1% vs 2.3%; RD, 4.8% [95% CI, 2.3%-7.3%]; aRR, 2.29 [95% CI, 1.84-2.85] vs respiratory involvement). Patients with MIS-C had higher neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (median, 6.4 vs 2.7, P < .001), higher C-reactive protein level (median, 152 mg/L vs 33 mg/L; P < .001), and lower platelet count (<150 ×103 cells/µL [212/523 {41%} vs 84/486 {17%}, P < .001]). A total of 398 patients (73.8%) with MIS-C and 253 (43.8%) with COVID-19 were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 10 (1.9%) with MIS-C and 8 (1.4%) with COVID-19 died during hospitalization. Among patients with MIS-C with reduced left ventricular systolic function (172/503, 34.2%) and coronary artery aneurysm (57/424, 13.4%), an estimated 91.0% (95% CI, 86.0%-94.7%) and 79.1% (95% CI, 67.1%-89.1%), respectively, normalized within 30 days. Conclusions and Relevance: This case series of patients with MIS-C and with COVID-19 identified patterns of clinical presentation and organ system involvement. These patterns may help differentiate between MIS-C and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , Age Factors , Biomarkers/analysis , /diagnosis , /therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Patient Acuity , Regression Analysis , Stroke Volume , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , United States , Young Adult
6.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(2): 239-243, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and chloroquine treatment for COVID-19 has not been verified. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study to summarize the clinical practices of nonsevere patients with COVID-19 receiving the standard care, LPV/r or chloroquine in Beijing Ditan Hospital from January 20 to March 26, 2020. The main outcome measurements include the changes of cycle threshold values of open reading frame 1 ab (ORF1ab) and nucleocapsid (N) genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay from day 1 to 7 after admission for patients receiving standard care or after treatment being initiated for patients receiving either LPV/r or chloroquine. The proportion of developing severe illness, fever duration and the time from symptom onset to chest computer tomography improvement, and negative conversion of nucleic acid were compared. RESULTS: Of the 129 patients included in the study, 59 received the standard care, 51 received LPV/r, and 19 received chloroquine. The demographics and baseline characteristics were comparable among the 3 groups. The median duration of fever, median time from symptom onset to chest computer tomography improvement, and negative conversion of the nucleic acid were similar among the 3 groups. The median increase in cycle threshold values of N and ORF1ab gene for patients receiving LPV/r or chloroquine or the standard care during the treatment course was 7.0 and 8.5, 8.0, and 7.6, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively. These figures were not found significantly different among the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Antiviral therapy using LPV/r or chloroquine seemed not to improve the prognosis or shorten the clinical course of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Adult , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Drug Combinations , Female , Fever , HIV Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
7.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(1): 1-5, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165585

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the magnitude of the global COVID-19 pandemic, persons living with HIV (PLWH) may become coinfected with SARS-CoV-2. SETTING: We conducted a survey in Wuhan, China, to characterize the status of coinfected PLWH, their time to clinical improvement, and clinical prognoses. METHODS: Using a Wuhan shipping service for antiretroviral medications, the Wuhan LGBT Center screened 2900 PLWH shipping addresses and cross-referenced 36 of them to quarantine sites or hospitals, suggesting possible COVID-19 cases. Through telephone calls and WeChat (social media) messaging, we conducted a survey after obtaining online informed consent. RESULTS: We had 12 HIV-infected respondents (10 men and 2 women) who also reported COVID-19. The median age was 36 years (interquartile range: 33.0-56.3), mean age 42.4 years, and range 25-66 years of age. Nine of 10 persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) presented with only mild COVID-19 symptoms. The 10th person on ART was a 56-year-old man who died at home early in the outbreak when health care services were overwhelmed. Two additional cases who had been in intensive care with acute COVID-19 were both men, aged 25 and 37 years; both were ART-naive until this hospitalization. Excluding the deceased man, 6 of 11 coinfected persons reported feeling depressed even after clinical improvements. CONCLUSION: Twelve coinfected persons were identified in Wuhan; 9 of 10 were on long-term ART and had favorable outcomes. Two men identified as having started ART only recently were found to have severe symptoms. Our case series suggests the value of ART for potential mitigation of COVID-19 coinfection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
8.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(1): 6-10, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preliminary data on SARS-CoV-2 infection suggest that some immunocompromised hosts experience worse outcomes. We performed a retrospective matched cohort study to characterize outcomes in HIV-positive patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: Leveraging data collected from electronic medical records for all patients hospitalized at NYU Langone Health with COVID-19 between March 2, 2020, and April 23, 2020, we matched 21 HIV-positive patients with 42 non-HIV patients using a greedy nearest-neighbor algorithm. Admission characteristics, laboratory test results, and hospital outcomes were recorded and compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS: Although there was a trend toward increased rates of intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality in HIV-positive patients, these differences were not statistically significant. Rates for these outcomes in our cohort are similar to those previously published for all patients hospitalized with COVID-19. HIV-positive patients had significantly higher admission and peak C-reactive protein values. Other inflammatory markers did not differ significantly between groups, although HIV-positive patients tended to have higher peak values during their clinical course. Three HIV-positive patients had superimposed bacterial pneumonia with positive sputum cultures, and all 3 patients died during hospitalization. There was no difference in frequency of thrombotic events or myocardial infarction between these groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that HIV coinfection does not significantly impact presentation, hospital course, or outcomes of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, when compared with matched non-HIV patients. A larger study is required to determine whether the trends we observed apply to all HIV-positive patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coinfection/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Care , Female , HIV Infections/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
10.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 1971-1974, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Oncological care has faced several challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, e.g. treatment delay and worsening symptoms. Patient-reported anxiety, depression and sleep quality might have changed due to these special circumstances. Therefore, we analyzed the symptom burden of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy at our center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was performed of 50 consecutive patients and the results were compared to those obtained in a previous pre-COVID study. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale was employed to assess the preradiotherapy symptoms. RESULTS: The highest mean scores were reported for pain in activity (3.2) and dry mouth (3.1). Regarding anxiety, sadness/depression and sleep, the corresponding scores were 1.5, 1.2 and 2.7, respectively. Compared to the previous study, no significant increases were found. Most items had numerically lower mean values, e.g. anxiety (1.5 vs. 2.7). Both study populations had comparable median age (70.5 vs. 70 years), gender distribution and proportion of patients with bone metastases. However, there were two significant imbalances, namely a lower proportion of patients with prostate cancer (12 vs. 30%, p=0.02) and breast cancer (0 vs. 12%, p=0.02). CONCLUSION: In patients who showed up for radiation treatment planning, the suspected increase in anxiety, sadness/depression and sleep disturbance was not demonstrable. It is not known whether or not patients with substantial worries chose to decline referral to palliative radiotherapy. Therefore, comprehensive large-scale studies of patterns of care are needed to fully understand the impact of COVID-19-related measures.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Cost of Illness , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Bone Neoplasms/epidemiology , Bone Neoplasms/secondary , Cancer Pain/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/epidemiology , Cancer Pain/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/pathology , Norway/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis , Symptom Assessment
11.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e929948, 2021 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), which manifests mainly as a respiratory condition, has become a global pandemic that causes coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Although the symptoms remain mild in most patients, the elderly and patients with previous comorbidities have higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Patients with liver cirrhosis, especially after decompensation, may be more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection due to systemic immune dysfunction. CASE REPORT The patient was a 51-year-old man who was hypertensive, an ex-alcoholic abstinent for 6 months, and a smoker. He was diagnosed with alcoholic liver cirrhosis in July 2019, and was using norfloxacin at home for secondary prophylaxis of bacterial peritonitis. He was also using furosemide and spironolactone to control ascites and propranolol for primary prophylaxis of esophageal varices. The patient entered our hospital in July 2020 with cough, dyspnea, runny nose, diarrhea, and fever. During hospitalization, we confirmed infection by COVID-19 and secondary nosocomial pulmonary infection. Chest tomography compatible with ground-glass standard was performed. The patient developed the need for auxiliary oxygen but without invasive mechanical ventilation. The patient received dexamethasone 6 mg/day and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy (he was started on cefepime but switched to meropenem). At the end of the 14-day isolation period, he was discharged with improved respiratory status. CONCLUSIONS Despite high mortality rates in patients with advanced cirrhosis who become infected with COVID-19, we report a case with a favorable outcome. Success has been achieved with the use of medications in studies of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the rapid detection of complications caused by the virus. Further studies in SARS-CoV-2 patients with chronic liver disease are needed.


Subject(s)
/diagnosis , Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic/complications , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Cough , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Diarrhea , Dyspnea , Fever , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Smokers
12.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 132, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166915

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic has created unique challenges to healthcare systems throughout the world. Ensuring subjects' safety is mandatory especially in oncology, in consideration of cancer patients' particular frailty. We examined the proportion of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) IgM and/or IgG positive subjects in three different groups from Istituto Nazionale Tumori - IRCCS "Fondazione G. Pascale" in Naples (Campania region, Italy): cancer patients treated with Innovative Immunotherapy (Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors, ICIs), cancer patients undergoing standard Chemotherapies (CHTs) and healthcare providers. 9 out of 287 (3.1%) ICIs patients resulted positive, with a significant lower percentage in respect to CHTs patients (39 positive subjects out of 598, 6.5%) (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference between ICIs cohort and healthcare providers, 48 out of 1050 resulting positive (4.6%). Performing a Propensity Score Matching based on gender and tumor stage, the effect of treatment on seropositivity was analyzed through a regression logistic model and the ICIs treatment resulted to be the only protective factor significantly (p = 0.03) associated with positivity (odds ratio-OR: 0.41; 95% confidence interval-CI 0.18-0.91). According to these preliminary data, ICIs would appear to be a protective factor against the onset of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , /immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Translational Medical Research
14.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e928837, 2021 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. To further reveal the pathologic associations between coronavirus and hypoxemia, we report the findings of 4 complete systematic autopsies of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-positive individuals who died of multiple organ failure caused by severe hypoxemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined the donated corpses of 4 deceased patients who had been diagnosed with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. A complete post-mortem examination was carried out on each corpse, and multiple organs were macroscopically examined. RESULTS The 4 corpses were 2 males and 2 females, with an average age of 69 years. Bilateral lungs showed various degrees of atrophy and consolidation, with diffusely tough and solid texture in the sections. A thromboembolism was found in the main pulmonary artery extending into the atrium in 1 corpse, and significant atherosclerotic plaques tagged in the inner wall of the aortic arch were found in 2 corpses. Two corpses were found to have slightly atrophied bilateral renal parenchyma. Atrophic changes in the spleen were found in 2 corpses. Notably, there were significantly expanded alveolar septa and prominent fibroblastic proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The laboratory data of these corpses showed a progressive decrease in blood oxygen saturation, followed by refractory and irreversible hypoxemia. Clinical and laboratory information and autopsy and histologic presentations of multiple organs showed insufficient air exchange due to abnormalities in the respiratory system, and reduced erythropoiesis in bone marrow may play a role.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , /virology , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/pathology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , /physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Cell Aggregation , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Mucus/metabolism , Myocardium/pathology , Necrosis , Pneumonia/complications , Thoracic Cavity/pathology
15.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 138, 2021 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spectrum of neurological involvement in COVID-19 is not thoroughly understood. To the best of our knowledge, no systematic review with meta-analysis and a sub-group comparison between severe and non-severe cases has been published. The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of neurological manifestations and complications, identify the neurodiagnostic findings, and compare these aspects between severe and non-severe COVID-19 cases. METHODS: A systematic search of PubMed, Scopus, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases was conducted for studies published between the 1st of January 2020 and 22nd of April 2020. In addition, we scanned the bibliography of included studies to identify other potentially eligible studies. The criteria for eligibility included studies published in English language (or translated to English), those involving patients with COVID-19 of all age groups, and reporting neurological findings. Data were extracted from eligible studies. Meta-analyses were conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled percentages and means with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the effect of individual studies on the summary estimate. A subgroup analysis was conducted according to severity. The main outcomes of the study were to identify the frequency and nature of neurological manifestations and complications, and the neuro-diagnostic findings in COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: 44 articles were included with a pooled sample size of 13,480 patients. The mean age was 50.3 years and 53% were males. The most common neurological manifestations were: Myalgia (22.2, 95% CI, 17.2 to 28.1%), taste impairment (19.6, 95% CI, 3.8 to 60.1%), smell impairment (18.3, 95% CI, 15.4 to 76.2%), headache (12.1, 95% CI, 9.1 to 15.8%), dizziness (11.3, 95% CI, 8.5 to 15.0%), and encephalopathy (9.4, 95% CI, 2.8 to 26.6%). Nearly 2.5% (95% CI, 1 to 6.1%) of patients had acute cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). Myalgia, elevated CK and LDH, and acute CVD were significantly more common in severe cases. Moreover, 20 case reports were assessed qualitatively, and their data presented separately. CONCLUSIONS: Neurological involvement is common in COVID-19 patients. Early recognition and vigilance of such involvement might impact their overall outcomes.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/complications , Humans
16.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 33(5): 695-700, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The data on clinical course and outcome of acute pancreatitis among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are sparse. In this study, we analyzed the clinical profiles of patients with COVID 19 and acute pancreatitis. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted on Research Patient Data Registry data which was pooled from five Mass General Brigham Healthcare Network hospitals. We extracted data on demographics, symptoms, ICU transfer, mechanical ventilation, laboratories' profiles, imaging findings, and patient outcomes. RESULT: Of 985 screened adult patients, 17 were eligible for the study, 9 (52.9%) were admitted primarily for respiratory failure and developed acute pancreatitis after a median of 22.5 days (13-76 days) from the onset of COVID-19 symptoms. On contrary, eight patients presented with typical symptoms and were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, the majority with mild severity (62.5%) on admission. Patients who were admitted primarily with severe COVID-19 illness were younger (median age 57 vs. 63 years), females (55.6 vs. 25%), of Hispanic ethnicity (55.6 vs. 25%), and obese (88.9 vs. 37.5%). The median peak lipase, C reactive protein, ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer were higher among patients who developed acute pancreatitis later during hospitalization. Patients who developed acute pancreatitis later also experienced higher episodes of necrotizing pancreatitis (11.1% vs. 0), thromboembolic complications (55.6 vs. 12.5%), and higher mortality (37.5 vs. 12.5%). CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis is not common among patients with COVID-19. Patients with COVID-19 who had acute pancreatitis on admission had more benign course and overall better outcome as compared to the patients who developed acute pancreatitis during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality , Pancreatitis/physiopathology , /physiopathology , Adult , African Americans , Age Distribution , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , /metabolism , European Continental Ancestry Group , Female , Ferritins/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hispanic Americans , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Length of Stay , Lipase/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pancreatitis/complications , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/metabolism , Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing/epidemiology , /metabolism , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Distribution , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
17.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In older people with psychoneurological diseases, COVID-19 infection may be associated with a risk of developing or exacerbating dysphagia. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between eating/swallowing function and COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Subjects were 44 inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 infection being treated for schizophrenia in a psychiatric ward. Eating function was assessed using the Food Intake Level Scale (FILS) before and after infection. We also evaluated age, comorbidities, COVID-19 hospital stay, obesity index, weight loss rate, and chlorpromazine equivalent. RESULTS: Subjects had a mean age of 68.86 years. Pre-infection, 20 subjects had a FILS score of 7-9 (presence of eating/swallowing disorder) and 24 subjects had a score of 10 (normal). Eating function after infection resolution showed decreasing FILS score compared to that before infection in 14 subjects (74.14 years). Six subjects (79.3 years) transitioned from oral feeding to parenteral feeding. A ≥ 10% weight loss during infection treatment was significantly associated with decreased eating function and a transition to parenteral feeding. Chlorpromazine equivalents, comorbidities, and number of days of hospitalization showed no associations with decreased eating function. CONCLUSIONS: Preventing malnutrition during treatment for COVID-19 infection is important for improving post-infection life prognosis and maintaining quality of life (QOL).


Subject(s)
/complications , Deglutition Disorders/etiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/etiology , Schizophrenia/complications , Weight Loss , Aged , /psychology , Deglutition Disorders/physiopathology , Deglutition Disorders/psychology , Eating/physiology , Eating/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/physiopathology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Status , Schizophrenia/virology
18.
J Trop Pediatr ; 67(1)2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159646

ABSTRACT

LAY SUMMARY: Clinical and laboratory parameters of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) mimic Kawasaki disease (KD). KD has been described in association with dengue, scrub typhus and leptospirosis. However, MIS-C with concomitant infection has rarely been reported in literature. A 14-year-old-girl presented with fever and rash with history of redness of eyes, lips and tongue. Investigations showed anemia, lymphopenia, thrombocytosis with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, pro-brain natriuretic peptide, Interleukin-6, ferritin and d-dimer. Scrub typhus immunoglobulin M was positive. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunoglobulin G (IgG) level was also elevated. A diagnosis of MIS-C with concomitant scrub typhus was proffered. Child received azithromycin, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone. After an afebrile period of 2.5 days, child developed unremitting fever and rash. Repeat investigations showed anemia, worsening lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, transaminitis, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperferritinemia and hypofibrinogenemia which were consistent with a diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). KD, MIS-C and MAS represent three distinct phenotypes of hyperinflammation seen in children during coronavirus disease pandemic. Several tropical infections may mimic or coexist with MIS-C which can be a diagnostic challenge for the treating physician. Identification of coexistence or differentiation between the two conditions is important in countries with high incidence of tropical infections to guide appropriate investigations and treatment.


Subject(s)
/complications , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/diagnosis , Scrub Typhus/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , /diagnosis , Child , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/complications , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/drug therapy , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/immunology , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Scrub Typhus/complications , Scrub Typhus/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e048391, 2021 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159364

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess medium-term organ impairment in symptomatic individuals following recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. DESIGN: Baseline findings from a prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Community-based individuals from two UK centres between 1 April and 14 September 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals ≥18 years with persistent symptoms following recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and age-matched healthy controls. INTERVENTION: Assessment of symptoms by standardised questionnaires (EQ-5D-5L, Dyspnoea-12) and organ-specific metrics by biochemical assessment and quantitative MRI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Severe post-COVID-19 syndrome defined as ongoing respiratory symptoms and/or moderate functional impairment in activities of daily living; single-organ and multiorgan impairment (heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, spleen) by consensus definitions at baseline investigation. RESULTS: 201 individuals (mean age 45, range 21-71 years, 71% female, 88% white, 32% healthcare workers) completed the baseline assessment (median of 141 days following SARS-CoV-2 infection, IQR 110-162). The study population was at low risk of COVID-19 mortality (obesity 20%, hypertension 7%, type 2 diabetes 2%, heart disease 5%), with only 19% hospitalised with COVID-19. 42% of individuals had 10 or more symptoms and 60% had severe post-COVID-19 syndrome. Fatigue (98%), muscle aches (87%), breathlessness (88%) and headaches (83%) were most frequently reported. Mild organ impairment was present in the heart (26%), lungs (11%), kidneys (4%), liver (28%), pancreas (40%) and spleen (4%), with single-organ and multiorgan impairment in 70% and 29%, respectively. Hospitalisation was associated with older age (p=0.001), non-white ethnicity (p=0.016), increased liver volume (p<0.0001), pancreatic inflammation (p<0.01), and fat accumulation in the liver (p<0.05) and pancreas (p<0.01). Severe post-COVID-19 syndrome was associated with radiological evidence of cardiac damage (myocarditis) (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In individuals at low risk of COVID-19 mortality with ongoing symptoms, 70% have impairment in one or more organs 4 months after initial COVID-19 symptoms, with implications for healthcare and public health, which have assumed low risk in young people with no comorbidities. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04369807; Pre-results.


Subject(s)
/complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Activities of Daily Living , Adult , Aged , /physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Community-Based Participatory Research , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
20.
A A Pract ; 15(4): e01432, 2021 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158241

ABSTRACT

The role of concurrent illness in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is unknown. Patients with leukemia may display altered thromboinflammatory responses. We report a 53-year-old man presenting with acute leukemia and COVID-19 who developed thrombotic complications and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Multiple analyses, including rotational thromboelastometry and flow cytometry on blood and bronchoalveolar lavage, are reported to characterize coagulation and immune profiles. The patient developed chemotherapy-induced neutropenia that may have protected his lungs from granulocyte-driven hyperinflammatory acute lung injury. However, neutropenia also alters viral clearing, potentially enabling ongoing viral propagation. This case depicts a precarious equilibrium between leukemia and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , /pathology , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/complications , Acute Lung Injury/diagnosis , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/diagnosis , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/complications , Neutropenia/diagnosis , Neutropenia/pathology , Thrombelastography , Virulence Factors
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