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1.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269484, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879324

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to capture Australian frontline healthcare workers' (HCWs) experiences with personal protective equipment (PPE) during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. This was a cross-sectional study using an online survey consisting of five domains: demographics; self-assessment of COVID risk; PPE access; PPE training and confidence; and anxiety. Participants were recruited from community and hospital healthcare settings in Australia, including doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, paramedics, and aged care and support staff. Data analysis was descriptive with free-text responses analysed using qualitative content analysis and multivariable analysis performed for predictors of confidence, bullying, staff furlough and anxiety. The 2258 respondents, comprised 80% women, 49% doctors and 40% nurses, based in hospital (39%) or community (57%) settings. Key findings indicated a lack of PPE training (20%), calls for fit testing, insufficient PPE (25%), reuse or extended use of PPE (47%); confusion about changing guidelines (48%) and workplace bullying over PPE (77%). An absence of in-person workplace PPE training was associated with lower confidence in using PPE (OR 0.21, 95%CI 0.12, 0.37) and a higher likelihood of workplace bullying (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.00, 2.03) perhaps reflecting deficiencies in workplace culture. Deficiencies in PPE availability, access and training linking to workplace bullying, can have negative physical and psychological impacts on a female dominant workforce critical to business as usual operations and pandemic response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Aged , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 527, 2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879224

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Latinos have had higher case counts, hospitalization rates and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic nationally and in the state of California. Meanwhile, Latino vaccination rates remain lower than those of non-Hispanic Whites. COVID-19 vaccine nonintent, defined as intent to not vaccinate against COVID-19, among Latino individuals continues to be an issue in the state of California. METHODS: Families from three Latino longitudinal mother-child cohorts previously recruited in the San Francisco Bay Area were surveyed telephonically from February to June 2021 to assess attitudes towards vaccination against COVID-19 and prior vaccination, in general, for themselves and their children. Risk for vaccine nonintent was assessed using the Mann-Whitney rank sum non-parametric test for continuous predictors and chi-squared tests for categorical ones. RESULTS: Three hundred and nineteen families were surveyed from the Telomere at Birth (TAB), Hispanic Eating and Nutrition (HEN) and Latino Eating and Diabetes Cohort (LEAD). Approximately 36% from TAB and 28% from HEN/LEAD indicated COVID-19 vaccine nonintent for themselves and/or their children. Risk factors for vaccine nonintent included lower maternal age (p = 0.01), concern about vaccine side effects (p < 0.01) and prior history of a household members being infected with SARS-CoV-2 (p < 0.01) and indexes of household crowding including number of people sharing a bathroom (p = 0.048). Vaccine intent was also associated with receiving vaccine input from friends (p = 0.03), family (p < 0.01) and/or coworkers (p = 0.02) compared with those who were not planning on getting vaccinated against COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Latino families living in crowded living situations who may not have received any COVID-19 advice from family, coworkers or friends are at particular risk for nonintent for vaccinatation against COVID-19. Community-based grassroots or promotor/a based interventions centered on trusted individuals with close community ties and counseling concerning vaccination against COVID-19 could help boost vaccination rates in this population group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Crowding , Family Characteristics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e053800, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879132

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While the secondary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the psychological well-being of pregnant women and parents has become apparent over the past year, the impact of these changes on early social interactions, physical growth and cognitive development of their infants is unknown, as is the way in which a range of COVID-19-related changes have mediated this impact. This study (CoCoPIP) will investigate: (1) how parent's experiences of the social, medical and financial changes during the pandemic have impacted prenatal and postnatal parental mental health and parent-infant social interaction; and (2) the extent to which these COVID-19-related changes in parental prenatal and postnatal mental health and social interaction are associated with fetal and infant development. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The CoCoPIP study is a national online survey initiated in July 2020. This ongoing study (n=1700 families currently enrolled as of 6 May 2021) involves both quantitative and qualitative data being collected across pregnancy and infancy. It is designed to identify the longitudinal impact of the pandemic from pregnancy to 2 years of age as assessed using a range of parent- and self-report measures, with the aim of identifying if stress-associated moderators (ie, loss of income, COVID-19 illness, access to ante/postnatal support) appear to impact parental mental health, and in turn, infant development. In addition, we aim to document individual differences in social and cognitive development in toddlers who were born during restrictions intended to mitigate COVID-19 spread (eg, social distancing, national lockdowns). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was given by the University of Cambridge, Psychology Research Ethics Committee (PRE.2020.077). Findings will be made available via community engagement, public forums (eg, social media,) and to national (eg, NHS England) and local (Cambridge Universities Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) healthcare partners. Results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviews journals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Infant , Longitudinal Studies , Mental Health , Pandemics , Parenting , Parents/psychology , Parturition , Pregnancy , Social Interaction
4.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(1): 30-35, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878846

ABSTRACT

For new families giving birth in a hospital setting, the COVID-19 pandemic has presented numerous challenges to their birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum experiences. We present experiences of three first-time, healthy mothers and their babies, as they gave birth in the hospital and were breastfeeding during the start of the pandemic in Philadelphia, PA. Each case is framed in the mother's prenatal goals, infant feeding intentions, birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum experiences. Shared concerns and experiences among the three participants are described in five key areas: 1) Recommendations changing every day, 2) Guilt, concern, and stress, 3) In-person versus telehealth visits, 4) Missing time with family and friends, and 5) Silver linings. Through these mothers' experiences, nurses and other health care providers can learn from their perceptions and events and proactively work to ensure we provide sound anticipatory guidance, enhance our communication, and improve provision of evidence-based lactation care and support.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Postnatal Care/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Labor, Obstetric , Pregnancy , Self Concept
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 411, 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all spheres of society including medical education and healthcare systems. In response to the pandemic, there has been a transition in medical education practice from traditional forms of teaching to online instruction delivery and virtual learning. Effective clinical microbiology education involves a combination of 'hands-on' practical learning and instructional delivery of scientific knowledge. Microbiology practical laboratories are critical learning environments offering 'hands-on' learning experiences that cannot be replicated through online learning. We conducted a mixed-methods study to understand the perception of online and face-to-face microbiology laboratory sessions among the medical students and microbiology faculty at Arabian Gulf University (AGU). METHODS: The study participants were third and fourth-year undergraduate medical students and faculty involved in delivering microbiology labs at AGU. The questionnaire consisted of questions ranging from perceived learning style to attitude towards online delivery of microbiology curriculum. After the questionnaire administration (google form), focus group discussion (FGD) was conducted for students and microbiology faculty separately. RESULTS: Among 168 students, 50.6% preferred face-to-face lab sessions as compared to 30.4% who preferred online labs, and 51.8% considered online labs to be an essential addition to face-to-face labs. Among the faculty, 85.7% preferred the face-to-face mode of teaching. All the faculty (100%) disagreed that all the microbiology labs teaching should be online. 57.2% considered online labs to be an essential addition to traditional face-to-face labs. Both faculty and students hold that a blended mode of instructional delivery is vital and indispensable for the transfer of skills and knowledge for microbiology students. CONCLUSION: The blended mode of delivering microbiology laboratory sessions in medical school is successful and well-received by both students and faculty. Students take the responsibility for furthering their own learning and understanding of concepts. Instructors have also noticed that blending learning strategies also successfully enhances the development of cognitive skills and problem-solving abilities in students. A review of the microbiology lab curriculum is necessary to identify content areas that can be delivered effectively through online, face-to-face lab sessions, or both, supported with appropriate tools and infrastructure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Faculty , Humans , Laboratories , Pandemics , Perception , Students, Medical/psychology , Universities
6.
Transl Psychiatry ; 12(1): 235, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878519

ABSTRACT

Mandatory quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic had substantial negative consequences on psychological health in the general population. Depression, anxiety, and insomnia were reported to increase the morbidity and mortality risk in cardiac patients after cardiac interventions. Nonetheless, a gap in the evidence appeared regarding the effects of COVID-19-related quarantine on psychological outcomes in patients after cardiac interventions. The present study aimed to longitudinally investigate the effects of quarantine on depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms in a group of patients who underwent cardiac intervention. Seventy-three patients admitted for cardiac rehabilitation completed a psychological assessment before and a reassessment after the quarantine and were included in the quarantine group. The control group included 76 patients who completed both evaluations before the quarantine. Depressive (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI-II), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory-II; BAI), and insomnia (Sleep Condition Indicator; SCI) symptoms were evaluated in both groups at one (assessment) and eight (reassessment) months after cardiac intervention. The statistical analyses revealed that at reassessment, the quarantine group showed higher global depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms than the control group and increased cognitive symptoms of depression. A higher presence of clinically relevant depressed patients was seen in the quarantine group. The present results showed that the COVID-19-related mandatory quarantine negatively affected psychological outcomes in patients after cardiac intervention, increasing the probability for these patients to be depressed. This, in turn, could influence patients' health in a critical period for morbidity and mortality risk. This underlines the priority of integrating and improving targeted mental health support as the pandemic continues, especially for cardiac patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
7.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 51(5): 283-291, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877049

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all populations, with frontline workers experiencing a higher risk of mental health effects compared to other groups. Although there are several research studies focusing on the mental health effects of the pandemic on healthcare workers, there is little research about its impact on workers in outsourced hospital essential services. This study aims to examine the prevalence and correlates of psychological distress and coronavirus anxiety among staff working in 3 outsourced hospital essential services-housekeeping, porter service and maintenance services. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among outsourced hospital essential services workers in a tertiary hospital. Data on demographics, medical history, lifestyle factors, psychosocial factors and mental well-being were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Robust logistic regression was used to determine risk factors associated with psychological distress and dysfunctional anxiety related to COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 246 hospital essential services workers participated in the study. The prevalence of psychological distress was 24.7%, and dysfunctional anxiety related to COVID-19 was 13.4%. Social support and workplace support were found to be independently associated with a lower risk of psychological distress, and social connectivity was associated with a lower risk of dysfunctional anxiety related to COVID-19. CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the crucial roles of communities and workplaces in combating the mental health consequences of the pandemic. Public health programmes that aim to tackle the emerging mental health crisis in hospital essential services workers should incorporate strategies to address psychosocial factors, in addition to traditional self-care approaches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
8.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(10): 3771-3786, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876426

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The two-year long epidemic situation around the world has resulted in an increasing number of people experiencing "pandemic fatigue". The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between a sense of self-efficacy and fatigue experienced in everyday life by nursing students in Poland, Spain and Slovakia during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted by the diagnostic survey method on a group of 756 nursing students of the first-cycle degree program, from 20 March to 15 May 2021, in the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin (Poland), as well as in Murcia University (Spain) and in the Catholic University in Ruzomberok (Slovakia). RESULTS: The sense of self-efficacy was significantly lower among the students in Poland than in those in Spain (p < 0.0001) and in Slovakia (p < 0.0001). Students in Slovakia showed symptoms of general, physical, cognitive and psychosocial fatigue much less frequently than those in Poland (p < 0.001) and Spain (p < 0.001). Especially students in Spain acutely felt physical health issues as a result of COVID-19 pandemic-imposed restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: A high level of a generalized sense of self-efficacy among the nursing students participating in the study was identified. However, it was significantly differentiated with respect to the country of residence. The fatigue severity experienced by the students during the COVID-19 pandemic was determined by a sense of self-efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Slovakia/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Students, Nursing/psychology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875635

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: This study aimed to investigate the motives and factors connected to suicidal behavior in 121 hospitalized patients with intentional self-harm (diagnosis X 60-81 according to the ICD-10); (2) Methods: Suicidal behavior of the patient was assessed from data obtained by psychiatric examinations and by the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Analysis of data to identify the patients' reason and motives behind suicidal behavior in a group of patients with a suicide attempt (SA, n = 80) and patients with Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious Behavior (NSSIB, n = 41) was carried out; (3) Results: Results showed that patients with affective disorder have a 19-times higher rate of SA against other diagnoses. Patients with personality disorders have a 32-times higher rate of NSSIB than patients with other diagnoses. Living alone and the absence of social support increased the likelihood of SA. Qualitative data analysis of patients' statements showed different themes in the justification of motives for suicidal behavior between SA and NSSIB cases. Significant differences were shown for non-communicated reasons, loneliness, social problems, extortion, and distress; (4) Conclusions: The evaluation of patients' verbal statements by qualitative analysis during the psychiatric examination should be considered in clinical practice. It should be considered to include self-poisoning in the criteria of the Non-suicidal Self-Injury diagnostic categories.


Subject(s)
Self-Injurious Behavior , Suicidal Ideation , Humans , Motivation , Personality Disorders , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Suicide, Attempted/psychology
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 871934, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875436

ABSTRACT

Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced the education system to undergo changes, which have also affected universities. E-learning became the main form of education, reducing interpersonal contacts, which could affect the mental wellbeing of students. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the level of perceived stress during e-learning among Polish students and to identify the factors for predicting higher levels of depression symptoms. Methods: The study included 753 participants with a mean age of 22.47 (±4.02) years. The Perception of Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) were used to measure the severity of stress and level of depression. Furthermore, our own survey was used to assess the impact of e-learning on various aspects of life. To examine how much stress can explain a statistically significant amount of variance in depression, three-step hierarchical multiple regression was used. In addition, our own questionnaire was used to assess the impact of e-learning on education, social contacts and technical abilities. Results: A total of 58% of the students characterized by an increased level of stress. 56% show symptoms of depression and 18% of the participants had suicidal thoughts. The most significant predictor of depression is high stress levels and factors related to e-learning: isolation from friends and acquaintances, negative impact on level of knowledge, reduced motivation to learn, and worsening grades. This predictors may explain about 66% of the variance of depression. Conclusion: Universities should implement interventions and educational programmes, providing ad hoc assistance in the form of individual or group meetings with a psychologist (also in a remote form) and organizing workshops and webinars on strategies for managing stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Young Adult
11.
Yonsei Med J ; 63(6): 499-510, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875397

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Globally, concerns have grown regarding the long-term effects of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection. Therefore, we evaluated the long-term course of persistent symptoms and patient quality of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective cohort study was conducted at a single tertiary university hospital from August 31, 2020 to March 29, 2021 with adult patients followed at 6 and 12 months after acute COVID-19 symptom onset or diagnosis. Clinical characteristics, self-reported symptoms, EuroQol 5 dimension 5 level (EQ5D-5L) index scores, Korean version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Korean version of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-5 (PCL-5-K), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) were investigated. Symptom persistent or non-persistent groups were defined according to persistency of COVID-19 related symptoms or signs after acute COVID-19 infection, respectively. RESULTS: Of all 235 patients, 170 (64.6%) patients were eligible for analysis. The median age was 51 (interquartile range, 37-61) years old, and 102 patients were female (60.0%). After 12 months from acute COVID-19 infection, in total, 83 (48.8%) patients still suffered from COVID-19-related symptoms. The most common symptoms included amnesia (24.1%), insomnia (14.7%), fatigue (13.5%), and anxiety (12.9%). Among the five EQ5D-5L categories, the average value of anxiety or depression was the most predominant. PHQ-9 and PCL-5-K scores were statistically higher in the COVID-19-related symptom persistent group than the non-persistent group (p=0.001). However, GAD-7 scores showed no statistical differences between the two groups (p=0.051). CONCLUSION: Neuropsychiatric symptoms were the major COVID-19-related symptoms after 12 months from acute COVID-19 infection, reducing quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life/psychology
12.
Work ; 72(1): 49-58, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has become a major cause of stress and anxiety at work. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the support provided to the employees by the workplaces about the depression, anxiety, stress, job satisfaction of the employees during the COVID-19. METHOD: The inclusion criterias were as follows: being between 18 and 65 years old, working at the time of the survey. The study self-administered included Depression-Anxiety-Stress Scale (DASS), Organizational Support Perception Scale, Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). RESULTS: In total, 260 people (mean age 38.17±14.9 years, 148 female) completed the survey. Extremely severe depression displayed on 39.9 %, extremely severe anxiety on 37.1%, and severe stress on 28.3% of the participants. Scores for depression (9.6±9.03), anxiety (7.2±7.04), stress (11.7±7.8) were also high for employees. It was observed that the average of organizational support score was 30.4±7.24, and the average job satisfaction score was 28.6±5.35. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between organizational support and job satisfaction (r = 0.562, p = 0.00). Considering the relationship between organizational support and DASS scale; there was negative correlation between (r =-0.161, p = 0.013). The results of the regression indicated that the model explained 32.9 % of the variance and that the model was a significant predictor, F (2,66)=117.145, p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Organizational support are associated with a decline in mental health and job satisfaction. Health-promotion strategies directed at adopting or maintaining positive job organizational support-related behaviors should be utilized to address increases in psychological distress during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Job Satisfaction , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology , Young Adult
13.
Work ; 72(1): 27-38, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875374

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety and concern are among the most common problems facing healthcare workers (HCWs) during epidemic diseases. OBJECTIVE: To identify the predictive factors of anxiety, fears, and psychological distress among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey method was used on a sample of 153 of HCWs; (110) frontline and (43) non-frontline HCWs. They answered on the Hamilton anxiety rating scale, the Kessler psychological distress scale (K10), and the COVID-19 Concerns Questionnaire. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that 47.05% of HCWs have a severe level of fear related to COVID-19, 43.13% have very severe anxiety, and 30.71% experience severe psychological distress. The differences between frontline and non-frontline HCWs, female and male HCWs, and HCWs working in medical clinics, on quarantine, or in another place were significant in the three scales. Predictive factors of anxiety, fear, and psychological distress include working on the front lines, being female, and being over 50 years old. Meanwhile, working in a workplace with COVID-19 patients predicted anxiety and psychological distress, but not fears associated with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: HCWs have a high prevalence of symptoms of mental disorders that may interfere with their work. These results may have therapeutic applications during pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Work ; 72(1): 19-26, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study is the second leg of a two-leg project. In the first leg, the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers (HCWs) was investigated in the period between the first case in Turkey and the arrival of the first case in the hospital. OBJECTIVE: In this second leg, three months after the first evaluation, we aimed to investigate whether psychological effects of COVID-19 such as stress, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality have been changed on HCWs. METHODS: This was a 3-month observational study. 169 hospital staff who participated in the first leg of the study were reached and asked to participate in the second leg evaluation in Gaziantep University Medical Faculty Hospital.110 HCWs accepted to participate. Impact of Event Scale (EIS-R), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were used to assess in both two legs. Paired Sample T-test was used for comparison of normally distributed variables. Wilcoxon test was used for the comparison of abnormally distributed variables. SPSS 22.0 software was used in the analysis of variables. RESULTS: Of the HCWs with an average age of 33.9±6.6 years, 59% (65) were males. There was no significant difference between the two legs in terms of IES-R, DASS-21, and PSQI scales. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on HCWs started with the pandemic, before the arrival of the first case in the hospital. Also, these psychological effects continued similarly without significant change after the initiation of direct contact with COVID-19 patients and even after the increase in COVID-19 patients in a hospital which in they work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 35(3): 593-596, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875334

ABSTRACT

Loneliness is the subjective feeling people experience when they feel less socially connected to others than they desire. Beyond the impact to mental health and well-being, loneliness is linked to detrimental health outcomes. During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing and isolation requirements likely exacerbated the prevalence of loneliness, which was reported by 1 in 5 American adults before the pandemic. Whether it be through in-person or virtual visits, primary care clinicians have tools and expertise to screen patients for loneliness, provide them supportive consultations, and refer persons with loneliness to helpful resources. As the societal changes from the pandemic continue to evolve, we recommend that primary care providers include loneliness screens as part of their standard workflow and consult with patients about effective interventions to reduce loneliness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , Social Isolation/psychology
16.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20210210, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875208

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to report the professional experience of a nurse manager facing the challenges of restructuring a hospital service in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: this is an experience report, based on the perspective of system resilience in a public hospital. RESULTS: the challenges faced were: internal service flow reorganization to assist suspected cases of COVID-19; institution of structural changes and adaptations, from entry into the emergency room to the wards and intensive care unit; equipment and supply acquisition for patient care with a focus on their quality and functionality; staff training, with the restructuring of work processes; staff sizing, considering the time of exposure to the virus; staff's professional qualification, absenteeism, stress, physical and psychological illness, with a view to safe and quality care; nursing staff leadership to deal with conflicts generated by professionals' stress and illness. CONCLUSION: healthcare service resilience is critical for hospital restructuring in the COVID-19 pandemic; however, patient care and healthcare professionals' physical and mental health must be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics
17.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 30: e3589, 2022.
Article in Portuguese, English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875201

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to analyze the relationship between the Burnout dimensions and the work resilience of intensive care Nursing professionals in the COVID-19 pandemic in four hospitals from southern Brazil. METHOD: this is a multicenter and cross-sectional study, composed of 153 nurses and nursing technicians of the Intensive Care Units. Sociodemographic, health and work-related questions were collected, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Resilience at Work Scale 20 instruments were applied. The data were submitted to descriptive analysis and to bivariate and partial correlations (network analysis). RESULTS: work resilience presented an inverse correlation to emotional exhaustion (r=-0.545; p=0.01) and depersonalization (r=-0.419; p=0.01) and a direct one to professional achievement (r=0.680; p=0.01). The variable with the greatest influence on the correlation network was the perception of the impact of the pandemic on mental health. CONCLUSION: resilience interferes in the emotional exhaustion and low professional achievement domains of Burnout. Emotional exhaustion is conducted through minor psychological disorders, with an impact on the workers' physical and mental health variables. The development of institutional resilience should be encouraged in order to moderate the illness.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
18.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269274, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the psychometric characteristics of the Spanish Post-COVID-19 Functional Status (PCFS) scale (web-based and paper-based forms) and the test-retest reliability of the web-based form. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study of 125 COVID-19 survivors. The test-retest reliability of the web-based form was assessed at 7 days after the first evaluation. We collected symptoms, functional status (PCFS scale), health-related quality of life (EuroQol-5D questionnaire, EQ-5D-5L), activities of daily living limitations [Barthel Index and Global Activity Limitation Index, GALI] and psychological state (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). RESULTS: The paper- and web-based forms of the Spanish PCFS scale showed adequate construct validity, and the web-based form provided substantial test-retest reliability (kappa = 0.63). The percentage of agreement between the web-based and paper-based forms was high (88%). Functional status showed a high correlation with EQ-5D-5L (inverse) and GALI (direct) (both; Rho ≥ .743), a moderate correlation with HADS (Rho ≥ .409) and a low correlation with the Barthel Index (Rho < .30). The Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistically significant differences in EQ-5D-5L, GALI and HADS according to the degree of functional status. CONCLUSION: The Spanish version of the PCFS scale (web-based and paper-based forms) showed adequate construct validity, and the web-based form provided substantial test-retest reliability in COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Activities of Daily Living , Cross-Sectional Studies , Functional Status , Humans , Internet , Quality of Life/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Survivors
19.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0264602, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875083

ABSTRACT

Empirical evidence on the social and psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the workplace and the resulting consequences for the mental health of employees is lacking. As a result, research on this subject is urgently needed to develop appropriate countermeasures. This study builds on Person-Environment fit theory to investigate social connections at work and mental health during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyses employees' needs for social connections and how social connections affect different mental health measures. Data were collected in May 2020 in an online survey of employees across Germany and analysed using response surface analysis. Mental health was measured as positive mental health and mental health disorders. Social connections were measured as social support and social interactions. 507 employees participated in the survey and more than one third reported having less social support and social interaction at work than they desired (p < .001). This was associated with a decrease in mental health. In contrast, having more than the desired amount of social support was associated with a decrease, and having more than the desired amount of social interaction with an increase, in mental health. This study provides important early evidence on the impact of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the workplace. With it, we aim to stimulate further research in the field and provide early evidence on the potential mental health consequences of social distancing-while also opening avenues to combat them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Workplace/psychology
20.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1104, 2022 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Informal care is vital to many people with severe mental illness under normal circumstances. Little is known about how extraordinary circumstances affect relatives with a family member with mental illness. This study investigated the consequences of the first COVID-19 lockdown in Norway from the perspective of relatives of persons with psychotic- and/or bipolar disorders: What were the challenges and for whom? METHOD: Relatives were invited to complete an online survey shortly after the first lockdown was initiated. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected concerning experiences of relatives' own and their affected family members' health and situation. Two hundred and seventy-nine relatives completed the survey, mostly mothers and partners. RESULTS: One-third of the relatives reported considerable deterioration in their family members' mental health, and a substantial minority worried about severe self-harm or suicide. Main themes in the qualitative analyses were "Isolation and its effects on mental health", "Worrying about the pandemic and its consequences", "Increased symptomatology" and "Suicide". Being a relative during the lockdown put heavy strain on the relatives' own health, in particular disturbance of sleep, concentration, and the ability to take care of others in the family. Relatives of family members with psychotic bipolar disorder, not currently in treatment, or living with their family experienced the situation especially challenging. CONCLUSIONS: Many relatives found the first lockdown hard for their family. Efforts to integrate relatives' perspectives in health care and contingency plans under normal circumstances could potentially alleviate some of the extra burden experienced by families during extraordinary circumstances.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Family/psychology , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology
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