Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 112
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(52): e28334, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594572

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, research indicates that the COVID-19 disease susceptibility varies among individuals depending on their ABO blood groups. Researchers globally commenced investigating potential methods to stratify cases according to prognosis depending on several clinical parameters. Since there is evidence of a link between ABO blood groups and disease susceptibility, it could be argued that there is a link between blood groups and disease manifestation and progression. The current study investigates whether clinical manifestation, laboratory, and imaging findings vary among ABO blood groups of hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients.This retrospective cohort study was conducted between March 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021 in King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre Riyadh and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Demographic information, clinical information, laboratory findings, and imaging investigations were extracted from the data warehouse for all confirmed COVID-19 patients.A total of 285 admitted patients were included in the study. Of these, 81 (28.4%) were blood group A, 43 (15.1%) were blood group B, 11 (3.9%) were blood group AB, and 150 (52.6%) were blood group O. This was almost consistent with the distribution of blood groups among the Saudi Arabia community. The majority of the study participants (79.6% [n = 227]) were asymptomatic. The upper respiratory tract infection (P = .014) and shortness of breath showed statistically significant differences between the ABO blood group (P = .009). Moreover, the incidence of the symptoms was highly observed in blood group O followed by A then B except for pharyngeal exudate observed in blood group A. The one-way ANOVA test indicated that among the studied hematological parameters, glucose (P = .004), absolute lymphocyte count (P = .001), and IgA (P = .036) showed statistically significant differences between the means of the ABO blood group. The differences in both X-ray and computed tomography scan findings were statistically nonsignificant among the ABO age group. Only 86 (30.3%) patients were admitted to an intensive care unit, and the majority of them were blood groups O 28.7% (n = 43) and A 37.0% (n = 30). However, the differences in complications' outcomes were statistically nonsignificant among the ABO age group.ABO blood groups among hospitalized COVID-19 patients are not associated with clinical, hematological, radiological, and complications abnormality.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , Disease Susceptibility , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
2.
Virulence ; 13(1): 30-45, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585280

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread throughout the world. To eradicate it, it is crucial to acquire a strong and long-lasting anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity, by either natural infection or vaccination. We collected blood samples 12-305 days after positive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) from 35 recovered individuals infected by SARS-CoV-2. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with SARS-CoV-2-derived peptide pools, such as the spike (S), nucleocapsid (N) and membrane (M) proteins, and we quantified anti-S immunoglobulins in plasma. After 10 months post-infection, we observed a sustained SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T-cell response directed against M-protein, but responses against S- or N-proteins were lost over time. Besides, we demonstrated that O-group individuals presented significantly lower frequencies of specific CD4+ T-cell responses against Pep-M than non O-group individuals. The non O-group subjects also needed longer to clear the virus, and they lost cellular immune responses over time, compared to the O-group individuals, who showed a persistent specific immune response against SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, the S-specific immune response was lost over time, and individual factors might determine the sustainability of the body's defenses, which must be considered in the future design of vaccines to achieve continuous anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Vox Sang ; 116(7): 766-773, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: ABO blood group may affect risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or severity of COVID-19. We sought to determine whether IgG, IgA and neutralizing antibody (nAb) to SARS-CoV-2 vary by ABO blood group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Among eligible convalescent plasma donors, ABO blood group was determined via agglutination of reagent A1 and B cells, IgA and IgG were quantified using the Euroimmun anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA, and nAb titres were quantified using a microneutralization assay. Differences in titre distribution were examined by ABO blood group using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis tests. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) of high nAb titre (≥1:160) were estimated by blood group using multivariable modified Poisson regression models that adjusted for age, sex, hospitalization status and time since SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 202 potential donors, 65 (32%) were blood group A, 39 (19%) were group B, 13 (6%) were group AB, and 85 (42%) were group O. Distribution of nAb titres significantly differed by ABO blood group, whereas there were no significant differences in anti-spike IgA or anti-spike IgG titres by ABO blood group. There were significantly more individuals with high nAb titre (≥1:160) among those with blood group B, compared with group O (aPR = 1·9 [95%CI = 1·1-3·3], P = 0·029). Fewer individuals had a high nAb titre among those with blood group A, compared with group B (aPR = 0·6 [95%CI = 0·4-1·0], P = 0·053). CONCLUSION: Eligible CCP donors with blood group B may have relatively higher neutralizing antibody titres. Additional studies evaluating ABO blood groups and antibody titres that incorporate COVID-19 severity are needed.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , Blood Donors , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261432, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571995

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the ongoing pandemic with multitude of manifestations and association of ABO blood group in South-East Asian population needs to be explored. METHODS: It was a retrospective study of patients with COVID-19. Blood group A, B, O, and AB were identified in every participant, irrespective of their RH type and allotted groups 1, 2,3, and 4, respectively. Correlation between blood group and lab parameters was presented as histogram distributed among the four groups. Multivariate regression and logistic regression were used for inferential statistics. RESULTS: The cohort included 1067 patients: 521 (48.8%) participants had blood group O as the prevalent blood type. Overall, 10.6% COVID-19-related mortality was observed at our center. Mortality was 13.9% in blood group A, 9.5% in group B, 10% in group C, and 10.2% in AB blood group (p = 0.412). IL-6 was elevated in blood group A (median [IQR]: 23.6 [17.5,43.8]), Procalcitonin in blood group B (median [IQR]: 0.54 [0.3,0.7]), D-dimers and CRP in group AB (median [IQR]: 21.5 [9,34]; 24 [9,49], respectively). Regarding severity of COVID-19 disease, no statistical difference was seen between the blood groups. Alteration of the acute phase reactants was not positively associated with any specific blood type. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, this investigation did not show significant association of blood groups with severity and of COVID-19 disease and COVID-19-associated mortality.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Adult , Aged , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Patient Acuity , Procalcitonin/blood , Retrospective Studies
5.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 767771, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526762

ABSTRACT

Background: ABO and Rh blood group systems are associated with many diseases including cancerous, infectious, non-infectious, bacterial and viral diseases. Studies have shown association of blood groups A and O with higher and lower odds for coronavirus disease 2019 positivity, respectively. Methods: This is a single-center, retrospective study conducted at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Delhi. We investigated the association of ABO and Rh blood groups with susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 infection, severity of disease, recovery period, and mortality of patients. Patients were enrolled from April 8, 2020 to October 4, 2020. A total of 2,586 real-time PCR (RT-PCR)-confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients were recruited. Data was analyzed using chi-square test, odds ratio, and Mann-Whitney test to determine the association of blood groups. Results: In the 2,586 COVID-19-infected patients, the frequencies of A, B, O, and AB were 29.93%, 41.80%, 21.19%, and 7.98%, respectively. Of the patients, 98.07% were Rh positive. Blood group A (odds ratio, 1.53; CI, 1.40-1.66; p < 0.001) and B (odds ratio, 1.15; CI, 1.06-1.24; p < 0.001) is observed to be significantly associated with COVID-19 susceptibility, whereas blood group O (odds ratio, 0.65; CI, 0.59-0.71; p < 0.001) and AB (odds ratio, 0.66; CI, 0.59-0.71; p < 0.001) have low risk of COVID-19 infection. Conclusion: A, B, and Rh+ are found to be more susceptible to COVID-19 infection, whereas blood groups O, AB, and Rh- are at a lower risk of COVID-19 infection. No association was found between blood groups and susceptibility to severity of disease and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Hospitals , Humans , India/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
JAMA ; 326(17): 1690-1702, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525402

ABSTRACT

Importance: The evidence for benefit of convalescent plasma for critically ill patients with COVID-19 is inconclusive. Objective: To determine whether convalescent plasma would improve outcomes for critically ill adults with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: The ongoing Randomized, Embedded, Multifactorial, Adaptive Platform Trial for Community-Acquired Pneumonia (REMAP-CAP) enrolled and randomized 4763 adults with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 between March 9, 2020, and January 18, 2021, within at least 1 domain; 2011 critically ill adults were randomized to open-label interventions in the immunoglobulin domain at 129 sites in 4 countries. Follow-up ended on April 19, 2021. Interventions: The immunoglobulin domain randomized participants to receive 2 units of high-titer, ABO-compatible convalescent plasma (total volume of 550 mL ± 150 mL) within 48 hours of randomization (n = 1084) or no convalescent plasma (n = 916). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary ordinal end point was organ support-free days (days alive and free of intensive care unit-based organ support) up to day 21 (range, -1 to 21 days; patients who died were assigned -1 day). The primary analysis was an adjusted bayesian cumulative logistic model. Superiority was defined as the posterior probability of an odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 (threshold for trial conclusion of superiority >99%). Futility was defined as the posterior probability of an OR less than 1.2 (threshold for trial conclusion of futility >95%). An OR greater than 1 represented improved survival, more organ support-free days, or both. The prespecified secondary outcomes included in-hospital survival; 28-day survival; 90-day survival; respiratory support-free days; cardiovascular support-free days; progression to invasive mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal mechanical oxygenation, or death; intensive care unit length of stay; hospital length of stay; World Health Organization ordinal scale score at day 14; venous thromboembolic events at 90 days; and serious adverse events. Results: Among the 2011 participants who were randomized (median age, 61 [IQR, 52 to 70] years and 645/1998 [32.3%] women), 1990 (99%) completed the trial. The convalescent plasma intervention was stopped after the prespecified criterion for futility was met. The median number of organ support-free days was 0 (IQR, -1 to 16) in the convalescent plasma group and 3 (IQR, -1 to 16) in the no convalescent plasma group. The in-hospital mortality rate was 37.3% (401/1075) for the convalescent plasma group and 38.4% (347/904) for the no convalescent plasma group and the median number of days alive and free of organ support was 14 (IQR, 3 to 18) and 14 (IQR, 7 to 18), respectively. The median-adjusted OR was 0.97 (95% credible interval, 0.83 to 1.15) and the posterior probability of futility (OR <1.2) was 99.4% for the convalescent plasma group compared with the no convalescent plasma group. The treatment effects were consistent across the primary outcome and the 11 secondary outcomes. Serious adverse events were reported in 3.0% (32/1075) of participants in the convalescent plasma group and in 1.3% (12/905) of participants in the no convalescent plasma group. Conclusions and Relevance: Among critically ill adults with confirmed COVID-19, treatment with 2 units of high-titer, ABO-compatible convalescent plasma had a low likelihood of providing improvement in the number of organ support-free days. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02735707.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , ABO Blood-Group System , Adult , Aged , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Length of Stay , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Failure , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 726283, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497074

ABSTRACT

Severe status of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is extremely associated to cytokine release. Moreover, it has been suggested that blood group is also associated with the prevalence and severity of this disease. However, the relationship between the cytokine profile and blood group remains unclear in COVID-19 patients. In this sense, we prospectively recruited 108 COVID-19 patients between March and April 2020 and divided according to ABO blood group. For the analysis of 45 cytokines, plasma samples were collected in the time of admission to hospital ward or intensive care unit and at the sixth day after hospital admission. The results show that there was a risk of more than two times lower of mechanical ventilation or death in patients with blood group O (log rank: p = 0.042). At first time, all statistically significant cytokine levels, except from hepatocyte growth factor, were higher in O blood group patients meanwhile the second time showed a significant drop, between 20% and 40%. In contrast, A/B/AB group presented a maintenance of cytokine levels during time. Hepatocyte growth factor showed a significant association with intubation or mortality risk in non-O blood group patients (OR: 4.229, 95% CI (2.064-8.665), p < 0.001) and also was the only one bad prognosis biomarker in O blood group patients (OR: 8.852, 95% CI (1.540-50.878), p = 0.015). Therefore, higher cytokine levels in O blood group are associated with a better outcome than A/B/AB group in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , ABO Blood-Group System , Aged , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Disease Progression , Female , Hepatocyte Growth Factor/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(30): e26738, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475910

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study assessed the proportion of ABO blood groups and clinical characteristics among Saudi patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Jazan, Saudi Arabia.This retrospective cohort study included 404 Saudi adults with COVID-19, confirmed by the real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The participants were selected randomly between July 1, 2020, and July 31, 2020, from the Health Electronic Surveillance Network system, which contains the primary data on COVID-19 infections in Jazan.Blood type O (62.4%) represented the highest proportion in COVID-19 Saudi patients followed by the other blood groups which distributed as follows: blood type A (25.5%), blood type B (10.1%), and blood type AB (2%). Men, and people aged 18-44 years, represented the higher percentage than women and those of a younger age. The majority of the patients with COVID-19 had clinical symptoms (88.4%), and the remainder (11.6%) were asymptomatic. Ninety four percent of the patients had mild COVID-19 symptoms and self-isolated at home. Only 6.4% of the cases were severe and admitted to hospital. There was no significant association between a specific ABO blood group and COVID-19 clinical symptoms (P = .950), incubation period (P = .780), disease duration (P = .430), and disease severity (P = .340). Old age and diabetes were the significant predictors of COVID-19 severity and hospital admission (P = .010).Blood group O represented the highest proportion of COVID-19 Saudi patients as it is the most common blood group in Saudi individuals in Jazan. However, no specific blood group was associated with COVID-19 severity and hospital admission. Old age and diabetes mellitus were shown to be significant predictors of severe COVID-19 and hospital admission.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Incubation Period , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Saudi Arabia , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Young Adult
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438602

ABSTRACT

After a COVID-19 outbreak in the Falles festival of Borriana (Spain) during March 2020, a cohort of patients were followed until October 2020 to estimate complications post-COVID-19, considering ABO blood groups (ABO). From 536 laboratory-confirmed cases, 483 completed the study (90.1%) carried by the Public Health Center of Castelló and the Emergency and Microbiology and Clinical Analysis of Hospital de la Plana Vila-real. The study included ABO determination and telephone interviews of patients. The participants had a mean age of 37.2 ± 17.1 years, 300 females (62.1%). ABO were O (41.4%), A (45.5%), B (9.1%), and AB (3.9%). We found no difference in the incidence of COVID-19 infections. A total of 159 (32.9%) patients reported one or more post-COVID-19 complications with divergent incidences after adjustment: O (32.3%), A (32.6%), B (54.1%), and AB (27.6%); B groups had more complications post-COVID-19 when compared with O group (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.68, 95% CI 1.24-2.27), and symptoms of fatigue (1.79, 95% CI 1.08-2.95), myalgia (2.06, 95% CI 1.10-3.84), headache (2.61, 95% CI 1.58-4.31), and disorder of vision (4.26 95% CI 1.33-13.60). In conclusion, we observed significant differences in post-COVID-19 complications by ABO, with a higher incidence in B group. Additional research is justified to confirm our results.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19 , Adult , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
10.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 344, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428800

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has resulted in considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. COVID-19 incidence, severity, and mortality rates differ greatly between populations, genders, ABO blood groups, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes, ethnic groups, and geographic backgrounds. This highly heterogeneous SARS-CoV-2 infection is multifactorial. Host genetic factors such as variants in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE), the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2), the transmembrane protease serine 2 gene (TMPRSS2), along with HLA genotype, and ABO blood group help to explain individual susceptibility, severity, and outcomes of COVID-19. This review is focused on COVID-19 clinical and viral characteristics, pathogenesis, and genetic findings, with particular attention on genetic diversity and variants. The human genetic basis could provide scientific bases for disease prediction and targeted therapy to address the COVID-19 scourge.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Genotype , HLA Antigens/genetics , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
11.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 107, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, the pandemic disease caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2, may take highly variable clinical courses, ranging from symptom-free and pauci-symptomatic to fatal disease. The goal of the current study was to assess the association of COVID-19 clinical courses controlled by patients' adaptive immune responses without progression to severe disease with patients' Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genetics, AB0 blood group antigens, and the presence or absence of near-loss-of-function delta 32 deletion mutant of the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5). PATIENT AND METHODS: An exploratory observational study including 157 adult COVID-19 convalescent patients was performed with a median follow-up of 250 days. The impact of different HLA genotypes, AB0 blood group antigens, and the CCR5 mutant CD195 were investigated for their role in the clinical course of COVID-19. In addition, this study addressed levels of severity and morbidity of COVID-19. The association of the immunogenetic background parameters were further related to patients' humoral antiviral immune response patterns by longitudinal observation. RESULTS: Univariate HLA analyses identified putatively protective HLA alleles (HLA class II DRB1*01:01 and HLA class I B*35:01, with a trend for DRB1*03:01). They were associated with reduced durations of disease instead decreased (rather than increased) total anti-S IgG levels. They had a higher virus neutralizing capacity compared to non-carriers. Conversely, analyses also identified HLA alleles (HLA class II DQB1*03:02 und HLA class I B*15:01) not associated with such benefit in the patient cohort of this study. Hierarchical testing by Cox regression analyses confirmed the significance of the protective effect of the HLA alleles identified (when assessed in composite) in terms of disease duration, whereas AB0 blood group antigen heterozygosity was found to be significantly associated with disease severity (rather than duration) in our cohort. A suggestive association of a heterozygous CCR5 delta 32 mutation status with prolonged disease duration was implied by univariate analyses but could not be confirmed by hierarchical multivariate testing. CONCLUSION: The current study shows that the presence of HLA class II DRB1*01:01 and HLA class I B*35:01 is of even stronger association with reduced disease duration in mild and moderate COVID-19 than age or any other potential risk factor assessed. Prospective studies in larger patient populations also including novel SARS-CoV-2 variants will be required to assess the impact of HLA genetics on the capacity of mounting protective vaccination responses in the future.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , COVID-19/etiology , HLA Antigens/genetics , Receptors, CCR5/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Mutation , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Vox Sang ; 116(8): 910-915, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Reports on the association of the ABO phenotypes with infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus have mostly come from countries with high infection rates. This study examined the possible association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the ABO phenotype in Black Africa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This report is from a single centre where both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients were quarantined. At the time of this report, Oyo State, Nigeria had carried out 15 733 tests of which 3119 were positive for the virus with 1952 recoveries and 37 deaths. The ABO distribution of patients was compared with that of a blood donor population. RESULTS: Of the 302 participants, 297 (98%) had their blood group determined, asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals were 123 (40·7%) and 179 (59·3%) respectively. Blood group O was significantly less represented among the patients (P < 0·01) while blood groups B and AB were significantly more represented (P < 0·01, P = 0·03 respectively). Patients with anti-B (groups A and O) were significantly less represented than those without anti-B (B and/or AB): B and AB (P < 0·001), B (P = 0·002), AB (P = 0·01). There was no difference in the blood group distribution of symptomatic and asymptomatic patients (χ2 (3, N = 302) = 2·29; P = 0·51), but symptomatic patients with anti-A (groups B and O) were more represented than asymptomatic patients with anti-A (χ2 4·89; P = 0·03). CONCLUSION: The higher prevalence of blood group O and more potent beta haemolysins (anti-B antibodies) are likely reasons for the lower infectivity by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and severity of COVID-19 disease in the community.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19 , Blood Donors , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Vox Sang ; 116(8): 849-861, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402984

ABSTRACT

Growing evidence suggests that ABO blood group may play a role in the immunopathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, with group O individuals less likely to test positive and group A conferring a higher susceptibility to infection and propensity to severe disease. The level of evidence supporting an association between ABO type and SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 ranges from small observational studies, to genome-wide-association-analyses and country-level meta-regression analyses. ABO blood group antigens are oligosaccharides expressed on red cells and other tissues (notably endothelium). There are several hypotheses to explain the differences in SARS-CoV-2 infection by ABO type. For example, anti-A and/or anti-B antibodies (e.g. present in group O individuals) could bind to corresponding antigens on the viral envelope and contribute to viral neutralization, thereby preventing target cell infection. The SARS-CoV-2 virus and SARS-CoV spike (S) proteins may be bound by anti-A isoagglutinins (e.g. present in group O and group B individuals), which may block interactions between virus and angiotensin-converting-enzyme-2-receptor, thereby preventing entry into lung epithelial cells. ABO type-associated variations in angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 activity and levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII could also influence adverse outcomes, notably in group A individuals who express high VWF levels. In conclusion, group O may be associated with a lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and group A may be associated with a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection along with severe disease. However, prospective and mechanistic studies are needed to verify several of the proposed associations. Based on the strength of available studies, there are insufficient data for guiding policy in this regard.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19 , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Blood Grouping and Crossmatching , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 157(5): e281, 2021 09 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397562
18.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256441, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376626

ABSTRACT

ABO blood types could be a biological predisposition for depression. The present cross-sectional analysis was conducted amid the second wave of COVID-19 in Japan during July 2020. We wanted to investigate the association between ABO blood types and depressive symptoms among workers (352 men and 864 women, aged 21-73 years) of a medical institution in Tokyo, Japan, which took a leading role in the response to COVID-19 in the country. A Poisson regression model with a robust variance estimator was used to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for depressive symptoms associated with ABO blood types. Overall, the prevalence of depressive symptoms (using two questions employed from a Two-question case-finding instrument) was 22.0%. The adjusted PRs (95% CI) for depressive symptoms, comparing the carriers of blood type O, A, and AB with those of type B, were 0.88 (0.66, 1.18), 0.81 (0.62, 1.07), and 1.07 (0.74, 1.53), respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of depressive symptoms between non-B and B carriers. The present study did not support the association of ABO blood types with depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/diagnosis , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Susceptibility/blood , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
19.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 179-182, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351695

ABSTRACT

It is not known whether non-ABO antibodies confer any protective effect against SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19 severe illness alone or in conjunction with O blood group. This cohort study included 413 576 persons in Ontario, Canada with known ABO blood group and non-ABO antibody screen status, who subsequently underwent SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA polymerase chain reaction testing between January and November 2020. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19 severe illness was not associated with the presence of non-ABO antibodies, even among persons with O blood group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ABO Blood-Group System , Antibodies, Viral , Cohort Studies , Humans , Ontario , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Pak J Biol Sci ; 24(7): 815-820, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346602

ABSTRACT

<b>Background and Objective:</b> Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread throughout the world. Several studies have indicated that ABO blood group polymorphism could be connected to COVID-19 vulnerability and clinical outcomes, nevertheless, the findings are debatable. The aim of this study was to determine the most blood groups susceptible for COVID-19 infection among Sudanese patients suffering from different chronic diseases. <b>Materials and Methods:</b> The research included 200 participants. A total of 100 samples were collected as a case study from patients who had been found to have COVID-19 and a total of 100 samples were collected as a control from non-COVID-19 patients. The data was then gathered using a formal interview questionnaire and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). <b>Results:</b> A total of 200 individuals were involved 100 of them was Patients and 100 were control. 51.4% were female and 48.6% were male. Current study revealed statistically significant difference between cases and controls. Blood group distribution was O positive as 59 (42.1%) followed by A Positive as 36 (25.7%), B positive 16 (11.4%), AB was 9 (6.4%) and only one (0.7%) was AB negative. In this study, the most common of other disease of COVID-19 patients were Asthma (6%), stomach ulcer (1%), renal failure (10%), diabetes (12%), hypertension (24%), vein thrombosis (1%), thrombosis (1%), heart disease (2%) and sinusitis (1%). <b>Conclusion:</b> There is a relation between ABO blood grouping and COVID-19 virus infection. The blood group distribution was O positive at 59 (42.1%), A positive at 36 (25.7%), B positive at 16 (11.4%), AB positive at 9 (6.4%) and AB negative at one (0.7 %). Blood group AB is the least likely to be infected with the COVID-19 virus, although blood group O Positive is the most likely.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Chronic Disease , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sudan
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...