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2.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e92, 2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169347

ABSTRACT

Case identification is an ongoing issue for the COVID-19 epidemic, in particular for outpatient care where physicians must decide which patients to prioritise for further testing. This paper reports tools to classify patients based on symptom profiles based on 236 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 positive cases and 564 controls, accounting for the time course of illness using generalised multivariate logistic regression. Significant symptoms included abdominal pain, cough, diarrhoea, fever, headache, muscle ache, runny nose, sore throat, temperature between 37.5 and 37.9 °C and temperature above 38 °C, but their importance varied by day of illness at assessment. With a high percentile threshold for specificity at 0.95, the baseline model had reasonable sensitivity at 0.67. To further evaluate accuracy of model predictions, leave-one-out cross-validation confirmed high classification accuracy with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.92. For the baseline model, sensitivity decreased to 0.56. External validation datasets reported similar result. Our study provides a tool to discern COVID-19 patients from controls using symptoms and day from illness onset with good predictive performance. It could be considered as a framework to complement laboratory testing in order to differentiate COVID-19 from other patients presenting with acute symptoms in outpatient care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Clinical Decision Rules , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Myalgia/physiopathology , Odds Ratio , Patient Selection , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Rhinorrhea/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 391-398, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168263

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the demographic and clinical characteristics, underlying comorbidities, and outcomes of children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we reported 62 pediatric patients (age <14 years) with confirmed COVID-19 between March 2 and July 1, 2020, at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. RESULTS: Comorbid conditions, including cardiac, neurological, respiratory, and malignant disorders, were reported in 9 patients (14.5%). The most prominent presenting complaints were fever (80.6%) and cough (48.4%). Most of our patients (80.6%) had mild disease, 11.3% had moderate disease, and 8.1% exhibited severe and critical illness. Twenty-one patients (33.9%) were hospitalized, with 4 patients (6.5%) admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, and 3 (4.8%) patients died. CONCLUSION: All pediatric age groups are susceptible to COVID-19, with no gender difference. COVID-19 infection may result in critical illness and even mortality in subsets of pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Asthma/epidemiology , Atrophy , Brain/pathology , Bronchiolitis Obliterans/epidemiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydrocephalus/epidemiology , Infant , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Rhinorrhea/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/physiopathology
5.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 33(5): 691-694, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is typically associated with a respiratory syndrome, but gastrointestinal symptoms have been described in early reports from China. However, data from European centres are scarce. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to characterise the gastrointestinal manifestations of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their disease course. METHODS: Patients admitted at our centre between March and April 2020 with diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. Asymptomatic patients or those without symptom information were excluded. Clinical features, laboratory data and disease severity (mechanical ventilation, intensive care admission or death) were analysed. RESULTS: Two-hundred one patients were included (median age 71 years; 56.2% male). Digestive symptoms were reported by 60 (29.9%) patients during the disease course, being part of the disease presentation in 34 (16.9%). The most frequent were diarrhoea in 36 patients (17.9%). Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms were younger (P = 0.032), had higher haemoglobin levels (P = 0.002) and lower C-reactive protein (P = 0.045) and potassium levels (P = 0.004). Patients with digestive symptoms had less severe disease (28.3 vs. 44.0%; P = 0.038). Regarding liver damage, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was elevated in 65.2% of patients and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in 62.7%, but these patients did not present a more severe disease (elevated AST P = 0.062; elevated ALT P = 0.276). CONCLUSION: A significant portion of COVID-19 patients have digestive symptoms, mostly at presentation. This should be taken into account in order to keep a high level of suspicion to reach an early diagnosis and setup infection control measures to control the transmission rate. This subgroup of patients appears to have a less severe disease course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/metabolism , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/metabolism , Ageusia/physiopathology , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/metabolism , Female , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/metabolism , Nausea/physiopathology , Portugal/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/metabolism , Young Adult
6.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 171, 2021 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of this century has overwhelmed the healthcare systems of affected countries, and all resources have been diverted to coronavirus disease 2019. At the onset, coronavirus disease 2019 can present as any other acute febrile undifferentiated illness. In tropical regions, clinicians are increasingly challenged to differentiate these febrile illnesses without the use of diagnostics. With this pandemic, many of these tropical diseases are neglected and go underreported. Dengue is holoendemic in the Maldives, and dengue viruses circulate throughout the year. Reports about coinfections with dengue virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 are scarce, and the outcome and the dynamics of the disease may be altered in the presence of coinfection. We have described the clinical manifestation and serial laboratory profile, and highlighted the atypical findings uncommon in dengue infection. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 39-year old Asian male, presented on day 6 of dengue infection with warning signs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that was done as per hospital protocol was found to be positive. Case 2 was a 38-year old Asian male, was admitted on day 5 of illness with symptoms of acute respiratory infection with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Evaluation of progressive leukopenia and thrombocytopenia showed positive dengue serology. CONCLUSION: Clinicians must be conscientious when working on the differential diagnosis of possible tropical diseases in cases of coronavirus disease 2019, specifically, when patients develop hemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, and transaminitis with elevated expression of aspartate higher than alanine transaminase, which is frequently observed in dengue infection. Caution must be taken during the administration of intravenous fluids when treating patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and dengue coinfection, as coronavirus disease 2019 patients are more prone to develop pulmonary edema. Timely diagnosis and appropriate management are essential to avoid the devastating complications of severe forms of dengue infection. It is important to repeat and reconfirm the dengue serology in coronavirus disease 2019 patients to avoid false positivity. Diligence and care must be taken not to neglect other endemic tropical diseases in the region during the present pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dengue/complications , Leukopenia/blood , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adult , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Coinfection , Cough/physiopathology , Dengue/blood , Dengue/physiopathology , Dengue/therapy , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Fluid Therapy , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/physiopathology
7.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 259: 95-99, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103850

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic there was a decrease in emergency room arrivals. There is limited evidence about the effect of this change in behavior on women's health. We aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the diagnosis, treatment and complications of women presenting with a tubal Ectopic Pregnancy (EP). STUDY DESIGN: This is a single centre retrospective cohort study. We compared the clinical presentation, treatment modalities and complications of all women presenting in our institution with a tubal EP during the COVID-19 pandemic between 15 March and 15 June 2020, with women who were treated in our institution with the same diagnosis in the corresponding period for the years 2018-2019. RESULTS: The study group included 19 cases of EP (N = 19) that were treated between the 15 March 2020 and 15 June 2020. The control group included 30 cases of EP (N = 30) that were admitted to in the corresponding period during 2018 and 2019. Maternal age, parity, gravity and mode of conception (natural vs. assisted) were similar between the two groups. There was no difference in the mean gestational age (GA) according to the last menstrual period. In the study group more women presented with sonographic evaluation of high fluid volume in the abdomen than in the control group (53 % vs 17 %, P value 0.01). This finding is correlated with a more advanced disease status. In the study group there was a highly statistically significant 3-fold increase in rupture among cases (P < 0.005) and a 4-fold larger volume of blood in the entrance to the abdomen (P < 0.002). We found that there were no cases of ruptured EP in the group of women who were pregnant after assisted reproduction. CONCLUSION: We found a higher rate of ruptured ectopic pregnancies in our institution during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health care providers should be alerted to this collateral damage in the non-infected population during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy, Tubal/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal/therapeutic use , Adult , Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human/blood , Cohort Studies , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Laparoscopy , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy, Tubal/diagnosis , Pregnancy, Tubal/physiopathology , Pregnancy, Tubal/therapy , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Retrospective Studies , Rupture, Spontaneous/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Salpingectomy , Ultrasonography, Prenatal , Uterine Hemorrhage/physiopathology
8.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 21, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102340

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Active pediatric COVID-19 pneumonia and MIS-C are two disease processes requiring rapid diagnosis and different treatment protocols. OBJECTIVE: To distinguish active pediatric COVID-19 pneumonia and MIS-C using presenting signs and symptoms, patient characteristics, and laboratory values. DESIGN: Patients diagnosed and hospitalized with active COVID-19 pneumonia or MIS-C at Children's of Alabama Hospital in Birmingham, AL from April 1 through September 1, 2020 were identified retrospectively. Active COVID-19 and MIS-C cases were defined using diagnostic codes and verified for accuracy using current US Centers for Disease Control case definitions. All clinical notes were reviewed for documentation of COVID-19 pneumonia or MIS-C, and clinical notes and electronic medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, prior exposure to or testing for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, laboratory data, imaging, treatment modalities and response to treatment. FINDINGS: 111 patients were identified, with 74 classified as mild COVID-19, 8 patients as moderate COVID-19, 8 patients as severe COVID-19, 10 as mild MIS-C and 11 as severe MIS-C. All groups had a male predominance, with Black and Hispanic patients overrepresented as compared to the demographics of Alabama. Most MIS-C patients were healthy at baseline, with most COVID-19 patients having at least one underlying illness. Fever, rash, conjunctivitis, and gastrointestinal symptoms were predominant in the MIS-C population whereas COVID-19 patients presented with predominantly respiratory symptoms. The two groups were similar in duration of symptomatic prodrome and exposure history to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but MIS-C patients had a longer duration between presentation and exposure history. COVID-19 patients were more likely to have a positive SAR-CoV-2 PCR and to require respiratory support on admission. MIS-C patients had lower sodium levels, higher levels of C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, d-dimer and procalcitonin. COVID-19 patients had higher lactate dehydrogenase levels on admission. MIS-C patients had coronary artery changes on echocardiography more often than COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study is one of the first to directly compare COVID-19 and MIS-C in the pediatric population. The significant differences found between symptoms at presentation, demographics, and laboratory findings will aide health-care providers in distinguishing the two disease entities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , African Americans , Asthma/epidemiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Conjunctivitis/physiopathology , Coronary Artery Disease , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dilatation, Pathologic , Echocardiography , Exanthema/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Humans , Hyponatremia/metabolism , Male , Nausea/physiopathology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Distribution , Stroke Volume , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Time Factors , Vomiting/physiopathology
9.
Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 18(4): 269-283, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085424

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread to more than 200 countries and regions globally. SARS-CoV-2 is thought to spread mainly through respiratory droplets and close contact. However, reports have shown that a notable proportion of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop gastrointestinal symptoms and nearly half of patients confirmed to have COVID-19 have shown detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA in their faecal samples. Moreover, SARS-CoV-2 infection reportedly alters intestinal microbiota, which correlated with the expression of inflammatory factors. Furthermore, multiple in vitro and in vivo animal studies have provided direct evidence of intestinal infection by SARS-CoV-2. These lines of evidence highlight the nature of SARS-CoV-2 gastrointestinal infection and its potential faecal-oral transmission. Here, we summarize the current findings on the gastrointestinal manifestations of COVID-19 and its possible mechanisms. We also discuss how SARS-CoV-2 gastrointestinal infection might occur and the current evidence and future studies needed to establish the occurrence of faecal-oral transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dysbiosis/physiopathology , Gastroenteritis/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Nausea/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Anorexia/physiopathology , COVID-19/transmission , Cell Line , Colon/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Feces/chemistry , Gastroenteritis/virology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestine, Small/metabolism , Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex/metabolism , Organoids , RNA, Viral , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Viral Load , Virus Shedding
10.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 19(6): 570-588, 2020 Dec 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068115

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) has increased since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic started. This study was aimed to describe clinical manifestation and outcomes of MIS-C associated with COVID-19. This systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted on all available literature until July 3rd, 2020. The screening was done by using the following keywords: ("novel coronavirus" Or COVID-19 or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or coronavirus) and ("MIS-C" or "multisystem inflammatory" or Kawasaki). Data on gender, ethnicity, clinical presentations, need for mechanical ventilation or admission to intensive care unit (ICU), imaging, cardiac complications, and COVID-19 laboratory results were extracted to measure the pooled estimates. Out of 314 found articles, 16 articles with a total of 600 patients were included in the study, the most common presentation was fever (97%), followed by gastrointestinal symptoms (80%), and skin rashes (60%) as well as shock (55%), conjunctivitis (54%), and respiratory symptoms (39%). Less common presentations were neurologic problems (33%), and skin desquamation (30%), MIS-C was slightly more prevalent in males (53.7%) compared to females (46.3%). The findings of this meta-analysis on current evidence found that the common clinical presentations of COVID-19 associated MIS-C include a combination of fever and mucocutaneous involvements, similar to atypical Kawasaki disease, and multiple organ dysfunction. Due to the relatively higher morbidity and mortality rate, it is very important to diagnose this condition promptly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Conjunctivitis/physiopathology , Exanthema/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Shock/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cheilitis/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Meningism/physiopathology , Myalgia/epidemiology , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , Sex Distribution , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Vomiting/physiopathology
11.
Neurogastroenterol Motil ; 33(5): e14092, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psychological stress and anxiety, such those generated by forced quarantine, affect gastrointestinal symptoms course in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders. Thus, our aim was to assess, in a cohort of patients regularly followed up in a devoted outpatient clinic of Southern Italy, the association between their gastrointestinal symptoms changes, stress, and anxiety reported during the Italian lockdown. METHODS: We recruited patients from the outpatient clinic of the University of Salerno, devoted to functional gastrointestinal disorders, selecting only patients for whom an evaluation was available in the last 6 months before the lockdown. Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated at each visit through standardized questionnaire and pooled in a database. On 45th days from the beginning of the lockdown, patients were re-assessed by phone with the same questionnaire. Anxiety and stress levels were assessed through a self-administered online questionnaire based on Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 test and Perceived Stress Scale 10 test. KEY RESULTS: The intensity-frequency scores of several upper gastrointestinal symptoms improved (Wilcoxon test <0.05). Higher anxiety levels had a higher risk of worsening chest pain (OR 1.3 [1.1-1.7]), waterbrash (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.7]), epigastric burning (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.6]), and abdominal pain (OR 1.6 [1.0-2.3]). When compared to the interval preceding the outbreak, half of the patients declared their symptoms remained unchanged, 13.6% worsened, and 36.4% improved. CONCLUSIONS AND INFERENCES: During the COVID-19 quarantine, there was an improvement of the majority of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in our patients, and anxiety seems an important risk of worsening few of them.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Dyspepsia/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Heartburn/physiopathology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/psychology , Adult , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Chest Pain/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Dyspepsia/psychology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Heartburn/psychology , Humans , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/psychology , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 14(6): 1841-1845, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059536

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To elucidate the clinical features of COVID-19 patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) under hospitalization and home isolation conditions. METHOD: This retrospective study was conducted among 32 patients with COVID-19 and T1D, who sought treatment at the Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between May 01, 2020 and July 30, 2020. Patients data were extracted from electronic medical records. RESULTS: Of the total of 32 COVID-19 patients with T1D, 21.9% required hospitalization, while 78.1% underwent home isolation. Among the study population, 9.4% (3/32) were reported to have hypertension, 21.9% (7/32) had chronic pulmonary disease (CPD), 18.8% (6/32) had thyroid disorders, and 18.8% (6/32) had the celiac disease. Of the 32 studied patients, 68.8% (22/32) of them were reported as normal, while 28.1% (9/32) had chronic kidney disease (CKD) II and 3.1% (1/32) had end-stage renal failure. The most common symptoms observed among the hospitalized patients were nausea and vomiting (71.4%; 5/7), followed by fever (57.1%; 4/7), cough (42.8%; 3/7), sore throat (42.8%; 3/7), abdominal pain (42.8%; 3/7) and dyspnea (42.%; 3/7). The most common reasons for hospitalization were diabetic ketoacidosis (71.4%; 5/7) followed by bacterial pneumonia (14.3%; 1/7), fever (14.3%; 1/7), sore throat (14.3%; 1/7), severe hyperglycemia (14.3%; 1/7) and COVID-19 pneumonia (14.3%; 1/7). Except the severity of COVID-19 (p = 0.0001), none of the demographic and clinical parameters indicated statistically significant differences between patients requiring hospitalization and home isolation. CONCLUSION: Majority of the COVID-19 patients with T1D recovered with conservative treatment at home. Diabetic ketoacidosis was the most common reason for hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/complications , Hospitalization , Patient Isolation , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Celiac Disease/epidemiology , Cough/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Lung Diseases , Male , Nausea/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Thyroid Diseases/epidemiology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Young Adult
13.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(2): 911-917, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (i) to describe the clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally related to Sars-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) in children; (ii) to propose a framework to guide multidisciplinary team (MDT) management; and (iii) to highlight the role of the paediatric rheumatologist in this context. METHODS: This study involved a retrospective case notes review of patients referred to a single specialist paediatric centre with suspected PIMS-TS, with a focus on clinical presentation, laboratory parameters, treatment, and outcome in the context of an MDT framework. RESULTS: Nineteen children of median age 9.1 years fulfilled the definition of PIMS-TS and were managed within an MDT framework: 5/19 were female; 14/19 were of Black, Asian or minority ethnicity; 9/19 also fulfilled diagnostic criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease (KD). Severe systemic inflammation, shock, and abdominal pain were ubiquitous. Treatment was stratified within an MDT framework and included CSs in all; i.v. immunoglobulin in all; anakinra in 4/19; infliximab in 1/19; and antiviral (aciclovir) in 4/19. CONCLUSIONS: We observed significant diagnostic equipoise using a current definition of PIMS-TS, overlapping with KD. Outside of clinical trials, an MDT approach is vital. The role of the paediatric rheumatologist is to consider differential diagnoses of hyperinflammation in the young, to advise on empiric immunomodulatory therapy, to set realistic therapeutic targets, to gauge therapeutic success, to oversee timely step-down of immunomodulation, and to contribute to the longer-term MDT follow-up of any late inflammatory sequelae.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Shock/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Acyclovir/therapeutic use , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Inflammation , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Male , Patient Care Team , Physician's Role , Retrospective Studies , Rheumatologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Shock/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , United Kingdom
14.
Chest ; 159(2): 657-662, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-928873
15.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 33(5): 610-612, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-900651

ABSTRACT

The main symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are respiratory manifestations, while some confirmed patients developed gastrointestinal symptoms or even initially presented digestive symptoms. The link between pneumonia and gastrointestinal symptoms caused by severe acute respiratory symptoms coronavirus 2 focused our attention on the concept of 'gut-lung axis'. In this review, we discuss the inevitability and possible mechanisms of the occurrence of intestinal symptoms or intestinal dysfunction in COVID-19 from the perspective of the gut-lung axis, as well as the influence of the imbalance of intestinal homeostasis on the respiratory symptoms of COVID-19. The interaction between lung and intestine might lead to a vicious cycle of pulmonary and intestinal inflammation which may be a potential factor leading to the death of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Intestines/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Feces/virology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Intestines/immunology , Lung/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Dig Liver Dis ; 52(10): 1076-1079, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803444

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods: The clinical data of 164 COVID-19 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms were extracted and analysed retrospectively. Results: In total, 505 COVID-19 patients were divided into two groups: those with gastrointestinal symptoms (G group) and those without gastrointestinal symptoms (NG group). Common gastrointestinal symptoms included inappetence, diarrhoea, nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. Significantly higher proportions of patients with fever, dizziness, myalgia, and fatigue were noted in group G than in group NG. Compared with patients without fever, there was a significant difference between G group and NG group in moderate fever or above, while there was no significant difference between the two groups in low fever. The laboratory results showed that patients in the G group had significantly higher C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase levels than those in the NG group. Moreover, the proportion of patients with severe pneumonia was significantly higher in the G group than in the NG group. Conclusion: In Wuhan, the proportion of COVID-19 patients who experience gastrointestinal symptoms is relatively high. Patients who experience gastrointestinal symptoms are more likely to suffer from severe pneumonia, which may help clinicians identify patients at high risk of COVID-19 and thus reduce the incidence of this condition.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Anorexia/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Nausea/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Abdominal Pain/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Anorexia/etiology , Anorexia/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diarrhea/etiology , Diarrhea/metabolism , Dizziness/etiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Female , Fever/etiology , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Nausea/etiology , Nausea/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/etiology , Vomiting/metabolism
17.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 50(10): e13351, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: More paediatric-confirmed cases have been reported with the global pandemic of COVID-19. This study aims to summarize the key points and supply suggestions on screening paediatric COVID-19 patients more appropriately. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively included paediatric patients who have accepted SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR testing in Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (30 January 2020 to 13 February 2020) and compared them with paediatric-confirmed COVID-19 cases. Besides, a review was carried out by analysing all current literature about laboratory-confirmed paediatric cases with COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 46 suspected cases included in the descriptive study. The results of SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR testing were all negative. Compared with paediatric-confirmed cases, the incidence of epidemic history was lower in suspected cases (P < .001). The rate of fever (P < .001), cough (P < .001), headache or dizziness (P < .001), vomiting (P < .001) and abdominal discomfort or distention (P = .01) were more observed in the included suspected children. There were more children having decreased WBC count in the confirmed group. In the literature review, twenty-nine studies were obtained with 488 paediatric COVID-19 cases. 88.6% of them had epidemiological history. Cough and fever were the most common symptoms. Compared with older patients, the incidence of fever, respiratory symptoms, lethargy and headache or dizziness was lower, while gastrointestinal symptoms were reported more. CONCLUSIONS: Children with a history of close contact with confirmed cases, manifested as cough and fever should be paid more attention to after excluding infection of other common pathogens. Atypical symptoms should not be over-emphasized in screening paediatric COVID-19. More studies are needed for guiding efficient recognition in paediatric COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Infant , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Male , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/physiopathology
20.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(8): 1153-1155, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-525850

Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Digestive System Diseases/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Abdominal Pain/metabolism , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/therapy , Ambulatory Care , Anorexia/etiology , Anorexia/metabolism , Anorexia/physiopathology , Anorexia/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Antipyretics/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/metabolism , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/physiopathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/therapy , China , Clostridium Infections/diagnosis , Clostridium Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diarrhea/etiology , Diarrhea/metabolism , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Diarrhea/therapy , Digestive System Diseases/etiology , Digestive System Diseases/metabolism , Digestive System Diseases/therapy , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Gastroenterology , Humans , Liver Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/metabolism , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Liver Diseases/therapy , Nausea/etiology , Nausea/metabolism , Nausea/physiopathology , Nausea/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Probiotics/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Vomiting/etiology
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