Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 46
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267111, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Schools are primary venues of influenza amplification with secondary spread to communities. We assessed K-12 student absenteeism monitoring as a means for early detection of influenza activity in the community. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between September 2014 and March 2020, we conducted a prospective observational study of all-cause (a-TOT), illness-associated (a-I), and influenza-like illness-associated (a-ILI) absenteeism within the Oregon School District (OSD), Dane County, Wisconsin. Absenteeism was reported through the electronic student information system. Students were visited at home where pharyngeal specimens were collected for influenza RT-PCR testing. Surveillance of medically-attended laboratory-confirmed influenza (MAI) occurred in five primary care clinics in and adjoining the OSD. Poisson general additive log linear regression models of daily counts of absenteeism and MAI were compared using correlation analysis. FINDINGS: Influenza was detected in 723 of 2,378 visited students, and in 1,327 of 4,903 MAI patients. Over six influenza seasons, a-ILI was significantly correlated with MAI in the community (r = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.53-0.63) with a one-day lead time and a-I was significantly correlated with MAI in the community (r = 0.49; 0.44-0.54) with a 10-day lead time, while a-TOT performed poorly (r = 0.27; 0.21-0.33), following MAI by six days. DISCUSSION: Surveillance using cause-specific absenteeism was feasible and performed well over a study period marked by diverse presentations of seasonal influenza. Monitoring a-I and a-ILI can provide early warning of seasonal influenza in time for community mitigation efforts.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Influenza, Human , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Schools , Students , Wisconsin/epidemiology
2.
Vaccine ; 40(23): 3174-3181, 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796036

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Short-term side effects related to mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 are frequent and bothersome, with the potential to disrupt work duties and impact future vaccine decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors more likely to lead to vaccine-associated work disruption, employee absenteeism, and future vaccine reluctance among healthcare workers (HCWs). HYPOTHESIS: Side effects related to COVID vaccination: 1- frequently disrupt HCW duties, 2- result in a significant proportion of HCW absenteeism, 3- contribute to uncertainty about future booster vaccination, 4- vary based on certain demographic, socioeconomic, occupational, and vaccine-related factors. METHODS: Using an anonymous, voluntary electronic survey, we obtained responses from a large, heterogeneous sample of COVID-19-vaccinated HCWs in two healthcare systems in Southern California. Descriptive statistics and regression models were utilized to evaluate the research questions. RESULTS: Among 2,103 vaccinated HCWs, 579 (27.5%) reported that vaccine-related symptoms disrupted their professional responsibilities, and 380 (18.1%) missed work as a result. Independent predictors for absenteeism included experiencing generalized and work-disruptive symptoms, and receiving the Moderna vaccine [OR = 1.77 (95% CI = 1.33 - 2.36), p < 0.001]. Physicians were less likely to miss work due to side effects (6.7% vs 21.2% for all other HCWs, p < 0.001). Independent predictors of reluctance toward future booster vaccination included lower education level, younger age, having received the Moderna vaccine, and missing work due to vaccine-related symptoms. CONCLUSION: Symptoms related to mRNA vaccinations against SARS-CoV-2 may frequently disrupt work duties, lead to absenteeism, and impact future vaccine decision-making. This may be more common in Moderna recipients and less likely among physicians. Accordingly, health employers should schedule future booster vaccination cycles to minimize loss of work productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Absenteeism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776244

ABSTRACT

School attendance is crucial for the development of a child. Sickness absence is the most common type of absenteeism and can be a red flag for underlying problems. To address sickness absence, the intervention Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students for Primary School (MASS-PS) was recently developed. It targets children at risk and is a school-based child and youth health care intervention. The present study is a process evaluation of the intervention. MASS-PS was implemented and evaluated in 29 schools in the West-Brabant region of the Netherlands, during three school years (2017-2020). Attendance coordinators (ACs) from the different schools were interviewed in six focus group interviews as well as in over 200 individual conversations, of which logbooks were kept. Content analysis was used based on a framework of implementation elements. During the first year of the study, the uptake was low. Changes were made by the project group to improve the uptake. The ACs generally considered the MASS-PS as compatible and relevant, but suggested improvements by adding a medical consultation function with a child and youth healthcare physician and increasing the threshold for selecting children at risk. They saw several personal benefits, although time was necessary to learn to use the intervention. An organisational barrier was the lack of teaching staff. A strength in the organisational structure was the appointment of ACs. A major event in the sociological structure was the COVID-19 pandemic. ACs felt that the intervention helped them keep track of sickness absence during the pandemic. The Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students for Primary School intervention was implemented successfully, and the process evaluation gave insight into possible improvements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Absenteeism , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Schools
4.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 16(3): 376-385, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774820

ABSTRACT

While the economic burden of influenza infection is well described among adults aged 65 and older, less is known about younger adults. A systematic literature review was conducted to describe the economic burden of seasonal influenza in adults aged 18 to 64 years, to identify the main determinants of direct and indirect costs, and to highlight any gaps in the existing published evidence. MEDLINE and Embase were searched from 2007 to February 7, 2020, for studies reporting primary influenza-related cost data (direct or indirect) or absenteeism data. Of the 2613 publications screened, 51 studies were included in this review. Half of them were conducted in the United States, and 71% of them described patients with influenza-like illness rather than laboratory-confirmed disease. Only 12 studies reported cost data specifically for at-risk populations. Extracted data highlighted that within the 18- to 64-year-old group, up to 88% of the economic burden of influenza was attributable to indirect costs, and up to 75% of overall direct costs were attributable to hospitalizations. Furthermore, within the 18- to 64-year-old group, influenza-related costs increased with age and underlying medical conditions. The reported cost of influenza-related hospitalizations was found to be up to 2.5 times higher among at-risk populations compared with not-at-risk populations. This review documents the considerable economic impact of influenza among adults aged 18 to 64. In this age group, most of the influenza costs are indirect, which are generally not recognized by decision makers. Future studies should focus on at-risk subgroups, lab-confirmed cases, and European countries.


Subject(s)
Influenza, Human , Absenteeism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cost of Illness , Financial Stress , Hospitalization , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760582

ABSTRACT

Sickness presenteeism involves employees continuing to work while unwell. As presenteeism is influenced by contextual and individual difference factors, it is important to assess its prevalence and implications for wellbeing and productivity in different occupational groups. This study examines these issues in a sample of prison officers working in UK institutions. Data were obtained from a survey of 1956 prison officers. Measures assessed the prevalence of and reasons for presenteeism and the perceived impact on job performance, along with mental health and perceptions of workplace safety climate. More than nine respondents out of ten (92%) reported working while unwell at least sometimes, with 43% reporting that they always did so. Presenteeism frequency was significantly related to mental health symptoms, impaired job performance and a poorer workplace safety climate. The reasons provided for presenteeism explained 31% of the variance in self-reported mental health, 34% in job performance and 17% in workplace safety climate, but the pattern of predictors varied according to the outcome. The findings can be used to inform interventions at the organisational and individual levels to encourage a 'healthier' approach to sickness absence, with likely benefits for staff wellbeing, job performance and workplace safety climate.


Subject(s)
Presenteeism , Prisons , Absenteeism , Efficiency , Humans , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
6.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(2): 124-128, 2022 Feb 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737295

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Our goal was to quantify healthcare clinician (HCC) absenteeism in the emergency department (ED) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) surge and to identify potential interventions that may mitigate the number of absences. METHODS: This was a retrospective, descriptive record review that included 82 resident physicians, physician assistants, and staff physicians who were scheduled to work more than three clinical shifts during March 2020 in an urban, academic ED that received a high number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Exposure was defined as a healthcare clinician who was not wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) having contact with a confirmed COVID-19 positive patient in the ED. The main outcome was the number of HCC absences secondary to exposure to or symptoms concerning for COVID-19. RESULTS: During March 2020, of 82 ED HCCs, 28 (34%) required an absence from clinical duties, totaling 152 absentee calendar days (N = 13 women [46%]; N = 15 men [54%]). Median HCC age was 32 years (interquartile range 28-39), and median number of days absent was four (interquartile range 3-7). While 16 (57%) of the total absences were secondary to a known exposure, 12 (43%) were symptomatic without a known exposure. A total of 25 (89%) absent HCCs received COVID-19 testing (N = 5 positive [20%]; N = 20 negative [80%]) with test results returning in 1-10 days. Eleven (39%) symptomatic HCCs had traveled domestically or internationally in the prior 30 days. CONCLUSION: Emergency departments should anticipate substantial HCC absences during the initial surge of a pandemic. Possible interventions to mitigate absences include early and broad use of PPE, planning for many asymptomatic HCC absences secondary to exposures, prioritizing HCC virus testing, and mandating early travel restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Absenteeism , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , Retrospective Studies
7.
Am J Hum Biol ; 34(1): e23578, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718235

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Especially in traditional, rural, and low-income areas, children attend school irregularly. School-based interventions are common mitigation strategies for infectious disease epidemics, but if daily attendance is not the norm, the impact of schools on disease spread might be overestimated. METHODS: We use an agent-based model of an early 20th century Newfoundland community to compare epidemic size and duration in three scenarios: (1) all school-aged children attend school each weekday, (2) students aged 10-15 have a chance of engaging in adult activities each day, and (3) students aged 10-15 have a chance of being reassigned to adult roles at the start of each simulation and thus never attend school. RESULTS: As the probability of not attending school increases, epidemics become smaller and peak earlier. The change in final size is larger with permanent reassignment (35% at baseline, 18% at maximum reassignment) than with daily nonattendance (35% vs. 22%). For both scenarios, the peak occurs 3 days earlier with maximum absence compared to the baseline. Benefits extend beyond the reassigned agents, as all school-aged agents are more likely to escape infection with increasing reassignment, and on average, 3-6 additional agents (2.6%-5.3%) escape infection compared to the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that absenteeism can have important impacts on epidemic outcomes. Thus, socioeconomic and other reasons for nonattendance of school, as well as how rates vary in different contexts, must be considered in models predicting epidemic outcomes or evaluating public health interventions in the face of major pandemics.


Subject(s)
Schools , Absenteeism , Adult , Child , Educational Status , Humans , Pandemics
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707222

ABSTRACT

In developed countries, population aging due to advances in living standards and healthcare infrastructure means that the care associated with chronic and degenerative diseases is becoming more prevalent across all facets of society-including the labour market. Informal caregiving, that is, care provision performed by friends and family, is expected to increase in the near future in Canada, with implications for workplaces. Absenteeism, presenteeism, work satisfaction and retention are known to be worse in employees who juggle the dual role of caregiving and paid employment, representing losses to workplaces' bottom line. Recent discourse on addressing the needs of carer-employees (CEs) in the workplace have been centred around carer-friendly workplace policies. This paper aims to assess the potential cost implication of a carer-friendly workplace intervention implemented within a large-sized Canadian workplace. The goal of the intervention was to induce carer-friendly workplace culture change. A workplace-wide survey was circulated twice, prior to and after the intervention, capturing demographic variables, as well as absenteeism, presenteeism, turnover and impact on coworkers. Utilizing the pre-intervention timepoint as a baseline, we employed a cost implication analysis to quantify the immediate impact of the intervention from the employer's perspective. We found that the intervention overall was not cost-saving, although there were some mixed effects regarding some costs, such as absenteeism. Non-tangible benefits, such as changes to employee morale, satisfaction with supervisor, job satisfaction and work culture, were not monetarily quantified within this analysis; hence, we consider it to be a conservative analysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Absenteeism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Caregivers , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638918

ABSTRACT

Infection with COVID-19 could result in lockdown, quarantine of contacts, absenteeism from work, and temporary productivity loss. This research aims to calculate (1) how the pandemic affects on-the-job probability and earnings for the working population, and (2) how much productivity loss is associated with self or a family member sick with COVID-19. Based on data collected from the U.S Research and Development Survey (RANDS), this research projects the relationship between on-the-job possibility and age of the index group and calculates the employment possibilities of the index group relative to the healthy group, namely the employment ratio. The weekly loss of productivity, presented by earnings, associated with COVID-19 for groups aged 18-44 years and 45-64 years was calculated, since the 18- to 64-year-old population is an economy's active workforce. Analytical results indicate that the older the age group, the lower the on-the-job possibility, and the higher the weekly productivity loss due to self or a family member being sick from COVID-19. For the group aged 45-64 years, the employment ratio of the index group relative to the healthy group dropped from 0.863 to 0.39, corresponding to a weekly productivity loss of 136-590 US dollars. The overall impact would be about a 9% loss in GDP. Infected or quarantined people would be confined to working in relatively isolated offices or places to allow for social distancing. Proactive health promotion in the workplace plus reactive work through telecommunication systems would reduce such losses. Such preparedness needs to be implemented early for more vulnerable workers who are of middle or old age and/or those comorbid with diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Absenteeism , Adolescent , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Efficiency , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560098

ABSTRACT

The main goal of this research was to investigate the psychosocial aspects that influence the acceptance of innovative technology in maritime transport and its impact on employees' work-related wellbeing and absenteeism. In particular, this study focused on a device that had been introduced to sailors working in water public transportation in Venice. The theoretical framework included two integrated models: the TAM model, concerning acceptance of the technology, and the JD-R model, related to workers' well-being. A two-wave study was conducted; at T1, a self-report questionnaire was administered to 122 sailors. Four months after its first administration (T2), objective data related to days of absenteeism were collected. The study showed that the perceived ease of use and the usefulness of the device influenced the workers' intentions to use the technology and their motivational processes of work engagement, which was also related to social support. Work engagement impacted on work satisfaction and predicted the level of absenteeism (measured at Time 2). The implementation of a new technology may fail if transportation companies do not consider psychosocial factors that assist in the acceptance of such technology and promote the involvement of workers in the technological system.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Work Engagement , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542547

ABSTRACT

Public health movement and social restrictions imposed by the Australian and New Zealand governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the working environment and may have affected health behaviours, work ability, and job performance. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between health behaviours and work ability and performance during COVID-19 restrictions and if health behaviours were related to demographic or population factors. A cross-sectional survey was used to gather responses from 433 adult employees in Australia and New Zealand between June and August 2020. The survey requested demographic information and used the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and the World Health Organisation's Health and Work Performance Questionnaire. Multivariate regression models were used to explore relationships between the identified variables while controlling for several possible confounders. Being sufficiently physically active was associated with higher reported physical (aOR = 2.1; p = 0.001) and mental work abilities (aOR = 1.8; p = 0.007) and self-reported job performance (i.e., lower presenteeism) (median +7.42%; p = 0.03). Part-time employees were 56% less likely (p = 0.002) to report a good or very good mental work ability. Those with existing medical conditions were 14% less likely (p = 0.008) to be sufficiently active and 80% less likely (p = 0.002) to report rather good or very good physical work ability. Being sufficiently active was associated with higher physical and mental work abilities and better job performance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Employers should support opportunities for regular physical activity and provide specific support to individuals with medical conditions or in part-time employment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Absenteeism , Adult , Australia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , New Zealand , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Capacity Evaluation
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534041

ABSTRACT

This study aims to extract and explain the territorially varied relation between socioeconomic factors and absence rate from work due to own illness or disability in European countries in the years 2006-2020. For this purpose, several causes were identified, depending on men and women. To explain the absenteeism and emphasize gender as well as intercountry differences, geographically weighted regression was applied. For men, there were five main variables that influenced sickness absence: body mass index, the average rating of satisfaction by job situation, employment in the manufacturing sector, social benefits by sickness/health care, and performing health-enhancing physical activity. For women, there were five main variables that increased the absence rate: the risk of poverty or social exclusion, long-standing illness or health problems, employment in the manufacturing sector, social protection benefits, and deaths due to pneumonia. Based on the conducted research, it was proven that the sickness absence observed in the analyzed countries was highly gender and spatially diverged. Understanding the multifactorial factors playing an important role in the occurrence of regional and gender-divergent sickness absence may be a good predictor of subsequent morbidity and mortality as well as be very useful to better prevent this outcome.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Sick Leave , Causality , Employment , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male
14.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e248, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506270

ABSTRACT

This study describes the development of a pilot sentinel school absence syndromic surveillance system. Using data from a sample of schools in England the capability of this system to monitor the impact of disease on school absences in school-aged children is shown, using the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic period as an example. Data were obtained from an online app service used by schools and parents to report their children absent, including reasons/symptoms relating to absence. For 2019 and 2020, data were aggregated into daily counts of 'total' and 'cough' absence reports. There was a large increase in the number of absence reports in March 2020 compared to March 2019, corresponding to the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in England. Absence numbers then fell rapidly and remained low from late March 2020 until August 2020, while lockdown was in place in England. Compared to 2019, there was a large increase in the number of absence reports in September 2020 when schools re-opened in England, although the peak number of absences was smaller than in March 2020. This information can help provide context around the absence levels in schools associated with COVID-19. Also, the system has the potential for further development to monitor the impact of other conditions on school absence, e.g. gastrointestinal infections.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Sentinel Surveillance , Child , Communicable Disease Control , England/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Students/statistics & numerical data
15.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1169, 2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human resources management plays an important role in social development and economic growth. Absence from work due to health problems can make obstacles to the growth of economy. This study conducted aimed to estimate the absenteeism costs of COVID-19 among the personnel of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in Mashhad, Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between February 19, 2020, and September 21, 2020. The absenteeism costs were calculated using the human capital approach. Finally, we applied the linear regression to assess the impact of variables on the lost productivity of absenteeism due to COVID-19 among the personnel of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. RESULTS: The results of this study showed that 1958 personnel had COVID-19. The total of absenteeism days in our study were 32,209 days, with an average of 16.44 absenteeism days. Total costs due to absenteeism were estimated to be nearly $1.3 million, with an average of $671.4 per patient. The results of regression model showed that gender (male), age (> 50 years), employment Type (non-permanent) and monthly income had a positive relationship with the absenteeism cost. Also, there are a negative significant relationship between absenteeism cost with job (physicians) and work experience. CONCLUSIONS: Absenteeism costs of COVID-19 in the hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences represent a significant economic burden. The findings of our study emphasize the emergency strategies to prevent and control COVID-19 among the healthcare workers. It can decrease the economic impacts of COVID-19 and improve human resources management during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19 , Cost of Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Vaccine ; 39(48): 7021-7027, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487999

ABSTRACT

AIM: Healthcare personnel (HCP) are prioritized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination to protect them and non-disruptive provision of healthcare services. We assessed the impact of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on morbidity and absenteeism among HCP. METHODS: We studied 7445 HCP in five tertiary-care hospitals in Greece from November 15, 2020 through April 18, 2021. RESULTS: A total of 910 episodes of absenteeism and 9695 days of absence were recorded during the entire study period. Starting from January 4, 2021, 4823/7445 HCP (64.8%) were fully or partially vaccinated. Overall, 535 episodes of absenteeism occurred from January 4, 2021 through April 18, 2021, including 309 (57.76%) episodes among 2622 unvaccinated HCP and 226 (42.24%) episodes among 4823 vaccinated HCP (11.8 versus 4.7 episodes of absenteeism per 100 HCP, respectively; p-value < 0.001). The mean duration of absenteeism was 11.9 days among unvaccinated HCP compared with 6.9 days among vaccinated HCP (p-value < 0.001). Unvaccinated HCP more frequently developed acute respiratory infection, influenza-like illness, and COVID-19 (p-values < 0.001 for all comparisons). Vaccine effectiveness for fully vaccinated HCP was estimated at 94.16% [confidence interval (CI): 88.50%-98.05%) against COVID-19, 83.62% (CI: 73.36%-90.38%) against SARS-CoV-2 infection (asymptomatic or COVID-19), and 66.42% (CI: 56.86%-74.15%) against absenteeism. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on healthcare workforce. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine significantly reduced morbidity, COVID-19, absenteeism and duration of absenteeism among HCP during a period of high SARS-CoV-2 circulation in the community. It is expected that HCP vaccination will protect them and healthcare services and contain healthcare costs.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Morbidity , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
17.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(9): 889-890, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406068
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376807

ABSTRACT

Work-related mental health issues, accounting for high worker absenteeism in the world's developed economies, are increasing, with the main cause being workplace conditions. The health services sector is especially experiencing great problems with this, because of challenging psychosocial working conditions. The aim of this study was to explore employees' experiences of development work with a focus on the work environment within a hospital department with an outspoken special development assignment. The special assignment was decided by the highest management at the hospital and concerned work environment, caring processes, and ways of organizing the work. Eleven employees completed two individually semi-structured interviews, approximately 7 and 13 months after the start of the special assignment at the department. Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results reveal that both internal and external aspects influence the development work and highlight the importance of viewing the local development work in relation to how the rest of the organization functions. Important factors and conditions for a supportive and change-friendly work culture are discussed, as well as the need to plan for integration and change to create conditions for successful implementation of the results from organizational development and change initiatives.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Workplace , Delivery of Health Care , Hospital Departments , Organizations
19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(34)2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360223

ABSTRACT

Essential worker absenteeism has been a pressing problem in the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 20% of US hospitals experienced staff shortages, exhausting replacement pools and at times requiring COVID-positive healthcare workers to remain at work. To our knowledge there are no data-informed models examining how different staffing strategies affect epidemic dynamics on a network in the context of rising worker absenteeism. Here we develop a susceptible-infected-quarantined-recovered adaptive network model using pair approximations to gauge the effects of worker replacement versus redistribution of work among remaining healthy workers in the early epidemic phase. Parameterized with hospital data, the model exhibits a time-varying trade-off: Worker replacement minimizes peak prevalence in the early phase, while redistribution minimizes final outbreak size. Any "ideal" strategy requires balancing the need to maintain a baseline number of workers against the desire to decrease total number infected. We show that one adaptive strategy-switching from replacement to redistribution at epidemic peak-decreases disease burden by 9.7% and nearly doubles the final fraction of healthy workers compared to pure replacement.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Quarantine , Shift Work Schedule , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
20.
J Glob Health ; 11: 03084, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357598
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL