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1.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 18: 9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distance learning, which became widespread in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been a burdensome challenge for students and lecturers. This study investigated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and burnout in first-year nursing students who participated in distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study included 69 first-year nursing students at Jenderal Achmad Yani University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data were collected in September 2020 through self-efficacy and burnout questionnaires that were distributed via email and social media for 2 weeks. The responses were analyzed using the gamma test. RESULTS: Most respondents were women (78.3%), with an average age of 19 years. Most nursing students had a moderate level of academic self-efficacy (72.5%), while only 13.0% of respondents had a low level of academic self-efficacy. However, 46.4% of students experienced severe burnout during distance learning. Cross-tabulation showed that students with moderate self-efficacy were more likely to experience severe burnout (24 respondents) (P<0.01 and r=-0.884). Exhaustion was the burnout dimension most closely associated with academic self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Students perceived distance learning as burdensome and reported high levels of exhaustion, which may negatively impact their academic achievement. Interventions to improve academic self-efficacy may foster students' confidence, potentially leading to reduced burnout levels. Nurse educators should reflect upon innovative learning strategies to create a favorable learning environment for nursing students.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
2.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 18: 9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221937

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distance learning, which became widespread in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been a burdensome challenge for students and lecturers. This study investigated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and burnout in first-year nursing students who participated in distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study included 69 first-year nursing students at Jenderal Achmad Yani University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data were collected in September 2020 through self-efficacy and burnout questionnaires that were distributed via email and social media for 2 weeks. The responses were analyzed using the gamma test. RESULTS: Most respondents were women (78.3%), with an average age of 19 years. Most nursing students had a moderate level of academic self-efficacy (72.5%), while only 13.0% of respondents had a low level of academic self-efficacy. However, 46.4% of students experienced severe burnout during distance learning. Cross-tabulation showed that students with moderate self-efficacy were more likely to experience severe burnout (24 respondents) (P<0.01 and r=-0.884). Exhaustion was the burnout dimension most closely associated with academic self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Students perceived distance learning as burdensome and reported high levels of exhaustion, which may negatively impact their academic achievement. Interventions to improve academic self-efficacy may foster students' confidence, potentially leading to reduced burnout levels. Nurse educators should reflect upon innovative learning strategies to create a favorable learning environment for nursing students.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Int J Psychol ; 56(4): 566-576, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942364

ABSTRACT

Using data from a computer-based formative feedback system, we compare learning gains in the 8 weeks of school closures related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland with learning gains in the 8 weeks before these school closures. The school performance in mathematics and language of N = 28,685 pupils is modelled in second-order piecewise latent growth models with strict measurement invariance for the two periods under investigation. While secondary school pupils remain largely unaffected by the school closures in terms of learning gains, for primary school pupils learning slows down and at the same time interindividual variance in learning gains increases. Distance learning arrangements seem an effective means to substitute for in-person learning, at least in an emergency situation, but not all pupils benefit to the same degree.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/trends , Educational Status , Learning , Schools/trends , Academic Performance/psychology , Academic Performance/trends , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Humans , Learning/physiology , Male , Pandemics , Switzerland/epidemiology
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