Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 93
Filter
1.
Aust Health Rev ; 46(2): 127-128, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778685

ABSTRACT

sion="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> AH Australian Health Review Aust. Health Rev. 0156-5788 1449-8944 CSIRO Publishing 36 Gardiner Road Clayton 3168 Melbourne Victoria Australia AH22054 10.1071/AH22054 Policy Reflection Election 2022 should address unfinished business in health and aged care S. Duckett Duckett Stephen PhD, DSc, FASSA, FAHMS, Director, Health and Aged Care Program, Honorary Enterprise Professor A * Grattan Institute, 8 Malvina Place, Carlton, Vic. 3083, Australia. * Correspondence to: Stephen Duckett Grattan Institute, 8 Malvina Place, Carlton, Vic. 3083, Australia Email: sduckett@unimelb.edu.au 7 April 2022 46 2 127 128 11 March 2022 Received 11 March 2022 15 March 2022 Accepted 15 March 2022 7 April 2022 Published © 2022 The Author(s) (or their employer(s)). Published by CSIRO Publishing on behalf of AHHA. 2022 The Authors The 2022 federal election is critical for the health and aged care sectors. Both parties need to address the COVID care deficit, oral health care, and commit to fix the aged care mess. The ongoing tragedy of First Nations health should also remain a priority. And a bipartisan acceptance of the need to address climate change is also required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Academies and Institutes , Aged , Humans , Politics , Victoria
2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702809

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e054163, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673436

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Poor adolescent mental health is a barrier to achieving several sustainable development goals in Tanzania, where adolescent mental health infrastructure is weak. This is compounded by a lack of community and policy maker awareness or understanding of its burden, causes and solutions. Research addressing these knowledge gaps is urgently needed. However, capacity for adolescent mental health research in Tanzania remains limited. The existence of a National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), with a nationwide mandate for research conduct and oversight, presents an opportunity to catalyse activity in this neglected area. Rigorous research priority setting, which includes key stakeholders, can promote efficient use of limited resources and improve both quality and uptake of research by ensuring that it meets the needs of target populations and policy makers. We present a protocol for such a research priority setting study and how it informs the design of an interinstitutional adolescent mental health research capacity strengthening strategy in Tanzania. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: From May 2021, this 6 month mixed-methods study will adapt and merge the James Lind Alliance approach and validated capacity strengthening methodologies to identify priorities for research and research capacity strengthening in adolescent mental health in Tanzania. Specifically, it will use online questionnaires, face-to-face interviews, focus groups, scoping reviews and a consensus meeting to consult expert and adolescent stakeholders. Key evidence-informed priorities will be collaboratively ranked and documented and an integrated strategy to address capacity gaps will be designed to align with the nationwide infrastructure and overall strategy of NIMR. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: National and institutional review board approvals were sought and granted from the National Health Research Ethics Committee of the NIMR Medical Research Coordinating Committee (Tanzania) and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (United Kingdom). Results will be disseminated through a national workshop involving all stakeholders, through ongoing collaborations and published commentaries, reviews, policy briefs, webinars and social media.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Mental Health , Academies and Institutes , Adolescent , Ethics Committees, Research , Humans , Tanzania
4.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 70: 103019, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670133

ABSTRACT

Mental health is a major public health issue that calls for immediate steps by individuals and societies around the globe. Talking about mental health issues has always been considered a taboo, especially in lower-middle income countries. This paper assesses the role of GVK Emergency Management Research Institute (GVK EMRI) 108 Ambulance Services in the management of behavioral emergencies in the state of Telangana, India. Primary data collection was carried out in Devaryamjal village of Medchal District with people from both rural and urban setting. The use of management services for behavioral emergencies are described, and knowledge attitude and practices in communities regarding the use of these services are identified. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of individuals is considered as well, and recommendations to strengthen 108 services for managing behavioral emergencies are suggested. As GVK EMRI is a first responder organization, understanding its role in the field of behavioral emergencies can fundamentally impact several lives. Findings indicate that mental health problems exist in communities, but individuals are reluctant to seek help. People from the urban setting were more open to talk about the topic. The awareness of 108 as an emergency response service was immaculate and a positive view was held about the services and the organization.


Subject(s)
Ambulances , COVID-19 , Academies and Institutes , Emergencies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 112: 281-287, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654535

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Serological testing is needed to better understand the epidemiology of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been developed to detect specific antibodies, IgM and IgG, to the virus. The performance of 25 of these RDTs was evaluated. METHODS: A serological reference panel of 50 positive and 100 negative plasma specimens was developed from SARS-CoV-2 PCR and antibody positive patients and pre-pandemic SARS-CoV-2-negative specimens collected in 2016. Test performance of the 25 RDTs was evaluated against this panel. RESULTS: A total of 10 RDTs had a sensitivity ≥98%, while 13 RDTs had a specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. Four RDTs (Boson, MultiG, Standard Q, and VivaDiag) had both sensitivity and specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. Only three RDTs had a sensitivity ≥98%, while 10 RDTs had a specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM antibodies. Three RDTs (Autobio, MultiG, and Standard Q) had sensitivity and specificity ≥98% to combined IgG/IgM. The RDTs that performed well also had perfect or almost perfect inter-reader agreement. CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation identified three RDTs with a sensitivity and specificity to IgM/IgG antibodies of ≥98% with the potential for widespread antibody testing in Uganda.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes , Antibodies, Viral , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Sensitivity and Specificity , Uganda/epidemiology
7.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 142(1): 75-84, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599886

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 has re-affirmed the crucial importance of the pharmaceuticals industry in improving the level of citizens' health and medical care, as well as the industry's importance in terms of contribution to economic growth and tax revenues. Although some time has passed since the importance of industry-academia collaboration was first raised in relation to the creation of innovative new drugs and the continuation of global competitiveness, conflicts between academia and companies have also been highlighted as barriers that hinder efforts to promote the practical realization of academia-initiated seeds. The authors have hypothesized that conflicts between academia and companies can be attributed to the vulnerability of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side, insufficient awareness concerning human resources that will undertake industry-academia operations, and inadequate development of structures. Consequently, we implemented fact-finding investigations in relation to universities and public research institutions in Japan, with the objective of ascertaining the actual status of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side. From the results of these investigations, we will clarify the issues that may present barriers to innovation creation, and consider policies, etc. for the enhancement of innovation creation environments.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , COVID-19 , Drug Discovery , Drug Industry , Intellectual Property , Intersectoral Collaboration , Humans , Universities , Workforce
9.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e934862, 2021 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND This population study aimed to investigate influenza and influenza-like respiratory virus infections in children during the 2019/20 influenza season and the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Poland. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study analyzed data from the National Influenza Centre, the Department of Influenza Research at the National Institute of Public Health, and 16 Voivodeship Sanitary and Epidemiological Stations in Poland. Nose and throat swabs were obtained from children during the 2019/20 influenza season and the COVID-19 pandemic. Viral RNA detection was performed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to diagnose influenza virus infection and viral subtypes. RESULTS In the analyzed group, both cases of influenza A and B and infections with influenza-like viruses were confirmed. Among all cases caused by influenza viruses, influenza A was more frequent than B, with predominance of the A/H1N1/pdm09 subtype. The flu-like virus which infected most children was the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The greatest number of cases with RSV was registered in the group of the youngest children (0-4 years). CONCLUSIONS This population study from Poland showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, and during the winter influenza season of 2019/20, influenza and influenza-like viral infections in children showed some differences from previous influenza seasons. The findings highlight the importance of viral infection surveillance and influenza vaccination in the pediatric population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Academies and Institutes , Age Distribution , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Male , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2136263, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565151

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic created the need for rapid and urgent guidance for clinicians to manage COVID-19 among patients and prevent transmission. Objective: To appraise the quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) using the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) criteria. Evidence Review: A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to December 14, 2020, and a search of related articles to February 28, 2021, that included CPGs developed by societies or by government or nongovernment organizations that reported pharmacologic treatments of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Teams of 2 reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed CPG quality using the 15-item National Guideline Clearinghouse Extent of Adherence to Trustworthy Standards (NEATS) instrument. Findings: Thirty-two CPGs were included in the review. Of these, 25 (78.1%) were developed by professional societies and emanated from a single World Health Organization (WHO) region. Overall, the CPGs were of low quality. Only 7 CPGs (21.9%) reported funding sources, and 12 (37.5%) reported conflicts of interest. Only 5 CPGs (15.6%) included a methodologist, described a search strategy or study selection process, or synthesized the evidence. Although 14 CPGs (43.8%) made recommendations or suggestions for or against treatments, they infrequently rated confidence in the quality of the evidence (6 of 32 [18.8%]), described potential benefits and harms (6 of 32 [18.8%]), or graded the strength of the recommendations (5 of 32 [15.6%]). External review, patient or public perspectives, or a process for updating were rare. High-quality CPGs included a methodologist and multidisciplinary collaborations involving investigators from 2 or more WHO regions. Conclusions and Relevance: In this review, few COVID-19 CPGs met NAM standards for trustworthy guidelines. Approaches that prioritize engagement of a methodologist and multidisciplinary collaborators from at least 2 WHO regions may lead to the production of fewer, high-quality CPGs that are poised for updates as new evidence emerges. Trial Registration: PROSPERO Identifier: CRD42021245239.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Hospitalization , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Academies and Institutes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Trust
11.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(D1): D11-D19, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546006

ABSTRACT

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) maintains a comprehensive range of freely available and up-to-date molecular data resources, which includes over 40 resources covering every major data type in the life sciences. This year's service update for EMBL-EBI includes new resources, PGS Catalog and AlphaFold DB, and updates on existing resources, including the COVID-19 Data Platform, trRosetta and RoseTTAfold models introduced in Pfam and InterPro, and the launch of Genome Integrations with Function and Sequence by UniProt and Ensembl. Furthermore, we highlight projects through which EMBL-EBI has contributed to the development of community-driven data standards and guidelines, including the Recommended Metadata for Biological Images (REMBI), and the BioModels Reproducibility Scorecard. Training is one of EMBL-EBI's core missions and a key component of the provision of bioinformatics services to users: this year's update includes many of the improvements that have been developed to EMBL-EBI's online training offering.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/education , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Factual , Academies and Institutes , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19 , Databases, Factual/economics , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Databases, Protein , Europe , Genome, Human , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval , RNA, Untranslated/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
12.
Acta Virol ; 65(4): 420-432, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526914

ABSTRACT

Cross-sectional seroprevalence study of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies was accomplished in the Slovak Academy of Sciences to inform authorities of research institutions about the situation at their workplaces, to assess the risk of next exposure to SARS-CoV-2, and to guide decisions on institutional measures sustaining essential research in evolving epidemic situation. Study participants provided informed consent, anamnestic information, and self-collected dry blood spot samples that were analyzed by ELISA for SARS-CoV-2 S protein-specific IgG antibodies. Relative antibody levels detected in 1928 subjects showed seroprevalence of 84.13% and led to the following main findings consistent with the current knowledge: (1) mRNA-based vaccines induce better humoral response compared to adenovirus vaccines, (2) antibody levels reflect severity of COVID-19 symptoms, (3) post-COVID vaccination results in marked elevation of IgG levels particularly in asymptomatic and mild cases, (4) antibody levels decrease with increasing time elapsed from vaccination or COVID-19. In addition, data sorting to distinct research institutes and their clustering to three principal scientific sections of the Slovak Academy of Sciences revealed marked differences in seroprevalence, and allowed to identify workplaces with relatively high seropositivity and response rate that can potentially provide a safer working environment than those, where seroprevalence was low or unknown due to low participation. Thus, findings of this study can have direct implications on management decisions during the next pandemic development, with the necessity to keep in mind the phenomenon of time-dependent immunity waning and current spread of more contagious Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2. Keywords: SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus; COVID-19; spike protein; seroprevalence; antibodies; vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Academies and Institutes , Antibodies, Viral , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Slovakia/epidemiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination
13.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e2, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525380

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , Vaccination , Humans
14.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511817

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
15.
Mol Biol Cell ; 32(22): ae2, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500972

ABSTRACT

If this was not happening in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, I imagine that I would be speaking these words instead of writing them on my laptop. Even so, I am so jazzed for this opportunity! No word or phrase describes what I am feeling in this moment in receiving the 2021 American Society for Cell Biology Prize for Excellence in Inclusivity. It is certainly an honor to be recognized in this way. I am grateful to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute for awarding me additional resources to keep on keeping on. My approach to finding the connection between people and their science certainly could use the monetary support. Resources open doors. At the same time that I am grateful for the attention, I am not exactly sure what to do with the spotlight. Importantly, there are a host of other folks out there also doing amazing things who have never been recognized. Let's work to ensure that their contributions are supported, appreciated, and recognized. Instead of focusing the spotlight on me, I would rather redirect it to recognize my foundational influences. I also hope to encourage the need for institutional approaches beyond celebrating individual accomplishment.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Cultural Diversity , Social Change , Academies and Institutes , History, 21st Century , Humans , Social Environment
17.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 395-405, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463959

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We analyzed the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19) to understand leading research institutions, collaborations among institutions, major publication venues, key research concepts, and topics covered by pandemic-related research. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive analysis of authors' institutions and relationships, automatic content extraction of key words and phrases from titles and abstracts, and topic modeling and evolution. Data visualization techniques were applied to present the results of the analysis. RESULTS: We found that leading research institutions on COVID-19 included the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the US National Institutes of Health, and the University of California. Research studies mostly involved collaboration among different institutions at national and international levels. In addition to bioRxiv, major publication venues included journals such as The BMJ, PLOS One, Journal of Virology, and The Lancet. Key research concepts included the coronavirus, acute respiratory impairments, health care, and social distancing. The ten most popular topics were identified through topic modeling and included human metapneumovirus and livestock, clinical outcomes of severe patients, and risk factors for higher mortality rate. CONCLUSION: Data analytics is a powerful approach for quickly processing and understanding large-scale datasets like CORD-19. This approach could help medical librarians, researchers, and the public understand important characteristics of COVID-19 research and could be applied to the analysis of other large datasets.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes/statistics & numerical data , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Research Report , Bibliometrics , China , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 142(1): 75-84, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463294

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 has re-affirmed the crucial importance of the pharmaceuticals industry in improving the level of citizens' health and medical care, as well as the industry's importance in terms of contribution to economic growth and tax revenues. Although some time has passed since the importance of industry-academia collaboration was first raised in relation to the creation of innovative new drugs and the continuation of global competitiveness, conflicts between academia and companies have also been highlighted as barriers that hinder efforts to promote the practical realization of academia-initiated seeds. The authors have hypothesized that conflicts between academia and companies can be attributed to the vulnerability of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side, insufficient awareness concerning human resources that will undertake industry-academia operations, and inadequate development of structures. Consequently, we implemented fact-finding investigations in relation to universities and public research institutions in Japan, with the objective of ascertaining the actual status of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side. From the results of these investigations, we will clarify the issues that may present barriers to innovation creation, and consider policies, etc. for the enhancement of innovation creation environments.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , COVID-19 , Drug Discovery , Drug Industry , Intellectual Property , Intersectoral Collaboration , Humans , Universities , Workforce
19.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
20.
Int J Infect Dis ; 112: 281-287, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428020

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Serological testing is needed to better understand the epidemiology of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been developed to detect specific antibodies, IgM and IgG, to the virus. The performance of 25 of these RDTs was evaluated. METHODS: A serological reference panel of 50 positive and 100 negative plasma specimens was developed from SARS-CoV-2 PCR and antibody positive patients and pre-pandemic SARS-CoV-2-negative specimens collected in 2016. Test performance of the 25 RDTs was evaluated against this panel. RESULTS: A total of 10 RDTs had a sensitivity ≥98%, while 13 RDTs had a specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. Four RDTs (Boson, MultiG, Standard Q, and VivaDiag) had both sensitivity and specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. Only three RDTs had a sensitivity ≥98%, while 10 RDTs had a specificity ≥98% to anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM antibodies. Three RDTs (Autobio, MultiG, and Standard Q) had sensitivity and specificity ≥98% to combined IgG/IgM. The RDTs that performed well also had perfect or almost perfect inter-reader agreement. CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation identified three RDTs with a sensitivity and specificity to IgM/IgG antibodies of ≥98% with the potential for widespread antibody testing in Uganda.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes , Antibodies, Viral , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Sensitivity and Specificity , Uganda/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL