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1.
Lancet ; 399(10331): 1226, 2022 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757955
2.
STAR Protoc ; 3(1): 101226, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713029

ABSTRACT

This Backstory discusses the development of a SARS-CoV-2 detection method using widely available laboratory equipment. The approach, reported in Cell Reports Methods and STAR Protocols, is intended as a diagnostic tool for COVID-19 that is accessible for resource-limited areas. We describe how the published method and protocols encourage adoption of the detection strategy in different areas and a variety of biological contexts. For complete details on the UnCovid method and protocols, please refer to (Alcántara et al., 2021a; Alcántara et al., 2021b; Mendoza-Rojas, et al., 2021).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Access to Information , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Immunity ; 54(12): 2673-2675, 2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709840

ABSTRACT

We talk to first and last authors Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman about their seminal 2005 paper ''Suppression of RNA recognition by Toll-like receptors: the impact of nucleoside modification and the evolutionary origin of RNA", about how they see the work in retrospect, the current progress in the field, and their inspiration-then and now.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , RNA/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , /immunology , Access to Information , Animals , Humans , Information Dissemination , Mice , Nucleosides/immunology
4.
Elife ; 112022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689827

ABSTRACT

A healthcare center widely sharing its internal guidelines on how to treat COVID-19 patients "just wasn't done." As the pandemic raged at a Boston hospital, the next generation of clinical leaders pushed for change.


Subject(s)
Access to Information , COVID-19/therapy , Laboratories, Hospital/standards , Leadership , Access to Information/ethics , Access to Information/psychology , Boston
5.
ChemistryOpen ; 11(1): e202100270, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653323

ABSTRACT

Shining On! Happy first 10 years, ChemistryOpen! From little more than a new trend in chemistry publishing, the Open Access model has grown into a major theme in publishing in the last decade. The idea of Open Science has become instrumental for the collaboration among scientists, not only during the pandemic, and ChemistryOpen is ready to start its next decade in a much more open world!


Subject(s)
Access to Information , Open Access Publishing , Publishing , Societies
6.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(4)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630982

ABSTRACT

Crisis motivates people to track news closely, and this increased engagement can expose individuals to politically sensitive information unrelated to the initial crisis. We use the case of the COVID-19 outbreak in China to examine how crisis affects information seeking in countries that normally exert significant control over access to media. The crisis spurred censorship circumvention and access to international news and political content on websites blocked in China. Once individuals circumvented censorship, they not only received more information about the crisis itself but also accessed unrelated information that the regime has long censored. Using comparisons to democratic and other authoritarian countries also affected by early outbreaks, the findings suggest that people blocked from accessing information most of the time might disproportionately and collectively access that long-hidden information during a crisis. Evaluations resulting from this access, negative or positive for a government, might draw on both current events and censored history.


Subject(s)
Access to Information , COVID-19/psychology , Information Seeking Behavior/physiology , Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence , Access to Information/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Political Systems , Politics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/legislation & jurisprudence , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/trends
13.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211044344, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440890

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many aspects of everyday life. Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) are in a particularly difficult situation. The purpose of the present study was to contribute to the very limited research on the everyday aspects of functioning in PID patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The survey included 85 adult PID patients treated with immunoglobulin replacement therapy in four reference centers for immunology. Everyday functioning of the patients as well as their opinion concerning new solutions in medical care were analyzed. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the percentage of patients experiencing fear/anxiety has increased from 47% to 70%. The wide dissemination of information about the SARS-CoV-2 in the media has increased anxiety in 40% of the patients. Patients diagnosed with PID were most afraid of the exposure to contact with strangers, especially in public places. As many as 67 respondents (79%) considered the introduction of restrictions concerning social functioning as good. Only every fifth person learned about the pandemic from reliable sources. Eighty three percent of the patients receiving immunoglobulin substitution experienced less fear of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The patients positively evaluated the solutions related to the direct delivery of drugs to the place of residence in order to continue home IgRT therapy. Fifty three respondents (62.5%) believed that the possibility of a remote consultation was a very good solution. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to increase educational activities concerning the pandemic provided by health care professionals, as patients obtain information mainly from the media and the Internet, which adversely affects the feeling of anxiety. The pandemic, in addition to the very negative impact on patients and the deterioration of their daily functioning, has made patients appreciate their life more, devote more time to family and friends, and do things they like.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/drug therapy , Access to Information , Adult , Affect , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cost of Illness , Drug Substitution , Fear , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Education as Topic , Poland , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/diagnosis , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/psychology , Social Behavior , Telemedicine , Treatment Outcome
14.
Australas J Ageing ; 40(3): 235-236, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434622
16.
Health Inf Manag ; 50(1-2): 13-25, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examined the health literacy demands of My Health Record (MyHR) in the context of preparing for a government-announced opt-out system by repeating two studies of health information and usability conducted in 2016. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether Australia's MyHR meets the information and usability needs of people at risk of low health literacy and changes since 2016. METHOD: Content analysis: Informed by the 2016 methods and findings, measures of information quality, themes and target audiences were recorded and reported for each online consumer-facing health information resource. Heuristic evaluation: An evaluation of the MyHR and supporting information website was conducted using a predetermined checklist of usability criteria. A list of usability violations for both websites was identified. RESULTS: Total number of resources grew from 80 in 2016 to 233 in 2018. There was little change since 2016 to average readability levels, target audiences, presentation style, links between resources and usability of MyHR. Compared to 2016, this study demonstrated increases in resources from non-government organisations; video resources; translated resources; and resources with themes of privacy, security and post-registration use. CONCLUSION: This study identified some improvements in information quality since 2016, but gaps remain in information quality and usability which may negatively impact the ability for people with low health literacy to access and use MyHR. IMPLICATIONS: This study provides a framework for ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the suitability of MyHR for people at risk of low health literacy.


Subject(s)
Consumer Health Information/legislation & jurisprudence , Consumer Health Information/standards , Health Literacy , Patient Rights , Privacy , Access to Information , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 947-950, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364847

ABSTRACT

While advances in science and technology continue to be at the forefront of the evolution of medical practice, the 21st century is also undergoing a unique and profound cultural shift that is changing the very nature of what it means to be a medical professional, namely humankind's transition to an information-based internet society. Medical care will increasingly depend on computer-generated probabilities guided and supported by a growing variety of individuals in health care-related professions, including statisticians, technologists, and information managers. Perhaps the biggest challenge to the profession will come from the erosion of professional autonomy, driven by smart machines, social networks, and internet search engines. As a result of these and other changes, physicians are facing a systematic loss of control, often without the direct input and leadership of the profession itself. In this commentary, the author urges the profession to adopt several strategies, including shifting its focus from reimbursement to the care patients value most, meaningfully addressing critical issues in health policy, becoming the definitive source for publicly available medical information, reimagining medical education, and overhauling the existing accreditation and licensing systems. Medical education must go beyond a focus on physicians whose professional identity revolves around being the exclusive source of medical knowledge. In the digitized 21st century, medical education should emphasize the centrality of the humanistic interface with patients such that the doctor-patient relationship is paramount in the complex medical world of machines and social media. Removing the roadblocks to successful professional reform is no small task, but the process can begin with a grassroots movement that empowers physicians and facilitates organizational and behavioral change. Failure to take action may well hasten the diminishment of patient care and the profession's trusted role in society.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/history , Medical Informatics/instrumentation , Medicine/instrumentation , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Access to Information , Accreditation/methods , Accreditation/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/methods , Empowerment , Health Policy , History, 21st Century , Humans , Knowledge , Leadership , Medical Informatics/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Professional Autonomy , Social Networking
18.
Physis (Rio J.) ; 31(2): e310204, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1350198

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective was to analyze the information related to the new coronavirus pandemic in Brazil, conveyed by national and state authorities, through the lens of risk communication and community engagement. This is a qualitative and reflective study, anchored in rhetorical analysis. Two groups of speeches were analyzed. The first, nationwide, subdivided into the discourse by the Presidency of the Republic of Brazil and by the Ministry of Health. The second, of the states, represented by their normative actions related to the fight against the pandemic. Some recommendations in the management of the disease have unanimous understanding. Other actions, however, do not find the same support in the national and subnational discourse, reason why the following is adopted for a more detailed analysis in this article: the organization of risk communication and community engagement; the practice of social distancing; and the use of medications to treat the disease. Risk communication is based on the premise that every public health emergency faces communication challenges and may benefit from the lessons already learned. The fact that there are different discourses among the entities of the Federation implies disorganization of information, disagreements, and a greater degree of uncertainty in the population about the disease and how to prevent it.


Resumo Objetivou-se analisar as informações relacionadas à pandemia do novo coronavírus no Brasil, veiculadas pelas autoridades nacionais e estaduais, pelas lentes da comunicação de risco e engajamento comunitário. Trata-se de um estudo qualitativo, reflexivo, ancorado na análise retórica. Foram analisados dois grupos de discursos. O primeiro, de âmbito nacional, subdividido em discurso da Presidência da República do Brasil e do Ministério da Saúde. O segundo, dos estados, representados por seus atos normativos relacionados ao enfrentamento da pandemia. Algumas recomendações no manejo da doença têm compreensão unânime. Outras ações, no entanto, não encontram o mesmo amparo no discurso nacional e subnacional, por esse motivo sendo tomado para análise mais detalhada nesse artigo, a saber: a organização da comunicação de risco e o engajamento comunitário; a prática de distanciamento social; e o uso de medicamentos para o tratamento da doença. A comunicação de risco parte da premissa de que toda emergência de saúde pública enfrenta desafios de comunicação e pode se beneficiar das lições aprendidas anteriormente. O fato da existência de discursos distintos entre os entes da federação implica na desorganização das informações, desentendimentos e maior grau de incerteza da população sobre a doença e como se prevenir.


Subject(s)
Humans , Politics , Public Health , Policy , Health Communication , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Brazil , Access to Information , Information Dissemination/methods , Social Networking
19.
Cell Rep ; 36(7): 109527, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330685

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pathology involves dysregulation of diverse molecular, cellular, and physiological processes. To expedite integrated and collaborative COVID-19 research, we completed multi-omics analysis of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, including matched analysis of the whole-blood transcriptome, plasma proteomics with two complementary platforms, cytokine profiling, plasma and red blood cell metabolomics, deep immune cell phenotyping by mass cytometry, and clinical data annotation. We refer to this multidimensional dataset as the COVIDome. We then created the COVIDome Explorer, an online researcher portal where the data can be analyzed and visualized in real time. We illustrate herein the use of the COVIDome dataset through a multi-omics analysis of biosignatures associated with C-reactive protein (CRP), an established marker of poor prognosis in COVID-19, revealing associations between CRP levels and damage-associated molecular patterns, depletion of protective serpins, and mitochondrial metabolism dysregulation. We expect that the COVIDome Explorer will rapidly accelerate data sharing, hypothesis testing, and discoveries worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Databases, Genetic , Metabolome , Proteome , Transcriptome , Access to Information , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Data Mining , Datasets as Topic , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Male , Metabolomics , Middle Aged , Proteomics , Young Adult
20.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
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