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1.
J. oral res. (Impresa) ; 11(6): 1-13, nov. 3, 2022. ilus, tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20234393

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The consumption of alcoholic beverages reduces the body's ability to deal with dangerous situations and exposes people to trauma. Objective: To determine the association between the consumption of alcoholic beverages and the characteristics of maxillofacial fractures treated at a Cuban university hospital in the context of COVID-19. Material and Methods: An observational, analytical, and cross-sectional study was carried out in the Maxillofacial Surgery unit at the "Carlos Manuel de Céspedes" General University Hospital during the year 2020. Prevalence ratios, 95% confidence intervals and p-values were obtained using generalized linear models. Results: In 58.23% of the cases, fractures were related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages. The fundamental etiology was interpersonal violence (47.75%), regardless of the consumption of alcoholic beverages. There was a prevalence of patients with nasal fractures (n=98; 55.06%), among which, 35.71% had consumed alcoholic beverages at the time of the trauma. Being male (p=0.005), the lack of university studies (p=0.007), the need for surgical treatment (p<0.001), the fractures of the zygomaticomaxillary complex (p=0.023), and the traumas that occurred during the weekends (p<0.001) or during the month of June (p=0.029) were factors associated with a higher frequency of fractures related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages. There was a lower frequency of fractures associated with alcohol consumption during the months of January (p=0.006) and March (p=0.001). Conclusion: Six out of ten cases were under the influence of alcoholic beverages. There was a greater number of young and male patients, mainly due to interpersonal violence.


Introducción: La ingestión de bebidas alcohólicas disminuye la capacidad del organismo para enfrentar situaciones de peligro y lo predispone a sufrir traumatismos diversos. Objetivo: Determinar la asociación entre el consumo de bebidas alcohólicas y las características de las fracturas maxilofaciales atendidas en un hospital universitario cubano en el contexto de la COVID-19. Material y Métodos: Estudio observacional, analítico y transversal realizado en el servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital General Universitario "Carlos Manuel de Céspedes" durante el 2020. Se obtuvieron razones de prevalencia, intervalos de confianza a 95% y valores p mediante modelos lineales generalizados. Resultados: En el 58.23% de los casos las fracturas se relacionaron con la ingestión de bebidas alcohólicas. La etiología fundamental fue la violencia interpersonal (47.75%), independientemente del consumo o no de bebidas alcohólicas. Predominaron los pacientes con fracturas nasales (n=98; 55.06%), en los que el 35.71% había consumido bebidas alcohólicas en el momento del trauma. El sexo masculino (p=0.005), la carencia de estudios universitarios (p=0.007), la necesidad de tratamiento quirúrgico (p<0.001), las fracturas del complejo cigomático-maxilar (p=0.023), los traumas sucedidos durante los fines de semanas (p<0.001) o durante el mes de junio (p=0.029) fueron factores asociados a una mayor frecuencia de fracturas relacionadas con el consumo de bebidas alcohólicas. Hubo menor frecuencia de fracturas asociadas a este consumo durante los meses de enero (p=0.006) y marzo (p= 0.001). Conclusión: Seis de cada diez casos estuvieron bajo los efectos de la ingestión de bebidas alcohólicas. Existió una mayor afectación de pacientes jóvenes, masculinos, a causa principalmente de la violencia interpersonal.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Skull Fractures/etiology , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Alcohol Drinking/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Maxillofacial Injuries/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cuba/epidemiology , Alcoholic Beverages , Alcoholism/complications , Pandemics
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 610504, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760273

ABSTRACT

Objective: Study aimed to identify the prevalence of falls and associated contributory factors among older Malaysians. Methods: A cross sectional study among community dwelling older adults aged 50 years and above. Self-administered questionnaires on history of falls in the previous 12 months, physical assessment and computerized and clinical measures of balance were assessed on a single occasion. Results: Forty nine (31.0%) participants fell, with 4.4% reported having multiple falls within the previous 12 months. Slips were the most prevalent cause of falls, accounting for 49% of falls. More than half (54.5%) of falls occurred in the afternoon while participants walked inside the home (32.7%), outside home (30.6%), and 36.7% were in community areas. More than half of respondents were identified as having turning instability. Step Test, turn sway, depression, physical activity level and edge contrast sensitivity were significantly worse for fallers (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that turning performance, visual acuity and back pain were significantly associated with falls risk, accounting for 72% of the variance of risk factors for falls among studied population. Conclusion: Falls are common among community dwelling older Malaysians. The findings provide information of falls and falls risk factors among community dwelling older adults in Malaysia. Future intervention studies should target locally identified falls risk factors. This study has highlighted the importance of instability during turning as an important fall risk factor.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls , Independent Living , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors
3.
Arch Dis Child ; 106(11): 1050-1055, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, injuries cause >5 million deaths annually and children and young people are particularly vulnerable. Injuries are the leading cause of death in people aged 5-24 years and a leading cause of disability. In most low-income and middle-income countries where the majority of global child injury burden occurs, systems for routinely collecting injury data are limited. METHODS: A new model of injury surveillance for use in emergency departments in Nepal was designed and piloted. Data from patients presenting with injuries were collected prospectively over 12 months and used to describe the epidemiology of paediatric injury presentations. RESULTS: The total number of children <18 years of age presenting with injury was 2696, representing 27% of all patients presenting with injuries enrolled. Most injuries in children presenting to the emergency departments in this study were unintentional and over half of children were <10 years of age. Falls, animal bites/stings and road traffic injuries accounted for nearly 75% of all injuries with poisonings, burns and drownings presenting proportionately less often. Over half of injuries were cuts, bites and open wounds. In-hospital child mortality from injury was 1%. CONCLUSION: Injuries affecting children in Nepal represent a significant burden. The data on injuries observed from falls, road traffic injuries and injuries related to animals suggest potential areas for injury prevention. This is the biggest prospective injury surveillance study in Nepal in recent years and supports the case for using injury surveillance to monitor child morbidity and mortality through improved data.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Global Burden of Disease/economics , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Animals , Bites and Stings/epidemiology , Burns/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Drowning/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Nepal/epidemiology , Poisoning/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Trauma Severity Indices , Wounds and Injuries/mortality , Wounds and Injuries/prevention & control
4.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(1): 49-59, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429915

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical function worsens with older age, particularly for sedentary and socially isolated individuals, and this often leads to injuries. Through reductions in physical activity, the COVID-19 pandemic may have worsened physical function and led to higher fall-related risks. METHODS: A nationally representative online survey of 2006 U.S. adults aged 50-80 was conducted in January 2021 to assess changes in health behaviors (worsened physical activity and less daily time spent on feet), social isolation (lack of companionship and perceived isolation), physical function (mobility and physical conditioning), and falls (falls and fear of falling) since March 2020. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess relationships among physical activity, social isolation, physical function, falls, and fear of falling. RESULTS: Among respondents, 740 (36.9%) reported reduced physical activity levels, 704 (35.1%) reported reduced daily time spent on their feet since March 2020, 712 (37.1%) reported lack of companionship, and 914 (45.9%) social isolation. In multivariable models, decreased physical activity (adjusted risk ratio, ARR: 2.92, 95% CI: 2.38, 3.61), less time spent on one's feet (ARR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.62, 2.34), and social isolation (ARR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.30, 1.74) were associated with greater risks of worsened physical conditioning. Decreased physical activity, time spent daily on one's feet, and social isolation were similarly associated with worsened mobility. Worsened mobility was associated with both greater risk of falling (ARR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.35, 2.15) and worsened fear of falling (ARR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.30, 3.13). Worsened physical conditioning and social isolation were also associated with greater risk of worsened fear of falling. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with worsened physical functioning and fall outcomes, with the greatest effect on individuals with reduced physical activity and social isolation. Public health actions to address reduced physical activity and social isolation among older adults are needed.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Health Status , Independent Living , Sedentary Behavior , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Exercise/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 90(4): 708-713, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire global health care system. In California, because of a high burden of cases, a lockdown order was announced on March 19, 2020. This study investigated the impact of the lockdown on the epidemiology and outcomes of trauma admissions at the largest trauma center in Los Angeles. METHODS: A retrospective study comparing epidemiological and clinical characteristics and outcomes of trauma admissions during the lockdown period (March 20, 2020, to June 30, 2020) to a similar period in the previous year (March 20, 2019, to June 30, 2019) was performed. Data collection included demographics, mechanism of injury, prehospital transportation, substance use, injury severity, resource utilization, and outcomes. FINDINGS: There were 1,202 admissions during the lockdown period in 2020 and 1,143 during the same calendar period in 2019. Following the lockdown, there was a reduction in the automobile versus pedestrian admissions by 42.5%, motorcycle injuries by 38.7%, and bicycle accidents by 28.4% but no significant effect on the number of motor vehicle accident admissions. There was an increase in ground level falls by 32.5%, especially in the elderly group. The absolute number of gunshot wounds increased by 6.2% and knife injuries by 39.3%. Suicides increased by 38.5%. Positive testing for substance use increased by 20.9%. During the lockdown, patients suffered less severe trauma, with Injury Severity Score of <9 (p < 0.001), as well as less severe head (p = 0.001) and severe chest trauma (p < 0.001). Trauma deaths were reduced by 27.9%, and the crude overall mortality was significantly lower during the lockdown period (4.1% vs. 5.9%, p = 0.046). Intensive care unit admission rates, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit length of stay were all reduced. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 had a significant effect on the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and critical care resource utilization of trauma admissions in a large academic trauma center. These findings may help in planning and optimization of hospital resources during the pandemic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiological study, level III; Retrospective observational, level III.


Subject(s)
Accidental Injuries/epidemiology , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Physical Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Male , Mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Severity Indices , Wounds, Gunshot/epidemiology
6.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(7): 1713-1721, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Emergency department (ED) visits have declined while excess mortality, not attributable to COVID-19, has grown. It is not known whether older adults are accessing emergency care differently from their younger counterparts. Our objective was to determine patterns of ED visit counts for emergent conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic for older adults. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational study. SETTING: Observational analysis of ED sites enrolled in a national clinical quality registry. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and sixty-four ED sites in 33 states from January 1, 2019 to November 15, 2020. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: We measured daily ED visit counts for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, sepsis, fall, and hip fracture, as well as deaths in the ED, by age categories. We estimated Poisson regression models comparing early and post-early pandemic periods (defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) to the pre-pandemic period. We report incident rate ratios to summarize changes in visit incidence. RESULTS: For AMI, stroke, and sepsis, the older (75-84) and oldest old (85+ years) had the greatest decline in visit counts initially and the smallest recovery in the post-early pandemic periods. For falls, visits declined early and partially recovered uniformly across age categories. In contrast, hip fractures exhibited less change in visit rates across time periods. Deaths in the ED increased during the early pandemic period, but then fell and were persistently lower than baseline, especially for the older (75-84) and oldest old (85+ years). CONCLUSIONS: The decline in ED visits for emergent conditions among older adults has been more pronounced and persistent than for younger patients, with fewer deaths in the ED. This is concerning given the greater prevalence and risk of poor outcomes for emergent conditions in this age group that are amenable to time-sensitive ED diagnosis and treatment, and may in part explain excess mortality during the COVID-19 era among older adults.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Aging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Myocardial Infarction , Sepsis , Stroke , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/physiology , Aging/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mortality , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/mortality , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , United States/epidemiology
7.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(3): 160-166, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110065

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in reconfiguration of the NHS. Elective services were stopped and trauma services focused on decreasing patient-clinician interactions and managing injuries nonoperatively wherever possible. The everyday life of the general public changed dramatically with the introduction of a national lockdown to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This paper looks at the experience of a South West London trauma unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients reviewed in fracture clinic and by the orthopaedic on-call team between 23 March to 23 April 2020 were included. Data on the mechanism of injury and whether this was a usual activity, the injury sustained and its management were collected. RESULTS: A total of 167 trauma injuries were seen, compared with 735 new patients with injuries in the previous month. The number of trauma operations completed decreased by 38%; 55% of injuries occurred inside the home and 44% outside the home during daily exercise. Some 31% of injuries were secondary to a new activity taken up during lockdown. Three open fractures and two polytrauma cases were seen that would have normally been managed at the local major trauma centre. CONCLUSION: Overall, both the number of injuries seen and trauma operations completed during the enforced lockdown decreased. This is probably due to a change in the way the general public are living their lives, and the reconfigurations within the NHS in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is an interesting time within trauma and orthopaedic departments, as they continue to adapt to the changing injuries and working environment.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Home/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Trauma Centers , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bicycling/injuries , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Femoral Neck Fractures/epidemiology , Femoral Neck Fractures/etiology , Femoral Neck Fractures/surgery , Fracture Fixation, Internal , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Gardening , Humans , Infant , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Radius Fractures/epidemiology , Radius Fractures/etiology , Radius Fractures/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
8.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(2): e211320, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092488

ABSTRACT

Importance: Describing the changes in trauma volume and injury patterns during the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic could help to inform policy development and hospital resource planning. Objective: To examine trends in trauma admissions throughout Los Angeles County (LAC) during the pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this cohort study, all trauma admissions to the 15 verified level 1 and level 2 trauma centers in LAC from January 1 to June 7, 2020 were reviewed. All trauma admissions from the same period in 2019 were used as historical control. For overall admissions, the study period was divided into 3 intervals based on daily admission trend analysis (January 1 through February 28, March 1 through April 9, April 10 through June 7). For the blunt trauma subgroup analysis, the study period was divided into 3 similar intervals (January 1 through February 27, February 28 through April 5, April 6 through June 7). Exposures: COVID-19 pandemic. Main Outcomes and Measures: Trends in trauma admission volume and injury patterns. Results: A total of 6777 patients in 2020 and 6937 in 2019 met inclusion criteria. Of those admitted in 2020, the median (interquartile range) age was 42 (28-61) years and 5100 (75.3%) were men. Mechanisms of injury were significantly different between the 2 years, with a higher incidence of penetrating trauma and fewer blunt injuries in 2020 compared with 2019 (penetrating: 1065 [15.7%] vs 1065 [15.4%]; blunt: 5309 [78.3%] vs 5528 [79.7%]). Overall admissions by interval in 2020 were 2681, 1684, and 2412, whereas in 2019 they were 2462, 1862, and 2613, respectively. There was a significant increase in overall admissions per week during the first interval (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.02; 95% CI, 1.002-1.04; P = .03) followed by a decrease in the second interval (IRR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.90-0.94; P < .001) and, finally, an increase in the third interval (IRR, 1.05; CI, 1.03-1.07; P < .001). On subgroup analysis, blunt admissions followed a similar pattern to overall admissions, while penetrating admissions increased throughout the study period. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, trauma centers throughout LAC experienced a significant change in injury patterns and admission trends during the COVID-19 pandemic. A transient decrease in volume was followed by a quick return to baseline levels. Trauma centers should prioritize maintaining access, capacity, and functionality during pandemics and other national emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Abbreviated Injury Scale , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Bites and Stings/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Injury Severity Score , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Violence/statistics & numerical data , Wounds, Gunshot/epidemiology , Wounds, Stab/epidemiology
9.
Injury ; 52(3): 395-401, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087000

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in both mechanism and diagnoses of injuries presenting to the orthopaedic department during this lockdown period, as well as to observe any changes in operative case-mix during this time. METHODS: A study period of twelve weeks following the introduction of the nationwide "lockdown period", March 23rd - June 14th, 2020 was identified and compared to the same time period in 2019 as a "baseline period". A retrospective analysis of all emergency orthopaedic referrals and surgical procedures performed during these time frames was undertaken. All data was collected and screened using the 'eTrauma' management platform (Open Medical, UK). The study included data from a five NHS Foundation Trusts within North West London. A total of 6695 referrals were included for analysis. RESULTS: The total number of referrals received during the lockdown period fell by 35.3% (n=2631) compared to the same period in 2019 (n=4064). Falls remained proportionally the most common mechanism of injury across all age groups in both time periods. The proportion sports related injuries compared to the overall number of injuries fell significantly during the lockdown period (p<0.001), however, the proportion of pushbike related accidents increased significantly (p<0.001). The total number of operations performed during the lockdown period fell by 38.8% (n=1046) during lockdown (n=1732). The proportion of patients undergoing operative intervention for Neck of Femur (NOF) and ankle fractures remained similar during both study periods. A more non-operative approach was seen in the management of wrist fractures, with 41.4% of injuries undergoing an operation during the lockdown period compared to 58.6% at baseline (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the nationwide lockdown has led to a decrease in emergency orthopaedic referrals and procedure numbers. There has been a change in mechanism of injuries, with fewer sporting injuries, conversely, there has been an increase in the number of pushbike or scooter related injuries during the lockdown period. NOF fractures remained at similar levels to the previous year. There was a change in strategy for managing distal radius fractures with more fractures being treated non-operatively.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/trends , Bicycling/injuries , COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Referral and Consultation/trends , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Arm Injuries/epidemiology , Arm Injuries/etiology , Arm Injuries/therapy , Athletic Injuries/epidemiology , Athletic Injuries/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Female , Femoral Neck Fractures/epidemiology , Femoral Neck Fractures/surgery , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Fractures, Bone/therapy , Fractures, Open/epidemiology , Fractures, Open/etiology , Fractures, Open/therapy , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Leg Injuries/epidemiology , Leg Injuries/etiology , Leg Injuries/therapy , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/therapy , Wrist Injuries/epidemiology , Wrist Injuries/etiology , Wrist Injuries/therapy , Young Adult
10.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 637-645, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has impacted population health and care delivery worldwide. As information emerges regarding the impact of "lockdown measures" and changes to clinical practice worldwide; there is no comparative information emerging from the United Kingdom with regard to major trauma. METHODS: This observational study from a UK Major Trauma Centre matched a cohort of patients admitted during a 10-week period of the SARS-CoV-2-pandemic (09/03/2020-18/05/2020) to a historical cohort of patients admitted during a similar time period in 2019 (11/03/2019-20/05/2019). Differences in demographics, Clinical Frailty Scale, SARS-CoV-2 status, mechanism of injury and injury severity were compared using Fisher's exact and Chi-squared tests. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the associated factors that predicted 30-days mortality. RESULTS: A total of 642 patients were included, with 405 in the 2019 and 237 in the 2020 cohorts, respectively. 4/237(1.69%) of patients in the 2020 cohort tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. There was a 41.5% decrease in the number of trauma admissions in 2020. This cohort was older (median 46 vs 40 years), had more comorbidities and were frail (p < 0.0015). There was a significant difference in mechanism of injury with a decrease in vehicle related trauma, but an increase in falls. There was a twofold increased risk of mortality in the 2020 cohort which in adjusted multivariable models, was explained by injury severity and frailty. A positive SARS-CoV-2 status was not significantly associated with increased mortality when adjusted for other variables. CONCLUSION: Patients admitted during the COVID-19 pandemic were older, frailer, more co-morbid and had an associated increased risk of mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Severity Indices , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/classification , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
11.
Acta Orthop ; 92(3): 249-253, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062816

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose - COVID-19 lockdowns have resulted in noteworthy changes in trauma admissions. We report and compare the incidence and characteristics of severe injuries (New Injury Severity Score [NISS] > 15) during the COVID-19 lockdown in Finland with earlier years.Methods - We retrospectively analyzed incidence rate, injury severity scores, injury patterns, and mechanisms of injury of all severely injured patients (NISS >15) in 4 Finnish hospitals (Tampere University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Central Finland Hospital, Mikkeli Central Hospital) during the 11-week lockdown period (March 16-May 31, 2020) with comparison with a matching time period in earlier years (2016-2018). These 4 hospitals have a combined catchment area of 1,150,000 people or roughly one-fifth of the population of Finland.Results - The incidence rate of severe injuries during the lockdown period was 4.9/105 inhabitants (95% CI 3.7-6.4). The incidence rate of severe injuries during years 2016-2018 was 5.1/105 inhabitants (CI 3.9-6.5). We could not detect a significant incidence difference between the lockdown period and the 3 previous years (incidence rate difference -0.2 (CI -2.0 to 1.7). The proportion of traffic-related accidents was 55% during the lockdown period and 51% during previous years. There were no detectable differences in injury patterns. During the lockdown period, the mean age of patients was higher (53 years vs. 47 years, p = 0.03) and the rate of severely injured elderly patients (aged 70 or more) was higher (30% vs. 16%).Interpretation - Despite heavy social restrictions, the incidence of severe injuries during the lockdown period was similar to previous years. Notably, a decline in road use and traffic volumes did not reduce the number of severe traffic accidents. Although our data is compatible with a decrease of 2.0 to an increase of 1.7 severely injured patients per 105 inhabitants, we conclude that severely injured patients do not disappear even during pandemic and stabile hospital resources are needed to treat these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/epidemiology , Abbreviated Injury Scale , Abdominal Injuries/epidemiology , Abdominal Injuries/etiology , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology , Craniocerebral Trauma/etiology , Extremities/injuries , Facial Injuries/epidemiology , Facial Injuries/etiology , Female , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Injury Severity Score , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pelvis/injuries , Public Policy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Soft Tissue Infections/epidemiology , Soft Tissue Infections/etiology , Thoracic Injuries/epidemiology , Thoracic Injuries/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology
14.
J Orthop Trauma ; 34(9): e343-e348, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682755

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare orthopaedic trauma volume and mechanism of injury before and during statewide social distancing and stay-at-home directives. DESIGN: Retrospective. SETTING: Level 1 trauma center. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS: One thousand one hundred thirteen patients sustaining orthopaedic trauma injuries between March 17 and April 30 of years 2018, 2019, and 2020. INTERVENTION: Statewide social distancing and stay-at-home directives. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Number of consults, mechanism of injury frequency, and type of injury frequency. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, orthopaedic trauma consult number decreased. Injuries due to gunshot wounds increased and those due to automobile versus pedestrian accidents decreased. Time-to-presentation increased and length of stay decreased. Operative consults remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Orthopaedic trauma injuries continued to occur during the COVID-19 pandemic at an overall decreased rate, however, with a different distribution in mechanism and type of injury. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Isolation , Trauma Centers , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
15.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 653-658, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662473

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In February 2020, the federal state of Tyrol in Austria has become one of the epicenters of the COVID-19 pandemic. Tyrol is known for numerous skiing areas. Thus, winter sport resorts became a starting point for COVID-19 infections spreading towards the rest of the state, Austria and other countries, leading to a mandatory quarantine for almost a million people, who were placed under a curfew and restrictions in daily life. Additionally, all ski resorts and hotels were closed. We aimed to analyze the influence of the COVID-19 quarantine on traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases in Tyrol. METHODS: We retrospectively compared demographical and injury characteristics from all TBI patients within the 2020 strict quarantine period with the respective time periods from 2016 to 2019. As our department is the only neurosurgical unit in Tyrol, all patients with moderate or severe TBI are transferred to our hospital. RESULTS: During 3 weeks of the full quarantine period, the weekly TBI cases load decreased significantly in comparison to the same time periods in the years 2016-2019. Furthermore, concomitant skull fractures decreased significantly (p < 0.016), probably reflecting different causative mechanisms. The other demographical and injury characteristics and particularly falls at home stayed relatively unchanged. CONCLUSION: TBI remained an important contributor to the neurosurgical workflow during the COVID-19 pandemic. Strategies to ensure neurosurgical care also under pandemic-induced lockdown are important.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Brain Injuries, Traumatic , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures , Skiing , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Austria/epidemiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/diagnosis , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/etiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgery/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Severity Indices , Workflow
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