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1.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 40(11-12): 336-341, 2020 12 09.
Article in English, French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1022346

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Research has shown that during the 2003 SARS pandemic, emergency department (ED) visits among the pediatric population decreased. We set out to investigate if this was also true for injury-related ED visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Using data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP), we looked at 28 years of injury-related ED visits at the Montreal Children's Hospital, a provincially designated Pediatric Trauma Centre. We compared data from a two-month period during the COVID-19 lockdown (16 March to 15 May) to the same period in previous years (1993-2019) to determine whether the 2020 decrease in ED visit numbers was unprecedented (i.e. a similar decrease had never occurred) for different age groups, nature of injuries, mechanisms and severity. RESULTS: The 2020 decrease was unprecedented across all age groups between 1993 and 2019. When compared with the 2015 to 2019 average, the decrease was smallest in children aged 2 to 5 years (a 35% decrease), and greatest in the group aged 12 to 17 years (83%). Motor vehicle collisions and sports-related injuries practically vanished during the COVID-19 lockdown. Surprisingly, more children aged 6 to 17 years presented with less urgent injuries during the COVID-19 lockdown than in previous years. CONCLUSION: As was the case with SARS in 2003, COVID-19 acted as a deterrent for pediatric ED visits. The lockdown in particular had a profound impact on injury-related visits. The de-confinement period will be monitored to determine the impact in both the short and the long term.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Athletic Injuries/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Protective Factors , Quebec/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology
2.
S Afr Med J ; 0(0): 13183, 2020 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-984642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the coronavirus pandemic, lockdown restrictions and a ban on alcohol sales were introduced in South Africa. Objectives. To investigate the impact of lockdown measures on the number of patients who visited a tertiary urban trauma centre. Methods. The period of investigation was from 1 February to 30 June 2020 and was segmented into three intervals: pre-lockdown (February and March 2020), hard lockdown (April and May 2020) and immediately post lockdown (June 2020). The electronic HECTIS health record registry was interrogated for the total number of patients that were seen per month. These were further categorised according to mechanism of injury (stab, gunshot, blunt assault and road traffic injuries). Penetrating (stab and gunshot) and blunt assault victims were collectively grouped as violent trauma. Results. The mean total number of patients seen decreased by 53% during the hard lockdown period. There was a moderate reduction (15%) in patients with gunshot injuries seen during the hard lockdown phase, but there was an 80% increase in the post-lockdown period. The proportion of patients injured in road traffic collisions pre lockdown, hard lockdown and immediate post lockdown was 16.4%, 8.9% and 11.1%, respectively. Patients injured in road traffic collisions decreased by 74% during the hard lockdown period and maintained a reduction of 32% during the immediate post-lockdown period. The mean total number of patients who visited the trauma unit returned to pre-lockdown levels in June. Conclusions. There was an overall trend of reduced number of patients who visited the trauma unit during the hard lockdown period; however, these numbers returned to pre-lockdown levels during the immediate post-lockdown period. The number of road traffic injury admissions remained reduced during all three phases of lockdown, while the number of gunshot victims increased substantially during the post-lockdown period.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control , Violence/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds, Gunshot/epidemiology , Adult , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , /prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , South Africa/epidemiology , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data
3.
Injury ; 51(12): 2811-2815, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-764865

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In Iran, like most other countries, COVID-19 has had a deep impact on children's lives. Our hypothesis was that, a significant change in the number of pediatric injuries has happened in trauma centers. In the current study, we intend to identify the possible epidemiological shift in pediatric fracture patterns, by comparing the data from 'COVID-19 era' and the mean data from the past 2 years. To the best of our knowledge there are only few reports on epidemiology of pediatric fractures during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: Data are reported in two sections. In the descriptive section, epidemiological data regarding pediatric fractures referred to Taleghani tertiary trauma center, including demographics, distribution curves, etiologies and fracture types are presented during the 'COVID era', from 1 March 2020 to 15 April 2020. In the comparative section, the aforementioned data are compared with mean data from the past 2 years, the 'non-COVID era'. RESULTS: Altogether 117 of the 288 trauma children (40.62%) had a fractured bone (145 fractures). Patients were mostly boys, with a mean age of 9.87 years (SD=5.27). The three most common fracture types in children included distal radius, mid-forearm and humeral supracondylar fractures. Compared to non-COVID era, the number of pediatric trauma admissions dropped from 589 to 288. No significant change happened in the mean age, male/female ratio and percentage of motor vehicle accidents. Proportion of proximal humeral, proximal forearm, carpal, and hand fractures declined. The number of open fractures significantly dropped (from 12 to 2). CONCLUSIONS: In Iran, overall trend of pediatric trauma has been decreasing during the outbreak; but the lack of reduction in proportion of accidents may pose an alarm that an effective lock-down has not been imposed. This study has implications as to preparing appropriate resources particular to common "COVID era fractures".


Subject(s)
Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Accidents, Traffic/trends , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Trauma Centers/standards , Trauma Centers/trends , Wounds and Injuries/etiology
4.
J Orthop Trauma ; 34(9): e343-e348, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682755

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare orthopaedic trauma volume and mechanism of injury before and during statewide social distancing and stay-at-home directives. DESIGN: Retrospective. SETTING: Level 1 trauma center. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS: One thousand one hundred thirteen patients sustaining orthopaedic trauma injuries between March 17 and April 30 of years 2018, 2019, and 2020. INTERVENTION: Statewide social distancing and stay-at-home directives. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Number of consults, mechanism of injury frequency, and type of injury frequency. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, orthopaedic trauma consult number decreased. Injuries due to gunshot wounds increased and those due to automobile versus pedestrian accidents decreased. Time-to-presentation increased and length of stay decreased. Operative consults remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Orthopaedic trauma injuries continued to occur during the COVID-19 pandemic at an overall decreased rate, however, with a different distribution in mechanism and type of injury. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Isolation , Trauma Centers , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
5.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(4): 819-822, 2020 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682439

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to social distancing and decreased travel in the United States. The impact of these interventions on trauma and emergency general surgery patient volume has not yet been described. METHODS: We compared trauma admissions and emergency general surgery (EGS) cases between February 1-April 14 from 2017-2020 in five two-week time periods. Data were compared across time periods with Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS: There were significant decreases in overall trauma admissions (57.4% decrease, p<0.001); motor vehicle collisions (MVC) (80.5% decrease, p<0.001); and non-MVCs (45.1% decrease, p<0.001) from February-April 2020. We found no significant change in EGS cases (p = 0.70). Nor was there was a significant change in trauma cases in any other year 2017-2019. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic's burden of disease correlated with a significant decrease in trauma admissions, with MVCs experiencing a larger decrease than non-MVCs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization , Humans , Time Factors , United States
6.
J Orthop Trauma ; 34(9): e336-e342, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601454

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the "shelter-in-place" order on orthopaedic trauma presenting to a community level II trauma center. It is hypothesized that the overall number of orthopaedic trauma encounters (OTEs), the number of OTEs related to both high and low severity injuries, and the proportion of OTEs related to high severity versus low severity injuries decreased compared with previous years. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted of OTEs between 2016 and 2020. High and low severity OTEs were classified according to an algorithm created by the researchers. Data were statistically analyzed and compared with external data for traffic counts, motor vehicle accidents, and Transportation Security Administration checkpoints. RESULTS: A 45.1% decrease (P = 0.0005) was seen in OTEs from March and April 2016-2019 compared with 2020. The decrease began approximately 12 days before the shelter-in-place order. There was a 58.8% decrease in high severity injuries with a fracture (P = 0.013) and a 42.9% decrease in low severities injuries (P = 0.0003). The proportion of high to low severity OTEs was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The quantity of OTEs was significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and Michigan shelter-in-place order. A decrease in both high and low severity OTEs was found; however, there was no statistically significant change in the ratio of high to low severity OTEs compared with previous years. Although it is difficult to determine what portion of the decrease in OTE is attributable to the shelter-in-place order versus the COVID-19 pandemic in general, data suggest both play a role. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of Levels of Evidence.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Algorithms , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Social Isolation , Trauma Centers , Trauma Severity Indices
7.
Am J Emerg Med ; 38(9): 1710-1714, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549266

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, normal daily life in the United States (US) has changed dramatically. As the US population shifts to practice social distancing, there are undoubtedly changes in the pattern of traumatic injuries presenting to Emergency Departments across the US. This analysis aims to analyze previously undocumented trends on how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the pattern of vehicle related injuries in selected US states. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed utilizing public vehicle collision data gathered from the Department of Transportation of Florida, New York, and Massachusetts from October 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020 regarding 158,341 motor vehicle collisions. Descriptive statistical analysis and linear regression was performed to investigate the counts and trends of motor vehicle collisions and injuries during the study period in order to determine what effect, if any, COVID-19 has had on the incidence and pattern of these events. RESULTS: In Florida, New York, and Massachusetts, there was a general downward trend of vehicle collisions and vehicle related injuries over this time period, with statistically significant association between number of total vehicle collisions vs. date (p < 0.001), as well as number of vehicle related injuries vs. date (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Incidence of vehicle collisions and vehicle related injuries have significantly decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The creation of improved public transport modalities and use of virtual/remote replacements for social activities could serve as long-term solutions to reduce vehicle collisions and vehicle related injuries.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
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