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1.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(10): e15753, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968087

ABSTRACT

The medical face mask, widely used by health care providers (HCPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic, is reported to be associated with adverse reactions, among which acne is one of the most common. This study aims to evaluate treatment strategies employed by HCPs affected by acne in association with prolonged medical face mask use, their openness towards accessing telemedicine as a patient, and other lifestyle factors with potential influence on the evolution of their acne. Our online-based cross-sectional survey was distributed between December 17, 2020, and February 17, 2021, and targeted HCPs from different medical centers in Romania. From the n = 134 respondents, 50% reported current acne lesions and 56.7% required treatment. Of the latter, 65.8% self-medicated and 34.2% sought medical advice. The most common treatment associations between anti-acne topical products were: retinoids and salicylic acid (18.18%; n = 8), retinoids and benzoyl peroxide (13.64%; n = 6), salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide (13.64%; n = 6), and azelaic acid together with salicylic acid (9.09%; n = 4). The health care provider responders were reluctant to use telemedicine, as only 14.2% participants were open to telemedicine. Our results suggest inadequate management of acne in HCPs using medical face masks. As with other occupational hazards and proper usage of personal protective equipment, HCPs should receive adequate screening, training, and treatment for this condition.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Dermatologic Agents , Acne Vulgaris/chemically induced , Acne Vulgaris/epidemiology , Acne Vulgaris/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Benzoyl Peroxide , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Retinoids , Salicylic Acid/therapeutic use
3.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(10): 4470-4478, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909447

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, face mask use has increased and became a part of our daily lives. While wearing, prolonged contact time and microenvironmental change profoundly lead to an acne flare-up, defined as "maskne." AIMS: We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of snail secretion filtrate, Calendula officinalis, and Glycyrrhiza glaba root extract combination serum (SCGS) in treating the maskne. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial study. This study enrolled 66 participants with mild-to-moderate maskne. The SCGS and placebo were randomly assigned for participants to use twice daily for 12 weeks. Percentage change of acne lesion count, acne severity by Investigator Global Evaluation Acne (IGEA), sebum levels, corneometry levels, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema score by Visia®, and adverse events were evaluated 4-weekly at baseline to Week 12. At Week 12, all participants evaluated their satisfaction scores using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: In the mask-covered area, the percent reduction in inflammatory acne lesions from the treatment group was significantly greater than the placebo group at all time points (coefficient of percentage change of inflammatory lesions = -33.89 [95% CI -65.24, -2.53]; p = 0.03). Also, a subgroup analysis with participants using concurrent acne treatments revealed similar results (12 participants, coefficient = -50.30 [95% -88.65, -11.95]; p = 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in non-inflammatory lesions, all skin biophysics, and VAS between groups. Adverse events were mild and occurred in a few cases in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The SCGS could significantly improve inflammatory acne lesions and had a favorable tolerability profile, suggesting its role as an adjunctive treatment in maskne.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Calendula , Glycyrrhiza , Humans , Treatment Outcome , Acne Vulgaris/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Plant Extracts/adverse effects , Glycyrrhiza/adverse effects
4.
J Cutan Med Surg ; 26(4): 393-397, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731469

ABSTRACT

Accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has changed the landscape of dermatology practice. This manuscript aims to review the role of telemedicine in acne management and provide management recommendations. A literature search of the PubMed and Scopus databases was conducted using keywords "acne," "telemedicine," "teledermatology," "telehealth," "virtual," and "video." Eight articles directly related to telemedicine and acne management were included in the study. In-person vs. telemedicine management of acne patients had high diagnostic concordance and similar efficacy and remission rates. Survey-based studies of acne patients reported high interest and satisfaction and no safety concerns with acne management via telemedicine. Telemedicine was reported as an effective triage tool. Prescription patterns for acne medications during telemedicine vs. in-person visits varied. It is likely that dermatologists will continue to treat acne and other common skin conditions via teledermatology. Therefore, it is important for dermatologists to gain comfort in utilizing virtual visits to diagnose and manage acne patients. Further studies are needed to establish a standardized structural framework for telemedicine visits to optimize patient care and outcomes for acne patients.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Telemedicine , Acne Vulgaris/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
6.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 20(4): 432-435, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184133

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine, defined as practicing medicine at a distance, has grown in popularity over the past ten years, as advances in consumer technology have permitted its expansion. Dermatology is a field that especially lends itself to this method of care, as many common dermatological diagnoses can be made upon visual inspection. With social distancing becoming the new standard in this age of COVID-19, telemedicine emerges as a key tool in continuing patient care without interruption. In this pilot study, we examine the reliability of acne vulgaris diagnostic assessments made via patient-taken photos compared to in-office assessments in patients between the ages of 16 and 23 with mild to moderate acne. Fourteen patient encounters were clinically examined for three outcomes: inflammatory lesions, noninflammatory acne lesions, and facial nodules. On the same day patient outcomes were counted and recorded in-person, patients were instructed to photograph their faces. These images were reviewed 8–12 weeks later by investigators for the same assessment. Initial findings suggest strong concordance between in-person and digital diagnosis, with a Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.96 across all lesion and nodule scores. These data support further research on the expansion and implementation of telemedicine for dermatology. J Drugs Dermatol. 20(4):432-435. doi:10.36849/JDD.5688.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris/diagnosis , Acne Vulgaris/therapy , Dermatology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Face , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Pilot Projects , Smartphone , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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