Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 72
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082095

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented crisis striking health services, generating risks of setbacks in health care and affecting the most vulnerable populations such as HIV patients. This study aims to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the operational management of health services for people living with HIV/AIDS in Cochabamba, Bolivia. We applied a qualitative approach using semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten key health professionals who care for patients with HIV/AIDS in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and uploaded to Atlas.ti software for analysis. We used an ethnographic approach within the interpretive paradigm to carry out the thematic analysis, considering the "Determinants of health systems resilience framework" of five dimensions developed by the World Health Organization. Even though the provision of services in public care services was not interrupted during the COVID-19 pandemic, health service delivery was severely affected. Digital technology could be used to compensate in urban areas. Regarding the distribution of medications, adaptative strategies to reduce patient complications were implemented. Unfortunately, the complementary tests availability was limited. The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on HIV/AIDS patient care services in Cochabamba, with repercussions for HIV treatment access and virologic suppression.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Humans , Pandemics , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/therapy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Bolivia/epidemiology
2.
Trop Med Int Health ; 27(2): 192-198, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To address ongoing pandemics and epidemics, policy makers need good data not only on the need for treatments but also on new interventions' impacts. We present a mathematical model of medicines' health consequences using disease surveillance data to inform health policy and scientific research that can be extended to address the current public health crisis. METHODS: The Global Health Impact index calculates the amount of mortality and morbidity averted by key medicines for malaria, TB, HIV/AIDS and several Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) using data on outcomes in the absence of treatment, treatment effectiveness and access to needed treatment. Country-level data were extracted from data repositories maintained by the Global Burden of Disease study, Global Health Observatory, WHO, UNICEF and a review of the scientific literature. RESULTS: The index aggregates drug impact by country, disease, company and treatment regimen to identify the spatial and temporal patterns of treatment impact and can be extended across multiple diseases. Approximately 62 million life-years were saved by key drugs that target malaria, TB, HIV/AIDS and NTDs in our latest model year. Malaria and TB medicines together were responsible for alleviating 95% of this burden, while HIV/AIDS and NTD medicines contribute 4% and 1%, respectively. However, the burden of disease in the absence of treatment was nearly evenly distributed among malaria, TB and HIV/AIDS. CONCLUSIONS: A common framework that standardises health impact across diseases and their interventions can aid in identifying current shortcomings on a global scale.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Global Health , Health Policy , Humans , Malaria/epidemiology , Models, Theoretical , Neglected Diseases/epidemiology , Tropical Medicine
3.
J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care ; 21: 23259582221128500, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064706

ABSTRACT

The degree to which COVID-19 has disrupted the advances in reducing new HIV infections and preventing AIDS-related deaths is unknown. We present findings related to the effect COVID-19 had on HIV, sexual health and harm reduction service delivery in the state of California. We conducted a qualitative rapid assessment with health care providers, as well as representatives from non-medical support service agencies serving clients living with HIV in a range of counties in California. Some organizations adapted fairly easily while others struggled or were unable to adapt at all. Clinics were better positioned than community-based organizations to accommodate COVID restrictions and to quickly reestablish services. Influential forces that softened or calcified the hardships created by COVID-19 included influx of funding, flexibility in managing funds, networking and relationships, and workforce vulnerabilities. These data clearly suggest that an enhanced level of flexibility within funding streams and reporting requirements should be continued.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans
4.
Curr HIV Res ; 20(3): 236-241, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039561

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has substantially changed lives and presented several barriers to health services. HIV care continuum needs a high rate of diagnosis, effective treatment, and sustained suppression of viral replication. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected these three steps of HIV care. This study investigated the characteristics of newly diagnosed patients living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) during the COVID pandemic and compared them with those before the pandemic. METHODS: All newly diagnosed patients in three HIV healthcare centers, in Istanbul, Turkey, were included in the study. The pandemic period included April 1, 2020, to April 1, 2021, and the prepandemic period included March 1, 2019, to March 1, 2020. RESULTS: 756 patients were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. In the pandemic period, this figure was 58% less: 315. Patients in the pre-pandemic and pandemic period had comparable age and gender distributions. PLWH diagnosed in the pandemic period had higher rates of low CD4 cells: low CD4 (<350 cells /mm3) was measured in 243 (36.4%) patients in the pre-pandemic period, while it was done in 126 (47.9%) in the pandemic period (p<0.01). Also, the distribution of CD4 cells was significantly different between periods: In the pandemic period, CD4 cell distribution significantly skewed to lower CD4 categories. Symptomatic patient rates and AIDS-defining disorder rates among symptomatic patients were comparable. Viral loads were not significantly different in the two periods. CONCLUSION: A low number of newly diagnosed PLWH can be explained by less HIV testing, less admission to health care, or an actual decrease of HIV prevalence during the pandemic. Sexual behaviors may have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to HIV transmission restriction. Lower CD4 counts among the newly diagnosed PLWH suggest that admittance to health care is late and a significant portion of PLWH remain undiagnosed.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Turkey/epidemiology
6.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 14(1): e1-e3, 2022 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024679

ABSTRACT

After four decades of the HIV epidemic, women from sub-Saharan Africa remain at a differentially high risk of acquisition. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS) statistics show that the majority of HIV infections occur in this population and region. Evidence from previous humanitarian crises demonstrated adverse maternal consequences as a result of neglect for the provision of essential maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has had a similar effect, including an additional risk of HIV acquisition amongst women in sub-Saharan Africa. The COVID-19 pandemic has aggravated the risk of sub-Saharan Africa women to HIV infection because of a multitude of factors including child marriages, teenage pregnancies, dropping out of school, increase in incidence of sexual and gender-based violence and reduced access to preventive and treatment services for HIV and sexually transmitted infections. These include provision of care for rape and sexual and gender-based violence victims and provision of pre-exposure and postexposure prophylaxis for HIV and other STIs. Failure to urgently restore and maintain robust HIV prevention and treatment during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a risk of reversing the gains made over the years in reducing the incidence and morbidity from HIV amongst the population of sub-Saharan Africa women. There is need for an urgent and robust discourse to formulate effective interventions for protecting women and girls living in sub-Saharan Africa from an aggravated risk of HIV infection during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and other future humanitarian crises.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957314

ABSTRACT

The HIV epidemic is fueled by poverty; yet, methods to measure poverty remain scarce among populations at risk for HIV infection and disease progression to AIDS in Malaysia. Between August and November 2020, using data from a cross-sectional study of people who use drugs, (PWUD), transgender people, sex workers and men who have sex with men, this study examined the reliability and validity of a material security scale as a measurement of poverty. Additionally, we assessed factors associated with material security scores. We performed confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) for 268 study participants included in the analysis. A revised nine-item three-factor structure of the material security scale demonstrated an excellent fit in CFA. The revised material security score displayed good reliability, with Cronbach's alpha of 0.843, 0.826 and 0.818 for housing, economic resources and basic needs factors, respectively. In a subsequent analysis, PWUD and transgender people were less likely to present good material security scores during the pandemic, compared to their counterparts. The revised nine-item scale is a useful tool to assess poverty among key populations at-risk for HIV/AIDS with the potential to be extrapolated in similar income settings.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Transgender Persons , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Poverty , Reproducibility of Results
10.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270831, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened continued access to public health services worldwide, including HIV prevention and care. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV service access and delivery in the Asia region. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, online study, conducted between October-November 2020, assessed the impact of COVID-19 on HIV prevention and care among people living with HIV (PLHIV), key populations (KPs), and healthcare providers (HCPs). The study populations were recruited across ten Asian countries/territories, covering Hong Kong, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. RESULTS: Across the region, 702 PLHIV, 551 KPs, and 145 HCPs were recruited. Both PLHIV and KPs reported decreased or had yet to visit hospitals/clinics (PLHIV: 35.9%; KPs: 57.5%), reduced HIV RNA viral load testing (21.9%; 47.3%), and interruptions in antiretroviral therapy (ART) (22.3%) or decreased/complete stop of HIV prevention medication consumption (40.9%). Travel constraints (40.6%), financial issues (28.9%), and not receiving prescription refills (26.9%) were common reasons for interrupted ART access, whereas reduced engagements in behaviours that could increase the risks of HIV acquisition and transmission (57.7%), travel constraints (41.8%), and less hospital/clinic visits (36.7%) underlie the disruptions in HIV preventive medications. Decreased visits from PLHIV/KPs and rescheduled appointments due to clinic closure were respectively reported by 50.7%-52.1% and 15.6%-17.0% of HCPs; 43.6%-61.9% observed decreased ART/preventive medication refills. Although 85.0% of HCPs adopted telemedicine to deliver HIV care services, 56.4%-64.1% of PLHIV/KPs were not using telehealth services. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic substantially disrupted HIV prevention to care continuum in Asia at the time of the study. The findings highlighted differences in HIV prevention to care continuum via telehealth services utilisation by PLHIV, KPs, and HCPs. Efforts are needed to optimise infrastructure and adapt systems for continued HIV care with minimal disruptions during health emergency crises.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Hong Kong , Humans , Pandemics
11.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 871, 2022 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During a fast-moving epidemic, timely monitoring of case counts and other key indicators of disease spread is critical to an effective public policy response. METHODS: We describe a nonparametric statistical method, originally applied to the reporting of AIDS cases in the 1980s, to estimate the distribution of reporting delays of confirmed COVID-19 cases in New York City during the late summer and early fall of 2020. RESULTS: During August 15-September 26, the estimated mean delay in reporting was 3.3 days, with 87% of cases reported by 5 days from diagnosis. Relying upon the estimated reporting-delay distribution, we projected COVID-19 incidence during the most recent 3 weeks as if each case had instead been reported on the same day that the underlying diagnostic test had been performed. Applying our delay-corrected estimates to case counts reported as of September 26, we projected a surge in new diagnoses that had already occurred but had yet to be reported. Our projections were consistent with counts of confirmed cases subsequently reported by November 7. CONCLUSION: The projected estimate of recently diagnosed cases could have had an impact on timely policy decisions to tighten social distancing measures. While the recent advent of widespread rapid antigen testing has changed the diagnostic testing landscape considerably, delays in public reporting of SARS-CoV-2 case counts remain an important barrier to effective public health policy.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
12.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(28): 894-898, 2022 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934745

ABSTRACT

During 2020, an estimated 150,000 persons aged 0-14 years acquired HIV globally (1). Case identification is the first step to ensure children living with HIV are linked to life-saving treatment, achieve viral suppression, and live long, healthy lives. Successful interventions to optimize pediatric HIV testing during the COVID-19 pandemic are needed to sustain progress toward achieving Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 95-95-95 targets.* Changes in HIV testing and diagnoses among persons aged 1-14 years (children) were assessed in 22 U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-supported countries during October 1, 2019-September 30, 2020. This period corresponds to the two fiscal quarters before the COVID-19 pandemic (i.e., Q1 and Q2) and the two quarters after the pandemic began (i.e., Q3 and Q4). Testing was disaggregated by age group, testing strategy, and fiscal year quarter. During October 2019-September 2020, PEPFAR supported 4,312,343 HIV tests and identified 74,658 children living with HIV (CLHIV). The number of HIV tests performed was similar during Q1 and Q2, decreased 40.1% from Q2 to Q3, and increased 19.7% from Q3 to Q4. The number of HIV cases identified among children aged 1-14 years (cases identified) increased 7.4% from Q1 to Q2, decreased 29.4% from Q2 to Q3, and increased 3.3% from Q3 to Q4. Although testing in outpatient departments decreased 21% from Q1 to Q4, testing from other strategies increased during the same period, including mobile testing by 38%, facility-based index testing (offering an HIV test to partners and biological children of persons living with HIV) by 8%, and testing children with signs or symptoms of malnutrition within health facilities by 7%. In addition, most tests (61.3%) and cases identified (60.9%) were among children aged 5-14 years (school-aged children), highlighting the need to continue offering HIV testing to older children. These findings provide important information on the most effective strategies for identifying CLHIV during the COVID-19 pandemic. HIV testing programs should continue to use programmatic, surveillance, and financial data at both national and subnational levels to determine the optimal mix of testing strategies to minimize disruptions in pediatric case identification during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Testing , Humans , Pandemics
13.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 25(7): e25960, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1925944

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened to diminish gains in HIV epidemic control and impacts are likely most profound among key populations in resource-limited settings. We aimed to understand the pandemic's impact on HIV-related service utilization among men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who inject drugs (PWID) across India. METHODS: Beginning in 2013, we established integrated care centres (ICCs) which provide HIV preventive and treatment services to MSM and PWID across 15 Indian sites. We examined utilization patterns for an 18-month period covering 2 months preceding the pandemic (January-February 2020) and over the first and second COVID-19 waves in India (March 2020-June 2021). We assessed: (1) unique clients accessing any ICC service, (2) ICC services provided, (3) unique clients tested for HIV and (4) HIV diagnoses and test positivity. Among an established cohort of PWID/MSM living with HIV (PLHIV), we administered a survey on the pandemic's impact on HIV care and treatment (June-August 2020). RESULTS: Overall, 13,854 unique clients visited an ICC from January 2020 to June 2021. In January/February 2020, the average monthly number of clients was 3761. Compared to pre-pandemic levels, the number of clients receiving services declined sharply in March 2020, dropping to 25% of pre-pandemic levels in April/May 2020 (first wave), followed by a slow rebound until April/May 2021 (second wave), when there was a 57% decline. HIV testing followed a similar trajectory. HIV test positivity changed over time, declining in the first wave and reaching its nadir around July 2020 at ∼50% of pre-pandemic levels. Positivity then increased steadily, eventually becoming higher than pre-pandemic periods. The second wave was associated with a decline in positivity for MSM but was relatively unchanged for PWID. Among 1650 PLHIV surveyed, 52% of PWID and 45% of MSM reported the pandemic impacted their ability to see an HIV provider. MSM had barriers accessing sexually transmitted infection testing and partner HIV testing. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic led to significant decreases in HIV-related service utilization among key populations in India. This presents an opportunity for increased transmission and patients presenting with advanced disease among groups already disproportionately impacted by HIV.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Substance Abuse, Intravenous , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cities , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/complications
15.
Med Trop Sante Int ; 1(2)2021 06 30.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893756

ABSTRACT

While the concept of "Global Health" has existed since the late 1990s, it is now part of the everyday language of international public health experts, but how can this approach be characterized? Because they transcend borders, because they call for collective and coordinated actions at the global level, and because they require a tripartite approach (multidisciplinary, multi-actor and multisectoral), the AIDS and Covid-19 epidemics illustrate perfectly, each in its own way, this new approach. The fight against AIDS can be considered, in a way, as a laboratory for global health. By provoking, along with others, the reorganization of the international health aid architecture, by stimulating the emergence of new actors on the international scene, and by contributing to the breakdown of borders and disciplines, AIDS has certainly accelerated this new way of thinking about health issues. The Covid-19 crisis is converting the try and forcing the international community to become aware of this new imperative: we have no other choice than global health, cooperation and solidarity on a global scale.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Epidemics , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation
16.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(3): 463-466, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883714

ABSTRACT

A Washington insider discusses lessons learned from communicating about the HIV/AIDS pandemic and current failures to talk effectively about COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Washington
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875623

ABSTRACT

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a serious public health problem. This study aims to establish a combined model of seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and Prophet models based on an L1-norm to predict the incidence of AIDS in Henan province, China. The monthly incidences of AIDS in Henan province from 2012 to 2020 were obtained from the Health Commission of Henan Province. A SARIMA model, a Prophet model, and two combined models were adopted to fit the monthly incidence of AIDS using the data from January 2012 to December 2019. The data from January 2020 to December 2020 was used to verify. The mean square error (MSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) were used to compare the prediction effect among the models. The results showed that the monthly incidence fluctuated from 0.05 to 0.50 per 100,000 individuals, and the monthly incidence of AIDS had a certain periodicity in Henan province. In addition, the prediction effect of the Prophet model was better than SARIMA model, the combined model was better than the single models, and the combined model based on the L1-norm had the best effect values (MSE = 0.0056, MAE = 0.0553, MAPE = 43.5337). This indicated that, compared with the L2-norm, the L1-norm improved the prediction accuracy of the combined model. The combined model of SARIMA and Prophet based on the L1-norm is a suitable method to predict the incidence of AIDS in Henan. Our findings can provide theoretical evidence for the government to formulate policies regarding AIDS prevention.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Forecasting , Humans , Incidence , Models, Statistical
18.
Epidemiol Infect ; 150: e112, 2022 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864714

ABSTRACT

India has the third-largest burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the world. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has only exposed the cracks in the Indian healthcare infrastructure concerning HIV. The prevalence of HIV in India is more among the destitute or sections of society shrouded by years of social stigma such as prostitutes, truck drivers, transsexuals and intravenous drug users. National AIDS Control Organisation and The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) organisation have many several efforts over the years to set up counselling and testing centres all over the country and spread awareness about HIV among the masses. COVID-19 pandemic has reversed years of progress made by the same. HIV patients are biologically more susceptible to COVID-19, and the lockdown has led to the loss of jobs, economic crises, shortage of drugs and necessities such as food and housing among this vulnerable population, which can result in lowered CD4-T cell counts in the coming months and make way for dangerous opportunistic infection outbreaks in this population increasing the overall HIV burden of India. This article explores how COVID-19 has impacted India's already existing HIV epidemic and tries to put forth recommendations based on the evidence found to be better prepared in treating the HIV-positive population in India in the face of another catastrophe like the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Delivery of Health Care , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics
19.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 622, 2022 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic thrust people living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV/AIDS service organizations into an environment ripe with uncertainty. This study examined Indiana HIV/AIDS service provider perceptions of how COVID-19 affected the overall health and access to care of their clients, and how the organizations prepared for, adapted, and responded to the needs of PLWH during the pandemic. METHODS: Guided by the socioecological model, fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten different HIV/AIDS service organizations across the state of Indiana. RESULTS: Despite the profound disruptions experienced by HIV programs, HIV/AIDS service organizations responded quickly to the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic through myriad innovative strategies, largely informed by prior experiences with the HIV epidemic. CONCLUSIONS: The lessons provided by HIV/AIDS service organizations are invaluable to informing future pandemic response for PLWH. Service delivery innovations in response to the COVID-19 crisis may provide insights to improve HIV care continuity strategies for vulnerable populations far beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , Indiana/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 78: 102154, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Environmental Determinants of KSHV transmission in rural Uganda (ENDKU) study began enrollment in February 2020 with the purpose of defining the relationship between malaria, primarily caused by Plasmodium falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa, and KSHV susceptibility and reactivation. Uganda is an ideal study site, because both malaria and KSHV are endemic and widespread, even among young children. METHODS: ENDKU is a longitudinal cohort study of infants enrolled at six months of age and followed until three years of age. The main study, and one smaller sub-study, is nested within the General Population Cohort (GPC), a long-standing population cohort in rural Uganda. The ENDKU study was created to test the hypothesis that P. falciparum malaria increases an infant's susceptibility to KSHV infection. A sub-study to evaluate the effects of P. falciparum on KSHV reactivation involves an additional cohort of 5-10-year-old children with and without acute malaria who presented to the GPC study clinic. For each study, participants provided demographic and behavioral data through administered questionnaires and blood and saliva samples. RESULTS: Despite barriers presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, the study team was able to leverage the long-standing relationship of the UK Medical Research Council and the Uganda Virus Research Institute (MRC/UVRI) with the community, a strong commitment to research, and a multi-disciplinary team of experts to successfully implement the ENDKU study. CONCLUSION: The results of this multi-pronged approach will answer important questions about the etiology and transmission of KSHV in sub-Saharan Africa and the data and samples collected will be an important future resource for scientific research in the region.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Herpesvirus 8, Human , Malaria , Sarcoma, Kaposi , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Longitudinal Studies , Malaria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sarcoma, Kaposi/epidemiology , Uganda/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL