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1.
Psicol. Estud. (Online) ; 27: e59776, 2022.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1903617

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN El artículo problematiza, a través de relatos de prácticas cotidianas de cuidado, emociones que se organizan en torno a las diferentes configuraciones del cuidado infantil en el Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Argentina). De esta forma, se trata de alimentar la mirada de las infancias, maternidades y paternidades urbanas en 'plural', con la meta de poder considerar el amplio repertorio de formas de disponerse, de estar y sentir que atraviesan el arco de experiencias de los arreglos familiares y el cuidado de hijos e hijas. ¿Cómo se reorganizaron los cuidados domésticos durante la pandemia? ¿Qué emociones y 'reglas del sentir' esto puso en evidencia? ¿Cómo impactaron los cambios en las fronteras del 'adentro' y el 'afuera' en las familias y en las subjetividades laborales y personales? Un primer nivel de análisis de la información empírica está estructurada por las formas de habitar (quiénes vivían con quiénes en términos de parentesco, con qué tipos de vivienda, haciendo qué uso del barrio), para presentar sobre ellas las tensiones emocionales, necesidades y estrategias que emergieron en los relatos.


RESUMO O artigo problematiza, por meio de relatos de práticas cotidianas do cuidado, as emoções que organizam-se em torno das diferentes configurações do cuidado das crianças na Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires, (Argentina). Dessa forma, o artigo pretende contribuir a um olhar das infâncias, das maternidades e das paternidades no plural, com o objetivo de poder contemplar o amplo repertório de modos de experienciar, ser e sentir que perpassam o arco de experiências das dinâmicas familiares e do cuidado das crianças. Como os cuidados domésticos foram reorganizados durante a pandemia? Que emoções e regras do sentir isso trouxe à tona? Como as mudanças nas fronteiras do 'dentro' e 'fora' impactaram as famílias e as subjetividades pessoais e do trabalho? Um primeiro nível de análise da informação empírica é estruturado pelos modos de viver (quem conviveu com quem em termos do parentesco, em que tipo de habitação, qual uso da vizinhança), para apresentar tensões emocionais, necessidades e estratégias que surgiram nos relatos.


ABSTRACT. This article addresses the emotions around different configurations of childcare in the Metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina, based on narratives about everyday care practices. In doing so, the article aims to contribute to a pluralistic view of childhood and parenthood in order to consider the vast repertoire of dispositions, of being and feeling that are intertwined in family arrangements and childcare. How did the interviewees rearrange domestic care during the pandemic? What emotions and 'emotional norms' does that new situation reveal? How did the changes in the limits of inside and outside affect families and personal and labor subjectivities? A first level empirical data analysis is performed on the modes of inhabiting a home -who lived with whom, in which type of house, and what use they make of the resources in their neighborhood — in order to reflect upon the emotional tensions, needs and strategies that emerged from the narratives.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Adult , Middle Aged , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Child Care/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Paternity , Family , Residence Characteristics , Parenting/psychology , Affect , Emotions , Family Relations/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Networking , Teleworking/trends , Interpersonal Relations
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28695, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1853276

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Compare community integration of people with stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) living in the community before and during the coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 disease (COVID-19) when stratifying by injury: participants with stroke (G1) and with TBI (G2); by functional independence in activities of daily living: independent (G3) and dependent (G4); by age: participants younger than 54 (G5) and older than 54 (G6); and by gender: female (G7) and male (G8) participants.Prospective observational cohort studyIn-person follow-up visits (before COVID-19 outbreak) to a rehabilitation hospital in Spain and on-line during COVID-19.Community dwelling adults (≥18 years) with chronic stroke or TBI.Community integration questionnaire (CIQ) the total-CIQ as well as the subscale domains (ie, home-CIQ, social-CIQ, productivity CIQ) were compared before and during COVID-19 using the Wilcoxon ranked test or paired t test when appropriate reporting Cohen effect sizes (d). The functional independence measure was used to assess functional independence in activities of daily living.Two hundred four participants, 51.4% with stroke and 48.6% with TBI assessed on-line between June 2020 and April 2021 were compared to their own in-person assessments performed before COVID-19.When analyzing total-CIQ, G1 (d = -0.231), G2 (d = -0.240), G3 (d = -0.285), G5 (d = -0.276), G6 (d = -0.199), G7 (d = -0.245), and G8 (d = -0.210) significantly decreased their scores during COVID-19, meanwhile G4 was the only group with no significant differences before and during COVID-19.In productivity-CIQ, G1 (d = -0.197), G4 (d = -0.215), G6 (d = -0.300), and G8 (d = -0.210) significantly increased their scores, meanwhile no significant differences were observed in G2, G3, G5, and G7.In social-CIQ, all groups significantly decreased their scores: G1 (d = -0.348), G2 (d = -0.372), G3 (d = -0.437), G4 (d = -0.253), G5 (d = -0.394), G6 (d = -0.319), G7 (d = -0.355), and G8 (d = -0.365).In home-CIQ only G6 (d = -0.229) significantly decreased, no significant differences were observed in any of the other groups.The largest effect sizes were observed in total-CIQ for G3, in productivity-CIQ for G6, in social-CIQ for G3 and in home-CIQ for G6 (medium effect sizes).Stratifying participants by injury, functionality, age or gender allowed identifying specific CIQ subtotals where remote support may be provided addressing them.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Community Integration , Quality of Life/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/psychology , Brain Injury, Chronic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke , Young Adult
3.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221085380, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765394

ABSTRACT

Elderly population is increasing, while the world has been facing the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), which causes a greater adverse impact among older population in various aspects of their lives, such as depression, daily routine disruption, illness, and social and emotional issues. The purpose of this study was to assess the elderly's depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the risk factors including socio-demographic, physical and psychosocial conditions, as well as family support. The method used was cross-sectional design, with a total sampling of 457 participants. The measuring instruments used were ADL (Activities of Daily Living Scale) and IADL (Lowton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale) for physical activities assessment, APGAR (Adaptability, Participation, Growth, Affection, Resolution) for family support function assessment, and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) for depression level measurement, with additional questions for psychosocial assessment. 212 elderlies (46.4%) were found with no depression tendency, 183 elderlies (40%) had a tendency of depression, and 62 elderlies (13.6%) had depression. These depression issues were significantly linked to retirement and income among elderly, dependency, fitness and health status, family and social support, and sources of funds. In the presence of depression, control measures for social, health, and psychosocial support must be implemented in order to minimize its impact among the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 34(5): 1187-1194, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the last two years, COVID-19 affected older people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but conflicting and sparse results are still present. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of changes in functional, cognitive and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), and caregiver's stress during the period of quarantine in 2020 in patients affected by dementia/MCI living in Palermo, Sicily. METHODS: Outpatients affected by MCI/dementia were evaluated before and after COVID-19 quarantine. Functional status was investigated using basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL); cognitive performance with the mini-mental state examination; BPSD through the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI). All scales were reported as pre/post-COVID-19 quarantine and a logistic regression analysis was performed for investigating the factors associated with worsening in NPI in patients and their caregivers. RESULTS: One hundred patients (mean age 77.1; females = 59%) were evaluated over a median of 10 months. In the sample as whole, a significant decline in functional and cognitive status was observed (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). The NPI significantly increased by 3.56 ± 8.96 points after the COVID-19 quarantine (p < 0.0001), while the caregivers' stress increased by 1.39 ± 3.46 points between the two evaluations (p < 0.0001). The decline was more evident in people with milder dementia. Higher values of instrumental ADL at baseline were associated with a significant lower worsening in NPI and caregiver's stress. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 quarantine negatively affected functional, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people affected by dementia/MCI, highlighting the impact of COVID-19 quarantine for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Dementia , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Aged , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Dementia/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Quarantine/psychology
5.
Transpl Immunol ; 69: 101479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was descriptively conducted to evaluate the fear of COVID 19 and its social effects on patients who had liver transplant. METHODS: The study was conducted between September 2020 and April 2021 in a liver transplant institute affiliated with a university hospital. The sample of the study was 135 patients. Personal Information Form, Fear of Covid 19 Scale, and Questionnaire of Social Impact of COVID 19 Pandemic were used to collect data. RESULTS: It was determined that the Fear of Covid 19 Scale mean score of the patients was 21.25 ± 6.99. As the fear of COVID 19 increases in patients who had liver transplant, it was determined that their desire to be in crowded environments, to prefer public transportation, to go to the doctor for examination and their focusing on various objectives were decreasing. Also, fear of COVID 19 increased the difficulty in sleep, storage of food and cleaning materials, washing hands frequently, using masks and gloves when going out, health concerns, doubts about disease symptoms, orientation towards healthy eating, worries about the future and questioning the meaning of life. CONCLUSION: The results show that it is important for transplant centers to be able to provide guidance and psychological counseling services to liver transplant patients, who are significantly affected by COVID 19, through telemedicine or various technological opportunities.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Attitude to Death , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Liver Transplantation/psychology , COVID-19/mortality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 85(2): 925-940, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with dementia have been widely-documented, but most studies have relied on carer reports and few have compared responses to information collected before the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore the impact of the pandemic on community-dwelling individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia and compare responses with pre-pandemic data. METHODS: During the second wave of the pandemic, we conducted structured telephone interviews with 173 people with dementia and 242 carers acting as informants, all of whom had previously participated in the IDEAL cohort. Where possible, we benchmarked responses against pre-pandemic data. RESULTS: Significant perceived negative impacts were identified in cognitive and functional skills and ability to engage in self-care and manage everyday activities, along with increased levels of loneliness and discontinuity in sense of self and a decline in perceived capability to 'live well'. Compared to pre-pandemic data, there were lower levels of pain, depression, and anxiety, higher levels of optimism, and better satisfaction with family support. There was little impact on physical health, mood, social connections and relationships, or perceptions of neighborhood characteristics. CONCLUSION: Efforts to mitigate negative impacts of pandemic-related restrictions and restore quality of life could focus on reablement to address the effects on participation in everyday activities, creating opportunities for social contact to reduce loneliness, and personalized planning to reconnect people with their pre-COVID selves. Such efforts may build on the resilience demonstrated by people with dementia and carers in coping with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dementia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/complications , Dementia/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17416, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380910

ABSTRACT

Burden of COVID-19 on Hospitals across the globe is enormous and has clinical and economic implications. In this retrospective study including consecutive adult patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted between 3/2020 and 30/9/20, we aimed to identify post-discharge outcomes and risk factors for re-admission among COVID-19 hospitalized patients. Mortality and re-admissions were documented for a median post discharge follow up of 59 days (interquartile range 28,161). Univariate and multivariate analyses of risk factors for re-admission were performed. Overall, 618 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were included. Of the 544 patient who were discharged, 10 patients (1.83%) died following discharge and 50 patients (9.2%) were re-admitted. Median time to re-admission was 7 days (interquartile range 3, 24). Oxygen saturation or treatment prior to discharge were not associated with re-admissions. Risk factors for re-admission in multivariate analysis included solid organ transplantation (hazard ratio [HR] 3.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.73-7.5, p = 0.0028) and higher Charlson comorbidity index (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.46, p < 0.0001). Mean age of post discharge mortality cases was 85.0 (SD 9.98), 80% of them had cognitive decline or needed help in ADL at baseline. In conclusion, re-admission rates of hospitalized COVID-19 are fairly moderate. Predictors of re-admission are non-modifiable, including baseline comorbidities, rather than COVID-19 severity or treatment.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , COVID-19/mortality , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Multivariate Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Young Adult
8.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 284, 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of COVID-19 social distancing on the function, health, and well-being of people with Parkinson disease (PD), and test the association of these effects with patients' activation levels, i.e., their skills and confidence in managing their health. METHODS: Community-dwelling individuals with PD answered an anonymous web-based survey. Part 1 included 27 multiple-choice questions regarding changes in function, health, medical care, and well-being. Part 2 consisted of the Patient Activation Measure, which enquired about skills and confidence in managing one's health. RESULTS: Respondents (N = 142) reported decreases in various function (24.8%-37.3%), health (33.8%-43%), and well-being (26.1%-47.1%) domains. Rehabilitation ceased for 61.2%. Among those reporting a worsening of health, 67.8% associated this with the cessation of rehabilitative treatments or decrease in physical activity. Patients' activation levels were inversely correlated with increased assistance for activities of daily living, increased tiredness, worsening symptoms, and lack of support from family and friends. CONCLUSIONS: Social distancing had a major negative impact on the health and function of people with PD. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Supporting people with PD skills and confidence in managing health may preserve their physical and mental health during this period of dramatic changes in life's circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Physical Distancing , Self-Management/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Health Behavior/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Self-Management/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Foot Ankle Res ; 14(1): 46, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, populations were advised to remain at home to control viral spread. Government-mandated restrictions on free movement affected individuals' engagement with physical activity, with reported increases leading to biopsychosocial health benefits and conversely increased sedentary behaviour leading to poorer health. Good foot health is key to enabling physical activity and maximal participation in activities of occupation and daily living. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was performed, using a web-based platform. Quantitative and qualitative data were captured through responses to closed and open survey questions. Anybody with a foot health condition was eligible to participate in the online survey. Links were sent through professional networks, support groups and charities, using a snowball strategy to maximise participation. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-five respondents completed the survey. Most (n = 193, 75.69%) reported an ongoing foot pain or problem that had been present for 4 weeks or longer, whilst 49 respondents (19.22%) noted a new pain or problem. Pain was the most frequently reported symptom (n = 139, 54.51%), whilst change in appearance of the foot was also commonly reported (n = 122, 47.84%), often alongside the observable presence of swelling. Musculoskeletal foot symptoms were frequently reported (n = 123, 48%), and were significantly associated with reported reduced physical activity (X2 = 6.61, p = 0.010). Following qualitative analysis five themes and 11 subthemes emerged, informed by 49 independent codes. A central theme of lockdown disrupting support networks, both formal (healthcare providers) and informal (friends or family members) emerged. The 5 sub-themes were: 1. foot pain is a constant companion, 2. self-care, 3. 'cope or crumble' scenarios, 4. future intent to access healthcare and 5. reduced ability to undertake physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Pain was the most frequently reported foot problem during COVID-19 lockdown restriction. Lockdown restrictions disrupted support networks integral to maintaining foot health. Poor foot health impacted people's ability to remain physically active. Complaints previously considered relatively 'minor' such as support for skin and nail care, were found to be exacerbated by restricted support networks, leading to greater negative impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Foot/pathology , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Female , Government Regulation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Pain/diagnosis , Patient Participation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sedentary Behavior , Self Care/psychology , Self-Help Groups/organization & administration , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Appl Behav Anal ; 54(2): 566-581, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086368

ABSTRACT

Children with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in daily living skills. Behavior analysts can use telehealth, such as videoconferencing technology, to deliver interventions to families of these children. Given the COVID-19 pandemic and the common barriers to accessing behavioral interventions, it is imperative to evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of delivering behavioral interventions via telehealth. This study evaluated the efficacy of a parent-implemented intervention with coaching via telehealth to improve daily living skills. Children ranging in age from 5 to 9 years participated in the study with 1 or 2 of their parents serving as the primary implementer(s). Parents implemented the intervention with fidelity and the intervention yielded increases in independent daily living skill completion for all 4 participants.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , Education, Nonprofessional/methods , Mentoring/methods , Parents/education , Telemedicine/methods , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Parents/psychology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244819, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067402

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The U.S. has experienced an unprecedented number of orders to shelter in place throughout the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to ascertain whether social distancing; difficulty with daily activities; and levels of concern regarding COVID-19 changed after the March 16, 2020 announcement of the nation's first shelter-in-place orders (SIPO) among individuals living in the seven affected counties in the San Francisco Bay Area. METHODS: We conducted an online, cross-sectional social media survey from March 14 -April 1, 2020. We measured changes in social distancing behavior; experienced difficulties with daily activities (i.e., access to healthcare, childcare, obtaining essential food and medications); and level of concern regarding COVID-19 after the March 16 shelter-in-place announcement in the San Francisco Bay Area versus elsewhere in the U.S. RESULTS: In this non-representative sample, the percentage of respondents social distancing all of the time increased following the shelter-in-place announcement in the Bay Area (9.2%, 95% CI: 6.6, 11.9) and elsewhere in the U.S. (3.4%, 95% CI: 2.0, 5.0). Respondents also reported increased difficulty obtaining hand sanitizer, medications, and in particular respondents reported increased difficulty obtaining food in the Bay Area (13.3%, 95% CI: 10.4, 16.3) and elsewhere (8.2%, 95% CI: 6.6, 9.7). We found limited evidence that level of concern regarding the COVID-19 crisis changed following the announcement. CONCLUSION: This study characterizes early changes in attitudes, behaviors, and difficulties. As states and localities implement, rollback, and reinstate shelter-in-place orders, ongoing efforts to more fully examine the social, economic, and health impacts of COVID-19, especially among vulnerable populations, are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Patient Isolation/psychology , Physical Distancing , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , San Francisco/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
13.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 202: 106488, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1025588

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness due to immune mediated damage of acetylcholine receptor (AchR). COVID-19 infection, mental stress and non-availability of drugs following lockdown may worsen myasthenic symptoms. We report the impact of COVID 19, and lockdown on the physical and mental health, and quality of sleep in a cohort of MG. METHODS: Thirty-eight MG patients were telephonically interviewed 2months after the declaration of lockdown in India. The difficulty in procuring drugs, complications, and worsening in the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) stage were noted. The patients were enquired about MG Quality of Life 15 (MGQOL15), MG Activity of Daily Living (MGADL), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) using a prefixed questionnaire. Their pre-COVID parameters were retrieved from our earlier trial data, which was completed 4months back. The scores of the above mentioned parameters before and after COVID were compared. RESULTS: Their median age was 45 years, and the median duration of treatment for MG was 4.5years. Eleven (28.9 %) patients were hypertensive and 3(7.9 %) diabetic. All were on prednisolone and 18(47.4 %) received azathioprine. None developed COVID, but three had other infections. Two patients needed hospitalization because of wrong medication in one and severe anxiety-insomnia in another. Following COVID19 and lockdown, MG patients had worsening in MGQOL15, MGADL, HADS and PSQI scores. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score correlated with MGQOL15 and dose of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 and lockdown were associated with anxiety, depression, poor MGQOL and sleep especially in severe MG patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Myasthenia Gravis/epidemiology , Myasthenia Gravis/psychology , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Quarantine/trends , Self Report , Young Adult
14.
Pain Pract ; 21(1): 132-143, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain, the leading cause of disability in the world, imposes limitations on activities of daily living and diminishes quality of life leading to unnecessary patient suffering. The personal and socioeconomic costs of chronic pain cannot be overstated. Physicians are at the crux of the pandemic and must attempt to limit the spread of the virus while maintaining their professional responsibility to their patients and staff members. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to analyze the existing literature to develop consensus recommendations for treating pain during the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Relevant literature was located via computer-generated citations between the months of March and May of 2020. Online computer searches of multiple databases including Google Scholar, CINAHL, PubMed, and Cochrane Review were conducted in conjunction with a thorough review of local, state, national, and international governmental and organizational websites to locate research on the area of interest. RESULTS: The guidelines in this review are meant to offer a framework to pain practitioners and organizations for providing highly effective, ethical, and safe care to patients while maintaining their commitment to mitigating the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific areas addressed include general and interventional-specific treatment and mitigation recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the recommendations in this review, if used in conjunction with evolving recommendations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and federal, state, and local governing bodies, provides a path to not only mitigate the spread of the pandemic but also limit the adverse impact of pain and suffering in chronic pain patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Pain Management/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Consensus , Humans , Pain Management/methods , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
15.
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen ; 35: 1533317520976720, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965689

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to analyze home confinement impact on individuals with neurocognitive disorders (NCD) through informal caregiver's perspective and examine how it has affected caregiving burden. METHODS: Thirty-six caregivers (64.94 ± 13.54 years, 41.7% female) of individuals with NCD (74.28 ± 6.76 years, 66.7% female) selected from the Body & Brain exercise program were interviewed over the phone. The following instruments were used: Barthel Index (BI) to assess care recipients' ability to function independently on activities of daily living (ADL), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms, and the CarerQol-7D/ CarerQol-VAS to determine caregiver subjective burden/well-being. RESULTS: Pre and post-confinement comparisons showed that care recipients significantly declined their independence in ADL (p = 0.003) and increased NPI total score (MD = 5.72; 95% CI: 1.19 to 10.25, p = 0.015). As for caregivers, results also showed an increased caregiving burden (MD = -0.17; 95% CI: -0.27 to -0.08; p = 0.001) and a decline in their well-being (p = 0.015). DISCUSSION: COVID-19 crisis sheds light on how imperative it is to find solutions and design contingency plans for future crisis, in order to ensure properly sustained support to dementia caregiving dyads and mitigate caregivers' burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Caregivers/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Dementia/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers/economics , Cognitive Dysfunction/drug therapy , Cost of Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
18.
Eur J Med Genet ; 63(12): 104062, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753653

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant health, social, and economic consequences internationally. While the pandemic has direct implications on infected patients and families, there is a need to examine the pandemic's effect on patients with non-COVID-19-related diseases. This study examines the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on 272 rare disease patients with 89 distinct rare diseases in Hong Kong using a cross-sectional online survey between April 10 and April 29, 2020 from the patient and caregiver perspective. The pandemic has impacted patient's health status in 46%, service use patterns in 71%, mental health in 79%, daily living in 82%, social life in 92%, and financial status in 81% of patients. Patient's health status, medical and rehabilitation, and mental health were more impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in the group of patients with any level of dependency according to the Barthel Index for Activities of Daily Living compared with that in the group of patients who are fully independent (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001; p = 0.0420). This study is the first study to examine the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the rare disease population in Hong Kong, and demonstrates the pandemic's effect on service and resource utilization, and patient's physical and mental well-being.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Rare Diseases , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/economics , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics/economics , Quality of Life/psychology , Rare Diseases/complications , Rare Diseases/economics , Rare Diseases/nursing , Rare Diseases/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener ; 22(1-2): 151-153, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To validate and assess the reliability of the Italian version of self-administered ALSFRS-R, considering patients' clinical and cognitive features and caregiver's help. Methods: During the COVID-19 pandemic, by analyzing the results of 70 paired self-administered vs standard telephone-administered ALSFRS-R, we calculated overall score, single item scores, ALSFRS-R domain scores, King's and MiToS stage inter-rater agreement and reliability using different validated methods. We created the Italian version of self-administered ALSFRS-R following ENCALS recommendation. Results: Correlation between the two scales was 0.94 and no systematic directional bias was found. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was very high (>0.90) for the vast majority of the considered classification criteria, especially King's total score (0.96) and MiToS score (0.94). A higher ICC was found when the patients answered the questionnaire with the caregiver's help (0.95). Conclusions: Online self-administered ALSFRS-R scale is a valid tool to stratify ALS patients into clinical stages and to implement telemedicine monitoring.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Aged , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/diagnosis , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Telemedicine/methods
20.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 173: 108343, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664333

ABSTRACT

During the unprecedented times of the COVID 19 pandemic, the lives of people with diabetes have been severely impacted. This article discusses the extent of this impact presenting the obstacles and challenges from the perspective of the patient, including specifics of practical day-to-day diabetes self-management routines. Since the COVID19 outbreak, certain psychosocial factors have been amplifieddue tothe manner in whichmainstream media and policy makers have carelessly emphasized the vulnerability of people with diabetes. The authors discuss the increased importance of support networksdue to people living in isolation and quarantine. Anewlayer of complexity has been added to the already difficult task of managing one's diabetes and ithasincreasedanxiety and stress levels. Guidelines and tips for people living with diabetes are discussed based on theauthors' personalexperiences as well as those ofthe diabetes associations they work with.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Pandemics , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/prevention & control , Diabetes Complications/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Perception/physiology , Psychosocial Support Systems , Quality of Life , Quarantine , Risk Reduction Behavior , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Self-Management/methods , Self-Management/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy
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