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1.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 21(1): 452, 2021 Dec 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report one case of rare acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN) in an elderly patient with hypertension and one case of common paracentral acute middle maculopathy (PAMM) in a patient with diabetes mellitus to illustrate the difference between the two diseases. CASE PRESENTATION: This report describes two cases, one involving AMN and the other PAMM. The first patient was a 70-year-old man complaining of blurred vision for 3 days. He was examined with fundus photography, optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT); a diagnosis of AMN was established. The second patient was a 50-year-old woman who complained of decreased vision during the past month. She had had diabetes mellitus for 6 years. From the ophthalmic imaging examination, the patient was diagnosed with PAMM and non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Both patients were treated with drugs for improving microcirculation and neurotrophic drugs; however, there was no significant improvement in visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: AMN is more common in young patients and is rarely observed in elderly patients with systemic diseases. The OCTA examination has an auxiliary diagnostic value for deep retinal capillary network ischaemia. Meanwhile, OCT examination has important imaging value in differentiating AMN from PAMM and can help avoid missed diagnoses.


Subject(s)
Macular Degeneration , Retinal Diseases , White Dot Syndromes , Acute Disease , Aged , Female , Fluorescein Angiography , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retinal Diseases/diagnosis , Tomography, Optical Coherence
2.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 22(1): 19, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During a global crisis like the current COVID-19 pandemic, delayed admission to hospital in cases of emergent medical illness may lead to serious adverse consequences. We aimed to determine whether such delayed admission affected the severity of an inflammatory process regarding acute appendicitis, and its convalescence. METHODS: In a retrospective observational cohort case-control study, we analyzed the medical data of 60 patients who were emergently and consecutively admitted to our hospital due to acute appendicitis as established by clinical presentation and imaging modalities, during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic (our study group). We matched a statistically control group consisting of 97 patients who were admitted during a previous 12-month period for the same etiology. All underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The main study parameters included intraoperative findings (validated by histopathology), duration of abdominal pain prior to admission, hospital stay and postoperative convalescence (reflecting the consequences of delay in diagnosis and surgery). RESULTS: The mean duration of abdominal pain until surgery was significantly longer in the study group. The rate of advanced appendicitis (suppurative and gangrenous appendicitis as well as peri-appendicular abscess) was greater in the study than in the control group (38.3 vs. 21.6%, 23.3 vs. 16.5%, and 5 vs. 1% respectively), as well as mean hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: A global crisis like the current viral pandemic may significantly affect emergent admissions to hospital (as in case of acute appendicitis), leading to delayed surgical interventions and its consequences.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Acute Disease , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Appendicitis/surgery , Case-Control Studies , Delayed Diagnosis , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613627

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic drastically highlighted the vulnerability of the elderly population towards viral and other infectious threats, illustrating that aging is accompanied by dysregulated immune responses currently summarized in terms like inflammaging and immunoparalysis. To gain a better understanding on the underlying mechanisms of the age-associated risk of adverse outcome in individuals experiencing a SARS-CoV-2 infection, we analyzed the impact of age on circulating monocyte phenotypes, activation markers and inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the context of COVID-19 disease progression and outcome in 110 patients. Our data indicate no age-associated differences in peripheral monocyte counts or subset composition. However, age and outcome are associated with differences in monocyte activation status. Moreover, a distinct cytokine pattern of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in elderly survivors versus non-survivors, which consolidates over the time of hospitalization, suggests that older patients with adverse outcomes experience an inappropriate immune response, reminiscent of an inflammaging driven immunoparalysis. Our study underscores the value, necessity and importance of longitudinal monitoring in elderly COVID-19 patients, as dynamic changes after symptom onset can be observed, which allow for a differentiated insight into confounding factors that impact the complex pathogenesis following an infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Aging/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Monocytes/pathology , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/metabolism , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/metabolism , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6818-6821, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530184

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) first described in Wuhan, China in December 2019, has rapidly spread across the world and become a global public health emergency. Literature on the neurological manifestations of COVID-19 is limited. We report a 24-year-old male, who presented with vertigo, dysarthria, and bradyphrenia 3 weeks after being diagnosed with COVID-19 on nasopharyngeal reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The patient was diagnosed with acute cerebellitis based on magnetic resonance imaging features and showed improvement posttreatment with intravenous methylprednisone for 5 days. The scope of this article is to highlight the importance of early identification of neurological symptoms and timely management as the outcomes may be catastrophic.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/etiology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Acute Disease , Adult , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526474

ABSTRACT

Viral-induced pancreatitis has been well-defined; however, there are limited data regarding COVID-19 and pancreatitis. Most cases are commonly in conjunction with severe COVID-19 as well as lipase elevation. We describe a unique case of mild SARS-CoV-2 infection resulting in acute pancreatitis in the absence of lipase elevation. A 39-year-old patient with no medical history, presented with epigastric pain. Vital signs were unremarkable. Patient was positive for COVID-19. Liver function panel, calcium, triglyceride and lipase levels were all unremarkable. CT of the abdomen demonstrated acute pancreatitis without gallstones. Our case may indicate that pancreatic injury in SARS-CoV-2 infection is due to a direct impact on the pancreas by the virus, given the absence of lipase elevation and mild presentation. This case highlights the importance of suspecting pancreatitis in mild COVID-19 that present with atypical symptoms such as epigastric pain, even without lipase elevation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Acute Disease , Adult , Humans , Pancreas , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 285-288, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525691

ABSTRACT

The arterial revascularization procedure is still a challenging issue in Covid-19 associated limb ischemia. Herein we aimed to present a case of a 64 year-old woman with acute ischemic signs in upper extremity who was diagnosed as a probable Covid-19 case incidentally after admission. Although late admission and failed recurrent embolectomies lead to an eventful course, intra-arterial thrombolysis seemed to present a benefitable treatment option for our patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemia/etiology , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Acute Disease , Amputation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Embolectomy , Female , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/physiopathology , Ischemia/therapy , Middle Aged , Regional Blood Flow , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
8.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 289-292, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525692

ABSTRACT

To describe the case of a young female patient, affected by Systemic Lupus Erythematous, hospitalized for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection pneumonia and presenting a treatment-resistant acute upper limb ischemia. Two days after hospital admission, the patient suffered sudden right upper limb pain associated with mild functional impairment. At physical examination, radial and ulnar pulses were absent, and no flow signal was detected at duplex ultrasound scan. Therefore, an acute limb ischemia diagnoses was posed. Despite several surgical and endovascular revascularization attempts, the patient underwent an above the elbow amputation in 10th postoperative day from first surgical embolectomy, and she died for respiratory failure 25 days after hospitalization. Our case of acute upper limb ischemia seems to confirm that clinical manifestation and fate of thrombotic disorder in COVID-19 patients could be precipitated by concomitant autoimmune diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemia/etiology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Acute Disease , Amputation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Progression , Embolectomy , Endovascular Procedures , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/physiopathology , Ischemia/therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
9.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(21): 6782-6796, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524866

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the eicosanoid and pro resolutive parameters in SARS COVID-19 patients with the severe acute respiratory syndrome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen male patients with an acute respiratory syndrome caused by SARS COVID-19 and four healthy controls were evaluated by measuring the following parameters in plasma: Polyunsaturated fatty acids: EPA, DHA, ARA, and DPA. Specialized Pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) (including monohydroxy-containing precursors 17-HDHA, 18-HEPE, 14-HDHA) resolvins, maresins, protectins, and lipoxins. The eicosanoids group included prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. RESULTS: Plasma from COVID-19 patients presented higher amounts of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic lipid mediators as compared to healthy subjects (65.7 pg/ml vs. 10.2 pg/ml), including thromboxane (2142.6 pg/ml vs. 10.4 pg/ml), and the ratio between total plasma pro-inflammatory mediators versus total SPM's was 13.2 to 0,4, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A clear disbalance favoring the pro-inflammatory axis is described, showing the need to perform future clinical interventions in these patients using SPM's or monohydroxylated lipid mediators derivates from fatty acids.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Eicosanoids/blood , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated/blood , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Thromboxanes/blood
10.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517636

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515266

ABSTRACT

Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a major risk factor for acute pancreatitis. In exceptional cases, it is caused by plasma components inhibiting lipoprotein lipase activity. This phenomenon is predominantly associated with autoimmune diseases. Here, we report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia due to a transient reduction in lipoprotein lipase activity following an episode of COVID-19 in an otherwise healthy 45-year-old woman. The lipoprotein lipase activity of the patient was markedly reduced compared with a healthy control and did recover to 20% of the healthy control's lipoprotein lipase activity 5 months after the COVID-19 episode. Mixing tests substantiated reduced lipolytic capacity in the presence of the patient's plasma at presentation compared with a homozygous lipoprotein lipase-deficient control, which was no longer present at follow-up. Western blotting confirmed that the quantity of lipoprotein lipase was not aberrant. Fibrate treatment and a strict hypolipidemic diet improved the patient's symptoms and triglyceride levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertriglyceridemia , Pancreatitis , Acute Disease , Female , Humans , Hypertriglyceridemia/complications , Middle Aged , Pancreatitis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Triglycerides
12.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512665

ABSTRACT

Acute viral bronchiolitis causes significant mortality in the developing world, is the number one cause of infant hospitalisation in the developed world, and is associated with the later development of chronic lung diseases such as asthma. A vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the leading cause of viral bronchiolitis in infancy, remains elusive, and hence new therapeutic modalities are needed to limit disease severity. However, much remains unknown about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Neutrophilic inflammation is the predominant phenotype observed in infants with both mild and severe disease, however, a clear understanding of the beneficial and deleterious effects of neutrophils is lacking. In this review, we describe the multifaceted roles of neutrophils in host defence and antiviral immunity, consider their contribution to bronchiolitis pathogenesis, and discuss whether new approaches that target neutrophil effector functions will be suitable for treating severe RSV bronchiolitis.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis, Viral/immunology , Bronchiolitis, Viral/pathology , Immunity, Innate , Neutrophils/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Acute Disease , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity
13.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(20): 23442-23458, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498162

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Hyperamylasemia was found in a group of patients with COVID-19 during hospitalization. However, the evolution and the clinical significance of hyperamylasemia in COVID-19, is not well characterized. DESIGN: In this retrospective cohort study, the epidemiological, demographic, laboratory, treatment and outcome information of 1,515 COVID-19 patients with available longitudinal amylase records collected from electronic medical system were analyzed to assess the prevalence and clinical significance of hyperamylasemia in this infection. Associated variables with hyperamylasemia in COVID-19 were also analyzed. RESULTS: Of 1,515 patients, 196 (12.9%) developed hyperamylasemia, among whom 19 (1.3%) greater than 3 times upper limit of normal (ULN) and no clinical acute pancreatitis was seen. Multivariable ordered logistic regression implied older age, male, chronic kidney disease, several medications (immunoglobin, systemic corticosteroids, and antifungals), increased creatinine might be associated with hyperamylasemia during hospitalization. Restricted cubic spline analysis indicated hyperamylasemia had a J-shaped association with all-cause mortality and the estimated hazard ratio per standard deviation was 2.85 (2.03-4.00) above ULN. Based on the multivariable mixed-effect cox or logistic regression model taking hospital sites as random effects, elevated serum amylase during hospitalization was identified as an independent risk factor associated with in-hospital death and intensive complications, including sepsis, cardiac injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and acute kidney injury. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated serum amylase was independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Since early intervention might change the outcome, serum amylase should be monitored dynamically during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Amylases/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Hyperamylasemia/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Acute Disease , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyperamylasemia/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(13-14): 927-932, 2021 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493274

ABSTRACT

Acute COVID-19 pneumonia may result in persistent changes with various imaging and histopathological patterns, including organizing pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with increased risk of pulmonary vascular endothelialitis and thrombosis. Herein, current findings on pulmonary consequences of COVID-19 with implications for clinical management are summarized based on a selective literature review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Acute Disease , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/therapy
16.
J Immunol Methods ; 499: 113174, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487843

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As in other viral infections, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs) are observed in SARS-CoV-2 infection. We investigated the presence of autoantibodies in acute COVID-19 and the association with early laboratory findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined 50 sera (>18 years, 25 Female) from patients with acute COVID-19. ANAs (HEp-20-10 liver biochip), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA, Europlus Granulocyte Mosaic 32) and anti-double stranded DNA were investigated with product of Euroimmune AG (Luebeck, Germany) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) method. Also, antibody against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) was examined by a chemiluminisens assay (Euroimmun AG, Luebeck, Germany). Samples from 50 blood bank donors collected before the COVID-19 pandemic were used as controls. RESULTS: The IIF-ANA test was positive in 18% (N = 9/50) of the patients. The median time of sample collection was 7 days (range: 1-28 days) after diagnosis. ANA was positive in only one (2%) control sample. Five (55.5%) patients were ANA positive with a strong titer (3+). There was no relationship between antibody titration and time of sample collection (p = 0,55). Anti-CCP was detected in a nucleolar (3+) positive patient (2%). ANA was detected in 14.28% (N = 1/7, rods-rings (±), p = 0,78) of patients in the intensive care unit(ICU). Patients treated in the clinic have more and higher titers of ANA, mostly in nucleolar patterns, than ICU patients. CONCLUSIONS: The variety of antibodies detected in acute COVID-19 and the uncertainty of how long they persist can lead to confusion, especially in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases for IIF-ANA testing in immunology laboratories. Improvements in cell lines and methods will facilitate the diagnostic process.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Antinuclear/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Antinuclear/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Young Adult
17.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 541, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486594

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic have already exceeded 10 million infected and more than 560,000 deaths worldwide since its inception. Currently, it is known that the disease affects mainly the respiratory system; however, recent studies have shown an increase in the number of patients with manifestations in other systems, including gastrointestinal manifestations. There is a lack of literature regarding the development of acute pancreatitis as a complication of coronavirus disease 2019. CASE REPORT: We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a white male patient with coronavirus disease 2019. A 35-year-old man (body mass index 31.5) had acute epigastric pain radiating to his back, dyspnea, nausea, and vomiting for 2 days. The patient was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis (AP)-APACHE II: 5, SOFA: 3, Marshall: 0; then he was transferred from ED to the semi-intensive care unit. He tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and his chest computed tomography findings were compatible with coronavirus disease 2019. Treatment was based on bowel rest, fluid resuscitation, analgesia, and empiric antibiotic therapy. At day 12, with resolution of abdominal pain and improvement of the respiratory condition, the patient was discharged. CONCLUSION: Since there is still limited evidence of pancreatic involvement in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, no definite conclusion can be made. Given the lack of other etiology, we consider the possibility that the patient's acute pancreatitis could be secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 infection, and we suggest investigation of pancreas-specific plasma amylase in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and abdominal pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Acute Disease , Adult , Brazil , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Pril (Makedon Akad Nauk Umet Odd Med Nauki) ; 42(2): 95-101, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485000

ABSTRACT

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is characterized by an inflammation with fever, elevated inflammatory markers, conjunctivitis, rash, impaired coagulation, gastrointestinal symptoms and cardiac abnormalities that may progress to multiorgan failure. The presence of a positive COVID-19 antigen via a PCR test, serological testing for antibodies or close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 helps differentiate MIS-C from other diseases. Gastrointestinal symptoms are recognized to be associated with COVID-19 infection or MIS-C in children, presenting as abdominal pain, gastrointestinal infection with watery stools, appendicitis, ileitis, pancreatitis and hepatitis, confusing the diagnosis with other gastrointestinal diseases. In this case report, we describe an 11 year old boy with MIS-C, who presents acute phlegmona of the appendix for which he undergoes appendectomy, accompanied with acute pancreatitis. These manifestations of MIS-C in our patient resolved without additional complications after a 2 month follow up. We call attention to MIS-C presenting in pediatric patients with fever and abdominal pain which might be caused by appendicitis and pancreatitis, and we recommend abdominal imaging and additional laboratory investigation to promote earlier diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Acute Disease , Appendicitis/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Male , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
19.
Orv Hetil ; 162(43): 1710-1716, 2021 10 24.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484906

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. Bevezetés: A koronavírus-2 által okozott fertozések igen gyakran súlyos, akut légzoszervi károsodás kialakulásához vezetnek, melynek következtében légzési elégtelenség manifesztálódik. A pneumoniák kialakulásának kezdete (2019. december) óta igen sok beteg szorult kórházi kezelésre. A súlyos tüdogyulladások ellátása során igazolódott, hogy a légzoszervi gyulladásos folyamatok során a betegek jelentos részében vénás, ritkábban artériás thrombosisok alakulnak ki, tovább súlyosbítva a klinikai állapotot. Célkituzés: A 2020. szeptember és 2021. március közötti idoszakban 1590, koronavírus-2 által megfertozött, tüdogyulladással szövodött beteget láttunk el osztályunkon. Betegeinkben azt vizsgáltuk, hogy milyen jellegu és arányú a thromboemboliás szövodmények elofordulása. Módszer: Az 1590, koronavírus-2 által fertozött beteg mindegyikében meghatároztuk a pneumonia súlyosságát; klinikai gyanú eseteiben alsó végtagi Doppler-ultrahangvizsgálatot, valamint komputertomográfiával végzett tüdoangiográfiát végeztünk. Eredmények: A képalkotó vizsgálatok eredményei azt igazolták, hogy a koronavírus-2 által okozott tüdogyulladással kezeltekben 13%-os gyakorisággal fordult elo mélyvénás thrombosis; akut tüdoemboliát a betegek 17%-ában kórisméztünk. Következtetés: A koronavírus-2 által okozott fertozésekben elsosorban a tüdoben, de egyéb szervekben is (szív, vese, máj) súlyos gyulladással járó kórfolyamatok alakulhatnak ki, amelyek hatására fokozott thrombosiskészség jelentkezik a gyulladásos és koagulációs rendszer interakciója következtében. A fokozott thrombosishajlam végeredményeként vénás és ritkábban artériás thrombosisok kialakulása súlyosbítja a betegek klinikai állapotát, s kedvezotlen hatást gyakorol az életkilátásra. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(43): 1710-1716. INTRODUCTION: The infections caused by coronavirus-2 very often lead to severe, acute respiratory damages, because of which respiratory insufficiency is manifested. As a result, since the development of pneumonias (December, 2019), many patients have required hospitalization. When treating the severe pneumonia cases, it was proved that in a significant number of patients with respiratory inflammatory processes, venous, less often arterial thrombosis occured, making the clinical state even more severe. OBJECTIVE: We treated 1590 coronavirus-2 infected, pneumonia-connected patients between September, 2020 and March, 2021 at our department. We examined the nature and the proportion of the thromboembolic complications. METHOD: We determined the severity of pneumonia in the 1950 coronavirus-2 infected patients; when clinically suspected, they had lower limb Doppler ultrasound examination and angiography carried out with computer tomograph. RESULTS: The result of imaging examinations proved that in 13% of cases deep vein thrombosis occured; in 17% of cases acute pulmonary embolia occured with pneumonia caused by coronavirus-2. CONCLUSION: In coronavirus-2 infected cases, mainly in the lung, but also in other organs (heart, kidney, liver), severe inflammatory disease-processes may occur, as a result of which increased thrombosis tendency shows because of the ineraction of the inflammatory and coagulatory system. As a result of the increased thrombosis tendency, venous and less often arterial thrombosis worsen the clinical state of patients, and have unfavourable effect on life expectancy. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(43): 1710-1716.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Acute Disease , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 60(1): 135-142, 2022 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484888

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies reported lipase elevations in serum of COVID-19 patients trying to establish a causal link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and pancreatic damage. However, the degree and prevalence of hyperlipasemia was not uniform across studies. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 1,092 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and at least one available lipase result. The number and frequency of patients with lipase above the upper reference limit (URL), >3 URL, and >6 URL were estimated. Correlations between lipase values and other biomarkers of organ or tissue damage were performed to identify possible extra-pancreatic sources of lipase release. The potential prognostic role of lipase to predict death and intensive care unit (ICU) admission during hospitalization was also evaluated. RESULTS: Lipase was >URL in 344 (31.5%) of COVID-19 patients. Among them, 65 (5.9%) and 25 (2.3%) had a peak lipase >3 URL and >6 URL, respectively. In the latter group, three patients had acute pancreatitis of gallstone or drug-induced etiology. In others, the etiology of lipase elevations appeared multifactorial and could not be directly related to SARS-CoV-2 infection. No correlation was found between lipase and other tested biomarkers of organ and tissue damage. Lipase concentrations were not different between survivors and non-survivors; however, lipase was significantly increased (p<0.001) in patients admitted to the ICU, even if the odds ratio for lipase as predictor of ICU admission was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Lipase was elevated in ∼1/3 of COVID-19 patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is unclear and irrelevant to patient prognosis during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lipase/blood , Acute Disease , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Retrospective Studies
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