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1.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens ; 31(1): 36-46, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612725

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe COVID-19 disease is often complicated by acute kidney injury (AKI), which may transition to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Better understanding of underlying mechanisms is important in advancing therapeutic approaches. RECENT FINDINGS: SARS-CoV-2-induced endothelial injury initiates platelet activation, platelet-neutrophil partnership and release of neutrophil extracellular traps. The resulting thromboinflammation causes ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury to end organs. Severe COVID-19 induces a lipid-mediator storm with massive increases in thromboxane A2 (TxA2) and PGD2, which promote thromboinflammation and apoptosis of renal tubular cells, respectively, and thereby enhance renal fibrosis. COVID-19-associated AKI improves rapidly in the majority. However, 15-30% have protracted renal injury, raising the specter of transition from AKI to CKD. SUMMARY: In COVID-19, the lipid-mediator storm promotes thromboinflammation, ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytotoxicity. The thromboxane A2 and PGD2 signaling presents a therapeutic target with potential to mitigate AKI and transition to CKD. Ramatroban, the only dual antagonist of the thromboxane A2/TPr and PGD2/DPr2 signaling could potentially mitigate renal injury in acute and long-haul COVID. Urgent studies targeting the lipid-mediator storm are needed to potentially reduce the heavy burden of kidney disease emerging in the wake of the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Thrombosis , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Fibrosis , Humans , Inflammation , Kidney/pathology , Lipids , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology
3.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(4): 1667-1675, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593038

ABSTRACT

In-hospital acute kidney injury (IH-AKI) has been reported in a significant proportion of patients with COVID-19 and is associated with increased disease burden and poor outcomes. However, the mechanisms of injury are not fully understood. We sought to determine the significance of race on cardiopulmonary outcomes and in-hospital mortality of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with AKI. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized in Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia between February and July 2020, who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) on qualitative polymerase-chain-reaction assay. We evaluated the primary composite outcome of in-hospital cardiac events, and mortality in blacks with AKI versus non-blacks with AKI. In a subgroup analysis, we evaluated the impact of AKI in all blacks and in all non-blacks. Of 293 patients, effective sample size was 267 after all exclusion criteria were applied. The mean age was 61.4 ± 16.7, 39% were female, and 75 (28.1%) had IH-AKI. In multivariable analyses, blacks with IH-AKI were not more likely to have in-hospital cardiac events (aOR 0.3, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.86, p = 0.18), require ICU stay (aOR 0.80, 95% CI 0.20-3.25, p = 0.75), acute respiratory distress syndrome (aOR 0.77, 95% CI 0.16-3.65, p = 0.74), require mechanical ventilation (aOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.12-2.10, p = 0.35), and in-hospital mortality (aOR 1.40, 95% CI 0.26-7.50, p = 0.70) when compared to non-blacks with IH-AKI. Regardless of race, the presence of AKI was associated with worse outcomes. Black race is not associated with higher risk of in-hospital cardiac events and mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients who develop AKI. However, blacks with IH-AKI are more likely to have ARDS or die from any cause when compared to blacks without IH-AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Middle Aged , Race Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 747732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598924

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the association between overweight and obesity on the clinical course and outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Design: Retrospective, observational cohort study. Methods: We performed a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study of hospitalized COVID-19 patients to evaluate the associations between overweight and obesity on the clinical course and outcomes. Results: Out of 1634 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 473 (28.9%) had normal weight, 669 (40.9%) were overweight, and 492 (30.1%) were obese. Patients who were overweight or had obesity were younger, and there were more women in the obese group. Normal-weight patients more often had pre-existing conditions such as malignancy, or were organ recipients. During admission, patients who were overweight or had obesity had an increased probability of acute respiratory distress syndrome [OR 1.70 (1.26-2.30) and 1.40 (1.01-1.96)], respectively and acute kidney failure [OR 2.29 (1.28-3.76) and 1.92 (1.06-3.48)], respectively. Length of hospital stay was similar between groups. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 27.7%, and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that overweight and obesity were not associated with increased mortality compared to normal-weight patients. Conclusion: In this study, overweight and obesity were associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury, but not with in-hospital mortality nor length of hospital stay.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Obesity/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Aged , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24439, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585782

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently associated with COVID-19 and it is considered an indicator of disease severity. This study aimed to develop a prognostic score for predicting in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients with AKI (AKI-COV score). This was a cross-sectional multicentre prospective cohort study in the Latin America AKI COVID-19 Registry. A total of 870 COVID-19 patients with AKI defined according to the KDIGO were included between 1 May 2020 and 31 December 2020. We evaluated four categories of predictor variables that were available at the time of the diagnosis of AKI: (1) demographic data; (2) comorbidities and conditions at admission; (3) laboratory exams within 24 h; and (4) characteristics and causes of AKI. We used a machine learning approach to fit models in the training set using tenfold cross-validation and validated the accuracy using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC). The coefficients of the best model (Elastic Net) were used to build the predictive AKI-COV score. The AKI-COV score had an AUC-ROC of 0.823 (95% CI 0.761-0.885) in the validation cohort. The use of the AKI-COV score may assist healthcare workers in identifying hospitalized COVID-19 patients with AKI that may require more intensive monitoring and can be used for resource allocation.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Hospital Mortality , Machine Learning , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(50): e28302, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583956

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Although the number of deaths due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is higher in men than women, prior studies have provided limited sex-stratified clinical data.We evaluated sex-related differences in clinical outcomes among critically ill adults with COVID-19.Multicenter cohort study of adults with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to intensive care units at 67 U.S. hospitals from March 4 to May 9, 2020. Multilevel logistic regression was used to evaluate 28-day in-hospital mortality, severe acute kidney injury (AKI requiring kidney replacement therapy), and respiratory failure occurring within 14 days of intensive care unit admission.A total of 4407 patients were included (median age, 62 years; 2793 [63.4%] men; 1159 [26.3%] non-Hispanic White; 1220 [27.7%] non-Hispanic Black; 994 [22.6%] Hispanic). Compared with women, men were younger (median age, 61 vs 64 years, less likely to be non-Hispanic Black (684 [24.5%] vs 536 [33.2%]), and more likely to smoke (877 [31.4%] vs 422 [26.2%]). During median follow-up of 14 days, 1072 men (38.4%) and 553 women (34.3%) died. Severe AKI occurred in 590 men (21.8%), and 239 women (15.5%), while respiratory failure occurred in 2255 men (80.7%) and 1234 women (76.5%). After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and clinical variables, compared with women, men had a higher risk of death (OR, 1.50, 95% CI, 1.26-1.77), severe AKI (OR, 1.92; 95% CI 1.57-2.36), and respiratory failure (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11-1.80).In this multicenter cohort of critically ill adults with COVID-19, men were more likely to have adverse outcomes compared with women.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Sex Factors , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
7.
Klin Lab Diagn ; 66(10): 586-592, 2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1567038

ABSTRACT

An relevance of the topic was defined by the high occurrence, unfavorable prognosis, lack of diagnostic techniques for early stages of acute kidney injury (AKI) disclosed in patients with COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). Screening of medical literature for selection of AKI preclinical biomarkers was considered as main aim of this review. More than 200 publications from Russian Science Citation Index (RSCI), Scopus, The Cochrane Library, and MEDLINE were reviewed. Such risk factors as hypoxemia, increased intrathoracic pressure associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), hypertension (HT) involving endothelial dysfunction, and Diabetes mellitus were considered to be associated with AKI. There were explicated cytopathic and immune-mediated (cytokine-induced) mechanisms of COVID-19 associated AKI pathogenesis. Multiple methodological approaches were defined for detection and identification of the biomarkers based on urine proteome and metabolome screening. Perspective ways in the preclinical diagnostics of AKI such as detection of the markers of injury of the hypoxia-sensitive proximal canaliculi and the ATP metabolites that reflect first stages of the energy metabolism disorder in the epithelium lining canaliculi were identified in this study. The instantaneous and non-invasive investigation of different markers was regarded as possible method of the prognostication. The accuracy of the diagnosis on the initial stages of AKI, substantiate for preventive start of therapy, and make projections on the disease`s outcome will be improved due to the identification of high-sensitive specific biomarkers.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Biomarkers , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6760-6764, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544331

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected more than a hundred million individuals and caused more than three million deaths worldwide. Specific risk groups were defined for increased risk of mortality and morbidity in COVID-19, and renal transplant recipients are at a significantly increased risk regarding outcomes due to their immunosuppressed conditions. This study evaluated the general characteristics of kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 infection. Among 1257 transplant cases, 56 had COVID-19 infection, and 23 (41%) were hospitalized during the 9-month study period. Among all COVID-19 cases, 58% were male with a mean age of 45.5 (±13.2, 19-71) years, and the most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (70.9%) and diabetes (23.6%). Hospitalized patients were older (p = 0.03) and had higher rates of hypertension (p = 0.008), diabetes (p = 0.002), and ischemic heart disease (p = 0.03). Therapeutic management included antimetabolite withdrawal and prednisolone increase in 71%, calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal in 8% and decrease in 58%, hydroxychloroquine in 17%, tocilizumab in 3%, and antivirals in 67% of patients. Acute kidney injury and respiratory failure developed in 34% and 85%, respectively. The mortality rate was 23%. These results emphasized that the COVID-19 infection in renal transplant recipients significantly increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, these patients should be intervened earlier and monitored closely to prevent poor outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Immunocompromised Host/drug effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Kidney/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Transplant Recipients , Young Adult
9.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6641-6652, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544314

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) may develop in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with in-hospital death. We investigated the incidence of AKI in 223 hospitalized COVID-19 patients and analyzed the influence factors of AKI. The incidence of cytokine storm syndrome and its correlation with other clinicopathologic variables were also investigated. We retrospectively enrolled adult patients with virologically confirmed COVID-19 who were hospitalized at three hospitals in Wuhan and Guizhou, China between February 13, 2020, and April 8, 2020. We included 124 patients with moderate COVID-19 and 99 with severe COVID-19. AKI was present in 35 (15.7%) patients. The incidence of AKI was 30.3% for severe COVID-19 and 4.0% for moderate COVID-19 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, cytokine storm was found in 30 (13.5%) patients and only found in the severe group. Kidney injury at admission (odds ratio [OR]: 3.132, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.150-8.527; p = 0.025), cytokine storm (OR: 4.234, 95% CI: 1.361-13.171; p = 0.013), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR: 7.684, 95% CI: 2.622-22.523; p < 0.001) were influence factors of AKI. Seventeen (48.6%) patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation developed AKI, of whom 64.7% (11/17) died. Up to 86.7% of AKI patients with cytokine storms may develop a secondary bacterial infection. The leukocyte counts were significantly higher in AKI patients with cytokine storm than in those without (13.0 × 109/L, interquartile range [IQR] 11.3 vs. 8.3 × 109/L, IQR 7.5, p = 0.005). Approximately 1/6 patients with COVID-19 eventually develop AKI. Kidney injury at admission, cytokine storm and ARDS are influence factors of AKI. Cytokine storm and secondary bacterial infections may be responsible for AKI development in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Bacterial Infections/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Adult , Aged , China , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
10.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(6): 414-420, 2021 12.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528985

ABSTRACT

Renal involvement among pediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) ranges between 10% and 80%. Given the limited information about its prognosis, the objective of this study was to describe the short-term course of patients in whom renal involvement was detected during hospitalization due to COVID-19. This was an observational, cross-sectional study in patients aged 1 month to 18 years who had COVID-19 and renal involvement. Those with a known kidney disease were excluded. A total of 27 patients with renal involvement were identified; 14 of them were followed-up to study their disease course for 3 months after diagnosis. All of the patients had achieved normal plasma creatinine levels during hospitalization and, at the time of outpatient follow-up, which took place 145 days (92-193) later, all had normal blood pressure and urinary values, except for 1 patient who continued with microscopic hematuria. Course was favorable; in most patients, renal involvement had fully resolved.


El compromiso renal en los pacientes pediátricos con enfermedad por el coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19, por su sigla en inglés) varía entre el 10 % y el 80 %. Dado que existe limitada información sobre su pronóstico, se realizó este estudio con el objetivo de describir la evolución en el corto plazo de pacientes a quienes se les detectó compromiso renal durante la internación por COVID-19. Estudio observacional y transversal que incluyó pacientes entre 1 mes y 18 años con COVID-19 con compromiso renal. Se excluyeron aquellos con patología renal conocida. Se identificaron 27 pacientes con afectación renal, en 14 de ellos se pudo realizar seguimiento para estudiar la evolución renal luego de 3 meses del diagnóstico. Todos habían normalizado los niveles de creatinina plasmática durante la internación y al momento del control ambulatorio, realizado a los 145 días (92-193), todos se encontraban normotensos y con hallazgos urinarios normales, excepto uno que persistía con microhematuria. La evolución fue favorable; la mayoría de los pacientes presentaron remisión completa del compromiso renal.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Child , Hematuria , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Clin Pathol ; 74(12): 796-803, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526518

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 have a variable incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) according to studies from different nationalities. The present systematic review and meta-analysis describes the incidence of AKI, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality among patients with COVID-19-associated AKI. METHODS: We systematically searched electronic database PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science to identify English articles published until 25 May 2020. In case of significant heterogeneity, the meta-analyses were conducted assuming a random-effects model. RESULTS: From 746 screened publications, we selected 21 observational studies with 15 536 patients with COVID-19 for random-effects model meta-analyses. The overall incidence of AKI was 12.3% (95% CI 7.3% to 20.0%) and 77% of patients with AKI were critically ill (95% CI 58.9% to 89.0%). The mortality among patients with AKI was 67% (95% CI 39.8% to 86.2%) and the risk of death was 13 times higher compared with patients without AKI (OR=13.3; 95% CI 6.1 to 29.2). Patients with COVID-19-associated AKI needed for RRT in 23.4% of cases (95% CI 12.6% to 39.4%) and those cases had high mortality (89%-100%). CONCLUSION: The present study evidenced an incidence of COVID-19-associated AKI higher than previous meta-analysis. The majority of patients affected by AKI were critically ill and mortality rate among AKI cases was high. Thus, it is extremely important for health systems to be aware about the impact of AKI on patients' outcomes in order to establish proper screening, prevention of additional damage to the kidneys and adequate renal support when needed.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
12.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3487-3496, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525603

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Black individuals have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, it remains unclear whether there are any biological factors that predispose Black patients to COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To compare in-hospital morbidity, mortality, and inflammatory marker levels between Black and White hospitalized COVID-19 patients. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: This single-center retrospective cohort study analyzed data for Black and White patients aged ≥18 years hospitalized with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test between March 1, 2020, and August 4, 2020. MAIN MEASURES: The exposure was self-identified race documented in the medical record. The primary outcome of was in-hospital death. Secondary outcomes included intensive care unit admission, hospital morbidities, and inflammatory marker levels. KEY RESULTS: A total of 1,424 Black and White patients were identified. The mean ± SD age was 56.1 ± 17.4 years, and 663 (44.5%) were female. There were 683 (48.0%) Black and 741 (52.0%) White patients. In the univariate analysis, Black patients had longer hospital stays (8.1 ± 10.2 vs. 6.7 ± 8.3 days, p = 0.011) and tended to have higher rates of in-hospital death (11.0% vs. 7.3%), myocardial infarction (6.9% vs. 4.5%), pulmonary embolism (PE; 5.0% vs. 2.3%), and acute kidney injury (AKI; 39.4% vs. 23.1%) than White patients (p <0.05). However, after adjusting for potential confounders, only PE (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.07, 95% CI, 1.13-3.79) and AKI (aOR 2.16, 95% CI, 1.57-2.97) were statistically significantly associated with Black race. In comparison with White patients, Black patients had statistically significantly higher peak plasma D-dimer (standardized ß = 0.10), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (standardized ß = 0.13), ferritin (standardized ß = 0.09), and lactate dehydrogenase (standardized ß = 0.11), after adjusting for potential confounders (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Black hospitalized COVID-19 patients had increased risks of developing PE and AKI and higher inflammatory marker levels compared with White patients. This observation may be explained by differences in the prevalence and severity of underlying comorbidities and other unmeasured biologic risk factors between Black and White patients. Future research is needed to investigate the mechanism of these observed differences in outcomes of severe COVID-19 infection in Black versus White patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(10): 2561-2575, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521396

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acute kidney injury (AKI) to sepsis-AKI (S-AKI). The morphology and transcriptomic and proteomic characteristics of autopsy kidneys were analyzed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Individuals 18 years of age and older who died from COVID-19 and had an autopsy performed at Mayo Clinic between April 2020 to October 2020 were included. Morphological evaluation of the kidneys of 17 individuals with COVID-19 was performed. In a subset of seven COVID-19 cases with postmortem interval of less than or equal to 20 hours, ultrastructural and molecular characteristics (targeted transcriptome and proteomics analyses of tubulointerstitium) were evaluated. Molecular characteristics were compared with archived cases of S-AKI and nonsepsis causes of AKI. RESULTS: The spectrum of COVID-19 renal pathology included macrophage-dominant microvascular inflammation (glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis), vascular dysfunction (peritubular capillary congestion and endothelial injury), and tubular injury with ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial damage. Investigation of the spatial architecture using a novel imaging mass cytometry revealed enrichment of CD3+CD4+ T cells in close proximity to antigen-presenting cells, and macrophage-enriched glomerular and interstitial infiltrates, suggesting an innate and adaptive immune tissue response. Coronavirus disease 2019 AKI and S-AKI, as compared to nonseptic AKI, had an enrichment of transcriptional pathways involved in inflammation (apoptosis, autophagy, major histocompatibility complex class I and II, and type 1 T helper cell differentiation). Proteomic pathway analysis showed that COVID-19 AKI and to a lesser extent S-AKI were enriched in necroptosis and sirtuin-signaling pathways, both involved in regulatory response to inflammation. Upregulation of the ceramide-signaling pathway and downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation in COVID-19 AKI were noted. CONCLUSION: This data highlights the similarities between S-AKI and COVID-19 AKI and suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a pivotal role in COVID-19 AKI. This data may allow the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Kidney/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Autopsy , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Sepsis/virology
14.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 36(9): 2627-2638, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 is responsible for the 2019 novel coronavirus disease pandemic. Despite the vast research about the adult population, there has been little data collected on acute kidney injury (AKI) epidemiology, associated risk factors, treatments, and mortality in pediatric COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. AKI is a severe complication of COVID-19 among children and adolescents. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane Center Trials to find all published literature related to AKI in COVID-19 patients, including incidence and outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty-four studies reporting the outcomes of interest were included. Across all studies, the overall sample size of COVID positive children was 1,247 and the median age of this population was 9.1 years old. Among COVID positive pediatric patients, there was an AKI incidence of 30.51%, with only 0.56% of these patients receiving KRT. The mortality was 2.55% among all COVID positive pediatric patients. The incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among COVID positive patients was 74.29%. CONCLUSION: AKI has shown to be a negative prognostic factor in adult patients with COVID-19 and now also in the pediatric cohort with high incidence and mortality rates. Additionally, our findings show a strong comparison in epidemiology between adult and pediatric COVID-19 patients; however, they need to be confirmed with additional data and studies.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality
15.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 87(11): 1209-1216, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our objective was to the describe indications, management, complications and outcomes of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in COVID-19 critically ill patients. To contextualize these findings, comparisons were made against 36 non-COVID-19 consecutive patients requiring RRT on ICU. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective single center observational cohort study of patients requiring acute RRT between 1st March and 30th June 2020. Comparison was made against those receiving RRT in the pre-COVID-19 period from January 2019 to February 2020. RESULTS: Of 154 COVID-19 patients, 47 (30.5%) received continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF), all of whom required mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. The requirement for RRT was related to fluid balance rather than azotemia. Compared to 36 non-COVID-19 patients, those with COVID-19 were younger (P=0.016) with a lower serum creatinine on hospital admission (P=0.049), and lesser degrees of metabolic acidosis (P<0.001) and lactatemia (P<0.001) before initiation of RRT. In addition, the duration of RRT requirement was longer (P<0.001). Despite lower CVVHF exchange rates with higher serum creatinine levels following RRT initiation in the COVID-19 patients, metabolic abnormalities were corrected. Hospital mortality was 60% among COVID-19 patients requiring RRT, compared to 67% in non-COVID-19 patients (P=0.508), and renal recovery among survivors without pre-existing CKD was similar (P=0.231). CONCLUSIONS: The requirement for RRT in COVID-19 patients was primarily related to fluid balance. Using lower CVVHF exchange rates was effective to correct metabolic abnormalities. Renal recovery occurred in all but one patient by 60 days in the 40% of patients who survived.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Renal Replacement Therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Cytokine ; 149: 155727, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although pneumonia is the hallmark of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), multiple organ failure may develop in severe disease. TNFα receptors in their soluble form (sTNFR) are involved in the immune cascade in other systemic inflammatory processes such as septic shock, and could mediate the inflammatory activation of distant organs. The aim of this study is to analyse plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 in association with organ failure and outcome in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: After informed consent, we included 122 adult patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 at ICU admission. Demographic data, illness severity scores, organ failure and survival at 30 days were collected. Plasma sTNFR 1 and 2 levels were quantified during the first days after ICU admission. Twenty-five healthy blood donors were used as control group. RESULTS: Levels of sTNFR were higher in severe COVID-19 patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Plasma levels of sTNFR were associated to illness severity scores (SAPS 3 and SOFA), inflammation biomarkers such as IL-6, ferritin and PCT as well as development of AKI during ICU stay. sTNFR 1 higher than 2.29 ng/mL and? sTNFR 2 higher than 11.7 ng/mL were identified as optimal cut-offs to discriminate survivors and non-survivors 30 days after ICU admission and had an area under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.75 and 0.67 respectively. CONCLUSION: Plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 were higher in COVID-19 patients compared to controls and were strongly associated with other inflammatory biomarkers, severity of illness and acute kidney injury development during ICU stay. In addition, sTNFR 1 was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality after adjustment for age and respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
18.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503762

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Digital systems have long been used to improve the quality and safety of care when managing acute kidney injury (AKI). The availability of digitised clinical data can also turn organisations and their networks into learning healthcare systems (LHSs) if used across all levels of health and care. This review explores the impact of digital systems i.e. on patients with AKI care, to gauge progress towards establishing LHSs and to identify existing gaps in the research. METHODS: Embase, PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched. Studies of real-time or near real-time digital AKI management systems which reported process and outcome measures were included. RESULTS: Thematic analysis of 43 studies showed that most interventions used real-time serum creatinine levels to trigger responses to enable risk prediction, early recognition of AKI or harm prevention by individual clinicians (micro level) or specialist teams (meso level). Interventions at system (macro level) were rare. There was limited evidence of change in outcomes. DISCUSSION: While the benefits of real-time digital clinical data at micro level for AKI management have been evident for some time, their application at meso and macro levels is emergent therefore limiting progress towards establishing LHSs. Lack of progress is due to digital maturity, system design, human factors and policy levers. CONCLUSION: Future approaches need to harness the potential of interoperability, data analytical advances and include multiple stakeholder perspectives to develop effective digital LHSs in order to gain benefits across the system.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Learning Health System , Patient Care , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Care/instrumentation , Patient Care/methods
20.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 451-454, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501177

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The authors report on a case of a 59-year-old man hospitalized in the intensive care unit because of severe SARS-COV-2 infection (COVID-19). BACKGROUND: The patient had several comorbidities, including liver cirrhosis. He developed ventilation-associated bacterial pneumonia for which he was administered cefepime at an initial dose of 2 g/8 hours. Therapeutic drug monitoring was performed, showing overexposure with an initial trough concentration of >60 mg/L. METHODS: Analysis of pharmacokinetic data and model-based dose adjustment was performed using BestDose software. RESULTS: The patient had unexpected pharmacokinetic parameter values. Serum creatinine was only moderately increased, whereas measured creatinine clearance based on urine collection showed impaired renal function. Bacterial minimum inhibitory concentration was also considered in the dosing decisions. After dose reduction to 0.5 g/8 hours, the cefepime trough concentration progressively declined and reached the target values by the end of the therapy. A post-hoc analysis provided a different interpretation of drug overexposure. CONCLUSION: This case report illustrates how physiological, microbiological, and drug concentration data can be used for model-based dosage individualization of cefepime in intensive care unit patients.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacokinetics , Cefepime/pharmacokinetics , Critical Illness/therapy , Drug Dosage Calculations , Precision Medicine/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Cefepime/administration & dosage , Cefepime/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
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