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1.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(4): 1667-1675, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593038

ABSTRACT

In-hospital acute kidney injury (IH-AKI) has been reported in a significant proportion of patients with COVID-19 and is associated with increased disease burden and poor outcomes. However, the mechanisms of injury are not fully understood. We sought to determine the significance of race on cardiopulmonary outcomes and in-hospital mortality of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with AKI. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized in Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia between February and July 2020, who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) on qualitative polymerase-chain-reaction assay. We evaluated the primary composite outcome of in-hospital cardiac events, and mortality in blacks with AKI versus non-blacks with AKI. In a subgroup analysis, we evaluated the impact of AKI in all blacks and in all non-blacks. Of 293 patients, effective sample size was 267 after all exclusion criteria were applied. The mean age was 61.4 ± 16.7, 39% were female, and 75 (28.1%) had IH-AKI. In multivariable analyses, blacks with IH-AKI were not more likely to have in-hospital cardiac events (aOR 0.3, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.86, p = 0.18), require ICU stay (aOR 0.80, 95% CI 0.20-3.25, p = 0.75), acute respiratory distress syndrome (aOR 0.77, 95% CI 0.16-3.65, p = 0.74), require mechanical ventilation (aOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.12-2.10, p = 0.35), and in-hospital mortality (aOR 1.40, 95% CI 0.26-7.50, p = 0.70) when compared to non-blacks with IH-AKI. Regardless of race, the presence of AKI was associated with worse outcomes. Black race is not associated with higher risk of in-hospital cardiac events and mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients who develop AKI. However, blacks with IH-AKI are more likely to have ARDS or die from any cause when compared to blacks without IH-AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Middle Aged , Race Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Clin Pathol ; 74(12): 796-803, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526518

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 have a variable incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) according to studies from different nationalities. The present systematic review and meta-analysis describes the incidence of AKI, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality among patients with COVID-19-associated AKI. METHODS: We systematically searched electronic database PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science to identify English articles published until 25 May 2020. In case of significant heterogeneity, the meta-analyses were conducted assuming a random-effects model. RESULTS: From 746 screened publications, we selected 21 observational studies with 15 536 patients with COVID-19 for random-effects model meta-analyses. The overall incidence of AKI was 12.3% (95% CI 7.3% to 20.0%) and 77% of patients with AKI were critically ill (95% CI 58.9% to 89.0%). The mortality among patients with AKI was 67% (95% CI 39.8% to 86.2%) and the risk of death was 13 times higher compared with patients without AKI (OR=13.3; 95% CI 6.1 to 29.2). Patients with COVID-19-associated AKI needed for RRT in 23.4% of cases (95% CI 12.6% to 39.4%) and those cases had high mortality (89%-100%). CONCLUSION: The present study evidenced an incidence of COVID-19-associated AKI higher than previous meta-analysis. The majority of patients affected by AKI were critically ill and mortality rate among AKI cases was high. Thus, it is extremely important for health systems to be aware about the impact of AKI on patients' outcomes in order to establish proper screening, prevention of additional damage to the kidneys and adequate renal support when needed.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
3.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3487-3496, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525603

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Black individuals have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, it remains unclear whether there are any biological factors that predispose Black patients to COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To compare in-hospital morbidity, mortality, and inflammatory marker levels between Black and White hospitalized COVID-19 patients. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: This single-center retrospective cohort study analyzed data for Black and White patients aged ≥18 years hospitalized with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test between March 1, 2020, and August 4, 2020. MAIN MEASURES: The exposure was self-identified race documented in the medical record. The primary outcome of was in-hospital death. Secondary outcomes included intensive care unit admission, hospital morbidities, and inflammatory marker levels. KEY RESULTS: A total of 1,424 Black and White patients were identified. The mean ± SD age was 56.1 ± 17.4 years, and 663 (44.5%) were female. There were 683 (48.0%) Black and 741 (52.0%) White patients. In the univariate analysis, Black patients had longer hospital stays (8.1 ± 10.2 vs. 6.7 ± 8.3 days, p = 0.011) and tended to have higher rates of in-hospital death (11.0% vs. 7.3%), myocardial infarction (6.9% vs. 4.5%), pulmonary embolism (PE; 5.0% vs. 2.3%), and acute kidney injury (AKI; 39.4% vs. 23.1%) than White patients (p <0.05). However, after adjusting for potential confounders, only PE (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.07, 95% CI, 1.13-3.79) and AKI (aOR 2.16, 95% CI, 1.57-2.97) were statistically significantly associated with Black race. In comparison with White patients, Black patients had statistically significantly higher peak plasma D-dimer (standardized ß = 0.10), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (standardized ß = 0.13), ferritin (standardized ß = 0.09), and lactate dehydrogenase (standardized ß = 0.11), after adjusting for potential confounders (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Black hospitalized COVID-19 patients had increased risks of developing PE and AKI and higher inflammatory marker levels compared with White patients. This observation may be explained by differences in the prevalence and severity of underlying comorbidities and other unmeasured biologic risk factors between Black and White patients. Future research is needed to investigate the mechanism of these observed differences in outcomes of severe COVID-19 infection in Black versus White patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 36(9): 2627-2638, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 is responsible for the 2019 novel coronavirus disease pandemic. Despite the vast research about the adult population, there has been little data collected on acute kidney injury (AKI) epidemiology, associated risk factors, treatments, and mortality in pediatric COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. AKI is a severe complication of COVID-19 among children and adolescents. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane Center Trials to find all published literature related to AKI in COVID-19 patients, including incidence and outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty-four studies reporting the outcomes of interest were included. Across all studies, the overall sample size of COVID positive children was 1,247 and the median age of this population was 9.1 years old. Among COVID positive pediatric patients, there was an AKI incidence of 30.51%, with only 0.56% of these patients receiving KRT. The mortality was 2.55% among all COVID positive pediatric patients. The incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among COVID positive patients was 74.29%. CONCLUSION: AKI has shown to be a negative prognostic factor in adult patients with COVID-19 and now also in the pediatric cohort with high incidence and mortality rates. Additionally, our findings show a strong comparison in epidemiology between adult and pediatric COVID-19 patients; however, they need to be confirmed with additional data and studies.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality
5.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 87(11): 1209-1216, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our objective was to the describe indications, management, complications and outcomes of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in COVID-19 critically ill patients. To contextualize these findings, comparisons were made against 36 non-COVID-19 consecutive patients requiring RRT on ICU. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective single center observational cohort study of patients requiring acute RRT between 1st March and 30th June 2020. Comparison was made against those receiving RRT in the pre-COVID-19 period from January 2019 to February 2020. RESULTS: Of 154 COVID-19 patients, 47 (30.5%) received continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF), all of whom required mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. The requirement for RRT was related to fluid balance rather than azotemia. Compared to 36 non-COVID-19 patients, those with COVID-19 were younger (P=0.016) with a lower serum creatinine on hospital admission (P=0.049), and lesser degrees of metabolic acidosis (P<0.001) and lactatemia (P<0.001) before initiation of RRT. In addition, the duration of RRT requirement was longer (P<0.001). Despite lower CVVHF exchange rates with higher serum creatinine levels following RRT initiation in the COVID-19 patients, metabolic abnormalities were corrected. Hospital mortality was 60% among COVID-19 patients requiring RRT, compared to 67% in non-COVID-19 patients (P=0.508), and renal recovery among survivors without pre-existing CKD was similar (P=0.231). CONCLUSIONS: The requirement for RRT in COVID-19 patients was primarily related to fluid balance. Using lower CVVHF exchange rates was effective to correct metabolic abnormalities. Renal recovery occurred in all but one patient by 60 days in the 40% of patients who survived.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Renal Replacement Therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens ; 30(6): 563-570, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494106

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although initially kidney involvement in COVID-19 infection was felt to occur relatively infrequently, this has proved not to be the case. In critically ill patients with COVID-19, multiorgan failure including acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity. This review focuses briefly on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of COVID-19 associated AKI as well as options for management. RECENT FINDINGS: The risk factors for AKI are common to both noncovid-related AKI and COVID-19 associated AKI. Kidney injury in COVID-19 associated AKI may arise through several mechanisms, including not only direct effects on the kidney leading to tubular injury but also through the effects of treatment of multiorgan failure complicating infection. During surge conditions, the use of kidney replacement therapy has embraced all modalities including the use of peritoneal dialysis. The use of blood purification techniques has been proposed, but to date, the results are variable. SUMMARY: COVID-19 associated AKI is common, affecting approximately a quarter of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Glomerular injury can occur, but in the main tubular injury seems most likely leading to AKI, which should be managed following clinical pathways informed by accepted guidelines.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Critical Illness , Humans , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Ren Fail ; 43(1): 1329-1337, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493366

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study sought to investigate incidence and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized COVID-19. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we enrolled 823 COVID-19 patients with at least two evaluations of renal function during hospitalization from four hospitals in Wuhan, China between February 2020 and April 2020. Clinical and laboratory parameters at the time of admission and follow-up data were recorded. Systemic renal tubular dysfunction was evaluated via 24-h urine collections in a subgroup of 55 patients. RESULTS: In total, 823 patients were enrolled (50.5% male) with a mean age of 60.9 ± 14.9 years. AKI occurred in 38 (40.9%) ICU cases but only 6 (0.8%) non-ICU cases. Using forward stepwise Cox regression analysis, we found eight independent risk factors for AKI including decreased platelet level, lower albumin level, lower phosphorus level, higher level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP), urea, and prothrombin time (PT) on admission. For every 0.1 mmol/L decreases in serum phosphorus level, patients had a 1.34-fold (95% CI 1.14-1.58) increased risk of AKI. Patients with hypophosphatemia were likely to be older and with lower lymphocyte count, lower serum albumin level, lower uric acid, higher LDH, and higher CRP. Furthermore, serum phosphorus level was positively correlated with phosphate tubular maximum per volume of filtrate (TmP/GFR) (Pearson r = 0.66, p < .001) in subgroup analysis, indicating renal phosphate loss via proximal renal tubular dysfunction. CONCLUSION: The AKI incidence was very low in non-ICU patients as compared to ICU patients. Hypophosphatemia is an independent risk factor for AKI in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Hypophosphatemia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypophosphatemia/epidemiology , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Kidney Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20073, 2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462039

ABSTRACT

Kidney transplantation recipients (KTR) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at higher risk of death than general population. However, mortality risk factors in KTR are still not clearly identified. Our objective was to systematically analyze published evidence for risk factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 KTR. Electronic databases were searched for eligible studies on 1 August 2021. All prospective and retrospective studies of COVID-19 in KTR were considered eligible without language restriction. Since data in case reports and series could potentially be subsets of larger studies, only studies with ≥ 50 patients were included. Random-effects model meta-analysis was used to calculate weighted mean difference (WMD) and pooled odds ratio (OR) of factors associated with mortality. From a total 1,137 articles retrieved, 13 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis comprising 4,440 KTR. Compared with survivors, non-survivors were significantly older (WMD 10.5 years, 95% CI 9.3-11.8). KTR of deceased donor were at higher risk of death (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.10-2.74). Comorbidities including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and active cancer significantly increased mortality risk. KTR with dyspnea (OR 5.68, 95% CI 2.11-15.33) and pneumonia (OR 10.64, 95% CI 3.37-33.55) at presentation were at higher mortality risk, while diarrhea decreased the risk (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47-0.78). Acute kidney injury was associated with mortality (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.36-7.70). Inflammatory markers were significantly higher in the non-survivors, including C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and interleukine-6. A number of COVID-19 mortality risk factors were identified from KTR patient characteristics, presenting symptoms, and laboratory investigations. KTR with these risk factors should receive more intensive monitoring and early therapeutic interventions to optimize health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transplant Recipients
9.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257253, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443836

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that acute kidney injury (AKI) occurrence post SARS-CoV-2 infection is complex and has a poor prognosis. Therefore, more studies are needed to understand the rate and the predications of AKI involvement among hospitalized COVID-19 patients and AKI's impact on prognosis while under different types of medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted at Bahrain Defence Force (BDF) Royal Medical Services. Medical records of COVID-19 patients admitted to BDF hospital, treated, and followed up from April 2020 to October 2020 were retrieved. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with covariate adjustment, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence (95% CI) interval were reported. RESULTS: Among 353 patients admitted with COVID-19, 47.6% developed AKI. Overall, 51.8% of patients with AKI died compared to 2.2% of patients who did not develop AKI (p< 0.001 with OR 48.6 and 95% CI 17.2-136.9). Besides, deaths in patients classified with AKI staging were positively correlated and multivariate regression analysis revealed that moderate to severe hypoalbuminemia (<32 g/L) was independently correlated to death in AKI patients with an OR of 10.99 (CI 95% 4.1-29.3, p<0.001). In addition, 78.2% of the dead patients were on mechanical ventilation. Besides age as a predictor of AKI development, diabetes and hypertension were the major risk factors of AKI development (OR 2.04, p<0.01, and 0.05 for diabetes and hypertension, respectively). Also, two or more comorbidities substantially increased the risk of AKI development in COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, high levels upon hospital admission of D-Dimer, Troponin I, and ProBNP and low serum albumin were associated with AKI development. Lastly, patients taking ACEI/ARBs had less chance to develop AKI stage II/III with OR of 0.19-0.27 (p<0.05-0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of AKI in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and the mortality rate among AKI patients were high and correlated with AKI staging. Furthermore, laboratory testing for serum albumin, hypercoagulability and cardiac injury markers maybe indicative for AKI development. Therefore, clinicians should be mandated to perform such tests on admission and follow-up in hospitalized patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Bahrain/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 372-379, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437057

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by dysregulated hyperimmune response and steroids have been shown to decrease mortality. However, whether higher dosing of steroids results in better outcomes has been debated. This was a retrospective observation of COVID-19 admissions between March 1, 2020, and March 10, 2021. Adult patients (≥18 years) who received more than 10 mg daily methylprednisolone equivalent dosing (MED) within the first 14 days were included. We excluded patients who were discharged or died within 7 days of admission. We compared the standard dose of steroids (<40 mg MED) versus the high dose of steroids (>40 mg MED). Inverse probability weighted regression adjustment (IPWRA) was used to examine whether higher dose steroids resulted in improved outcomes. The outcomes studied were in-hospital mortality, rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring hemodialysis, invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), hospital-associated infections (HAI), and readmissions. Of the 1379 patients meeting study criteria, 506 received less than 40 mg of MED (median dose 30 mg MED) and 873 received more than or equal to 40 mg of MED (median dose 78 mg MED). Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was higher in patients who received high-dose corticosteroids (40.7% vs. 18.6%, p < 0.001). On IPWRA, the use of high-dose corticosteroids was associated with higher odds of death (odds ratio [OR] 2.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-3.14, p < 0.001) but not with the development of HAI, readmissions, or requirement of IMV. High-dose corticosteroids were associated with lower rates of AKI requiring hemodialysis (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.63). In COVID-19, corticosteroids more than or equal to 40 mg MED were associated with higher in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
11.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens ; 30(6): 563-570, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429358

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although initially kidney involvement in COVID-19 infection was felt to occur relatively infrequently, this has proved not to be the case. In critically ill patients with COVID-19, multiorgan failure including acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity. This review focuses briefly on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of COVID-19 associated AKI as well as options for management. RECENT FINDINGS: The risk factors for AKI are common to both noncovid-related AKI and COVID-19 associated AKI. Kidney injury in COVID-19 associated AKI may arise through several mechanisms, including not only direct effects on the kidney leading to tubular injury but also through the effects of treatment of multiorgan failure complicating infection. During surge conditions, the use of kidney replacement therapy has embraced all modalities including the use of peritoneal dialysis. The use of blood purification techniques has been proposed, but to date, the results are variable. SUMMARY: COVID-19 associated AKI is common, affecting approximately a quarter of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Glomerular injury can occur, but in the main tubular injury seems most likely leading to AKI, which should be managed following clinical pathways informed by accepted guidelines.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Critical Illness , Humans , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 349-356, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427138

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroid dosing in the range of 0.5-2 mg/kg/day of methylprednisolone equivalents has become a standard part of the management of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19 pneumonia based on positive results of randomized trials and a meta-analysis. Alongside such conventional dosing, administration of 1 gm of methylprednisolone daily (pulse dosing) has also been reported in the literature with claims of favorable outcomes. Comparisons between such disparate approaches to corticosteroids for Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia are lacking. In this retrospective study of patients admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 pneumonia, we compared patients treated with 0.5-2 mg/kg/day in methylprednisolone equivalents (high-dose corticosteroids) and patients treated with 1 gm of methylprednisolone (pulse-dose corticosteroids) to those who did not receive any corticosteroids. The endpoints of interest were hospital mortality, ICU-free days at Day 28, and complications potentially attributable to corticosteroids. Pulse-dose corticosteroid therapy was associated with a significant increase in ICU-free days at Day 28 compared to no receipt: adjusted relative risk (aRR): 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.02; p = 0.03) and compared with high-dose corticosteroid administration (p = 0.003). Nonetheless, receipt of high-dose corticosteroids-but not of pulse-dose corticosteroids-significantly reduced the odds of hospital mortality compared to no receipt: adjusted Odds ratio (aOR) 0.31 (95% CI: 0.12-0.77; p = 0.01). High-dose corticosteroids reduced mortality compared to pulse-dose corticosteroids (p = 0.04). Pulse-dose corticosteroids-but not high-dose corticosteroids-significantly increased the odds of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy compared to no receipt: aOR 3.53 (95% CI: 1.27-9.82; p = 0.02). The odds of this complication were also significantly higher in the pulse-dose group when compared to the high-dose group (p = 0.05 for the comparison). In this single-center study, pulse-dose corticosteroid therapy for COVID-19 pneumonia in the ICU was associated with an increase in ICU-free days but failed to impact hospital mortality, perhaps because of its association with development of severe renal failure. In line with existing trial data, the effect of high-dose corticosteroids on mortality was favorable.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pulse Therapy, Drug/adverse effects , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Critical Care/methods , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/adverse effects , Pulse Therapy, Drug/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
13.
Kidney Int ; 100(4): 750-752, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415629

ABSTRACT

In this issue, Birkelo et al. performed a rigorous analysis of acute kidney injury (AKI) differences in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 versus influenza. Coronavirus disease 2019 AKI was more severe, with worse outcomes, than influenza, despite adjustment for confounders. Their findings highlight the need for development of a new category of AKI syndrome, "viral pandemic-associated AKI," in which a more varied pathophysiological approach to AKI would combine with consideration of overcoming future surge-related resource shortages.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
14.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(5): 1167-1172, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on clinical characteristics and outcomes of people living with HIV (PLWH) hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are limited. SETTING: Large tertiary health care system in the Bronx, NY. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 83 PLWH and 4151 patients without HIV hospitalized with COVID-19 from March 10, 2020, to May 11, 2020. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes associated with AKI by HIV serostatus and evaluated HIV-related factors for AKI among PLWH. AKI was defined and staged using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. RESULTS: The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 did not differ significantly by HIV serostatus (54.2% in PLWH vs 49.5% in patients without HIV, P = 0.6). Despite a higher incidence of stage 3 AKI (28.9% vs 17.1% P = 0.05) in PLWH compared with those without HIV, there was no significant difference in the need for renal replacement therapy (22.2% vs 13.4% P = 0.12), renal recovery (76.9% vs 82.5% P = 0.61), or dependence on renal replacement therapy (7.7% vs 3.8% P = 0.27). CD4 T-cell count, HIV-1 RNA viral suppression, and antiretroviral therapy use were not associated with AKI. AKI was associated with increased need for invasive ventilation and in-hospital death, but HIV was not an independent risk factor of in-hospital death after AKI [adjusted hazard ratio 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59 to 1.72), P = 0.98]. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-related factors were not associated with increased risk of AKI in PLWH hospitalized with COVID-19. PLWH hospitalized with COVID-19 had more stage 3 AKI, but outcomes after AKI were similar to those without HIV.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Aged , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 299, 2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367680

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may predispose patients to thrombotic events. The best anticoagulation strategy for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in such patients is still under debate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact that different anticoagulation protocols have on filter clotting risk. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study comparing two different anticoagulation strategies (citrate only and citrate plus intravenous infusion of unfractionated heparin) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), associated or not with COVID-19 (COV + AKI and COV - AKI, respectively), who were submitted to CRRT. Filter clotting risks were compared among groups. RESULTS: Between January 2019 and July 2020, 238 patients were evaluated: 188 in the COV + AKI group and 50 in the COV - AKI group. Filter clotting during the first filter use occurred in 111 patients (46.6%). Heparin use conferred protection against filter clotting (HR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.25-0.55), resulting in longer filter survival. Bleeding events and the need for blood transfusion were similar between the citrate only and citrate plus unfractionated heparin strategies. In-hospital mortality was higher among the COV + AKI patients than among the COV - AKI patients, although it was similar between the COV + AKI patients who received heparin and those who did not. Filter clotting was more common in patients with D-dimer levels above the median (5990 ng/ml). In the multivariate analysis, heparin was associated with a lower risk of filter clotting (HR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.18-0.43), whereas an elevated D-dimer level and high hemoglobin were found to be risk factors for circuit clotting. A diagnosis of COVID-19 was marginally associated with an increased risk of circuit clotting (HR = 2.15, 95% CI 0.99-4.68). CONCLUSIONS: In COV + AKI patients, adding systemic heparin to standard regional citrate anticoagulation may prolong CRRT filter patency by reducing clotting risk with a low risk of complications.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Citric Acid/pharmacology , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/instrumentation , Heparin/pharmacology , Micropore Filters/standards , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Citric Acid/adverse effects , Citric Acid/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Micropore Filters/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies
16.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(11): e13582, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A systematic analysis of concomitant arterial hypertension in COVID-19 patients and the impact of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been studied in a large multicentre cohort yet. We conducted a subanalysis from the international HOPE Registry (https://hopeprojectmd.com, NCT04334291) comparing COVID-19 in presence and absence of arterial hypertension. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Out of 5837 COVID-19 patients, 2850 (48.8%) patients had the diagnosis arterial hypertension. 1978/2813 (70.3%) patients were already treated with ACEI or ARBs. The clinical outcome of the present subanalysis included all-cause mortality over 40 days of follow-up. RESULTS: Patients with arterial hypertension suffered significantly more from different complications including respiratory insufficiency (60.8% vs 39.5%), heart failure (9.9% vs 3.1%), acute kidney injury (25.3% vs 7.3%), pneumonia (90.6% vs 86%), sepsis (14.7% vs 7.5%), and bleeding events (3.6% vs 1.6%). The mortality rate was 29.6% in patients with concomitant arterial hypertension and 11.3% without arterial hypertension (P < .001). Invasive and non-invasive respiratory supports were significantly more required in presence of arterial hypertension as compared without it. In the multivariate cox regression analysis, while age≥65, benzodiazepine, antidepressant at admission, elevated LDH or creatinine, respiratory insufficiency and sepsis might be a positive independent predictors of mortality, antiviral drugs, interferon treatment, ACEI or ARBs at discharge or oral anticoagulation at discharge might be an independent negative predictor of the mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality rate and in-hospital complications might be increased in COVID-19 patients with a concomitant history of arterial hypertension. The history of ACEI or ARBs treatments does not seem to impact the outcome of these patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , Sepsis/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Creatinine/metabolism , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Italy/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Noninvasive Ventilation , Proportional Hazards Models , Registries , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology
17.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 87(11): 1209-1216, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our objective was to the describe indications, management, complications and outcomes of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in COVID-19 critically ill patients. To contextualize these findings, comparisons were made against 36 non-COVID-19 consecutive patients requiring RRT on ICU. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective single center observational cohort study of patients requiring acute RRT between 1st March and 30th June 2020. Comparison was made against those receiving RRT in the pre-COVID-19 period from January 2019 to February 2020. RESULTS: Of 154 COVID-19 patients, 47 (30.5%) received continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF), all of whom required mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. The requirement for RRT was related to fluid balance rather than azotemia. Compared to 36 non-COVID-19 patients, those with COVID-19 were younger (P=0.016) with a lower serum creatinine on hospital admission (P=0.049), and lesser degrees of metabolic acidosis (P<0.001) and lactatemia (P<0.001) before initiation of RRT. In addition, the duration of RRT requirement was longer (P<0.001). Despite lower CVVHF exchange rates with higher serum creatinine levels following RRT initiation in the COVID-19 patients, metabolic abnormalities were corrected. Hospital mortality was 60% among COVID-19 patients requiring RRT, compared to 67% in non-COVID-19 patients (P=0.508), and renal recovery among survivors without pre-existing CKD was similar (P=0.231). CONCLUSIONS: The requirement for RRT in COVID-19 patients was primarily related to fluid balance. Using lower CVVHF exchange rates was effective to correct metabolic abnormalities. Renal recovery occurred in all but one patient by 60 days in the 40% of patients who survived.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Renal Replacement Therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335098

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is mainly considered a respiratory illness, but since SARS-CoV-2 uses the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor (ACE2) to enter human cells, the kidney is also a target of the viral infection. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most alarming condition in COVID-19 patients. Recent studies have confirmed the direct entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the renal cells, namely podocytes and proximal tubular cells, but this is not the only pathomechanism of kidney damage. Hypovolemia, cytokine storm and collapsing glomerulopathy also play an important role. An increasing number of papers suggest a strong association between AKI development and higher mortality in COVID-19 patients, hence our interest in the matter. Although knowledge about the role of kidneys in SARS-CoV-2 infection is changing dynamically and is yet to be fully investigated, we present an insight into the possible pathomechanisms of AKI in COVID-19, its clinical features, risk factors, impact on hospitalization and possible ways for its management via renal replacement therapy.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Renal Replacement Therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
20.
Kidney Blood Press Res ; 46(5): 620-628, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327770

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Kidney involvement, ranging from mild hematuria and proteinuria to acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), is a recent finding with various incidence rates reported among hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Given the various AKI rates and their associated risk factors, lack of AKI recovery in the majority of patients hospitalized with COVID-19, and limited data regarding AKI in patients with COVID-19 in Iran, we aim to investigate the potential risk factors for AKI development and its incidence in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we enrolled adult patients referred to the Sina Hospital, Iran, from February 20 to May 14, 2020, with either a positive PCR test or a highly susceptible chest computed tomography features consistent with COVID-19 diagnosis. AKI was defined according to the kidney disease improving global outcomes criteria, and patients were stratified based on their AKI staging. We evaluated the risk indicators associated with AKI during hospitalization besides in-hospital outcomes and recovery rate at the time of discharge. RESULTS: We evaluated 516 patients with a mean age of 57.6 ± 16.1 years and a male-to-female ratio of 1.69 who were admitted with the COVID-19 diagnosis. AKI development was observed among 194 (37.6%) patients, comprising 61.9% patients in stage 1, 18.0% in stage 2, and 20.1% in stage 3. Out of all patients, AKI occurred in 58 (11.2%) patients during the hospital course, and 136 (26.3%) patients arrived with AKI upon admission. AKI development was positively associated with all of the in-hospital outcomes, including intensive care unit admissions, need for invasive ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute cardiac injury, acute liver injury, multiorgan damage, and mortality. Patients with stage 3 AKI showed a significantly higher mortality rate, ARDS, and need for invasive ventilation than other stages. After multivariable analysis, male sex (odds ratio [OR]: 11.27), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR: 6.89), history of hypertension (OR: 1.69), disease severity (OR: 2.27), and high urea levels (OR: 1.04) on admission were independent risk indicators of AKI development. Among 117 (28.1%) patients who experienced AKI and survived, only 33 (28.2%) patients made a recovery from the AKI, and 84 (71.8%) patients did not exhibit full recovery at the time of discharge. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: We found that male sex, history of CKD, hypertension, disease severity, and high serum urea were independent risk factors associated with AKI in patients with COVID-19. Also, higher stages of AKI were associated with increased risk of mortality and in-hospital complications. Our results indicate a necessity for more precise care and monitoring for AKI during hospitalization in patients with COVID-19, and lack of AKI recovery at the time of discharge is a common complication in such patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
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