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1.
Clin Sci (Lond) ; 136(10): 747-769, 2022 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873565

ABSTRACT

Pneumonia and its sequelae, acute lung injury, present unique challenges for pulmonary and critical care healthcare professionals, and these challenges have recently garnered global attention due to the ongoing Sars-CoV-2 pandemic. One limitation to translational investigation of acute lung injury, including its most severe manifestation (acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS) has been heterogeneity resulting from the clinical and physiologic diagnosis that represents a wide variety of etiologies. Recent efforts have improved our understanding and approach to heterogeneity by defining sub-phenotypes of ARDS although significant gaps in knowledge remain. Improving our mechanistic understanding of acute lung injury and its most common cause, infectious pneumonia, can advance our approach to precision targeted clinical interventions. Here, we review the pathogenesis of pneumonia and acute lung injury, including how respiratory infections and lung injury disrupt lung homoeostasis, and provide an overview of respiratory microbial pathogenesis, the lung microbiome, and interventions that have been demonstrated to improve outcomes-or not-in human clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
JCI Insight ; 7(11)2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807766

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure in COVID-19 is characterized by widespread disruption of the lung's alveolar gas exchange interface. To elucidate determinants of alveolar lung damage, we performed epithelial and immune cell profiling in lungs from 24 COVID-19 autopsies and 43 uninfected organ donors ages 18-92 years. We found marked loss of type 2 alveolar epithelial (T2AE) cells and increased perialveolar lymphocyte cytotoxicity in all fatal COVID-19 cases, even at early stages before typical patterns of acute lung injury are histologically apparent. In lungs from uninfected organ donors, there was also progressive loss of T2AE cells with increasing age, which may increase susceptibility to COVID-19-mediated lung damage in older individuals. In the fatal COVID-19 cases, macrophage infiltration differed according to the histopathological pattern of lung injury. In cases with acute lung injury, we found accumulation of CD4+ macrophages that expressed distinctly high levels of T cell activation and costimulation genes and strongly correlated with increased extent of alveolar epithelial cell depletion and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity. Together, our results show that T2AE cell deficiency may underlie age-related COVID-19 risk and initiate alveolar dysfunction shortly after infection, and we define immune cell mediators that may contribute to alveolar injury in distinct pathological stages of fatal COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Autopsy , Humans , Lung/pathology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 4058, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735282

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key host protein by which severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) enters and multiplies within cells. The level of ACE2 expression in the lung is hypothesised to correlate with an increased risk of severe infection and complications in COrona VIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). To test this hypothesis, we compared the protein expression status of ACE2 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in post-mortem lung samples of patients who died of severe COVID-19 and lung samples obtained from non-COVID-19 patients for other indications. IHC for CD61 and CD163 was performed for the assessment of platelet-rich microthrombi and macrophages, respectively. IHC for SARS-CoV-2 viral antigen was also performed. In a total of 55, 44 COVID-19 post-mortem lung samples were tested for ACE2, 36 for CD163, and 26 for CD61, compared to 15 non-covid 19 control lung sections. Quantification of immunostaining, random sampling, and correlation analysis were used to substantiate the morphologic findings. Our results show that ACE2 protein expression was significantly higher in COVID-19 post-mortem lung tissues than in controls, regardless of sample size. Histomorphology in COVID-19 lungs showed diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), acute bronchopneumonia, and acute lung injury with SARS-CoV-2 viral protein detected in a subset of cases. ACE2 expression levels were positively correlated with increased expression levels of CD61 and CD163. In conclusion, our results show significantly higher ACE2 protein expression in severe COVID-19 disease, correlating with increased macrophage infiltration and microthrombi, suggesting a pathobiological role in disease severity.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antigens, CD/genetics , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , Autopsy , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Integrin beta3/genetics , Integrin beta3/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
4.
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol ; 49(4): 483-491, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691664

ABSTRACT

Progress in the study of Covid-19 disease in rodents has been hampered by the lack of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2; virus entry route to the target cell) affinities for the virus spike proteins across species. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a modified protocol of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats can mimic both cell signalling pathways as well as severe disease phenotypes of Covid-19 disease. Rats were injected via intratracheal (IT) instillation with either 15 mg/kg of LPS (model group) or saline (control group) before being killed after 3 days. A severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like effect was observed in the model group as demonstrated by the development of a "cytokine storm" (>2.7 fold increase in blood levels of IL-6, IL-17A, GM-CSF, and TNF-α), high blood ferritin, demonstrable coagulopathy, including elevated D-dimer (approximately 10-fold increase), PAI-1, PT, and APTT (p < 0.0001). In addition, LPS increased the expression of lung angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R)-JAK-STAT axis (>4 fold increase). Chest imaging revealed bilateral small patchy opacities of the lungs. Severe lung injury was noted by the presence of both, alveolar collapse and haemorrhage, desquamation of epithelial cells in the airway lumen, infiltration of inflammatory cells (CD45+ leukocytes), widespread thickening of the interalveolar septa, and ultrastructural alterations similar to Covid-19. Thus, these findings demonstrate that IT injection of 15 mg/kg LPS into rats, induced an AT1R/JAK/STAT-mediated cytokine storm with resultant pneumonia and coagulopathy that was commensurate with moderate and severe Covid-19 disease noted in humans.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Hemorrhage/etiology , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Lung Diseases/etiology , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Hemorrhage/pathology , Janus Kinases , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Wistar
5.
Sci Total Environ ; 825: 153964, 2022 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689055

ABSTRACT

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution poses significant health concerns worldwide and can cause respiratory diseases. However, how it causes health problems is still poorly understood. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)2 is a terminal carboxypeptidase implicated in the functions of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and plays a crucial role in the control of lung inflammation. To investigate whether ACE2 functions in PM2.5-induced lung inflammation, wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice and ACE2 knock-out (KO) mice were intratracheally instilled with PBS or PM2.5 suspension for 3 consecutive days, respectively. The concentrations of cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined by ELISA. The expression of ACE2 and ACE and activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in lung tissues were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. We found that PM2.5 exposure increased ACE2 expression. Loss of ACE2 significantly elevated the levels of total proteins, total cells, and the concentrations of MCP-1, IL-1ß in BALF after PM2.5 challenge. Additionally, loss of ACE2 enhanced lung pathologies, airway resistance, and inflammatory signaling activation. Collectively, loss of ACE2 exacerbates PM2.5-induced acute lung injury in mice.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , Pneumonia , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Particulate Matter/metabolism , Particulate Matter/toxicity
6.
Cells ; 11(2)2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613628

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory lung injury is characterized by lung endothelial cell (LEC) death, alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death, LEC-LEC junction weakening, and leukocyte infiltration, which together disrupt nutrient and oxygen transport. Subsequently, lung vascular repair is characterized by LEC and AEC regeneration and LEC-LEC junction re-annealing, which restores nutrient and oxygen delivery to the injured tissue. Pulmonary hypoxia is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory lung conditions, including acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The vascular response to hypoxia is controlled primarily by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2. These transcription factors control the expression of a wide variety of target genes, which in turn mediate key pathophysiological processes including cell survival, differentiation, migration, and proliferation. HIF signaling in pulmonary cell types such as LECs and AECs, as well as infiltrating leukocytes, tightly regulates inflammatory lung injury and repair, in a manner that is dependent upon HIF isoform, cell type, and injury stimulus. The aim of this review is to describe the HIF-dependent regulation of inflammatory lung injury and vascular repair. The review will also discuss potential areas for future study and highlight putative targets for inflammatory lung conditions such as ALI/ARDS and severe COVID-19. In the development of HIF-targeted therapies to reduce inflammatory lung injury and/or enhance pulmonary vascular repair, it will be vital to consider HIF isoform- and cell-specificity, off-target side-effects, and the timing and delivery strategy of the therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560687

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are severe respiratory disorders that are caused by aspiration, sepsis, trauma, and pneumonia. A clinical feature of ALI/ARDS is the acute onset of severe hypoxemia, and the mortality rate, which is estimated at 38-50%, remains high. Although prostaglandins (PGs) are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with ALI/ARDS, the role of PGF2α in ALI remains unclear. We aimed to clarify the role of PGF2α/PGF2α receptor (FP) signaling in acid-induced ALI using an FP receptor antagonist, AL8810. Intratracheal injection of hydrochloric acid (HCl) increased neutrophil migration into the lungs, leading to respiratory dysfunction. Pre-administration of AL8810 further increased these features. Moreover, pre-treatment with AL8810 enhanced the HCl-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil migratory factors in the lungs. Administration of HCl decreased the gene expression of lung surfactant proteins, which was further reduced by co-administration of AL8810. Administration of AL8810 also increased lung edema and reduced mRNA expression of epithelial sodium channel in the lungs, indicating that AL8810 reduced fluid clearance. Furthermore, AL8810 also increased lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of adhesion molecules such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results indicate that inhibition of FP receptors by AL8810 exacerbated HCl-induced ALI.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Pneumonia/metabolism , Receptors, Prostaglandin/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hydrochloric Acid/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pneumonia/chemically induced , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Prostaglandins F/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
8.
Viral Immunol ; 34(10): 679-688, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560640

ABSTRACT

The newfound coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), initiated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is an international public health concern, threatening the lives of millions of people worldwide. The virus seems to have a propensity to infect older males, especially those with underlying diseases. The cytokine storm following hyperactivated immune responses due to SARS-CoV-2 infection is probably the crucial source of severe pneumonia that leads to acute lung injury, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, and finally multiple organ dysfunction syndromes, as well as death in many cases. Several studies revealed that interleukin (IL)-1ß levels were elevated during COVID-19 infection. In addition, the IL-1 cytokine family has a pivotal role in the induction of cytokine storm due to uncontrolled immune responses in COVID-19 infection. This article reviews the role of IL-1 in inflammation and utilization of IL-1 inhibitor agents in controlling the inflammatory outcomes initiated by SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Interleukin-1/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Multiple Organ Failure/drug therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/immunology , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
9.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260450, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528732

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) is a specific form of lung damage caused by different infectious and non-infectious agents, including SARS-CoV-2, leading to severe respiratory and systemic inflammation. To gain deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms behind ALI and to identify core elements of the regulatory network associated with this pathology, key genes involved in the regulation of the acute lung inflammatory response (Il6, Ccl2, Cat, Serpine1, Eln, Timp1, Ptx3, Socs3) were revealed using comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of whole-genome microarray datasets, functional annotation of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), reconstruction of protein-protein interaction networks and text mining. The bioinformatics data were validated using a murine model of LPS-induced ALI; changes in the gene expression patterns were assessed during ALI progression and prevention by anti-inflammatory therapy with dexamethasone and the semisynthetic triterpenoid soloxolone methyl (SM), two agents with different mechanisms of action. Analysis showed that 7 of 8 revealed ALI-related genes were susceptible to LPS challenge (up-regulation: Il6, Ccl2, Cat, Serpine1, Eln, Timp1, Socs3; down-regulation: Cat) and their expression was reversed by the pre-treatment of mice with both anti-inflammatory agents. Furthermore, ALI-associated nodal genes were analysed with respect to SARS-CoV-2 infection and lung cancers. The overlap with DEGs identified in postmortem lung tissues from COVID-19 patients revealed genes (Saa1, Rsad2, Ifi44, Rtp4, Mmp8) that (a) showed a high degree centrality in the COVID-19-related regulatory network, (b) were up-regulated in murine lungs after LPS administration, and (c) were susceptible to anti-inflammatory therapy. Analysis of ALI-associated key genes using The Cancer Genome Atlas showed their correlation with poor survival in patients with lung neoplasias (Ptx3, Timp1, Serpine1, Plaur). Taken together, a number of key genes playing a core function in the regulation of lung inflammation were found, which can serve both as promising therapeutic targets and molecular markers to control lung ailments, including COVID-19-associated ALI.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Loci , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , Computational Biology , Gene Regulatory Networks , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Mice
10.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 285: 114838, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509996

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Keguan-1, a new traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription contained seven Chinese herbs, is developed to treat coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). The first internationally registered COVID-19 randomised clinical trial on integrated therapy demonstrated that Keguan-1 significantly reduced the incidence of ARDS and inhibited the severe progression of COVID-19. AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the protective mechanism of Keguan-1 on ARDS, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was used to simulate the pathological state of ARDS in patients with COVID-19, focusing on its effect and mechanism on ALI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were challenged with LPS (2 mg/kg) by intratracheal instillation (i.t.) and were orally administered Keguan-1 (low dose, 1.25 g/kg; medium dose, 2.5 g/kg; high dose, 5 g/kg) after 2 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected 6 h and 24 h after i.t. administration of LPS. The levels of inflammatory factors tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ß, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC or mCXCL1), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP2 or mCXCL2), angiotensin II (Ang II), and endothelial cell junction-associated proteins were analysed using ELISA or western blotting. RESULTS: Keguan-1 improved the survival rate, respiratory condition, and pathological lung injury; decreased the production of proinflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ß, KC, and MIP2) in BALF and the number of neutrophils in the lung tissues; and ameliorated inflammatory injury in the lung tissues of the mice with LPS-induced ALI. Keguan-1 also reduced the expression of Ang II and the adhesion molecule ICAM-1; increased tight junction proteins (JAM-1 and claudin-5) and VE-cadherin expression; and alleviated pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in LPS-induced ALI. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that Keguan-1 can improve LPS-induced ALI by reducing inflammation and pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, providing scientific support for the clinical treatment of patients with COVID-19. Moreover, it also provides a theoretical basis and technical support for the scientific use of TCMs in emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19 , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Lung , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Capsules , Chemokine CXCL2/analysis , Coix , Forsythia , Interleukin-1beta/analysis , Interleukin-6/analysis , Lonicera , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mortality , Morus , Peptide Fragments/analysis , Prunus armeniaca , Respiration/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470894

ABSTRACT

Infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in many cases is accompanied by the release of a large amount of proinflammatory cytokines in an event known as "cytokine storm", which is associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and high mortality. The excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines is linked, inter alia, to the enhanced activity of receptors capable of recognizing the conservative regions of pathogens and cell debris, namely TLRs, TREM-1 and TNFR1. Here we report that peptides derived from innate immunity protein Tag7 inhibit activation of TREM-1 and TNFR1 receptors during acute inflammation. Peptides from the N-terminal fragment of Tag7 bind only to TREM-1, while peptides from the C-terminal fragment interact solely with TNFR1. Selected peptides are capable of inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors and in vivo in the mouse model of acute lung injury (ALI) by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Treatment with peptides significantly decreases the infiltration of mononuclear cells to lungs in animals with DAD. Our findings suggest that Tag7-derived peptides might be beneficial in terms of the therapy or prevention of acute lung injury, e.g., for treating COVID-19 patients with severe pulmonary lesions.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Cytokines/chemistry , Peptides/metabolism , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/metabolism , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Protein Binding , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/antagonists & inhibitors
12.
mBio ; 12(4): e0157221, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349194

ABSTRACT

Tissue- and cell-specific expression patterns are highly variable within and across individuals, leading to altered host responses after acute virus infection. Unraveling key tissue-specific response patterns provides novel opportunities for defining fundamental mechanisms of virus-host interaction in disease and the identification of critical tissue-specific networks for disease intervention in the lung. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) patients, and little is understood about how lung cell types contribute to disease outcomes. MERS-CoV replicates equivalently in primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells (MVE) and fibroblasts (FB) and to equivalent peak titers but with slower replication kinetics in human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE). However, only infected MVE demonstrate observable virus-induced cytopathic effect. To explore mechanisms leading to reduced MVE viability, donor-matched human lung MVE, HAE, and FB were infected, and their transcriptomes, proteomes, and lipidomes were monitored over time. Validated functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that MERS-CoV-infected MVE were dying via an unfolded protein response (UPR)-mediated apoptosis. Pharmacologic manipulation of the UPR in MERS-CoV-infected primary lung cells reduced viral titers and in male mice improved respiratory function with accompanying reductions in weight loss, pathological signatures of acute lung injury, and times to recovery. Systems biology analysis and validation studies of global kinetic transcript, protein, and lipid data sets confirmed that inhibition of host stress pathways that are differentially regulated following MERS-CoV infection of different tissue types can alleviate symptom progression to end-stage lung disease commonly seen following emerging coronavirus outbreaks. IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe atypical pneumonia in infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis remain unknown. While much has been learned from the few reported autopsy cases, an in-depth understanding of the cells targeted by MERS-CoV in the human lung and their relative contribution to disease outcomes is needed. The host response in MERS-CoV-infected primary human lung microvascular endothelial (MVE) cells and fibroblasts (FB) was evaluated over time by analyzing total RNA, proteins, and lipids to determine the cellular pathways modulated postinfection. Findings revealed that MERS-CoV-infected MVE cells die via apoptotic mechanisms downstream of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interruption of enzymatic processes within the UPR in MERS-CoV-infected male mice reduced disease symptoms, virus-induced lung injury, and time to recovery. These data suggest that the UPR plays an important role in MERS-CoV infection and may represent a host target for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Apoptosis/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Unfolded Protein Response/physiology , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Animals , Cell Line , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Female , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Fibroblasts/virology , Humans , Male , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology
13.
Mol Med Rep ; 24(4)2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395036

ABSTRACT

Chronic alcohol abuse increases the risk of mortality and poor outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on lung injury and clarify the signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC). In order to produce rodent models with chronic alcohol consumption, wild­type C57BL/6 mice were treated with alcohol. A2a adenosine receptor (AR) small interfering (si)RNA or A2bAR siRNA were transfected into the lung tissue of mice and primary rat alveolar type II (ATII) cells. The rate of AFC in lung tissue was measured during exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) expression was determined to investigate the mechanisms underlying alcohol­induced regulation of AFC. In the present study, exposure to alcohol reduced AFC, exacerbated pulmonary edema and worsened LPS­induced lung injury. Alcohol caused a decrease in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and inhibited α­ENaC, ß­ENaC and γ­ENaC expression levels in the lung tissue of mice and ATII cells. Furthermore, alcohol decreased α­ENaC, ß­ENaC and γ­ENaC expression levels via the A2aAR or A2bAR­cAMP signaling pathways in vitro. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that chronic alcohol consumption worsened lung injury by aggravating pulmonary edema and impairing AFC. An alcohol­induced decrease of α­ENaC, ß­ENaC and γ­ENaC expression levels by the A2AR­mediated cAMP pathway may be responsible for the exacerbated effects of chronic alcohol consumption in lung injury.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Sodium Channels/drug effects , Epithelial Sodium Channels/metabolism , Ethanol/pharmacology , Receptors, Adenosine A2/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Animals , Cyclic AMP/metabolism , Cytokines , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung Injury/chemically induced , Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung Injury/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pulmonary Alveoli/metabolism , Pulmonary Edema/chemically induced , Pulmonary Edema/metabolism , Pulmonary Edema/pathology , RNA Splicing Factors/genetics , RNA Splicing Factors/metabolism , Rats , Receptor, Adenosine A2A/genetics , Receptor, Adenosine A2A/metabolism , Signal Transduction
14.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(2): L477-L484, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376529

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome is the major cause of COVID-19 lethality. Cell entry of SARS-CoV-2 occurs via the interaction between its surface spike protein (SP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). It is unknown if the viral spike protein alone is capable of altering lung vascular permeability in the lungs or producing lung injury in vivo. To that end, we intratracheally instilled the S1 subunit of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S1SP) in K18-hACE2 transgenic mice that overexpress human ACE2 and examined signs of COVID-19-associated lung injury 72 h later. Controls included K18-hACE2 mice that received saline or the intact SP and wild-type (WT) mice that received S1SP. K18-hACE2 mice instilled with S1SP exhibited a decline in body weight, dramatically increased white blood cells and protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), upregulation of multiple inflammatory cytokines in BALF and serum, histological evidence of lung injury, and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways in the lung. K18-hACE2 mice that received either saline or SP exhibited little or no evidence of lung injury. WT mice that received S1SP exhibited a milder form of COVID-19 symptoms, compared with the K18-hACE2 mice. Furthermore, S1SP, but not SP, decreased cultured human pulmonary microvascular transendothelial resistance (TER) and barrier function. This is the first demonstration of a COVID-19-like response by an essential virus-encoded protein by SARS-CoV-2 in vivo. This model of COVID-19-induced ALI may assist in the investigation of new therapeutic approaches for the management of COVID-19 and other coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Membrane Permeability , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Lung/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Protein Subunits , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Replication
15.
Pharmacol Res ; 163: 105224, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364404

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as common life-threatening lung diseases with high mortality rates are mostly associated with acute and severe inflammation in lungs. With increasing in-depth studies of ALI/ARDS, significant breakthroughs have been made, however, there are still no effective pharmacological therapies for treatment of ALI/ARDS. Especially, the novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) is ravaging the globe, and causes severe respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, developing new drugs for therapy of ALI/ARDS is in great demand, which might also be helpful for treatment of COVID-19. Natural compounds have always inspired drug development, and numerous natural products have shown potential therapeutic effects on ALI/ARDS. Therefore, this review focuses on the potential therapeutic effects of natural compounds on ALI and the underlying mechanisms. Overall, the review discusses 159 compounds and summarizes more than 400 references to present the protective effects of natural compounds against ALI and the underlying mechanism.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Signal Transduction
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346496

ABSTRACT

qRT-PCR still remains the most widely used method for quantifying gene expression levels, although newer technologies such as next generation sequencing are becoming increasingly popular. A critical, yet often underappreciated, problem when analysing qRT-PCR data is the selection of suitable reference genes. This problem is compounded in situations where up to 25% of all genes may change (e.g., due to leukocyte invasion), as is typically the case in ARDS. Here, we examined 11 widely used reference genes for their suitability in commonly used models of acute lung injury (ALI): ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), in vivo and ex vivo, lipopolysaccharide plus mechanical ventilation (MV), and hydrochloric acid plus MV. The stability of reference gene expression was determined using the NormFinder, BestKeeper, and geNorm algorithms. We then proceeded with the geNorm results because this is the only algorithm that provides the number of reference genes required to achieve normalisation. We chose interleukin-6 (Il-6) and C-X-C motif ligand 1 (Cxcl-1) as the genes of interest to analyse and demonstrate the impact of inappropriate normalisation. Reference gene stability differed between the ALI models and even within the subgroup of VILI models, no common reference gene index (RGI) could be determined. NormFinder, BestKeeper, and geNorm produced slightly different, but comparable results. Inappropriate normalisation of Il-6 and Cxcl1 gene expression resulted in significant misinterpretation in all four ALI settings. In conclusion, choosing an inappropriate normalisation strategy can introduce different kinds of bias such as gain or loss as well as under- or overestimation of effects, affecting the interpretation of gene expression data.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/genetics , Algorithms , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression Profiling/standards , Gene Expression Regulation , Genetic Markers , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Female , Mice , Reference Standards
18.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(2): L477-L484, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280498

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome is the major cause of COVID-19 lethality. Cell entry of SARS-CoV-2 occurs via the interaction between its surface spike protein (SP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). It is unknown if the viral spike protein alone is capable of altering lung vascular permeability in the lungs or producing lung injury in vivo. To that end, we intratracheally instilled the S1 subunit of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S1SP) in K18-hACE2 transgenic mice that overexpress human ACE2 and examined signs of COVID-19-associated lung injury 72 h later. Controls included K18-hACE2 mice that received saline or the intact SP and wild-type (WT) mice that received S1SP. K18-hACE2 mice instilled with S1SP exhibited a decline in body weight, dramatically increased white blood cells and protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), upregulation of multiple inflammatory cytokines in BALF and serum, histological evidence of lung injury, and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways in the lung. K18-hACE2 mice that received either saline or SP exhibited little or no evidence of lung injury. WT mice that received S1SP exhibited a milder form of COVID-19 symptoms, compared with the K18-hACE2 mice. Furthermore, S1SP, but not SP, decreased cultured human pulmonary microvascular transendothelial resistance (TER) and barrier function. This is the first demonstration of a COVID-19-like response by an essential virus-encoded protein by SARS-CoV-2 in vivo. This model of COVID-19-induced ALI may assist in the investigation of new therapeutic approaches for the management of COVID-19 and other coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Membrane Permeability , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Lung/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Protein Subunits , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Replication
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273453

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are common and devastating clinical disorders with high mortality and no specific therapy. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is usually used intratracheally to induce ALI in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an ultramicronized preparation of palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in mice subjected to LPS-induced ALI. Histopathological analysis reveals that um-PEA reduced alteration in lung after LPS intratracheal administration. Besides, um-PEA decreased wet/dry weight ratio and myeloperoxidase, a marker of neutrophils infiltration, macrophages and total immune cells number and mast cells degranulation in lung. Moreover, um-PEA could also decrease cytokines release of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-1ß, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-18. Furthermore, um-PEA significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation in ALI, and at the same time decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK) expression, that was increased after LPS administration. Our study suggested that um-PEA contrasted LPS-induced ALI, exerting its potential role as an adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapeutic for treating lung injury, maybe also by p38/NF-κB pathway.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Amides/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Amides/therapeutic use , Animals , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Immunohistochemistry , Inflammation/metabolism , Interleukin-18/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/administration & dosage , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/pathology , Mice , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , NF-KappaB Inhibitor alpha/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/immunology , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Peroxidase/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11734, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258596

ABSTRACT

To explore the role of chronic liver disease (CLD) in COVID-19. A total of 1439 consecutively hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from one large medical center in the United States from March 16, 2020 to April 23, 2020 were retrospectively identified. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared between patients with and without CLD. Postmortem examination of liver in 8 critically ill COVID-19 patients was performed. There was no significant difference in the incidence of CLD between critical and non-critical groups (4.1% vs 2.9%, p = 0.259), or COVID-19 related liver injury between patients with and without CLD (65.7% vs 49.7%, p = 0.065). Postmortem examination of liver demonstrated mild liver injury associated central vein outflow obstruction and minimal to moderate portal lymphocytic infiltrate without evidence of CLD. Patients with CLD were not associated with a higher risk of liver injury or critical/fatal outcomes. CLD was not a significant comorbid condition for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Acute Lung Injury/epidemiology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Liver Diseases/pathology , Liver Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , United States/epidemiology
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