Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Proteomics Clin Appl ; 16(6): e2100100, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047908

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acute phase reactants (APRs) play a critical role in inflammation. The difference in their physiological functions or the different dynamic ranges of these proteins in plasma makes it difficult to detect them simultaneously and to use several of these proteins as a tool in clinical practice. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A novel multiplex assay has been designed and optimized to carry out a high-throughput and simultaneous screening of APRs, allowing the detection of each of them at the same time and in their corresponding dynamic range. RESULTS: Using Sars-CoV-2 infection as a model, it has been possible to profile different patterns of acute phase proteins that vary significantly between healthy and infected patients. In addition, severity profiles (acute respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis) have been established. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Differential profiles in acute phase proteins can serve as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, among patient stratification. The design of this new platform for their simultaneous detection paves the way for them to be more extensive use in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins , Acute-Phase Reaction , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Proteomics , Acute-Phase Reaction/blood , Acute-Phase Reaction/diagnosis , Acute-Phase Reaction/virology
2.
Arch Med Res ; 53(2): 179-185, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739545

ABSTRACT

BACKROUND: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disease that affects the peripheral nervous system and may occur after some bacterial-viral infections. AIM: The aim of this study is to determine and compare the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients followed up in our clinic with the diagnosis of GBS in the 15 month periods before and after March 2020. At the same time, we aimed to examine the importance of these markers as prognostic indicators by investigating the relationship of D-dimer, CRP, albumin and transferrin levels with Hughes functional grading scale score (HFGSS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The medical files of the patients who were followed up with the diagnosis of GBS between December 2018 and May 2021 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into groups as pandemic, pre-pandemic, post-COVID-19 and non-COVID-19. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of GBS patients and plasma D-dimer, serum albumin, CRP and transferrin levels were recorded. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the pandemic and pre-pandemic periods in terms of age, gender, GBS subtype, seasonal distribution and treatment characteristics of GBS patients. PostCOVID-19 GBS patients had significantly higher HFGSS both at admission and at discharge (p <0.05). In post-COVID-19 GBS patients good-excellent negative correlation between transferrin and albumin levels and HFGSS at hospital admission and discharge, positive correlations with CRP levels were observed. CONCLUSION: Post-COVID-19 GBS patients had worse HFGSS at both admission and discharge. CRP was positively correlated with HFGSS whereas transferrin and albumin showed negative correlation with HFGSS.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Serum Albumin, Human , Transferrin
3.
Cell Mol Life Sci ; 78(8): 3987-4002, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130731

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a major burden on healthcare and economic systems across the globe. Even though a majority of the population develops only minor symptoms upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, a significant number are hospitalized at intensive care units (ICU) requiring critical care. While insights into the early stages of the disease are rapidly expanding, the dynamic immunological processes occurring in critically ill patients throughout their recovery at ICU are far less understood. Here, we have analysed whole blood samples serially collected from 40 surviving COVID-19 patients throughout their recovery in ICU using high-dimensional cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and cytokine multiplexing. Based on the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), we defined four sequential immunotypes during recovery that correlated to various clinical parameters, including the level of respiratory support at concomitant sampling times. We identified classical monocytes as the first immune cell type to recover by restoration of HLA-DR-positivity and the reduction of immunosuppressive CD163 + monocytes, followed by the recovery of CD8 + and CD4 + T cell and non-classical monocyte populations. The identified immunotypes also correlated to aberrant cytokine and acute-phase reactant levels. Finally, integrative analysis of cytokines and immune cell profiles showed a shift from an initially dysregulated immune response to a more coordinated immunogenic interplay, highlighting the importance of longitudinal sampling to understand the pathophysiology underlying recovery from severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Critical Illness , Leukocyte Count , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Antigens, CD/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Convalescence , Cytokines/blood , Female , Follow-Up Studies , HLA-DR Antigens/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocyte Subsets , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
4.
Curr Atheroscler Rep ; 22(9): 48, 2020 07 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103544

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic has infected over > 11 million as of today people worldwide and is associated with significant cardiovascular manifestations, particularly in subjects with preexisting comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. Recently, a predisposition for arterial and venous thromboses has been reported in COVID-19 infection. We hypothesize that besides conventional risk factors, subjects with elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) may have a particularly high risk of developing cardiovascular complications. RECENT FINDINGS: The Lp(a) molecule has the propensity for inhibiting endogenous fibrinolysis through its apolipoprotein(a) component and for enhancing proinflammatory effects such as through its content of oxidized phospholipids. The LPA gene contains an interleukin-6 (IL-6) response element that may induce an acute phase-type increase in Lp(a) levels following a cytokine storm from COVID-19. Thus, subjects with either baseline elevated Lp(a) or those who have an increase following COVID-19 infection, or both, may be at very high risk of developing thromboses. Elevated Lp(a) may also lead to acute destabilization of preexisting but quiescent atherosclerotic plaques, which might induce acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Ongoing studies with IL-6 antagonists may be informative in understanding this relationship, and registries are being initiated to measure Lp(a) in subjects infected with COVID-19. If indeed an association is suggestive of being causal, consideration can be given to systematic testing of Lp(a) and prophylactic systemic anticoagulation in infected inpatients. Therapeutic lipid apheresis and pharmacotherapy for the reduction of Lp(a) levels may minimize thrombogenic potential and proinflammatory effects. We propose studies to test the hypothesis that Lp(a) may contribute to cardiovascular complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Inflammation/etiology , Lipoprotein(a)/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Acute-Phase Proteins/genetics , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Apolipoprotein E4/genetics , Atherosclerosis/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , Biomedical Research , Blood Component Removal , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genotype , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Lipoprotein(a)/genetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Race Factors , Racial Groups/genetics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/prevention & control
5.
Pathog Glob Health ; 115(7-8): 496-498, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045913

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, countries still have to struggle with their endemic diseases such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). Severity grading score (SGS) is a practical approach and may shed light on the course of the CCHF, whose pathogenesis is not clearly understood, and have no effective treatments. It is aimed to assess the association between SGS and acute phase reactants (APR). Laboratory-confirmed patients were categorized by severity scores, and the relationship between APR and SGS was evaluated. A significant correlation between SGS and C-reactive protein (CRP) was found (p < 0.001). High SGS was associated with mortality and high CRP levels were used to predict the mortality at the beginning of the hospital admission. To predict the outcome of the disease and for appropriate patient management, SGS and APR can be used simultaneously.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Hemorrhagic Fever, Crimean , Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Crimean-Congo , Hemorrhagic Fever, Crimean/diagnosis , Hemorrhagic Fever, Crimean/epidemiology , Humans , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 121(9): 628-633, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807866

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to explain the demographic data, comorbidity and laboratory findings of our first cases in COVID-19 pneumonia in our country. METHODS: We gathered the data of COVID-19 pneumonia participants from our electronic medical system, including daily medical knowledge and laboratory, radiological, and microbiological results between March 10 to April 7, 2020. RESULTS: Totally, 125 patients, whose findings were compatible with COVID-19, were included in the study, 42 patients were excluded from the study. The distribution of genders was, 39 females (46.9 %), 44 males (53.01 %), the average age was 56.36 ± 16.25 (19-85). Hypertension above 60 years of age and diabetes mellitus under 60 years of age were the most common comorbidities. Neutrophils/ Lymphocyte percent(% NLR) was noted in 44 (53.01 %) patients, average: 3 (range 1.78-4.63). There was a statistically significant and positive relationship between D-dimer and C Reactive Protein (CRP) and ferritin. CONCLUSION: We detected that comorbidities, which were seen at COVID-19 disease differ according to the patients age. Besides that D-dimer, ferritin and CRP outcomes were particularly high and had a significant correlation with COVID-19 severity (Tab. 3, Fig. 2, Ref. 25). Text in PDF www.elis.sk Keywords: COVID-19, prognosis, acute phase reactan.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Slovakia/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Dig Liver Dis ; 53(2): 158-165, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-703974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A cytokine storm conceivably contributes to manifestations of corona virus disease (COVID-19). Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) cause acute liver injury while serum detectability indicates systemic inflammation. AIMS: We explored a link between systemic IL-6, related acute phase proteins and liver injury in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: 655 patients with suspected COVID-19 were screened in the emergency department at the University Hospital of Innsbruck, Austria, between February and April 2020. 96 patients (∼15%) were hospitalized with COVID-19. 15 patients required intensive-care treatment (ICT). Plasma aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, and gamma glutamyl transferase, as well as IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined by standard clinical assays. RESULTS: Of all hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 41 (42%) showed elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentration. COVID-19 patients with elevated AST exhibited significantly higher IL-6 (p < 0.001), ferritin (p < 0.001), LDH (p < 0.001) and CRP (p < 0.05) serum concentrations compared to patients with normal AST. Liver injury correlated with systemic IL-6 (p < 0.001), CRP (p < 0.001), ferritin (p < 0.001) and LDH (p < 0.001) concentration. In COVID-19 patients requiring ICT, correlations were more pronounced. CONCLUSION: Systemic inflammation could be a fuel for hepatic injury in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , COVID-19 , Cytokines/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Liver Diseases , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Correlation of Data , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Liver Diseases/blood , Liver Diseases/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e164, 2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679966

ABSTRACT

The emergence of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is currently a global concern. In this study, our goal was to explore the changing expression levels of acute-phase reaction proteins (APRPs) in the serum of COVID-19 patients and to elucidate the immunological characteristics of COVID-19. In the study design, we recruited 72 COVID-19 patients, including 22 cases of mild degree, 38 cases of moderate degree and 12 cases of severe degree. We also recruited 20 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 20 normal control subjects as a comparison. Fasting venous blood was taken to detect the content of complement 3 (C3), complement 4 (C4), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA) and prealbumin (PA). When compared the COVID-19 group with the CAP and normal control groups, respectively, the mean value of CRP and SAA in the COVID-19 group (including mild, moderate and severe patients) had increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the mean values of C3, C4 and PA decreased (P < 0.01). For the asymptomatic or mild symptomatic patients with COVID-19, the actual aggravation of disease may be more advanced than the clinical appearances. Meanwhile, the statistical analyses indicated that the development of COVID-19 brought about a significant increase in the content of CRP and SAA (P < 0.01), and a decline in the content of C3, C4 and PA (P < 0.01). These findings suggested that the changes in the level of APRPs could be used as indicators to identify the degree and progression of COVID-19, and the significant changes might demonstrate the aggravation of disease. This study provided a new approach to improve the clinical management plan and prognosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/analysis , Acute-Phase Proteins/biosynthesis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , C-Reactive Protein/biosynthesis , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/immunology , Complement C3/analysis , Complement C3/biosynthesis , Complement C4/analysis , Complement C4/biosynthesis , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Prealbumin/analysis , Prealbumin/biosynthesis , Prognosis , Serum Amyloid A Protein/analysis , Serum Amyloid A Protein/biosynthesis , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL