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1.
urol. colomb. (Bogotá. En línea) ; 31(4): 170-176, 2022. ilus
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2186455

ABSTRACT

Objetivo Describir la tasa de mortalidad de infección por coronavirus de tipo 2 causante del síndrome respiratorio agudo severo (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2, en inglés) y los factores de riesgo asociados a la severidad de la enfermedad en pacientes con trasplante renal de un centro del nordeste colombiano. Materiales y Métodos Estudio descriptivo de una cohorte de pacientes en seguimiento postrasplante renal, en el que se hizo una búsqueda retrospectiva de los que presentaron infección por SARS-CoV-2 entre marzo del 2020 y mayo del 2021. Para el análisis, se incluyeron los pacientes con infección confirmada mediante pruebas de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (polymerase chain reaction, PCR, en inglés), de antígenos, o de anticuerpos. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de las variables sociodemográficas y clínicas, y un análisis bivariado de los posibles factores asociados con el riesgo de mortalidad. Resultados Con un total de 307 individuos en seguimiento, se encontró una prevalencia del 14,3% (n = 44) de infección por enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19, en inglés). La media de edad fue de 56 años, con predominio del género masculino. El esquema de inmunosupresión más frecuente fue micofenolato­tacrolimus­prednisona. Entre los pacientes infectados, la mortalidad fue del 34,1% (15/44), lo que representa el 4,8% de toda la población a estudio. Maás de la mitad de los pacientes requirieron hemodiálisis, y en el 86,7% fue necesario hacer ajustes en el esquema de inmunosupresión. Conclusión La prevalencia de infección por SARS-CoV-2 en nuestro grupo de trasplantes fue similar a la reportada por otros grupos de trasplante del país, y mayor a la de la población no trasplantada. El valor de creatinina previo a la infección, la edad y las comorbilidades se asociaron con un mayor riesgo de mortalidad.


Objective To describe the mortality related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and the risk factors associated with disease severity in patients submitted to a kidney transplant from a center in northeastern Colombia. Materials and Methods The present is a descriptive study of a cohort of patients in follow-up care after kidney transplant, with a retrospective search for those who presented SARS-CoV-2 infection between March 2020 and May 2021. Patients with confirmed infection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antigens or antibodies tests were included for analysis. We performed a descriptive analysis of the sociodemographic and clinical variables as well as a bivariate analysis to evaluate the possible factors associated with the risk of mortality. Results With a total of 307 individuals in follow-up care, a prevalence of 14.3% (n = 44) of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection was found. The mean age of the sample was of 56 years, with a male predominance. The most frequent immunosuppression regimen was mycophenolate-tacrolimus-prednisone. Among the infected patients, the mortality rate was of 34.1% (15/44), representing 4.8% of the entire study population. More than half of the patients required hemodialysis, and 86.7% required adjustments to the immunosuppression regimen. Conclusion The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in our transplant group was similar to that reported by other transplant groups in the country and higher than among the non-transplanted population. The preinfection creatinine value, age, and comorbidities were associated with a higher risk of mortality.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Renal Dialysis , Kidney Transplantation , Coronavirus , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Severity of Illness Index , Adaptation, Psychological , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , Immunosuppression Therapy , Antigens
2.
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique ; 70(4): 183-189, 2022 Aug.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2182744

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic generated "risks" and uncertainties as well as organizational changes among French perinatal caregivers. Our study aimed to investigate the psychosocial impact of the first wave on this population. METHOD: Our participants (N=565) were invited to answer an online questionnaire that included questions on various indices of health and quality of life at work (e.g., ProQoL, perceived stress) and other questions on the impact of the pandemic on work organization. An open-ended question was designed to identify the participants' three most frequently perceived preoccupations with regard to the health situation. RESULTS: In addition to highlighting the multifactorial nature of participants' preoccupations, our results illustrated the effect of professional status and type of motherhood on the different indices of health and quality of life at work. When it was found that the pandemic had an impact on work organization and on teams, lower health and quality of work life scores were recorded. On the other hand, when positive impacts on organization were reported, mainly in terms of reduced work intensity, they were associated with higher health and quality of work life scores. CONCLUSION: We explain this last result as either one actual effect of the pandemic on work organization, or as a phenomenon of cognitive rationalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
3.
Am J Med ; 135(12): 1517-1518, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2158374
4.
Nurs Res ; 71(3): E21-E27, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Millions of Americans have tested positive for COVID-19. The illness has a range of clinical symptoms with varying degrees of symptom severity; there is limited research about the lived experience of having COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The study aim was to understand the lived experience of having COVID-19, provide detail on the length and severity of symptoms as well as coping mechanisms of those with the illness, and identify issues individuals face when accessing healthcare. METHODS: This phenomenological qualitative study included semistructured interviews of 45 people ages 18 years and older living in the United States who tested positive for COVID-19. Inductive content analysis was employed for subjective interpretation of the text through a systematic coding classification to identify themes for analysis and conclusions. RESULTS: This study details a variety of symptom presentations of individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 as well as mental health concerns related to fear and living with COVID-19. DISCUSSION: Individuals expressed varying emotions when finding they tested positive for COVID-19. Many conveyed fear of having COVID-19 and indicated it was a traumatic experience. This fear is an important clinical finding that policymakers and providers should consider when treating acute and chronic COVID-19 patients. Finally, many participants, commonly referred to as "long haulers," experienced ongoing and lingering symptoms highlighting an area in need of further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Emotions , Fear , Humans , Qualitative Research
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143121

ABSTRACT

Collective resilience is the ability of human beings to adapt and collectively cope with crises in adversity. Emotional expression is the core element with which to characterize the psychological dimension of collective resilience. This research proposed a stage model of collective resilience based on the temporal evolution of the public opinions of COVID-19 in China's first anti-pandemic cycle; using data from hot searches and commentaries on Sina Weibo, the changes in the emotional patterns of social groups are revealed through analyses of the sentiments expressed in texts. A grounded theory approach is used to elucidate the factors influencing collective resilience. The research results show that collective resilience during the pandemic exhibited an evolutionary process that could be termed, "preparation-process-recovery". Analyses of expressed sentiments reveal an evolutionary pattern of "positive emotion prevailing-negative emotion appearing-positive emotion recovering Collective resilience from a psycho-emotional perspective is the result of "basic cognition-intermediary condition-consequence" positive feedback, in which the basic cognition is expressed as will embeddedness and the intermediary conditions include the subject behavior and any associated derived behavioral characteristics and spiritual connotation. These results are significant both theoretically and practically with regard to the reconstruction of collective resilience when s' force majeure' event occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Emotions , Adaptation, Psychological , China/epidemiology
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143050

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated and facilitated the introduction of telework in organizations. This has also impacted the workers' relationship between work and private life. The aim of the current study was to examine the links between resilience and mode of work (stationary vs. remote) and the work-home and home-work relationships, and whether they are mediated by passion for work and strategies of coping with stress. The study was carried out on a sample of 1251 participants from Great Britain, India, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Vietnam. The following measures were used: The Survey Work-Home Interaction, The Brief Resilience Coping Scale, The Passion Scale, and the Brief COPE. Results showed that the more stationary the mode of work, the lower the intensity of the negative influence of personal life on work. Resilience was revealed to have a positive effect on worker functioning. The study also showed a relationship between education and gender and passion for work. Finally, the importance of furthering the knowledge on the home-work and work-home relationships among teleworkers is discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Teleworking , Humans , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 970378, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142326

ABSTRACT

Background: Female long haulers deal with persistent post-acute COVID-19 symptoms that have serious health implications. This study aimed to identify resilience resources at multiple socio-ecological levels for female long haulers and describe how resilience resources affect their responses to long COVID. Methods: Purposive sampling was adopted to recruit participants through social media from April to June 2021 followed by 15 semi-structured interviews. An inductive analytical approach was adopted to categorize themes by open and axial coding that were verified by peer review. Results: Female long haulers relied on resources at various socio-ecological levels to foster their resilience in response to long COVID. At the individual level, they utilized cognitive and emotional resources to increase knowledge, learn new skills, set goals, and manage emotions; behavioral resources (e.g., internal motivation and executive functioning) to perform physical, creative, and recreational activities, and adopt healthier eating habits; and spiritual resources to perform spiritual rituals and connect with God. At the social level, the support from existing relationships and/or online social support groups enhanced their social identity and provided material and informational resources. At the health systems level, the guidance from counselors and physicians and availability of clinics, medicines, and health equipment assisted them in symptom management and medication adherence. Conclusion: The resilience of female long haulers can be enhanced through (1) offering financial and health-related resources, (2) developing online social-support groups, (3) counseling and care service training for healthcare professionals, and (4) implementing more psychosocial interventions by labor organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adaptation, Psychological , Qualitative Research , Social Support
8.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2151, 2022 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Varied populations may react differently to similar crises, depending on their social, cultural, and personal backgrounds; conversely, the same populations may respond differently to varied adversities. The current study aimed to examine three types of resilience (individual, community, and societal resilience) predicting six coping mechanisms (sense of danger, anxiety and depressive symptoms, well-being, hope, and morale) among the same sample of people that faced across two different adversities-COVID-19 and an armed conflict. METHODS: Two repeated measurements of the same Israeli sample (N = 593) were employed, through an internet panel. The research variables were examined through a structured, quantitative questionnaire that consisted of nine scales, based on validated and reliable questionnaires. RESULTS: Results indicated that: (a) respondents reported more difficulties in coping with the COVID-19 crisis, compared to the armed conflict, in all variables but morale. (b) similar patterns of correlations among the study variables were found in both measurements. (c) path's analysis indicated similar patterns of prediction of distress and well-being by individual and societal resilience. Use of the coping mechanism varied depending on the perception of the threat: COVID -19 is perceived as a less familiar and predictable adversity, which is harder to cope with, compared with the more familiar risk - an armed conflict, which is a recurrent threat in Israel. The correlations between the investigated psychological responses and the impacts of resilience on the coping and distress mechanism were similar in both adversities. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that respondents tend to react in a similar pattern of associations among resilience, distress, and well-being across different adversities, such as COVID and armed conflict. However, individuals tend to regard unfamiliar, less predictable adversities as more complex to cope with, compared to better-known crises. Furthermore, respondents tend to underestimate the risks of potential familiar adversities. Healthcare professionals must be aware of and understand the coping mechanisms of individuals during adversities, to appropriately design policies for the provision of medical and psychological care during varied emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Research , Armed Conflicts
9.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 732, 2022 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has induced high levels of stress. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between emotional stress (COVID-19 related fear, anger, frustration, and loneliness) and the use of coping strategies among adults in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data from adults aged 18 years and above were collected through an online survey from July to December 2020. The dependent variables were COVID-19 related fear (fear of infection and infecting others with COVID-19), anger, frustration, and loneliness. The independent variables were coping strategies (use of phones to communicate with family and others, video conferencing, indoor exercises, outdoor exercises, meditation/mindfulness practices, engaging in creative activities, learning a new skill, following media coverage related to COVID-19) and alcohol consumption. Five logistic regression models were developed to identify the factors associated with each dependent variables. All models were adjusted for sociodemographic variables (age, sex at birth, and the highest level of education). RESULTS: Respondents who consumed alcohol, followed media coverage for COVID-19 related information, and who spoke with friends or family on the phone had higher odds of having fear of contracting COVID-19 or transmitting infection to others, and of feeling angry, frustrated, or lonely (p < 0.05). Respondents who exercised outdoors (AOR: 0.69) or learned a new skill (AOR: 0.79) had significantly lower odds of having fear of contracting COVID-19. Respondents who practiced meditation or mindfulness (AOR: 1.47) had significantly higher odds of feeling angry. Those who spoke with friends and family on the phone (AOR: 1.32) and exercised indoors (AOR: 1.23) had significantly higher odds of feeling frustrated. Those who did video conferencing (AOR: 1.41), exercised outdoors (AOR: 1.32) and engaged with creative activities (AOR: 1.25) had higher odds of feeling lonely. CONCLUSION: Despite the significant association between emotional stress and use of coping strategies among adults in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic, it appears that coping strategies were used to ameliorate rather than prevent emotional stress. Learning new skills and exercising outdoors were used to ameliorate the fear of contracting COVID-19 in older respondents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adult , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Fear/psychology
10.
Soc Sci Med ; 305: 115031, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132384

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID19 pandemic has caused a mental health crisis worldwide, which may have different age-specific impacts, partly due to age-related differences in resilience and coping. The purposes of this study were to 1) identify disparities in mental distress, perceived adversities, resilience, and coping during the COVID-19 pandemic among four age groups (18-34, 35-49, 50-64, and ≥65); 2) assess the age-moderated time effect on mental distress, and 3) estimate the effects of perceived adversities on mental distress as moderated by age, resilience and coping. METHODS: Data were drawn from a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample (n = 7830) administered during the pandemic. Weighted mean of mental distress and adversities (perceived loneliness, perceived stress, and perceived risk), resilience, and coping were compared among different age groups. Hierarchical random-effects models were used to assess the moderated effects of adversities on mental distress. RESULTS: The youngest age group (18-34) reported the highest mental distress at baseline with the mean (standard error) as 2.70 (0.12), which showed an incremental improvement with age (2.27 (0.10), 1.88 (0.08), 1.29 (0.07) for 35-49, 50-64, and ≥65 groups respectively). The older age groups reported lower levels of loneliness and perceived stress, higher perceived risk, greater resilience, and more relaxation coping (ps < .001). Model results showed that mental distress declined slightly over time, and the downward trend was moderated by age group. Perceived adversities, alcohol, and social coping were positively,whereas resilience and relaxation were negatively associated with mental distress. Resilience and age group moderated the slope of each adversity on mental distress. CONCLUSIONS: The youngest age group appeared to be most vulnerable during the pandemic. Mental health interventions may provide resilience training to combat everyday adversities for the vulnerable individuals and empower them to achieve personal growth that challenges age boundaries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Loneliness , Mental Health
11.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 81(1): 2149064, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123051

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced novel stressors. Remote/rural communities have experienced additional difficulties, while also potentially benefitting from unique sources of resilience against such stressors. However, very little research has been conducted in remote/rural communities regarding coping and stress/violence. This study examines coping strategies and household stress/violence in remote Alaska communities across the pandemic through three online survey waves (November 2020-September 2021) (total n = 1,020). Across all waves, personal care was reported most frequently followed by social activities, religious activities, and traditional/subsistence activities. Substance use combined (alcohol, nicotine, marijuana) and seeking counselling were less frequently reported, with significant differences across gender and age categories. Less than 10% of individuals reported physical violence towards children and/or other adults within the household. Overall, these findings indicate that individuals are primarily relying on positive coping strategies to contend with additional stress brought into their lives by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Alaska/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Violence
12.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(11): 641-645, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although mental health symptoms increased during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, little is known about the associations between nursing students' perceived risk of contracting COVID-19 and their academic and psychological well-being. This study examined associations between perceived COVID-19 risk, likelihood of completing nursing education, and mental health factors of nursing students. METHOD: A total of 979 nursing students completed self-report measures of perceived COVID-19 risk, anticipated academic completion, anxiety and depressive symptoms, stress, coping self-efficacy, hope, and social support. RESULTS: Students with higher perceived COVID-19 risk reported increased anxiety and depression as well as decreased likelihood of graduating, coping self-efficacy, and levels of social support. CONCLUSION: Findings indicate the need for increased mental health support for nursing students for successful completion of their programs. Educators should increase support and proactively strengthen positive psychology factors to mitigate the effects of COVID-19 and other crises on nursing students' well-being. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(11):641-645.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110105

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought significant interruptions to life certainty, and there has been a lack of research on the influence of uncertainty. The present research aimed to explore how intolerance of uncertainty, maladaptive coping strategies, and fear of missing out affect social media use in a Chinese community sample (N = 311) during the pandemic. Serial mediation analysis was applied, integrating the mediating role of maladaptive coping strategy and fear of missing out. Intolerance of uncertainty, maladaptive coping strategies, and fear of missing out was positively related to PSMU. Based on the mediation analysis, when age and gender were controlled, the direct effect of intolerance of uncertainty on PSMU was significant. The total indirect effect was also significant. The effect of intolerance of uncertainty on PSMU was mediated by maladaptive coping strategies and fear of missing out. Taken together, maladaptive coping strategies and fear of missing out played a serial mediating role between intolerance of uncertainty and PSMU. The findings imply that strategies to improve the tolerance of uncertainty, reduce fear of missing out, and relevant coping strategies could be potentially helpful in mitigating problematic social media use, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Uncertainty , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological
14.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277694, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aims to investigate the health-related quality of life and coping strategies among COVID-19 survivors in Bangladesh. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 2198 adult, COVID-19 survivors living in Bangladesh. Data were collected from previously diagnosed COVID-19 participants (confirmed by an RT-PCR test) via door-to-door interviews in the eight different divisions in Bangladesh. For data collection, Bengali-translated Brief COPE inventory and WHO Brief Quality of Life (WHO-QoLBREF) questionnaires were used. The data collection period was from October 2020 to March 2021. RESULTS: Males 72.38% (1591) were more affected by COVID-19 than females 27.62% (607). Age showed significant correlations (p<0.005) with physical, psychological and social relationships, whereas gender showed only a significant correlation with physical health (p<0.001). Marital status, occupation, living area, and co-morbidities showed significant co-relation with all four domains of QoL (p<0.001). Education and affected family members showed significant correlation with physical and social relationship (p<0.001). However, smoking habit showed a significant correlation with both social relationship and environment (p<0.001). Age and marital status showed a significant correlation with avoidant coping strategies (p<0.001); whereas gender and co-morbidities showed a significant correlation with problem-focused coping strategies (p<0.001). Educational qualification, occupation and living area showed significant correlation with all three coping strategies(p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Survivors of COVID-19 showed mixed types of coping strategies; however, the predominant coping strategy was avoidant coping, followed by problem-focused coping, with emotion-focused coping reported as the least prevalent. Marital status, occupation, living area and co-morbidities showed a greater effect on QoL in all participants. This study represents the real scenario of nationwide health-associated quality of life and coping strategies during and beyond the Delta pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Male , Female , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Survivors
15.
Behav Neurosci ; 136(6): 528-540, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119281

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an ongoing stressor that has resulted in the exacerbation of mental health problems worldwide. However, longitudinal studies that identify preexisting behavioral and neurobiological factors associated with mental health outcomes during the pandemic are lacking. Here, we examined associations between prepandemic coping strategy engagement and frontolimbic circuitry with internalizing symptoms during the pandemic. In 85 adults (71.8% female; age 18-30 years), we assessed prototypically adaptive coping strategies (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale), resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging functional connectivity (FC) of frontolimbic circuitry, and depression and anxiety symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory, Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders-Adult, respectively). We conducted general linear models to test preregistered hypotheses that (1) lower coping engagement prepandemic and (2) weaker frontolimbic FC prepandemic would predict elevated symptoms during the pandemic; and (3) coping would interact with FC to predict symptoms during the pandemic. Depression and anxiety symptoms worsened during the pandemic (ps < .001). Prepandemic adaptive coping engagement and frontolimbic FC were not associated with depression or anxiety symptoms during the pandemic (uncorrected ps > .05). Coping interacted with insula-rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) FC (p = .003, pFDR = .014) and with insula-ventral ACC FC (p < .001, pFDR < .001) to predict depression symptoms, but these findings did not survive FDR correction after removal of outliers. Findings from our preregistered study suggest that specific prepandemic factors, particularly adaptive coping and frontolimbic circuitry, are not robustly associated with emotional responses to the pandemic. Additional studies that identify preexisting neurobehavioral factors implicated in mental health outcomes during global health crises are needed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Male , Depression , Longitudinal Studies , Anxiety/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological
16.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 261, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116844

ABSTRACT

The aims explored the associations between stress, personality and coping on student mental health and compared defensive-pessimism and optimism as influences on learning motivation. Most research construes 'stress' as 'distress', with little attempt to measure the stress that enhances motivation and wellbeing. Undergraduate psychology students (N = 162) were surveyed on student and pandemic-related stressors, personality, support, control, mental health and learning motivation. Overall, adverse mental health was high and the lack of motivation acute. While positive ratings of teaching and optimistic thinking were associated with good mental health, context control was key. Adverse ratings of teaching quality lowered learning motivation. Support and conscientiousness bolstered learning motivation and conscientiousness buffered against the adverse impact of stress on motivation. Openness was associated with the stress involved in learning. For those anxious-prone, defensive-pessimism was as effective as optimism was in stimulating learning motivation. Developing context control, support and strategies linked to personality could bolster student resilience during and post Covid-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Motivation , Humans , Universities , Mental Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personality , Adaptation, Psychological , Students/psychology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116095

ABSTRACT

Migrant populations have always been vulnerable to a high burden of social exclusion, mental disorders, physical illnesses, and economic crises. The current COVID-19 pandemic has further created a frantic plight among them, particularly for undocumented migrant workers in the global south. We have conducted a mixed method study among the undocumented Myanmar migrant workers (UMMWs) in Thailand to explore how the COVID-19 disruption has impacted their mental health and what coping strategies they have adopted. Following the onset of COVID-19 and the recent coup d'état in Myanmar, our current study is the first attempt to understand the mental health status and predicament of this neglected migrant group. A total of 398 UMMWs were included in the online survey, of which 23 participated in qualitative interviews. The major mental health issues reported by the study participants were depression, generalized anxiety disorder, frustration, stress, and panic disorders, while loss of employment, worries about the pandemic, social stigma, lack of access to healthcare, lockdown, and fear of detention were the predominant contributing factors. In response, we identified two key coping mechanisms: coping at a personal level (listening to music, playing online game, praying, and self-motivation) and coping at a social level (chatting with family and friends and visiting religious institutions). These findings point to the importance of policy and intervention programs aimed at upholding mental health at such humanitarian conditions. Sustainable institutional mental health care support and social integration for the migrant workers, irrespective of their legal status, should be ensured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Humans , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Thailand/epidemiology , Myanmar/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Adaptation, Psychological
18.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 704, 2022 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115599

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had a devastating effect on college students worldwide. Here, the authors aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety and its related coping strategies, provide a theoretical basis for understanding self-prescription, and identify the factors contributing to stress and anxiety in medical students during the pandemic. METHODS: The authors conducted a cross-sectional study among medical students in Saudi Arabia from September to November 2020. They assessed anxiety using the GAD-7 scale based on seven core symptoms. The authors also examined perceived psychological stress using a single-item measure of stress, the factors contributing to stress during the transition to online learning and examinations, and related coping strategies. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26.0 was used to examine the data for both descriptive and inferential analyses. Chi-square test, one-way ANOVA, and univariate linear regression were used to test the research hypotheses. RESULTS: The authors collected and analyzed data from 7116 medical students distributed across 38 medical colleges. Among them, 40% reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms. Pre-clinical and female students experienced more stress than clinical and male students. 12.19% (n = 868) of respondents reported using medication during their college years. Among those, 58.9% (n = 512) had moderate to severe anxiety, and the most commonly used drug was propranolol (45.4%, n = 394). Among the studied sample, 40.4% (n = 351) decreased their medication use after switching to online teaching. Most students used these medications during the final exam (35.8%, n = 311) and before the oral exam (35.5%, n = 308). In terms of coping strategies, males were much more likely to use substances than females, who mainly resorted to other strategies. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a national overview of the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of medical students. The results indicated that the pandemic is associated with highly significant levels of anxiety. These findings can provide theoretical evidence for the need for supportive psychological assistance from academic leaders in this regard.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Male , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
19.
Curationis ; 45(1): e1-e8, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  It is critical for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses to develop resilient coping strategies to cope with workplace adversities. The coping strategies will mitigate the development of maladaptive psychological disorders prone to working in a stressful environment. OBJECTIVES:  The aim of this study is to analyse previous literature conducted on strategies that enhance resilience in ICU nurses to cope with workplace adversities beyond the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study was conducted by examining all available global literature in the context of the aim of the study. METHOD:  An integrative literature review was chosen for the study. Purposive sampling method was used to select the relevant databases to answer the review question, namely Google Scholar, EBSCOhost, Medline and Nursing/Academic Edition. The search terms used were 'strategies', 'resilience', 'intensive care unit nurses', 'coping', 'workplace adversities', 'beyond COVID-19' and post 'COVID-19'. RESULTS:  Three themes emerged from the study, namely promoting personal attributes, effective relational support and active psychological support. CONCLUSION:  Enhancing resilience among ICU nurses requires both intentional individualised care from the ICU nurses and a systematic approach by nursing management that will meet the psychological needs of ICU nurses when working in a stressful ICU environment.Contribution: The findings of the review have highlighted specific strategies of improving resilience in ICU nurses, which can ultimately create a safe working environment in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Workplace/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Intensive Care Units
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110069

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused serious health problems that affected people around the globe. This study aims to understand the physical distress (PhyD), psychological distress (PsyD), and coping experiences among people infected with COVID-19, develop a grounded theory, and examine PhyD, PsyD, and coping among people infected with COVID-19. A sequential exploratory mixed methods strategy is employed. A qualitative procedure is based on a grounded theory; data collection includes observation and in-depth interviews with 25 participants, aged 18 years and above. The quantitative one included 180 participants. Content analysis was applied using the Strauss and Corbin method, and ATLAS.ti software. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and the independent t-test were used. Results: The six major themes, including (1) severity of COVID-19 symptoms, (2) death anxiety, (3) uncertainty, (4) barrier to healthcare access, (5) compliance and self-regulation coping (6) post-COVID-19 effects. PhyD, PsyD, and coping were all at a moderate level. The relationship between PhyD, PsyD, and coping was positive. The prevalence in post-COVID-19 effects was 70% (95% CI 63.3-76.4%). There were higher amounts in women than men. The most frequent residual symptoms were decreased activity tolerance (40%), fatigue (33.3%), anxiety and fear of abnormal lungs (33.3%), dyspnea (27.8%), allergy (24.4%), and lung impairment (22.2%). Moreover, the prevalence of more than two symptoms was 54% (95% CI 47.2-61.7%). This study considers that the healthcare providers should be concerned with sufficient healthcare services. Interventions are needed for supporting their recovery from COVID-19 effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Services , Adaptation, Psychological
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