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1.
Int. j. morphol ; 41(2): 482-490, abr. 2023. ilus, tab, graf
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20239353

ABSTRACT

En estudios preliminares objetivamos alta prevalencia de uso de sustancias psicoactivas (SP) entre alumnos de Anatomía, con mayor impacto entre los recursantes o aquellos con actividades laborales. La causa del uso es multifactorial, pero se destacan factores de riesgo y precipitantes como la carga horaria de la currícula, exigencias de estudio, el distrés por el afrontamiento cadavérico negativo, el nuevo contexto educativo y la cantidad de horas de sueño. El objetivo fue comparar la prevalencia de uso de SP entre las cohortes de 2011-2019, con focalización en los factores determinantes conductuales. Estudio observacional, transversal y comparativo mediante encuesta estandarizada y anónima en 945 alumnos (año 2011= 122; año 2013= 158; año 2015=204; año 2017= 228; año 2019= 233). Se aplicaron parámetros estadísticos, se definió la significación como p -0.84; AA: r> -0.71). En el caso de ansiolíticos benzodiacepínicos, se asoció con falta de sueño y distrés por el afrontamiento negativo al estudio con cadáveres. En las cohortes comparadas por el lapso de 9 años hallamos alta prevalencia de uso de sustancias psicoactivas con tendencia al incremento. Las variables actividad laboral y recursante fueron determinantes para el uso de sustancias, y se asociaron cuestiones relativas a la adaptabilidad universitaria y afrontamiento de estudio negativo con el cadáver; todos con incidencia pedagógica en el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje.


SUMMARY: In preliminary studies, we observed a high prevalence of the use of psychoactive substances (PS) among Anatomy students, with a greater impact among recurrent students or those with work activities. The cause of use is multifactorial, but risk and precipitating factors stand out, such as the workload of the curriculum, study demands, distress due to negative cadaveric coping, the new educational context and the number of hours of sleep. The objective was to compare the prevalence of SP use between the 2011-2019 cohorts, with a focus on behavioral determinants. Observational, cross-sectional and comparative study using a standardized and anonymous survey in 945 students (year 2011= 122; year 2013= 158; year 2015=204; year 2017= 228; year 2019= 233). Statistical parameters were applied, significance was defined as p -0.84; AA: r> -0.71). In the case of benzodiazepine anxiolytics, it was associated with lack of sleep and distress due to negative coping with the study with cadavers. In the cohorts compared for a period of 9 years, we found a high prevalence of psychoactive substance use with an increasing trend. The variables work activity and recurrence were determinants for the use of substances, and issues related to university adaptability and negative study coping with the corpse were associated; all with pedagogical impact on the teaching and learning process.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Young Adult , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Anatomy/education , Argentina , Adaptation, Psychological , Attitude to Death , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Factors , Cohort Studies , Dissection/education , Dissection/psychology , Psychological Distress
3.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 179, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted parental and child mental health and wellbeing in the UK. This study aimed to explore the experiences of parents of children with rare neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions with a known or suspected genetic cause (neurogenetic) across the first year of the pandemic in the UK. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 parents of children with rare neurogenetic conditions. Parents were recruited via opportunity sampling from the CoIN Study, a longitudinal quantitative study exploring the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of families with rare neurogenetic conditions. Interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes were identified: (1) "A varied impact on child wellbeing: from detrimental to 'no big drama'"; (2) "Parental mental health and wellbeing: impact, changes, and coping"; (3) "'The world had shut its doors and that was that': care and social services during the pandemic"; and (4) "Time and luck: abstract concepts central to parents' perspectives of how they coped during the pandemic". The majority of parents described experiencing an exacerbation of pre-pandemic challenges due to increased uncertainty and a lack of support, with a minority reporting positive effects of the pandemic on family wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: These findings offer a unique insight into the experiences parents of children with rare neurogenetic conditions across the first year of the pandemic in the UK. They highlight that the experiences of parents were not pandemic-specific, and will continue to be highly relevant in a non-pandemic context. Future support should to be tailored to the needs of families and implemented across diverse future scenarios to promote coping and positive wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Mental Health
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 374, 2023 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238920

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Distinguishing whether and how pre-existing characteristics impact maternal responses to adversity is difficult: Does prior well-being decrease the likelihood of encountering stressful experiences? Does it protect against adversity's negative effects? We examine whether the interaction between relatively uniformly experienced adversity (due to COVID-19 experience) and individual variation in pre-existing (i.e., pre-pandemic onset) distress predicted mothers' pandemic levels of distress and insensitive caregiving within a country reporting low COVID-19 death rates, and strict nationwide regulations. METHOD: Fifty-one Singaporean mothers and their preschool-aged children provided data across two waves. Pre- pandemic onset maternal distress (i.e., psychological distress, anxiety, and parenting stress) was captured via self-reports and maternal sensitivity was coded from videos. Measures were repeated after the pandemic's onset along with questionnaires concerning perceived COVID-19 adversity (e.g., COVID-19's impact upon stress caring for children, housework, job demands, etc.) and pandemic-related objective experiences (e.g., income, COVID-19 diagnoses, etc.). Regression analyses (SPSS v28) considered pre-pandemic onset maternal distress, COVID-19 stress, and their interaction upon post-pandemic onset maternal distress. Models were re-run with appropriate covariates (e.g., objective experience) when significant findings were observed. To rule out alternative models, follow up analyses (PROCESS Model) considered whether COVID-19 stress mediated pre- and post-pandemic onset associations. Models involving maternal sensitivity followed a similar data analytic plan. RESULTS: Pre-pandemic maternal distress moderated the association between COVID-19 perceived stress and pandemic levels of maternal distress (ß = 0.22, p < 0.01) but not pandemic assessed maternal sensitivity. Perceived COVID-19 stress significantly contributed to post-pandemic onset maternal distress for mothers with pre-pandemic onset distress scores above (ß = 0.30, p = 0.05), but not below (ß = 0.25, p = 0.24), the median. Objective COVID-19 adversity did not account for findings. Post-hoc analyses did not suggest mediation via COVID-19 stress from pre-pandemic to pandemic maternal distress. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-existing risk may interact with subsequent perceptions of adversity to impact well-being. In combination with existing research, this small study suggests prevention programs should focus upon managing concurrent mental health and may highlight the importance of enhanced screening and proactive coping programs for people entering high stress fields and/or phases of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parenting/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological
5.
Soc Work Health Care ; 62(6-7): 243-262, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238580

ABSTRACT

Medical social workers are essential members of healthcare teams, especially during a pandemic. Their scope of practice includes conducting psychological assessments, coordinating social services, connecting patients to resources that address social determinants of health, discharge planning, and patient advocacy. Social workers' experiences of psychological distress were unique even before the COVID-19 pandemic; their work demands a high amount of emotional investment as they frequently witness others' pain and suffering and navigate various daily challenges and crises. This study explores psychological distress experienced by medical social workers and the coping strategies used by these professionals during the pandemic prior to the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. Faced with conflicting information from state and federal agencies, social workers dealt with resource shortages, took on additional roles and responsibilities, and contended with regular value conflicts and ethical dilemmas. Our findings indicate that medical social workers are not sufficiently protected or prioritized in their workplaces and that infrastructure to support social workers' emotional wellbeing is lacking. Distinct themes that emerged from the data under the umbrella of psychological distress include feeling unprotected, overburdened, and undervalued. We discuss a need for targeted policy and sustainability-oriented solutions to improve coping and resilience, mitigate psychological distress, and prevent burnout among medical social workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Social Workers , COVID-19 Vaccines , Adaptation, Psychological , Health Personnel/psychology
6.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 54(2S): S17-S21, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236773
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236675

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers (HCW) were categorized as "essential" and "non-essential", creating a division where some were "locked-in" a system with little ability to prepare for or control the oncoming crisis. Others were "locked-out" regardless of whether their skills might be useful. The purpose of this study was to systematically gather data over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic from HCW through an interprofessional lens to examine experiences of locked-out HCW. This convergent parallel mixed-methods study captured perspectives representing nearly two dozen professions through a survey, administered via social media, and video blogs. Analysis included logistic regression models of differences in outcome measures by professional category and Rapid Identification of Themes from Audio recordings (RITA) of video blogs. We collected 1299 baseline responses from 15 April 2020 to 16 March 2021. Of those responses, 12.1% reported no signs of burnout, while 21.9% reported four or more signs. Qualitative analysis identified four themes: (1) professional identity, (2) intrinsic stressors, (3) extrinsic factors, and (4) coping strategies. There are some differences in the experiences of locked-in and locked-out HCW. This did not always lead to differing reports of moral distress and burnout, and both groups struggled to cope with the realities of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Blogging , Health Personnel
8.
9.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1085, 2023 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A nationwide Movement Control Order (MCO) was enforced in Malaysia on 18 March 2020 in view of the global COVID-19 pandemic. Malaysia implemented various public health measures and later raced against time to administer COVID-19 vaccines when they became available. As a result of various public health measures to curb the spread of the virus, people in Malaysia faced unprecedented circumstances and new challenges. This study addressed the knowledge gap in our understanding the experiences, coping strategies and perspectives of the people in Malaysia about infection countermeasures by investigating their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A sequential mixed method approach was used to conduct an online survey and in-depth interviews among residents in Malaysia. A total of 827 respondents participated in the online survey from 1st May to 30th June 2020. Nineteen in-depth interviews were conducted online and by phone with key informants and members of the public, who were selected through maximum variation purposive sampling between 2nd May 2020 to 20th December 2021. The semi-structured interviews employed a phenomenological approach and transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. The survey data were analysed using descriptive statistics in Stata 15.0. RESULTS: The survey reflected significant economic impacts of the pandemic, the maximum number of days that people could cope during the MCO, and their coping strategies, which generally entailed changes in lifestyle. The internet and social media were vital platforms to mitigate against the impact of public health measures. Thematic analysis of the interview data revealed participant experiences and perceptions of COVID-19 and public health measures in four main themes: (1) work and business; (2) emotional impact (3) coping with change and (4) the COVID-19 vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insights into the experiences, coping strategies and perspectives of people in Malaysia living through the first-ever MCO during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such insights into COVID-19-related public health measures are pertinent for successfully planning and implementing future responses to pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , Malaysia/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological
10.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 175, 2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233667

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Students pursuing higher education and health professional (HP) programs (e.g., nursing, pharmacy, social work, medicine) experience stressors including academic pressures, workload, developing professional competencies, professional socialization, the hidden curriculum, entering clinical practice and navigating relationships with colleagues. Such stress can have detrimental effects on HP students physical and psychological functioning and can adversely affect patient care. This study examined the role of perceived social support and resilience in predicting distress of Atlantic Canadian HP students during the COVID-19 pandemic and compared the findings to a pre-COVID population of age and sex matched Canadians. METHOD: Second year HP students (N = 93) completed a survey assessing distress, perceived social support, and resilience and open-ended questions on student awareness of supports and counselling available to them, their use/barriers to the services, and the impact of COVID-19 on their personal functioning. HP student responses were also compared with age and sex matched Canadian peers from data collected prior to COVID-19. RESULTS: It was found that HP students reported moderate to severe psychological distress, and while they reported high levels of social support on a measure of perceived social support they also reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made them feel isolated and that they lacked social support. It was found that the sample of HP students reported significantly higher psychological distress than the mean scores of the age and sex matched sample of Canadian peers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings call for creation of more tailored interventions and supports for HP students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Canada/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Students/psychology , Social Support
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233100

ABSTRACT

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in early 2020, not only did it abruptly impede the progress that was being made toward achieving global targets to end the HIV pandemic, but it also created significant impacts on the physical and mental health of middle-aged and older men who have sex with men living with HIV. Utilizing a qualitative, community-based participatory research approach, we conducted semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with 16 ethnoracially diverse, middle-aged and older men who have sex with men living with HIV residing in Southern Nevada, to examine the different ways the COVID-19 pandemic directly impacted their physical and mental health, and explore how they eventually coped and thrived during the peak of the crisis. Using thematic analysis to analyze our interview data, we identified three prominent themes: (1) challenges to obtaining credible health information, (2) the physical and mental health impacts of the COVID-19-pandemic-imposed social isolation, and (3) digital technologies and online connections for medical and social purposes. In this article, we extensively discuss these themes, the current discourse on these themes in academic literature, and how the perspectives, input, and lived experiences of our participants during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic could be critical to addressing issues they had already been experiencing prior to the emergence of the pandemic in 2020, and just as importantly, helping us best prepare in stark anticipation of the next potentially devastating pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Male , Middle Aged , Humans , Aged , Pandemics , Homosexuality, Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , HIV Infections/epidemiology
12.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286733, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232611

ABSTRACT

The current study investigated the association between psychological factors and financial behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic in older people. Older people were chosen compared to other age groups because of the relatively greater impact in this age group of suboptimal financial decisions on future financial wellbeing. We hypothesised that the psychological factors facilitating general wellbeing during the COVID-I9 pandemic, i.e., positive mental wellbeing, hope, and positive coping, will have positive effects on financial behaviour. Based on telephone interviews, 1501 older Australians (Men = 750 and Women = 751; 55-64y = 630; > 65y = 871) completed an omnibus questionnaire examining coping, hope, mental wellbeing, and financial behaviour. Data was analysed using logistic regression and an ordinary and two-stage least square frameworks. Analyses revealed that the psychological factors identified as facilitating general wellbeing during the COVID-I9 pandemic also facilitated positive financial behaviour with hope and mental wellbeing emerging as significant determinants. Based on weightings from principal component analysis, one item each from the hope and mental wellbeing scale with eigenvalues > 1 were found to be robust predictors of positive financial behaviours. In conclusion, the findings support the assumption that the psychological factors associated with general wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic are also associated with positive financial behaviour. They further raise the possibility that single hope and positive mental well-being items can also be used to monitor psychological health and predict financial behaviour in older people and, in particular, at times of crisis. The latter may be useful measures for government to monitor psychological and financial wellbeing and inform policy for supporting older people at times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Adaptation, Psychological , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Middle Aged
13.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 29(2): 2155135, 2023 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic has increased stress levels in GPs, who have resorted to different coping strategies to deal with this crisis. Gender differences in coping styles may be contributing factors in the development of psychological distress. OBJECTIVES: To identify differences by gender and by stress level in coping strategies of GPs during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey conducted with GPs in Catalonia (Spain), in June-July 2021. via the institution's email distribution list, all GPs members of the Catalan Society of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete a survey assessing sociodemographic, health and work-related characteristics, experienced stress (Stress scale of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-DASS 21) and the frequency of use of a range of coping strategies (Brief-COPE) classified as problem-focused, emotion-focused and avoidant strategies, some of which are adaptive and others maladaptive. We compared the scores of each strategy by gender and stress level using Student's t-test. RESULTS: Of 4739 members, 522 GPs participated in the study (response rate 11%; 79.1% women; mean age = 46.9 years, SD = 10.5). Of these, 41.9% reported moderate-severe stress levels. The most common coping strategies were acceptance, active coping, planning, positive reframing and venting. More frequently than men, women resorted to emotional and instrumental support, venting, distraction and self-blame, whereas men used acceptance and humour more commonly than women. Moderate-severe stress levels were associated with non-adaptive coping, with increased use of avoidance strategies, self-blame, religion and venting, and decreased use of positive reframing and acceptance. CONCLUSION: The most common coping strategies were adaptive and differed by gender. However, highly stressful situations caused maladaptive strategies to emerge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Pandemics , Sex Factors , Adaptation, Psychological
14.
Inquiry ; 60: 469580231179876, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232525

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus infection COVID-19 has been a risk to world health, particularly for individuals who are vulnerable to it. Critical care nurses have described experiencing extremely high levels of stress under these struggling conditions. This study aimed to assess the relationship between stress and resilience of intensive care unit nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 227 nurses who are working in the intensive care units in the West Bank hospitals, Palestine. Data collection utilized the Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) and the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS). Two hundred twenty-seven intensive care nurses completed the questionnaire; (61.2%) were males, and (81.5%) had documented COVID-19 infection among their friends, family, or coworkers. Most intensive care nurses reported high levels of stress (105.9 ± 11.9), but low levels of resilience (11.0 ± 4.3). There was a moderate negative correlation between nurses' stress and their resilience (P < .05) and a small to moderate negative correlation between nurses' stress sub-scales and resilience (P < .05). Also, the results revealed a statistically significant difference between the stress score mean and the nurses who had documented COVID-19 infection among their friends, family, or coworkers (P < .05), and between the resilience mean score and the nurses' gender (P < .05). During the COVID-19 outbreak, intensive care nurses' stress levels were high, and their resilience was low. Thus, controlling nurses' stress levels and identifying possible stress sources related to the COVID-19 pandemic are important to maintain patients' safety and improve the quality of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Intensive Care Units , Adaptation, Psychological
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e403, 2023 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study is aimed at investigating the relationships between religious practice, religious coping strategies, and mental health among Chinese Christians in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A total of 915 participants from several cities in China completed online questionnaires, including sociodemographic data, mental disorder history, and years as a Christian, as well as frequency of weekly religious practice, Religious Coping Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). RESULTS: The result of multivariate analysis indicated that during the COVID-19 pandemic, among Chinese Christians without a history of mental disorder, negative religious coping were associated with depression, and anxiety symptoms. Among Chinese Christians with a history of mental disorders, comorbidity with 1 mental disorder, comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with depression symptoms. Comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Christians with a previous history of mental illness are more likely to experience anxiety during the epidemic. In the future, mental health services during disasters may put more attention on certain religious groups and provide more spiritual care to maintain their well-being accordingly.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Christianity , Pandemics , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , East Asian People
17.
Psychiatr Q ; 94(2): 321-341, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244167

ABSTRACT

Much has been written about the COVID-19 pandemic's epidemiological, psychological, and sociological consequences. Yet, the question about the role of the lockdown policy from psychological and sociological points of view has not been sufficiently addressed. Using epidemiological, psychological, and sociological daily data, we examined the causal role of lockdown and variation in morbidity referring to emotional and behavioral aspects. Dynamics of support requests to the Sahar organization concerning loneliness, depression, anxiety, family difficulties, and sexual trauma were investigated alongside processes of emergency and domestic violence reports to the Ministry of Welfare and Social Affairs. By exploring the signals and predictive modeling for a situation with no lockdown implementation, the lockdown was found as a critical factor in distress rising among the general population, which could affect long after the improvement in pandemic case counts. Applications and implications are discussed in the context of decision-making in dealing with crises as well as the need to allocate resources for adaptive coping.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety
18.
Med Sci Monit ; 29: e939485, 2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243148

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic has caused varying degrees of psychological stress among medical students. This research explored the post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) of medical students in China and their relationship with positive coping and social support. MATERIAL AND METHODS In the form of cross-sectional online survey, 2280 medical students locked down at home were selected by random cluster method to investigate social support, coping style, and PTSS using the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ), and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), respectively. RESULTS This research found that the PTSS detection rate in medical students was 10.42% during the COVID-19 pandemic. The PTSS scores of females were significantly higher than that of the males. However, the PTSS detection rate in females (9.71%) was not significantly different from that in males (11.24%). Compared with those of the non-PTSS group, the total score and its all-factor score of social support, the total score of coping style and the positive coping score of the PTSS group were much lower, while the negative coping score of the PTSS group was much higher (P<0.01). Positive coping was positively correlated with social support, while positive coping and social support were negatively correlated with PTSS. The total effect of positive coping on PTSS was -0.310 (P<0.001), the direct effect was -0.128 (P<0.01), and the indirect effect was -0.182 (P<0.001). Social support played a mediating role between positive coping and PTSS, with the mediating effect accounting for 58.81% of the total effect. CONCLUSIONS Social support plays a mediating role between positive coping and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Objective support and positive coping are the 2 main protective factors of PTSS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Students, Medical , Male , Female , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , China/epidemiology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235169

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic posed a major threat to public health, with long-lasting consequences for the daily habits and practices of people around the world. The combination of hazardous health conditions and extensive changes to people's daily routines due to lockdowns, social restrictions, and employment uncertainty have led to mental health challenges, reduced levels of subjective wellbeing, and increased maladaptive behaviors and emotional distress. Nevertheless, some studies have reported increased adaptive functioning and resilience after the pandemic, suggesting a more complex pattern of effects. The goals of the current study were to explore the role of two coping variables, sense of coherence and hope, in people's emotional wellbeing and adaptation in dealing with loneliness before and after such a stressful period. In a cross-sectional study, 974 Israeli participants (sample 1: 540 participants before the pandemic; sample 2: 434 participants after the pandemic restrictions) answered online questionnaires about their loneliness, hope and sense of coherence levels before and after the pandemic. While the two groups did not differ in their levels of hope, the participants in the group before COVID-19 reported lower levels of loneliness and sense of coherence. However, the results also indicated that although the COVID-19 pandemic was related to increased levels of loneliness, the participants' sense of coherence mediated this increase and their levels of hope moderated it. The theoretical contribution of these findings is discussed, as well as interventional implications and future directions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sense of Coherence , Humans , Loneliness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Adaptation, Psychological
20.
Cien Saude Colet ; 27(9): 3571-3582, 2022 Sep.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242423

ABSTRACT

The objective was to analyze the coping strategies adopted by female sex workers in the face of stressors resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Qualitative study supported by Systems and Coping theories. An in-depth interview was carried out with 30 sex workers from the Alto Sertão Produtivo Baiano between September and October 2020. The narratives were submitted to the resources of hermeneutics-dialectic to organize the categories. Four categories make reference to the system's stressors: negative feelings of fear, anxiety and difficulties in sleeping with the uncertainties in the face of the pandemic; concern about personal and family support; irritability in the face of conflicts; anxieties and insecurities with working conditions. Five categories allude to coping: strategies focused on the problem (pandemic); reframing and regulation of emotions; spirituality and religiosity; support networks and social support; use of medications. Stressors arise as a result of sexual service experiences combined with the pandemic situation with reduced customers and income, leading to the development of negative feelings and emotions. However, coping strategies are diverse and they women made effort to deal with problems and to balance their mental health.


Objetivou-se analisar as estratégias de coping adotadas por trabalhadoras sexuais frente aos agentes estressores decorrentes da pandemia da COVID-19. Estudo qualitativo, apoiado nas teorias do Sistemas e Coping. Realizou-se entrevista em profundidade com 30 trabalhadoras sexuais, do Alto Sertão Produtivo Baiano, entre os meses de setembro e outubro de 2020. As narrativas foram submetidas aos recursos da hermenêutica-dialética para organização das categorias. Quatro categorias remetem aos agentes estressores do sistema: sentimentos negativos de medo, ansiedade e dificuldades de dormir com as incertezas diante da pandemia; preocupação com o sustento dos familiares; irritabilidade diante de conflitos; angústias e inseguranças com as condições de trabalho. Cinco categorias fazem alusão ao coping: focam no problema (pandemia); ressignificação e regulação de emoções; espiritualidade e religiosidade; redes de apoio e suporte social; uso de substâncias e medicamentos. Os estressores surgem em decorrência das vivências do serviço sexual aliadas a situação pandêmica com redução de clientes e renda, desenvolvendo sentimentos e emoções negativas. Todavia, as estratégias de coping são diversas e tentativas de lidar com os problemas e equilibrar a saúde mental.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sex Workers , Adaptation, Psychological , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
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