Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 40
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257252, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Teaching work is stressful, moreover during the pandemic teachers' stress might have been intensified by distance education as well as by limited access to social support, which functions as a buffer in experiencing stress. The aim of the research was to investigate the relation between distance education and teachers' well-being, and their close relations and other social relations during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The research was conducted in two stages on 285 Polish primary and secondary school teachers who were recruited by means of the chain referral method. The following measures were used: The Depression Anxiety & Stress Scales-21, Berlin Social Support Scales, The Relationship Satisfaction Scale and The Injustice Experience Questionnaire. RESULTS: The teachers experienced at least mild levels of stress, anxiety and depression, both during the first as well as the second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. It has been confirmed that there is a negative relation between relationship quality change and social relations quality change, and stress, anxiety and depression. The variables taken into consideration in the research have provided the explanation for the variation of stress-from 6% in the first stage of the research to 47% in the second stage; for the variation of anxiety-from 21% to 31%; and for the variation of depression-from 12% to 46%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The research results show that due to distance work the distinction between professional work and family life might have been blurred, and as a consequence teachers' well-being could have been worsened. The isolation put on to stop the spreading of the virus might have contributed to changes in social relations, in close relations in particular, and at the same time negatively influenced teachers' abilities to effectively cope with the crisis situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , School Teachers/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Health Education/methods , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Mental Health , Personal Satisfaction , Poland , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Support , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255440, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341504

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in quarantine/lockdown measures in most countries. Quarantine may create intense psychological problems including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) especially for the vulnerable critically developing children/adolescents. Few studies evaluated PTSD associated with infectious disasters but no Saudi study investigated PTSD associated with COVID-19 in children/adolescents. This study was undertaken to screen for PTSD in children/adolescent in Saudi Arabia to identify its prevalence/risk factors during COVID-19 pandemic and its quarantine. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted after 2 months form start of quarantine for COVID-19 pandemic utilizing the original English version and an Arabic translated version for the University of California at Los Angeles Brief COVID-19 Screen for Child/Adolescent PTSD that can be parent-reported or self-completed by older children/adolescents. Participants (Saudi citizens/non-Saudi residents) were approached online via social media. RESULTS: Five hundred and thirty seven participants were enrolled. The participants were 262 boys and 275 girls with a mean age of 12.25±3.77 years. Symptoms of no, minimal, mild and potential PTSD were identified in 15.5%, 44.1%, 27.4% and 13.0% of children/adolescents, respectively. The age, gender, school grade, and residence were not predictive of PTSD symptoms. Univariate analysis of risk factors for PTSD revealed that work of a close relative around people who might be infected was significantly different between groups of PTSD symptoms, but this difference disappeared during multivariate analysis. Children/adolescents of Saudi citizens had significantly lower median total PTSD score than children/adolescents of expatriate families (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: PTSD associated with the COVID-19 and its resultant quarantine shouldn't be overlooked in different populations as it is expected in a considerable proportion of children/adolescents with variable prevalence, risk factors and severity. Parents/healthcare providers must be aware of PTSD associated with COVID-19 or similar disasters, so, they can provide children/adolescent with effective coping mechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Psychology, Child , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255268, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332007

ABSTRACT

How and why do people comply with protective behaviours during COVID-19? The emerging literature employs a variable-centered approach, typically using a narrow selection of constructs within a study. This study is the first to adopt a person-centred approach to identify complex patterns of compliance, and holistically examine underlying psychological differences, integrating multiple psychology paradigms and epidemiology. 1575 participants from Australia, US, UK, and Canada indicated their behaviours, attitudes, personality, cognitive/decision-making ability, resilience, adaptability, coping, political and cultural factors, and information consumption during the pandemic's first wave. Using Latent Profile Analysis, two broad groups were identified. The compliant group (90%) reported greater worries, and perceived protective measures as effective, whilst the non-compliant group (about 10%) perceived them as problematic. The non-compliant group were lower on agreeableness and cultural tightness-looseness, but more extraverted, and reactant. They utilised more maladaptive coping strategies, checked/trusted the news less, and used official sources less. Females showed greater compliance than males. By promoting greater appreciation of the complexity of behaviour during COVID-19, this research provides a critical platform to inform future studies, public health policy, and targeted behaviour change interventions during pandemics. The results also challenge age-related stereotypes and assumptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adult , Australia , Canada , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Public Policy
5.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255149, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331998

ABSTRACT

Previous literature on the psychological impact of COVID-19 has shown a direct relationship between family conflicts and psychological distress among parents and their children during the domestic lockdown and social isolation; but there are also opportunities to enhance family bonding, encourage collective problem-solving and improve personal relationships. This study aimed to explore psychological adjustment processes of Spanish adolescents and their parents during the first month of lockdown by analyzing their narratives, perceived outcomes, protection and risk factors. A total of 142 people agreed to participate in this study. Of all participants, 61 were adolescents (M = 13.57; SD = 1.74; 57% women) and 81 were parents (M = 46.09; SD = 4.72; 91% mothers). All were Spanish residents and completed an online survey during the domestic lockdown in March 2020. From a qualitative design, methodology followed a mixed approach to analyze data. The results showed three different types of adaptation to lockdown and social isolation in both adolescents and their parents: 1) positive adjustment, 2) moderate adjustment, and 3) maladjustment. Most participants reported a good adjustment and only a 20% of parents and a 16% of adolescents stated that they had not been able to achieve a positive psychological adjustment. There are few significant quantitative differences between adolescents and their parents. The qualitative analysis of data showed that adolescents reported less psychological distress than their parents. The two most important protective factors were social support and keeping busy during lockdown. The most significant risk factors were loss of mobility and social isolation. The conclusions stressed that regarding psychological maladjustment, parents experienced feelings of uncertainty whereas adolescents experienced a kind of mourning process. These findings can be used to design and implement effective intervention measures for mental health and psychological well-being in such a difficult situation as domestic lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emotional Adjustment/physiology , Parents/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Psychological Distress , Spain , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Semin Cell Dev Biol ; 118: 73-82, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260862

ABSTRACT

Meaningful social interactions are a fundamental human need, the lack of which can pose serious risks to an individual's physical and mental health. Across species, peer-oriented social behaviors are dramatically reshaped during adolescence, a developmental period characterized by dynamic changes in brain structure and function as individuals transition into adulthood. Thus, the experience of social isolation during this critical developmental stage may be especially pernicious, as it could permanently derail typical neurobiological processes that are necessary for establishing adaptive adult behaviors. The purpose of this review is to summarize investigations in which rodents were isolated during adolescence, then re-housed in typical social groups prior to testing, thus allowing the investigators to resolve the long-term consequences of social adversity experienced during adolescent sensitive periods, despite subsequent normalization of the social environment. Here, we discuss alterations in social, anxiety-like, cognitive, and decision-making behaviors in previously isolated adult rodents. We then explore corresponding neurobiological findings, focusing on the prefrontal cortex, including changes in synaptic densities and protein levels, white matter and oligodendrocyte function, and neuronal physiology. Made more urgent by the recent wave of social deprivation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, especially amongst school-aged adolescents, understanding the mechanisms by which even transient social adversity can negatively impact brain function across the lifespan is of paramount importance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Humans , Social Behavior
7.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(2)2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231532

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Substance use disorder (SUD) is a chronic remitting and relapsing disorder, and abrupt discontinuation of the substance due to nonavailability in the absence of treatment precipitates withdrawals and craving. The objective of this study was to assess the craving and withdrawal coping mechanisms used by patients with SUDs as a result of disruption in availability of substances and medications due to sudden lockdown in response to coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: A survey was administered via telephone from June 25, 2020, to July 15, 2020, to patients who had previously attended the substance use clinic of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India from January 1, 2020, to March 21, 2020 (up to the time of lockdown). Sociodemographic and clinical details were obtained from case record files. A 16-item questionnaire was developed to collect information on coping with craving and withdrawal symptoms. A total of 215 patients were registered in the substance use clinic during this period for the treatment of SUDs, and of those, 43 could not be contacted due to various reasons such as wrong contact numbers, patient expired (not related to substance withdrawal), or not willing to talk. The mean age of the subjects was 37.05 (SD = 13.22) years, and men outnumbered women. The remaining 172 patients were contacted via telephone, and responses were gathered regarding withdrawal symptoms and coping with craving. RESULTS: More than two-thirds of the patients were still maintaining abstinence from their primary substance of abuse during lockdown. A large number of patients (n = 41, 43.2%) reported difficulty in obtaining prescribed medication for detoxification without renewal of their prescription. More than 66% of patients reported that they were able to control their craving, and many kept themselves busy with household activities. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients who had completed the acute phase of withdrawals were able to maintain abstinence in the absence of renewal of prescribed medication and substance of abuse due to sudden disruption in supply. The patients were able to use certain strategies to control their craving.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Craving/physiology , Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/physiopathology , Adult , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 45(4): 752-764, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199630

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In spring 2020, U.S. universities closed campuses to limit the transmission of COVID-19, resulting in an abrupt change in residence, reductions in social interaction, and in many cases, movement away from a heavy drinking culture. The present mixed-methods study explores COVID-19-related changes in college student drinking. We characterize concomitant changes in social and location drinking contexts and describe reasons attributed to changes in drinking. METHODS: We conducted two studies of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on drinking behavior, drinking context, and reasons for both increases and decreases in consumption among college students. Study 1 (qualitative) included 18 heavy-drinking college students (Mage  = 20.2; 56% female) who completed semi-structured interviews. Study 2 (quantitative) included 312 current and former college students who reported use of alcohol and cannabis (Mage  = 21.3; 62% female) and who completed an online survey. RESULTS: In both studies, COVID-19-related increases in drinking frequency were accompanied by decreases in quantity, heavy drinking, and drunkenness. Yet, in Study 2, although heavier drinkers reduced their drinking, among non-heavy drinkers several indices of consumption increased or remained stable . Both studies also provided evidence of reductions in social drinking with friends and roommates and at parties and increased drinking with family. Participants confirmed that their drinking decreased due to reduced social opportunities and/or settings, limited access to alcohol, and reasons related to health and self-discipline. Increases were attributed to greater opportunity (more time) and boredom and to a lesser extent, lower perceived risk of harm and to cope with distress. CONCLUSION: This study documents COVID-19-related changes in drinking among college student drinkers that were attributable to changes in context, particularly a shift away from heavy drinking with peers to lighter drinking with family. Given the continued threat of COVID-19, it is imperative for researchers, administrators, and parents to understand these trends as they may have lasting effects on college student drinking behaviors.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking in College/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities/trends , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Self Report , Young Adult
9.
Psychiatry Res ; 300: 113938, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188961

ABSTRACT

An online survey among French-speaking Belgians (N=7711) investigated self-reported changes in alcohol consumption during the first COVID-19-related lockdown (March 17th - May 4th 2020). Population-weighted estimates indicated that 31.37% of the population increased consumption during lockdown, 30.32% decreased consumption and 38.31% reported unchanged consumption. The magnitude of change was higher for "decreasers" than "increasers", resulting in a slight reduction in overall consumption. A multiple regression analysis revealed that age, occupational status, number of cohabitants, perceived alcohol accessibility, drinking motivations and previous consumption predicted consumption changes. The lockdown was thus associated with consumption modifications among French-speaking Belgians, without a prevailing direction of change.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Motivation , Social Isolation , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , Belgium , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Psychiatry Res ; 300: 113920, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164352

ABSTRACT

In a large (n=10918), national, longitudinal probability-based sample of UK adults the prevalence of clinically significant psychological distress rose from prepandemic levels of 20.8% in 2019 to 29.5% in April 2020 and then declined significantly to prepandemic levels by September (20.8%). Longitudinal analyses showed that all demographic groups examined (age, sex, race/ethnicity, income) experienced increases in distress after the onset of the pandemic followed by significant decreases. By September 2020 distress levels were indistinguishable from prepandemic levels for all groups. This recovery may reflect the influence of the easing of restrictions and psychological adaptation to the demands of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , COVID-19/psychology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Sampling Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 300: 113916, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164350

ABSTRACT

Mourning is a coping-with-loss stage that prevents grief from becoming pathologic, i.e., complicated grief (CG) syndrome and persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD), recently included in international classification systems. During the COVID-19 pandemic, to contain virus spread, several countries adopted/adopt the prohibition of mourning rituals (funeral ceremonies/visiting to cemeteries), so that people were/are unable to give their hospitalized relatives the latest goodbye. Such measures can lead vulnerable individuals to develop CG and PCBD. We critically discuss literature-based risk factors for and protective resources against the onset of these conditions since the start of the pandemic and analyze prevention strategies to inform public health programs.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors
12.
Psychiatry Res ; 300: 113910, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164346

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a great deal of anxiety for many individuals. Several papers have noted that individuals with OCD may be particularly negatively impacted by COVID-19, and that the threat of COVID-19 may impact treatment (Banerjee, 2020; Jassi et al., 2020; Sheu et al., 2020). The study presented herein examined OCD-related and COVID-related intrusions in a non-patient sample. Individuals with elevated OCD symptoms reported having both OCD and COVID intrusions at a similar frequency. Further, OCD symptom severity was significantly correlated with the frequency of COVID related intrusions and the amount of distress they caused. However, distress from COVID related intrusions was not significantly correlated with OCD symptom severity. These results shed light on the similarities between reactions to objectively elevated threat and the perceptions of elevated threat experienced in OCD.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Mental Health , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
13.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 45(4): 752-764, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In spring 2020, U.S. universities closed campuses to limit the transmission of COVID-19, resulting in an abrupt change in residence, reductions in social interaction, and in many cases, movement away from a heavy drinking culture. The present mixed-methods study explores COVID-19-related changes in college student drinking. We characterize concomitant changes in social and location drinking contexts and describe reasons attributed to changes in drinking. METHODS: We conducted two studies of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on drinking behavior, drinking context, and reasons for both increases and decreases in consumption among college students. Study 1 (qualitative) included 18 heavy-drinking college students (Mage  = 20.2; 56% female) who completed semi-structured interviews. Study 2 (quantitative) included 312 current and former college students who reported use of alcohol and cannabis (Mage  = 21.3; 62% female) and who completed an online survey. RESULTS: In both studies, COVID-19-related increases in drinking frequency were accompanied by decreases in quantity, heavy drinking, and drunkenness. Yet, in Study 2, although heavier drinkers reduced their drinking, among non-heavy drinkers several indices of consumption increased or remained stable . Both studies also provided evidence of reductions in social drinking with friends and roommates and at parties and increased drinking with family. Participants confirmed that their drinking decreased due to reduced social opportunities and/or settings, limited access to alcohol, and reasons related to health and self-discipline. Increases were attributed to greater opportunity (more time) and boredom and to a lesser extent, lower perceived risk of harm and to cope with distress. CONCLUSION: This study documents COVID-19-related changes in drinking among college student drinkers that were attributable to changes in context, particularly a shift away from heavy drinking with peers to lighter drinking with family. Given the continued threat of COVID-19, it is imperative for researchers, administrators, and parents to understand these trends as they may have lasting effects on college student drinking behaviors.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking in College/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities/trends , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Self Report , Young Adult
14.
Int J Psychol ; 56(4): 512-521, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141315

ABSTRACT

Using data collected from two provinces in China through an online survey, the current study aimed to investigate left-behind children's emotional and academic adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. The participants included 1780 left-behind (960 boys) and 1500 non-left-behind (811 boys) children in elementary and junior high school with a mean age of 11.23. Self-reported questionnaires concerning children's depression, loneliness, anxiety, and academic adjustment, and parents' coping with children's negative emotions were completed. The results suggested that compared with non-left-behind children, left-behind children's depression and anxiety symptoms were more severe and their academic adjustment was poorer. However, left-behind children had lower levels of loneliness than non-left-behind children. Additionally, supportive coping types, especially emotion-focused and problem-focused reactions, were significantly negatively correlated with children's depression and anxiety. Unsupportive coping types, especially distress and punitive reactions, were significantly positively correlated with children's depression and anxiety symptoms. Moreover, the relationships between punitive reactions and depression, ignoring and loneliness and problem-focused reactions and academic adjustment were significantly stronger in left-behind children. Hence, during the pandemic, left-behind children were still at a disadvantage even with their parents' company. However, parents' coping style towards left-behind children's negative emotions played a significant role in their adjustment.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , COVID-19/psychology , Emotions/physiology , Parent-Child Relations , Parents/psychology , Social Adjustment , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Psychother Psychosom ; 90(3): 200-206, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125222

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The long-lasting threat of COVID-19 makes it necessary to explore strategies to improve coping skills which enable us to master a balanced life in the face of adversity. OBJECTIVE: To unravel the most challenging aspects of COVID-19 in a nonclinical adult population and identify predictors of lost balance and consequent allostatic overload (AO). We examined the role of regular, moderate-intensity formula aerobic exercise (312 meridian exercise) in preventing allostatic overload through increasing well-being. METHODS: An online survey was conducted to measure CO-VID-related allostatic overload according to clinimetric criteria. The Psychosocial Index (PSI), Kellner's Symptom Questionnaire (KSQ), short Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21), Public Health Surveillance Well-Being Scale -(PHS-WB), and Whiteley-7 were used to explore mental health characteristics. Univariate statistics logistic regression analysis and a general linear model were used. RESULTS: According to 442 valid answers, 217 adults practiced physical exercise (PE) frequently (fPE, 3-5 times/every day) while 120 did it less regularly (1-2 times/week), and 105 did not exercise/practiced irregularly (controls). Restriction-related stressors were most challenging, resulting in AO in 29% (n = 128) of the sample. The main predictors were additional stressors (p = 0.005) and anxiety symptoms (p < 0.001). The prevalence of AO was lower (p = 0.018) in the fPE group when compared to controls. KSQ distress symptoms were also lower in fPE (p < 0.0001), while total well-being was increased (p < 0.001) after adjusting for sex, age, and number of chronic diseases. According to the PHS-WB, both physical and mental well-being were higher (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively) in fPE. CONCLUSIONS: Frequent moderate exercise is associated with better mental and physical well-being and a lower prevalence of AO.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Allostasis/physiology , COVID-19/psychology , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychological Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 7-12, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068452

ABSTRACT

Medical students, residents, and practicing physicians experience high burnout, depression, and suicide rates, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated stress for many.1-6 While laudable, current well-being efforts appear insufficient to meet the challenges that so many are facing. This essay explores approaches that individuals and organizations can take to promote mental health and well-being from medical school to practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/standards , Physicians/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Limbic System/physiopathology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Mindfulness/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Schools, Medical/standards , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data
17.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 45-49, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068451

ABSTRACT

Healthcare providers perform lifesaving work in unusually stressful work environments due to the challenges and related risks of battling the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic. The potential personal and professional toll is substantial. This article describes how one healthcare facility benefited from existing peer support resources to address workforce well-being, ensuring that resources were available to support workforce resilience throughout the protracted COVID response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/standards , Workplace/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Humans , Male , Mental Health/trends , Missouri/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self-Help Groups/organization & administration , Universities/organization & administration , Workplace/statistics & numerical data
18.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 55-62, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068442

ABSTRACT

Background: Global pandemics have a profound psycho-social impact on health systems and their impact on healthcare workers is under-reported. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey with 13 Likert-scale responses and some additional polar questions pertaining to dressing habits and learning in a university hospital in the midwest United States. Descriptive and analytical statistics were performed. Results: The 370 respondents (66.1% response rate, age 38.5±11.6 years; 64.9% female), included 102 supervising providers [96 (25.9%) physicians, 6 (1.6%) mid-level], 64 (17.3%) residents/fellows, 73 (19.7% nurses, 45 (12.2%) respiratory therapists, 31 (8.4%) therapy services and others: 12 (3.2%) case-managers, 4 (1.1%) dietitians, 39 (10.5%) unclassified]. Overall, 200 (54.1%) had increased anxiety, 115 (31.1%) felt overwhelmed, 159 (42.9%) had fear of death, and 281 (75.9%) changed dressing habits. Females were more anxious (70.7% vs. 56%, X2 (1, N=292)=5.953, p=0.015), overwhelmed (45.6% vs. 27.3%, X2 (1, N=273)=8.67, p=0.003) and suffered sleep disturbances (52% vs. 39%, X2 (1, N=312)=4.91, p=0.027). Administration was supportive; 243 (84.1%, N=289), 276 (74.5%) knew another co-worker with COVID-19, and only 93 (25.1%) felt healthcare employment was less favorable. Residents and fellows reported a negative impact on their training despite feeling supported by their program. Conclusion: Despite belief of a supportive administration, over half of healthcare workers and learners reported increased anxiety, and nearly a third felt overwhelmed during this current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Psychology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 14(6): 1603-1605, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: People with diabetes have multiple psychosocial issues related to diabetes and its complications and this may be exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We reviewed the psychological adaptative difficulties in people with diabetes especially during natural disasters including the prevailing COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: There are significant concerns regarding worsening of glycemic control, unavailability of appropriate medicines, inaccessibility to health care or acquiring SARS- CoV-2 infection and subsequent poorer outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although there are some guidance documents for managing diabetes and associated complications during COVID-19 pandemic but very few address the psychological issues in people with diabetes. We discuss the psychological adaptive difficulties and an approach to address the psychosocial concerns in people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: People with diabetes have significant diabetes distress and psychological adaptive difficulties that is aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. An integrated multidisciplinary approach is needed to manage the prevailing psychological issues amongst people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Self-Management/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Self-Management/trends
20.
Cogn Behav Ther ; 50(4): 261-275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057782

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has contributed to thousands of hospitalizations and deaths worldwide. Although alcohol use has increased in response to the pandemic, no known studies have identified transdiagnostic risk factors for greater drinking in response to COVID-related distress. Individuals with more difficulty with emotion regulation may drink more during the pandemic to manage pandemic-related distress. The current study tested whether difficulty with emotion regulation was related to greater estimated blood alcohol content (eBAC) during a typical week in the past month and if this was due to COVID-related distress and drinking to cope with the pandemic. The sample consisted of 347 past-month drinking undergraduates in Louisiana, a state with some of the U.S. highest rates of COVID-19 infections and related deaths. Difficulty with engaging in goal-directed behaviors was related to greater past-month eBAC and this relation was mediated by the sequential effects of COVID-related worry and drinking to cope with the pandemic. Results indicate that individuals with difficulty engaging in goal-directed behaviors are especially vulnerable to greater eBAC during the COVID-19 pandemic which may be due in part to their vulnerability to more COVID-related worry which may lead to more drinking to cope with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Alcohol Drinking in College/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Emotional Regulation , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Alcoholism/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...