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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 750969, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551506

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection. A large number of clinical studies found high-level expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, which fuels the rapid development of the disease. However, the specific molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we found that SARS-CoV-2 Nsp5 can induce the expression of cytokines IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-2 in Calu-3 and THP1 cells. Further research found that Nsp5 enhances cytokine expression through activating the NF-κB signaling pathway. Subsequently, we investigated the upstream effectors of the NF-κB signal pathway on Nsp5 overexpression and discovered that Nsp5 increases the protein level of MAVS. Moreover, Nsp5 can promote the SUMOylation of MAVS to increase its stability and lead to increasing levels of MAVS protein, finally triggering activation of NF-κB signaling. The knockdown of MAVS and the inhibitor of SUMOylation treatment can attenuate Nsp5-mediated NF-κB activation and cytokine induction. We identified a novel role of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp5 to enhance cytokine production by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/immunology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , NF-kappa B/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sumoylation/physiology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/biosynthesis , Interleukin-2/biosynthesis , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Signal Transduction/physiology , Sumoylation/drug effects , THP-1 Cells , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis , Vero Cells
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4502, 2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550282

ABSTRACT

Cells in many tissues, such as bone, muscle, and placenta, fuse into syncytia to acquire new functions and transcriptional programs. While it is known that fused cells are specialized, it is unclear whether cell-fusion itself contributes to programmatic-changes that generate the new cellular state. Here, we address this by employing a fusogen-mediated, cell-fusion system to create syncytia from undifferentiated cells. RNA-Seq analysis reveals VSV-G-induced cell fusion precedes transcriptional changes. To gain mechanistic insights, we measure the plasma membrane surface area after cell-fusion and observe it diminishes through increases in endocytosis. Consequently, glucose transporters internalize, and cytoplasmic glucose and ATP transiently decrease. This reduced energetic state activates AMPK, which inhibits YAP1, causing transcriptional-reprogramming and cell-cycle arrest. Impairing either endocytosis or AMPK activity prevents YAP1 inhibition and cell-cycle arrest after fusion. Together, these data demonstrate plasma membrane diminishment upon cell-fusion causes transient nutrient stress that may promote transcriptional-reprogramming independent from extrinsic cues.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , AMP-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , AMP-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Animals , Biological Transport , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Cells, Cultured , Giant Cells/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Mice , RNA-Seq/methods , Signal Transduction/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics
3.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 19(1): 67-78, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541184

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused severe morbidity and mortality in humans. It is urgent to understand the function of viral genes. However, the function of open reading frame 10 (ORF10), which is uniquely expressed by SARS-CoV-2, remains unclear. In this study, we showed that overexpression of ORF10 markedly suppressed the expression of type I interferon (IFN-I) genes and IFN-stimulated genes. Then, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) was identified as the target via which ORF10 suppresses the IFN-I signaling pathway, and MAVS was found to be degraded through the ORF10-induced autophagy pathway. Furthermore, overexpression of ORF10 promoted the accumulation of LC3 in mitochondria and induced mitophagy. Mechanistically, ORF10 was translocated to mitochondria by interacting with the mitophagy receptor Nip3-like protein X (NIX) and induced mitophagy through its interaction with both NIX and LC3B. Moreover, knockdown of NIX expression blocked mitophagy activation, MAVS degradation, and IFN-I signaling pathway inhibition by ORF10. Consistent with our observations, in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection, ORF10 inhibited MAVS expression and facilitated viral replication. In brief, our results reveal a novel mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 inhibits the innate immune response; that is, ORF10 induces mitophagy-mediated MAVS degradation by binding to NIX.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Open Reading Frames , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Autophagy/immunology , Gene Silencing , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Mitochondria/metabolism , Mitophagy , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Ubiquitination , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6761, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526072

ABSTRACT

Viral proteins make extensive use of short peptide interaction motifs to hijack cellular host factors. However, most current large-scale methods do not identify this important class of protein-protein interactions. Uncovering peptide mediated interactions provides both a molecular understanding of viral interactions with their host and the foundation for developing novel antiviral reagents. Here we describe a viral peptide discovery approach covering 23 coronavirus strains that provides high resolution information on direct virus-host interactions. We identify 269 peptide-based interactions for 18 coronaviruses including a specific interaction between the human G3BP1/2 proteins and an ΦxFG peptide motif in the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein. This interaction supports viral replication and through its ΦxFG motif N rewires the G3BP1/2 interactome to disrupt stress granules. A peptide-based inhibitor disrupting the G3BP1/2-N interaction dampened SARS-CoV-2 infection showing that our results can be directly translated into novel specific antiviral reagents.


Subject(s)
Integration Host Factors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Humans , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology
5.
FEBS Lett ; 595(23): 2872-2896, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516705

ABSTRACT

The current work investigated SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid (NCAP or N protein) interactors in A549 human lung cancer cells using a SILAC-based mass spectrometry approach. NCAP interactors included proteins of the stress granule (SG) machinery and immunoregulators. NCAP showed specific interaction with the SG proteins G3BP1, G3BP2, YTHDF3, USP10 and PKR, and translocated to SGs following oxidative stress and heat shock. Treatment of recombinant NCAP with RNA isolated from A549 cells exposed to oxidative stress-stimulated NCAP to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). RNA degradation using RNase A treatment completely blocked the LLPS property of NCAP as well as its SG association. The RNA intercalator mitoxantrone also disrupted NCAP assembly in vitro and in cells. This study provides insight into the biological processes and biophysical properties of the SARS-CoV-2 NCAP.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , /metabolism , A549 Cells , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Humans , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/metabolism , eIF-2 Kinase/metabolism
6.
J Photochem Photobiol B ; 226: 112357, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510060

ABSTRACT

Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein mediates innate antiviral responses, including responses to certain coronaviruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). We have previously shown that ultraviolet-A (UVA) therapy can prevent virus-induced cell death in human ciliated tracheal epithelial cells (HTEpC) infected with coronavirus-229E (CoV-229E), and results in increased intracellular levels of MAVS. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which UVA light can activate MAVS, and whether local UVA light application can activate MAVS at locations distant from the light source (e.g. via cell-to-cell communication). MAVS levels were compared in HTEpC exposed to 2 mW/cm2 narrow band (NB)-UVA for 20 min and in unexposed controls at 30-40% and at 100% confluency, and in unexposed HTEpC treated with supernatants or lysates from UVA-exposed cells or from unexposed controls. MAVS was also assessed in different sections of confluent monolayer plates where only one section was exposed to NB-UVA. Our results showed that UVA increases the expression of MAVS protein. Further, cells in a confluent monolayer exposed to UVA conferred an elevation in MAVS in cells adjacent to the exposed section, and also in cells in the most distant sections which were not exposed to UVA. In this study, human ciliated tracheal epithelial cells exposed to UVA demonstrate increased MAVS protein, and also appear to transmit this influence to confluent cells not exposed to UVA, likely via cell-cell signaling.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/radiotherapy , COVID-19/virology , Cell Communication/immunology , Cell Communication/radiation effects , Cells, Cultured , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/radiation effects , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/radiation effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate/radiation effects , Photobiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/immunology , Signal Transduction/radiation effects , Trachea/cytology , Ultraviolet Therapy
7.
Immunity ; 54(12): 2877-2892.e7, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499988

ABSTRACT

Adjuvants are critical for improving the quality and magnitude of adaptive immune responses to vaccination. Lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-encapsulated nucleoside-modified mRNA vaccines have shown great efficacy against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but the mechanism of action of this vaccine platform is not well-characterized. Using influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2 mRNA and protein subunit vaccines, we demonstrated that our LNP formulation has intrinsic adjuvant activity that promotes induction of strong T follicular helper cell, germinal center B cell, long-lived plasma cell, and memory B cell responses that are associated with durable and protective antibodies in mice. Comparative experiments demonstrated that this LNP formulation outperformed a widely used MF59-like adjuvant, AddaVax. The adjuvant activity of the LNP relies on the ionizable lipid component and on IL-6 cytokine induction but not on MyD88- or MAVS-dependent sensing of LNPs. Our study identified LNPs as a versatile adjuvant that enhances the efficacy of traditional and next-generation vaccine platforms.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , /immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Animals , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Liposomes/administration & dosage , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , Protein Subunits/genetics , /genetics
8.
mBio ; 12(5): e0234221, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494971

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence and spread of zoonotic viruses highlights that animal-sourced viruses are the biggest threat to global public health. Swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV) is an HKU2-related bat coronavirus that was spilled over from Rhinolophus bats to swine, causing large-scale outbreaks of severe diarrhea disease in piglets in China. Unlike other porcine coronaviruses, SADS-CoV possesses broad species tissue tropism, including primary human cells, implying a significant risk of cross-species spillover. To explore host dependency factors for SADS-CoV as therapeutic targets, we employed genome-wide CRISPR knockout library screening in HeLa cells. Consistent with two independent screens, we identified the zinc finger DHHC-type palmitoyltransferase 17 (ZDHHC17 or ZD17) as an important host factor for SADS-CoV infection. Through truncation mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the DHHC domain of ZD17 that is involved in palmitoylation is important for SADS-CoV infection. Mechanistic studies revealed that ZD17 is required for SADS-CoV genomic RNA replication. Treatment of infected cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) significantly suppressed SADS-CoV infection. Our findings provide insight on SADS-CoV-host interactions and a potential therapeutic application. IMPORTANCE The recent emergence of deadly zoonotic viral diseases, including Ebola virus and SARS-CoV-2, emphasizes the importance of pandemic preparedness for the animal-sourced viruses with potential risk of animal-to-human spillover. Over the last 2 decades, three significant coronaviruses of bat origin, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, have caused millions of deaths with significant economy and public health impacts. Lack of effective therapeutics against these coronaviruses was one of the contributing factors to such losses. Although SADS-CoV, another coronavirus of bat origin, was only known to cause fatal diarrhea disease in piglets, the ability to infect cells derived from multiple species, including human, highlights the potential risk of animal-to-human spillover. As part of our effort in pandemic preparedness, we explore SADS-CoV host dependency factors as targets for host-directed therapeutic development and found zinc finger DHHC-type palmitoyltransferase 17 is a promising drug target against SADS-CoV replication. We also demonstrated that a palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), can be used as an inhibitor for SADS-CoV treatment.


Subject(s)
Acyltransferases/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Acyltransferases/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , HeLa Cells , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics , Palmitates/pharmacology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Swine
9.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(8): e1009800, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435629

ABSTRACT

Type I Interferons (IFN-Is) are a family of cytokines which play a major role in inhibiting viral infection. Resultantly, many viruses have evolved mechanisms in which to evade the IFN-I response. Here we tested the impact of expression of 27 different SARS-CoV-2 genes in relation to their effect on IFN production and activity using three independent experimental methods. We identified six gene products; NSP6, ORF6, ORF7b, NSP1, NSP5 and NSP15, which strongly (>10-fold) blocked MAVS-induced (but not TRIF-induced) IFNß production. Expression of the first three of these SARS-CoV-2 genes specifically blocked MAVS-induced IFNß-promoter activity, whereas all six genes induced a collapse in IFNß mRNA levels, corresponding with suppressed IFNß protein secretion. Five of these six genes furthermore suppressed MAVS-induced activation of IFNλs, however with no effect on IFNα or IFNγ production. In sharp contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infected cells remained extremely sensitive to anti-viral activity exerted by added IFN-Is. None of the SARS-CoV-2 genes were able to block IFN-I signaling, as demonstrated by robust activation of Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs) by added interferon. This, despite the reduced levels of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1, was likely caused by broad translation inhibition mediated by NSP1. Finally, we found that a truncated ORF7b variant that has arisen from a mutant SARS-CoV-2 strain harboring a 382-nucleotide deletion associating with mild disease (Δ382 strain identified in Singapore & Taiwan in 2020) lost its ability to suppress type I and type III IFN production. In summary, our findings support a multi-gene process in which SARS-CoV-2 blocks IFN-production, with ORF7b as a major player, presumably facilitating evasion of host detection during early infection. However, SARS-CoV-2 fails to suppress IFN-I signaling thus providing an opportunity to exploit IFN-Is as potential therapeutic antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
Interferon-beta/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/metabolism , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
10.
mBio ; 12(5): e0233521, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430167

ABSTRACT

Newly emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a global pandemic with astonishing mortality and morbidity. The high replication and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 are remarkably distinct from those of previous closely related coronaviruses, and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The innate immune defense is a physical barrier that restricts viral replication. We report here that the SARS-CoV-2 Nsp5 main protease targets RIG-I and mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein via two distinct mechanisms for inhibition. Specifically, Nsp5 cleaves off the 10 most-N-terminal amino acids from RIG-I and deprives it of the ability to activate MAVS, whereas Nsp5 promotes the ubiquitination and proteosome-mediated degradation of MAVS. As such, Nsp5 potently inhibits interferon (IFN) induction by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in an enzyme-dependent manner. A synthetic small-molecule inhibitor blunts the Nsp5-mediated destruction of cellular RIG-I and MAVS and processing of SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural proteins, thus restoring the innate immune response and impeding SARS-CoV-2 replication. This work offers new insight into the immune evasion strategy of SARS-CoV-2 and provides a potential antiviral agent to treat CoV disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. IMPORTANCE The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is caused by SARS-CoV-2, which is rapidly evolving with better transmissibility. Understanding the molecular basis of the SARS-CoV-2 interaction with host cells is of paramount significance, and development of antiviral agents provides new avenues to prevent and treat COVID-19 diseases. This study describes a molecular characterization of innate immune evasion mediated by the SARS-CoV-2 Nsp5 main protease and subsequent development of a small-molecule inhibitor.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , A549 Cells , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Animals , Caco-2 Cells , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , HCT116 Cells , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Immunoblotting , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Mice , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/physiology , Ubiquitination , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology
11.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 190: 636-648, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401500

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein undergoes RNA-induced phase separation (LLPS) and sequesters the host key stress granule (SG) proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and 2 (G3BP1 and G3BP2) to inhibit SG formation. This will allow viral packaging and propagation in host cells. Based on a genomic-guided meta-analysis, here we identify upstream regulatory elements modulating the expression of G3BP1 and G3BP2 (collectively called G3BP1/2). Using this strategy, we have identified FOXA1, YY1, SYK, E2F-1, and TGFBR2 as activators and SIN3A, SRF, and AKT-1 as repressors of G3BP1/2 genes. Panels of the activators and repressors were then used to identify drugs that change their gene expression signatures. Two drugs, imatinib, and decitabine have been identified as putative modulators of G3BP1/2 genes and their regulators, suggesting their role as COVID-19 mitigation agents. Molecular docking analysis suggests that both drugs bind to G3BP1/2 with a much higher affinity than the SARS-CoV-2 N protein. This study reports imatinib and decitabine as candidate drugs against N protein and G3BP1/2 protein.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , DNA Helicases/chemistry , Decitabine/chemistry , Imatinib Mesylate/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/chemistry , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/chemistry , RNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/antagonists & inhibitors , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , DNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Decitabine/pharmacology , Drug Delivery Systems , Genomics , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
12.
Mil Med Res ; 8(1): 49, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398883

ABSTRACT

Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) sense viral RNA and activate antiviral immune responses. Herein we investigate their functions in human epithelial cells, the primary and initial target of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). A deficiency in MDA5, RIG-I or mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) enhanced viral replication. The expression of the type I/III interferon (IFN) during infection was impaired in MDA5-/- and MAVS-/-, but not in RIG-I-/-, when compared to wild type (WT) cells. The mRNA level of full-length angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cellular entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, was ~ 2.5-fold higher in RIG-I-/- than WT cells. These data demonstrate MDA5 as the predominant SARS-CoV-2 sensor, IFN-independent induction of ACE2 and anti-SARS-CoV-2 role of RIG-I in epithelial cells.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cell Line , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Signal Transduction , Virus Replication
13.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 8(15): e2100606, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340232

ABSTRACT

Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is the core signaling adaptor in the RNA signaling pathway. Thus, appropriate regulation of MAVS expression is essential for antiviral immunity against RNA virus infection. However, the regulation of MAVS expression at the mRNA level especially at the post transcriptional level is not well-defined. Here, it is reported that the MAVS mRNA undergoes N6 -methyladenosine (m6 A) modification through methyltransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14), which leads to a fast turnover of MAVS mRNA. Knockdown or deficiency of METTL14 increases MAVS mRNA stability, and downstream phosphorylation of TBK1/IRF3 and interferon-ß production in response to RNA viruses. Compared to wild-type mice, heterozygotes Mettl14+/- mice better tolerate RNA virus infection. The authors' findings unveil a novel mechanism to regulate the stability of MAVS transcripts post-transcriptionally through m6 A modification.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Methyltransferases/immunology , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/immunology , Adenosine/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Methyltransferases/genetics , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683800, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305645

ABSTRACT

The major cause of death in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients is due to de-regulation of the innate immune system and development of cytokine storm. SARS-CoV-2 infects multiple cell types in the lung, including macrophages, by engagement of its spike (S) protein on angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. ACE2 receptor initiates signals in macrophages that modulate their activation, including production of cytokines and chemokines. IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)-M is a central regulator of inflammatory responses regulating the magnitude of TLR responsiveness. Aim of the work was to investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 S protein-initiated signals modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. For this purpose, we treated PMA-differentiated THP-1 human macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein and measured the induction of inflammatory mediators including IL6, TNFα, IL8, CXCL5, and MIP1a. The results showed that SARS-CoV-2 S protein induced IL6, MIP1a and TNFα mRNA expression, while it had no effect on IL8 and CXCL5 mRNA levels. We further examined whether SARS-CoV-2 S protein altered the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR signals. Treatment of LPS-activated macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein augmented IL6 and MIP1a mRNA, an effect that was evident at the protein level only for IL6. Similarly, treatment of PAM3csk4 stimulated macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein resulted in increased mRNA of IL6, while TNFα and MIP1a were unaffected. The results were confirmed in primary human peripheral monocytic cells (PBMCs) and isolated CD14+ monocytes. Macrophage responsiveness to TLR ligands is regulated by IRAK-M, an inactive IRAK kinase isoform. Indeed, we found that SARS-CoV-2 S protein suppressed IRAK-M mRNA and protein expression both in THP1 macrophages and primary human PBMCs and CD14+ monocytes. Engagement of SARS-CoV-2 S protein with ACE2 results in internalization of ACE2 and suppression of its activity. Activation of ACE2 has been previously shown to induce anti-inflammatory responses in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with the ACE2 activator DIZE suppressed the pro-inflammatory action of SARS-CoV-2. Our results demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2/ACE2 interaction rendered macrophages hyper-responsive to TLR signals, suppressed IRAK-M and promoted pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, activation of ACE2 may be a potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy to eliminate the development of cytokine storm observed in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Protein Binding , THP-1 Cells , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
17.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253458, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286869

ABSTRACT

L-Dopa decarboxylase (DDC) is the most significantly co-expressed gene with ACE2, which encodes for the SARS-CoV-2 receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and the interferon-inducible truncated isoform dACE2. Our group previously showed the importance of DDC in viral infections. We hereby aimed to investigate DDC expression in COVID-19 patients and cultured SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, also in association with ACE2 and dACE2. We concurrently evaluated the expression of the viral infection- and interferon-stimulated gene ISG56 and the immune-modulatory, hypoxia-regulated gene EPO. Viral load and mRNA levels of DDC, ACE2, dACE2, ISG56 and EPO were quantified by RT-qPCR in nasopharyngeal swab samples from COVID-19 patients, showing no or mild symptoms, and from non-infected individuals. Samples from influenza-infected patients were analyzed in comparison. SARS-CoV-2-mediated effects in host gene expression were validated in cultured virus-permissive epithelial cells. We found substantially higher gene expression of DDC in COVID-19 patients (7.6-fold; p = 1.2e-13) but not in influenza-infected ones, compared to non-infected subjects. dACE2 was more elevated (2.9-fold; p = 1.02e-16) than ACE2 (1.7-fold; p = 0.0005) in SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals. ISG56 (2.5-fold; p = 3.01e-6) and EPO (2.6-fold; p = 2.1e-13) were also increased. Detected differences were not attributed to enrichment of specific cell populations in nasopharyngeal tissue. While SARS-CoV-2 virus load was positively associated with ACE2 expression (r≥0.8, p<0.001), it negatively correlated with DDC, dACE2 (r≤-0.7, p<0.001) and EPO (r≤-0.5, p<0.05). Moreover, a statistically significant correlation between DDC and dACE2 expression was observed in nasopharyngeal swab and whole blood samples of both COVID-19 and non-infected individuals (r≥0.7). In VeroE6 cells, SARS-CoV-2 negatively affected DDC, ACE2, dACE2 and EPO mRNA levels, and induced cell death, while ISG56 was enhanced at early hours post-infection. Thus, the regulation of DDC, dACE2 and EPO expression in the SARS-CoV-2-infected nasopharyngeal tissue is possibly related with an orchestrated antiviral response of the infected host as the virus suppresses these genes to favor its propagation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Dopa Decarboxylase/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Area Under Curve , Aromatic-L-Amino-Acid Decarboxylases , COVID-19/virology , Dopa Decarboxylase/genetics , Down-Regulation , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Erythropoietin/genetics , Erythropoietin/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/metabolism , Protein Isoforms/genetics , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Up-Regulation , Viral Load
18.
Biochem J ; 478(10): 1853-1859, 2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232077

ABSTRACT

The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has spurred new interest in interferon signaling in response to viral pathogens. Much of what we know about the signaling molecules and associated signal transduction induced during the host cellular response to viral pathogens has been gained from research conducted from the 1990's to the present day, but certain intricacies of the mechanisms involved, still remain unclear. In a recent study by Vaughn et al. the authors examine one of the main mechanisms regulating interferon induction following viral infection, the RIG-I/MAVS/IRF3 pathway, and find that similar to PKR both DICER interacting proteins, PACT and TRBP, regulate RIG-I signaling in an opposing manner. More specifically, the reported findings demonstrate, like others, that PACT stimulates RIG-I-mediated signaling in a manner independent of PACT dsRNA-binding ability or phosphorylation at sites known to be important for PACT-dependent PKR activation. In contrast, they show for the first time that TRBP inhibits RIG-I-mediated signaling. RIG-I inhibition by TRBP did not require phosphorylation of sites shown to be important for inhibiting PKR, nor did it involve PACT or PKR, but it did require the dsRNA-binding ability of TRBP. These findings open the door to a complex co-regulation of RIG-I, PKR, MDA5, miRNA processing, and interferon induction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Interferons/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nuclear Receptor Coactivators/genetics , Nuclear Receptor Coactivators/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism
19.
J Biol Chem ; 295(51): 17781-17801, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985572

ABSTRACT

Knockout mouse models have been extensively used to study the antiviral activity of IFIT (interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats). Human IFIT1 binds to cap0 (m7GpppN) RNA, which lacks methylation on the first and second cap-proximal nucleotides (cap1, m7GpppNm, and cap2, m7GpppNmNm, respectively). These modifications are signatures of "self" in higher eukaryotes, whereas unmodified cap0-RNA is recognized as foreign and, therefore, potentially harmful to the host cell. IFIT1 inhibits translation at the initiation stage by competing with the cap-binding initiation factor complex, eIF4F, restricting infection by certain viruses that possess "nonself" cap0-mRNAs. However, in mice and other rodents, the IFIT1 orthologue has been lost, and the closely related Ifit1b has been duplicated twice, yielding three paralogues: Ifit1, Ifit1b, and Ifit1c. Although murine Ifit1 is similar to human IFIT1 in its cap0-RNA-binding selectivity, the roles of Ifit1b and Ifit1c are unknown. Here, we found that Ifit1b preferentially binds to cap1-RNA, whereas binding is much weaker to cap0- and cap2-RNA. In murine cells, we show that Ifit1b can modulate host translation and restrict WT mouse coronavirus infection. We found that Ifit1c acts as a stimulatory cofactor for both Ifit1 and Ifit1b, promoting their translation inhibition. In this way, Ifit1c acts in an analogous fashion to human IFIT3, which is a cofactor to human IFIT1. This work clarifies similarities and differences between the human and murine IFIT families to facilitate better design and interpretation of mouse models of human infection and sheds light on the evolutionary plasticity of the IFIT family.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Coronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus/genetics , Protein Biosynthesis , RNA Cap-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA Caps/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/deficiency , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Animals , Coronavirus/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , RAW 264.7 Cells , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
20.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 18(4): 945-953, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104474

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the pathogenic agent of COVID-19, which has evolved into a global pandemic. Compared with some other respiratory RNA viruses, SARS-CoV-2 is a poor inducer of type I interferon (IFN). Here, we report that SARS-CoV-2 nsp12, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), suppresses host antiviral responses. SARS-CoV-2 nsp12 attenuated Sendai virus (SeV)- or poly(I:C)-induced IFN-ß promoter activation in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited IFN promoter activation triggered by RIG-I, MDA5, MAVS, and IRF3 overexpression. Nsp12 did not impair IRF3 phosphorylation but suppressed the nuclear translocation of IRF3. Mutational analyses suggested that this suppression was not dependent on the polymerase activity of nsp12. Given these findings, our study reveals that SARS-CoV-2 RdRp can antagonize host antiviral innate immunity and thus provides insights into viral pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/metabolism , Mutation , Phosphorylation , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Sendai virus/metabolism
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