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1.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6055, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475294

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has become a global pandemic. 3CL protease is a virally encoded protein that is essential across a broad spectrum of coronaviruses with no close human analogs. PF-00835231, a 3CL protease inhibitor, has exhibited potent in vitro antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 as a single agent. Here we report, the design and characterization of a phosphate prodrug PF-07304814 to enable the delivery and projected sustained systemic exposure in human of PF-00835231 to inhibit coronavirus family 3CL protease activity with selectivity over human host protease targets. Furthermore, we show that PF-00835231 has additive/synergistic activity in combination with remdesivir. We present the ADME, safety, in vitro, and in vivo antiviral activity data that supports the clinical evaluation of PF-07304814 as a potential COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Indoles/administration & dosage , Leucine/administration & dosage , Pyrrolidinones/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/enzymology , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/adverse effects , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Design , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , HeLa Cells , Humans , Indoles/adverse effects , Indoles/pharmacokinetics , Infusions, Intravenous , Leucine/adverse effects , Leucine/pharmacokinetics , Mice , Pyrrolidinones/adverse effects , Pyrrolidinones/pharmacokinetics , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Vero Cells
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19998, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462031

ABSTRACT

Understanding the effects of metabolism on the rational design of novel and more effective drugs is still a considerable challenge. To the best of our knowledge, there are no entirely computational strategies that make it possible to predict these effects. From this perspective, the development of such methodologies could contribute to significantly reduce the side effects of medicines, leading to the emergence of more effective and safer drugs. Thereby, in this study, our strategy is based on simulating the electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) fragmentation of the drug molecules and combined with molecular docking and ADMET models in two different situations. In the first model, the drug is docked without considering the possible metabolic effects. In the second model, each of the intermediates from the EI-MS results is docked, and metabolism occurs before the drug accesses the biological target. As a proof of concept, in this work, we investigate the main antiviral drugs used in clinical research to treat COVID-19. As a result, our strategy made it possible to assess the biological activity and toxicity of all potential by-products. We believed that our findings provide new chemical insights that can benefit the rational development of novel drugs in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenine/adverse effects , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Adenine/metabolism , Adenine/pharmacology , Adenosine/adverse effects , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Amides/adverse effects , Amides/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Chloroquine/analogs & derivatives , Chloroquine/metabolism , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Drug Design , Humans , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nitro Compounds/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds/metabolism , Nitro Compounds/pharmacology , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazines/metabolism , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/adverse effects , Pyrrolidines/metabolism , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ribavirin/metabolism , Ribavirin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thiazoles/adverse effects , Thiazoles/metabolism , Thiazoles/pharmacology
3.
Pharmacotherapy ; 40(5): 416-437, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449937

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has evolved into an emergent global pandemic. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can manifest on a spectrum of illness from mild disease to severe respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit admission. As the incidence continues to rise at a rapid pace, critical care teams are faced with challenging treatment decisions. There is currently no widely accepted standard of care in the pharmacologic management of patients with COVID-19. Urgent identification of potential treatment strategies is a priority. Therapies include novel agents available in clinical trials or through compassionate use, and other drugs, repurposed antiviral and immunomodulating therapies. Many have demonstrated in vitro or in vivo potential against other viruses that are similar to SARS-CoV-2. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 have additional considerations related to adjustments for organ impairment and renal replacement therapies, complex lists of concurrent medications, limitations with drug administration and compatibility, and unique toxicities that should be evaluated when utilizing these therapies. The purpose of this review is to summarize practical considerations for pharmacotherapy in patients with COVID-19, with the intent of serving as a resource for health care providers at the forefront of clinical care during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunomodulation , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Drug Combinations , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Immunization, Passive , Interferon-alpha/administration & dosage , Interferon-alpha/adverse effects , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Nelfinavir/administration & dosage , Nelfinavir/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds , Pandemics , Purines , Pyrazoles , Ribavirin/administration & dosage , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Thiazoles/administration & dosage , Thiazoles/adverse effects
4.
Drug Saf ; 44(9): 987-998, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349372

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The safety profile of remdesivir, conditionally approved for COVID-19, was limited at its 2020 introduction. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) for medicines are collected in VigiBase, the WHO Global Database of Individual Case Safety Reports (ICSRs). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to provide a descriptive analysis of COVID-19 ICSR data focusing on remdesivir, including a disproportionality analysis (DA) of ADRs. METHODS: A dedicated algorithm enabled retrieval of all COVID-19 treatment-specific ICSRs. A severity algorithm based on co-reported medicines and symptoms enabled selection of tocilizumab with its well established safety profile as comparator for remdesivir. Descriptive statistics were used for general ICSR demographics for all COVID-19-specific medicines, remdesivir and tocilizumab individually and furthermore to present treatment patterns of medicines co-reported with remdesivir. A COVID-19 indication-focused DA was deployed to minimize confounding from underlying polysymptomatic disease. RESULTS: 14,574 COVID-19-related ICSRs were entered into VigiBase during 2020. Remdesivir was the most common medicine reported. Of 4944 remdesivir ICSRs, where tocilizumab was not co-reported, 93% described remdesivir as the sole suspect medicine. Sixty percent of ICSRs concerned males, median age was 63 years and the majority originated from the Americas (72%). In 1089 (21%) of remdesivir ICSRs, data indicated severe/critical disease. Co-reported medicines peaked during the first 3 days of remdesivir treatment. The DA for the established tocilizumab and the new remdesivir were mainly in line with the safety profiles for both medicines but suggested new safety concerns. The most reported ADRs for remdesivir represented liver dysfunction, kidney injury, death and bradycardia. CONCLUSION: Global COVID-19-related ADR reporting proved useful in providing information on ADRs as well as on treatment patterns in this patient group. Indication-focused disproportionality analysis, together with the use of a comparator with a known safety profile, proved effective in identifying known safety information and suggested new safety concerns for remdesivir.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems/statistics & numerical data , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , World Health Organization , Young Adult
5.
Respir Investig ; 59(6): 799-803, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread worldwide and is also an important disease in Japan. Thus, the optimal treatment strategy for severe COVID-19 should be established urgently. The effects of combination treatment with baricitinib-a Janus kinase inhibitor, remdesivir, and dexamethasone (BRD) are unknown. METHODS: Patients who received combination therapy with BRD at the Japanese Red Cross Medical Center were enrolled in the study. All patients received baricitinib (≤14 d), remdesivir (≤10 d), and dexamethasone (≤10 d). The efficacy and adverse events were evaluated. RESULTS: In total, 44 patients with severe COVID-19 were enrolled in this study. The 28-d mortality rate was low at 2.3% (1/44 patients). The need for invasive mechanical ventilation was avoided in most patients (90%, 17/19 patients). Patients who received BRD therapy had a median hospitalization duration of 11 d, time to recovery of 9 d, duration of intensive care unit stay of 6 d, duration of invasive mechanical ventilation of 5 d, and duration of supplemental oxygen therapy of 5 d. Adverse events occurred in 15 patients (34%). Liver dysfunction, thrombosis, iliopsoas hematoma, renal dysfunction, ventilator-associated pneumonia, infective endocarditis, and herpes zoster occurred in 11%, 11%, 2%, 2%, 2%, 2%, and 2% of patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Combination therapy with BRD was effective in treating severe COVID-19, and the incidence rate of adverse events was low. The results of the present study are encouraging; however, further randomized clinical studies are needed.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Azetidines/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Purines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
6.
Expert Opin Drug Saf ; 20(12): 1559-1564, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334105

ABSTRACT

Background: Remdesivir has been used for treating patients with moderate to severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) although there is conflicting evidence regarding its usefulness. Data regarding its safety largely come from the clinical trials conducted to support its emergency use authorization (EUA). This study aimed to identify the adverse events of remdesivir with disproportionately high reporting using real-world data.Research design and methods: The adverse event reports submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) by health-care professionals for drugs that have received EUA or approved for the treatment of COVID-19 in the US were studied. Adisproportionality analysis was performed to determine adverse events more frequently reported with remdesivir compared with other COVID-19 drugs in the database.Results: Elevated liver enzymes, acute kidney injury, raised blood creatinine levels, bradycardia, cardiac arrest, and death had disproportionately higher reporting with remdesivir as asuspect drug compared with other drugs. There is no significant difference in the reporting of these events based on patient sex or age.Conclusions: Our study confirms the drug label information regarding liver enzyme elevation. The renal and cardiac safety signals identified necessitate reevaluation for potential drug-labeling changes.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Bradycardia , COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Liver Function Tests , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems/statistics & numerical data , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Bradycardia/chemically induced , Bradycardia/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Approval/methods , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/diagnosis , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/epidemiology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Female , Humans , Liver Function Tests/methods , Liver Function Tests/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , United States Food and Drug Administration/statistics & numerical data
7.
Expert Opin Drug Saf ; 20(11): 1299-1307, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334104

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Remdesivir is a nucleoside analog that inhibits viral RNA replication by blocking RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. First developed and tested during the Ebola epidemic, repurposed, and gained prominence during the Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Based on data from three major trials, remdesivir became the first and only medication to obtain approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat patients hospitalized with COVID-19 disease. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of the article is to review available preclinical, clinical, and post-marketing data to assess the safety and efficacy of remdesivir in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. We performed a comprehensive literature review of articles published on remdesivir until January 2021. EXPERT OPINION: The substantial evidence of its effectiveness in a few trials together with the favorable safety profile makes remdesivir a primary therapeutic candidate for treatment in adult and pediatric patients who are hospitalized with COVID-19 and requiring oxygen supplementation. While remdesivir does not improve mortality, it has been shown to reduce the recovery time and increase the odds for clinical improvement, specifically in patients with early presentation and moderate COVID-19 disease. Remdesivir is well tolerated and has an acceptable safety profile in the pediatric and adult populations.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(29): e203, 2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328073

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is generally milder in children than in adults, and a substantial proportion of children with the disease have asymptomatic infections. Remdesivir is recommended for severe COVID-19. To date, there are little data on the outcomes of remdesivir treatment in children. We report a case of severe COVID-19 in a previously healthy but obese (body mass index, 27.6; 99.8th percentile of the age) 9-year-old boy treated with remdesivir and dexamethasone. The patient had pneumonia at the time of diagnosis and required supplemental oxygen due to hypoxia one day after diagnosis. The patient developed respiratory distress as his pneumonia progressed rapidly. Therefore, remdesivir with dexamethasone therapy was initiated on hospital day 2. Supplemental oxygen was gradually weaned on hospital day 6 and stopped on hospital day 9. Significant improvement in pneumonic consolidations on chest X-ray was noted on hospital day 8. The patient was discharged on hospital day 21. We did not observe any adverse effects of remdesivir therapy and successfully treated a 9-year-old child with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Child , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Male
10.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104899, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318934

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is causing an increasing number of deaths worldwide because no effective treatment is currently available. Remdesivir has shown in vitro activity against coronaviruses and is a possible antiviral treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection. This prospective (compassionate), open-label study of remdesivir, which was conducted at Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy, between February 23 and March 20, 2020, involved patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia aged ≥18 years undergoing mechanical ventilation or with an oxygen saturation level of ≤94 % in air or a National Early Warning Score 2 of ≥4. The primary outcome was the change in clinical status based on a 7-category ordinal scale (1 = not hospitalised, resuming normal daily activities; 7 = deceased). The 35 patients enrolled from February 23 to March 20, 2020, included 18 in intensive care unit (ICU), and 17 in our infectious diseases ward (IDW). The 10-day course of remdesivir was completed by 22 patients (63 %) and discontinued by 13, of whom eight (22.8 %) discontinued because of adverse events. The median follow-up was 39 days (IQR 25-44). At day 28, 14 (82.3 %) patients from IDW were discharged, two were still hospitalized and one died (5.9 %), whereas in ICU 6 (33.3 %) were discharged, 8 (44.4 %) patients died, three (16.7 %) were still mechanically ventilated and one (5.6 %) was improved but still hospitalized. Hypertransaminasemia and acute kidney injury were the most frequent severe adverse events observed (42.8 % and 22.8 % of the cases, respectively). Our data suggest that remdesivir can benefit patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia hospitalised outside ICU where clinical outcome was better and adverse events are less frequently observed. Ongoing randomised controlled trials will clarify its real efficacy and safety, who to treat, and when.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Betacoronavirus , Compassionate Use Trials/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Transaminases/blood , Treatment Outcome
12.
Clin Interv Aging ; 16: 1037-1046, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266601

ABSTRACT

Background: Remdesivir, an antiviral agent able to reduce inflammatory cascade accompanying severe, life-threatening pneumonia, became the first drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hospitalized patients with coronavirus 2 related severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS CoV2). As from its previously known clinical indications, the use of remdesivir in the presence of severe renal impairment is contraindicated; however, the impact of remdesivir on renal function in aging patients has not been elucidated. Subjects and Methods: This retrospective observational study involved 109 individuals consecutively admitted in internal medicine section, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana hospital, in November-December 2020 due to a confirmed diagnosis of SARS CoV2 and receiving remdesivir according to international inclusion criteria. Biochemical variables at admission were evaluated, together with slopes of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) built during remdesivir treatment. Participants were followed until discharge or exitus. Results: Patients were stratified according to age (80 formed the study cohort and 29 served as controls); CKD stage III was present in 46% of them. No patients showed any sign of deteriorated renal function during remdesivir. Fourteen patients in the elderly cohort deceased; their eGFR at baseline was significantly lower. Recovered patients were characterized by a relevant eGFR gaining during remdesivir treatment. Conclusion: We show here for the first time as remdesivir does not influence eGFR in a cohort of elderly people hospitalized for SARS CoV2, and that eGFR gain during such treatment is coupled with a better prognosis.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Aging/physiology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Pharm Pharm Sci ; 24: 277-291, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262713

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Remdesivir, a drug originally developed against Ebola virus, is currently recommended for patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19). In spite of United States Food and Drug Administration's recent assent of remdesivir as the only approved agent for COVID-19, there is limited information available about the physicochemical, metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetic (PK), and drug-drug interaction (DDI) properties of this drug. The objective of this in silico simulation work was to simulate the biopharmaceutical and DDI behavior of remdesivir and characterize remdesivir PK properties in special populations which are highly affected by COVID-19. METHODS: The Spatial Data File format structures of remdesivir prodrug (GS-5734) and nucleoside core (GS-441524) were obtained from the PubChem database to upload into the GastroPlus software 9.8 version (Simulations Plus Inc., USA). The Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) Predictor and PKPlus modules of GastroPlus were used to simulate physicochemical and PK properties, respectively, in healthy and predisposed patients. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of GastroPlus was used to simulate different patient populations based on age, weight, liver function, and renal function status. Subsequently, these data were used in the Drug-Drug Interaction module to simulate drug interaction potential of remdesivir with other COVID-19 drug regimens and with agents used for comorbidities. RESULTS: Remdesivir nucleoside core (GS-441524) is more hydrophilic than the inactive prodrug (GS-5734) with nucleoside core demonstrating better water solubility. GS-5734, but not GS-441524, is predicted to be metabolized by CYP3A4. Remdesivir is bioavailable and its clearance is achieved through hepatic and renal routes. Differential effects of renal function, liver function, weight, or age were observed on the PK profile of remdesivir. DDI simulation study of remdesivir with perpetrator drugs for comorbidities indicate that carbamazepine, phenytoin, amiodarone, voriconazole, diltiazem, and verapamil have the potential for strong interactions with victim remdesivir, whereas agents used for COVID-19 treatment such as chloroquine and ritonavir can cause weak and strong interactions, respectively, with remdesivir. CONCLUSIONS: GS-5734 (inactive prodrug) appears to be a superior remdesivir derivative due to its hepatic stability, optimum hydrophilic/lipophilic balance, and disposition properties. Remdesivir disposition can potentially be affected by different physiological and pathological conditions, and by drug interactions from COVID-19 drug regimens and agents used for comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , Prodrugs/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Chemical , Drug Interactions , Furans/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Prodrugs/administration & dosage , Prodrugs/adverse effects , Pyrroles/pharmacokinetics , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Triazines/pharmacokinetics
14.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 43(8): 472-480, 2020 Oct.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1235898

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has proven to be a serious challenge for the Spanish healthcare system. The impact of the virus on the liver is not well known, but in patients with chronic liver disease, mostly in advanced stages, it can critically compromise survival and trigger decompensation. Treatment in this subpopulation is complex due to the potential hepatotoxicity of some of the medicinal products used. Moreover, the pandemic has also negatively impacted patients with liver disease who have not contracted COVID-19, since the reallocation of human and material resources to the care of patients with the virus has resulted in a decrease in the treatment, diagnosis and follow-up of patients with liver disease, which will surely have negative consequences in the near future. Efficient reorganization of hepatology units is a priority to minimise the impact of the pandemic on a population as vulnerable as liver disease patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Age Factors , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bile Ducts/virology , COVID-19 , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Susceptibility , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Hepatitis, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis, Chronic/epidemiology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Liver Function Tests , Liver Transplantation , Obesity/epidemiology , Resource Allocation , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Epilepsy Res ; 174: 106675, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233420

ABSTRACT

In regard to the global pandemic of COVID-19, it seems that persons with epilepsy (PWE) are not more vulnerable to get infected by SARS-CoV-2, nor are they more susceptible to a critical course of the disease. However, management of acute seizures in patients with COVID-19 as well as management of PWE and COVID-19 needs to consider potential drug-drug interactions between antiseizure drugs and candidate drugs currently assessed as therapeutic options for COVID-19. Repurposing of several licensed and investigational drugs is discussed for therapeutic management of COVID-19. While for none of these approaches, efficacy and tolerability has been confirmed yet in sufficiently powered and controlled clinical studies, testing is ongoing with multiple clinical trials worldwide. Here, we have summarized the possible mechanisms of action of drugs currently considered as potential therapeutic options for COVID-19 management along with possible and confirmed drug-drug interactions that should be considered for a combination of antiseizure drugs and COVID-19 candidate drugs. Our review suggests that potential drug-drug interactions should be taken into account with drugs such as chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir while remdesivir and tocilizumab may be less prone to clinically relevant interactions with ASMs.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Anticonvulsants/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Amides/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A Inducers/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Drug Combinations , Drug Interactions , Epilepsy/complications , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/adverse effects , Ivermectin/adverse effects , Lopinavir , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Ritonavir , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 19(9): 889-892, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231668

ABSTRACT

Early December 2019 witnessed an international outbreak of a novel coronavirus (COVID 19) designated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2). Since then, a number of therapeutic molecules have been explored to have potential efficacy against the SARS-Cov-2 per se or its sequelae. There are no Food and Drug Administration specific therapies approved so far; however, numerous drugs based on varying levels of evidence, in vitro studies and compassionate drug trials are being established as therapeutic agents, especially drugs approved for previous emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-Cov). Numerous active clinical trials for COVID-19 with more than 150 drugs and products are under study. Needless to say, many dermatological drugs are being employed to mitigate this pandemic threat. We aim to review drugs with potential against SARS-Cov-2 widely used in dermatology practice. Additionally, rampant and overzealous use of these drugs as well as introduction of new molecules might lead to emergence of adverse effects associated with these agents. Dermatologists must be on lookout for any cutaneous adverse effects of these drugs. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(9):889-892. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5323.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dermatologic Agents/adverse effects , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Products/administration & dosage , Biological Products/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Dermatologic Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Eruptions/epidemiology , Drug Eruptions/physiopathology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology
19.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(2): 209-220, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few treatments exist for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness and harms of remdesivir for COVID-19. DATA SOURCES: Several databases, tables of contents of journals, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration and company websites were searched from 1 January through 31 August 2020. STUDY SELECTION: English-language, randomized trials of remdesivir treatments for adults with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. New evidence will be incorporated using living review methods. DATA EXTRACTION: Single-reviewer abstraction and risk-of-bias assessment verified by a second reviewer; GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods used for certainty-of-evidence assessments. DATA SYNTHESIS: Four randomized trials were included. In adults with severe COVID-19, remdesivir compared with placebo probably improves recovery by a large amount (absolute risk difference [ARD] range, 7% to 10%) and may result in a small reduction in mortality (ARD range, -4% to 1%) and a shorter time to recovery or clinical improvement. Remdesivir may have little to no effect on hospital length of stay. Remdesivir probably reduces serious adverse events by a moderate amount (ARD range, -6% to -8%). Compared with a 10-day remdesivir course, a 5-day course may reduce mortality, increase recovery or clinical improvement by small to moderate amounts, reduce time to recovery, and reduce serious adverse events among hospitalized patients not requiring mechanical ventilation. Recovery due to remdesivir may not vary by age, sex, symptom duration, or disease severity. LIMITATIONS: Low-certainty evidence with few published trials, including 1 preliminary report and 2 open-label trials. Trials excluded pregnant women and adults with severe kidney or liver disease. CONCLUSION: In hospitalized adults with COVID-19, remdesivir probably improves recovery and reduces serious adverse events and may reduce mortality and time to clinical improvement. For adults not receiving mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a 5-day course of remdesivir may provide similar benefits to and fewer harms than a 10-day course. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration Office of Research and Development, Health Services Research and Development Service, and Evidence Synthesis Program.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Drug Administration Schedule , Humans , Length of Stay , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Pediatrics ; 147(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197419

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Remdesivir shortens time to recovery in adults with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but its efficacy and safety in children are unknown. We describe outcomes in children with severe COVID-19 treated with remdesivir. METHODS: Seventy-seven hospitalized patients <18 years old with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection received remdesivir through a compassionate-use program between March 21 and April 22, 2020. The intended remdesivir treatment course was 10 days (200 mg on day 1 and 100 mg daily subsequently for children ≥40 kg and 5 mg/kg on day 1 and 2.5 mg/kg daily subsequently for children <40 kg, given intravenously). Clinical data through 28 days of follow-up were collected. RESULTS: Median age was 14 years (interquartile range 7-16, range <2 months to 17 years). Seventy-nine percent of patients had ≥1 comorbid condition. At baseline, 90% of children required supplemental oxygen and 51% required invasive ventilation. By day 28 of follow-up, 88% of patients had a decreased oxygen-support requirement, 83% recovered, and 73% were discharged. Among children requiring invasive ventilation at baseline, 90% were extubated, 80% recovered, and 67% were discharged. There were 4 deaths, of which 3 were attributed to COVID-19. Remdesivir was well tolerated, with a low incidence of serious adverse events (16%). Most adverse events were related to COVID-19 or comorbid conditions. Laboratory abnormalities, including elevations in transaminase levels, were common; 61% were grades 1 or 2. CONCLUSIONS: Among 77 children treated with remdesivir for severe COVID-19, most recovered and the rate of serious adverse events was low.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Compassionate Use Trials , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Male , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
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