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1.
J Immunol Res ; 2022: 1433323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697599

ABSTRACT

We performed a database mining on 102 transcriptomic datasets for the expressions of 29 m6A-RNA methylation (epitranscriptomic) regulators (m6A-RMRs) in 41 diseases and cancers and made significant findings: (1) a few m6A-RMRs were upregulated; and most m6A-RMRs were downregulated in sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock, and trauma; (2) half of 29 m6A-RMRs were downregulated in atherosclerosis; (3) inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis modulated m6A-RMRs more than lupus and psoriasis; (4) some organ failures shared eight upregulated m6A-RMRs; end-stage renal failure (ESRF) downregulated 85% of m6A-RMRs; (5) Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections modulated m6A-RMRs the most among viral infections; (6) proinflammatory oxPAPC modulated m6A-RMRs more than DAMP stimulation including LPS and oxLDL; (7) upregulated m6A-RMRs were more than downregulated m6A-RMRs in cancer types; five types of cancers upregulated ≥10 m6A-RMRs; (8) proinflammatory M1 macrophages upregulated seven m6A-RMRs; (9) 86% of m6A-RMRs were differentially expressed in the six clusters of CD4+Foxp3+ immunosuppressive Treg, and 8 out of 12 Treg signatures regulated m6A-RMRs; (10) immune checkpoint receptors TIM3, TIGIT, PD-L2, and CTLA4 modulated m6A-RMRs, and inhibition of CD40 upregulated m6A-RMRs; (11) cytokines and interferons modulated m6A-RMRs; (12) NF-κB and JAK/STAT pathways upregulated more than downregulated m6A-RMRs whereas TP53, PTEN, and APC did the opposite; (13) methionine-homocysteine-methyl cycle enzyme Mthfd1 downregulated more than upregulated m6A-RMRs; (14) m6A writer RBM15 and one m6A eraser FTO, H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1, and DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, regulated m6A-RMRs; and (15) 40 out of 165 ROS regulators were modulated by m6A eraser FTO and two m6A writers METTL3 and WTAP. Our findings shed new light on the functions of upregulated m6A-RMRs in 41 diseases and cancers, nine cellular and molecular mechanisms, novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory disorders, metabolic cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, organ failures, and cancers.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Neoplasms/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Datasets as Topic , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Metabolic Diseases/genetics , Methylation
2.
J Mol Med (Berl) ; 100(4): 569-584, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653410

ABSTRACT

For over a year, the coronavirus disease 2019 has been affecting the world population by causing severe tissue injuries and death in infected people. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +) are two molecules that are released into the extracellular microenvironment after direct virus infection or cell death caused by hyper inflammation and coagulopathy. Also, these molecules are well known to participate in multiple pathways and have a pivotal role in the purinergic signaling pathway. Thus, using public datasets available on the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), we analyzed raw proteomics data acquired using mass spectrometry (the gold standard method) and raw genomics data from COVID-19 patient samples obtained by microarray. The data was analyzed using bioinformatics and statistical methods according to our objectives. Here, we compared the purinergic profile of the total leukocyte population and evaluated the levels of these soluble biomolecules in the blood, and their correlation with coagulation components in COVID-19 patients, in comparison to healthy people or non-COVID-19 patients. The blood metabolite analysis showed a stage-dependent inosine increase in COVID-19 patients, while the nucleotides ATP and ADP had positive correlations with fibrinogen and other coagulation proteins. Also, ATP, ADP, inosine, and hypoxanthine had positive and negative correlations with clinical features. Regarding leukocyte gene expression, COVID-19 patients showed an upregulation of the P2RX1, P2RX4, P2RX5, P2RX7, P2RY1, P2RY12, PANX1, ADORA2B, NLPR3, and F3 genes. Yet, the ectoenzymes of the canonical and non-canonical adenosinergic pathway (ENTPD1 and CD38) are upregulated, suggesting that adenosine is produced by both active adenosinergic pathways. Hence, approaches targeting these biomolecules or their specific purinoreceptors and ectoenzymes may attenuate the high inflammatory state and the coagulopathy seen in COVID-19 patients. KEY MESSAGES : Adenosinergic pathways are modulated on leukocytes from COVID-19 patients. Plasmatic inosine levels are increased in COVID-19 patients. ATP, ADP, AMP, hypoxanthine, and inosine are correlated with coagulation players. The nucleotides and nucleosides are correlated with patients' clinical features. The P2 receptors and ectoenzymes are correlated with Tissue factor in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Connexins , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Nerve Tissue Proteins , Signal Transduction
3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(6)2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642083

ABSTRACT

Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) are RNA-editing enzymes that may restrict viral infection. We have utilized deep sequencing to determine adenosine to guanine (A→G) mutations, signifying ADAR activity, in clinical samples retrieved from 93 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. A→G mutations were detected in 0.035% (median) of RNA residues and were predominantly nonsynonymous. These mutations were rarely detected in the major viral population but were abundant in minor viral populations in which A→G was more prevalent than any other mutation (P < 0.001). The A→G substitutions accumulated in the spike protein gene at positions corresponding to amino acids 505 to 510 in the receptor binding motif and at amino acids 650 to 655. The frequency of A→G mutations in minor viral populations was significantly associated with low viral load (P < 0.001). We additionally analyzed A→G mutations in 288,247 SARS-CoV-2 major (consensus) sequences representing the dominant viral population. The A→G mutations observed in minor viral populations in the initial patient cohort were increasingly detected in European consensus sequences between March and June 2020 (P < 0.001) followed by a decline of these mutations in autumn and early winter (P < 0.001). We propose that ADAR-induced deamination of RNA is a significant source of mutated SARS-CoV-2 and hypothesize that the degree of RNA deamination may determine or reflect viral fitness and infectivity.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Point Mutation , RNA Editing , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amino Acid Substitution , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Deamination , Female , Genetic Fitness , Genome, Viral , Guanine/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Sweden/epidemiology , Viral Load , Virulence
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 774776, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581334

ABSTRACT

Both RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification of SARS-CoV-2 and immune characteristics of the human body have been reported to play an important role in COVID-19, but how the m6A methylation modification of leukocytes responds to the virus infection remains unknown. Based on the RNA-seq of 126 samples from the GEO database, we disclosed that there is a remarkably higher m6A modification level of blood leukocytes in patients with COVID-19 compared to patients without COVID-19, and this difference was related to CD4+ T cells. Two clusters were identified by unsupervised clustering, m6A cluster A characterized by T cell activation had a higher prognosis than m6A cluster B. Elevated metabolism level, blockage of the immune checkpoint, and lower level of m6A score were observed in m6A cluster B. A protective model was constructed based on nine selected genes and it exhibited an excellent predictive value in COVID-19. Further analysis revealed that the protective score was positively correlated to HFD45 and ventilator-free days, while negatively correlated to SOFA score, APACHE-II score, and crp. Our works systematically depicted a complicated correlation between m6A methylation modification and host lymphocytes in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 and provided a well-performing model to predict the patients' outcomes.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Leukocytes/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adenosine/metabolism , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , ROC Curve
5.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580896

ABSTRACT

ADAR1-mediated deamination of adenosines in long double-stranded RNAs plays an important role in modulating the innate immune response. However, recent investigations based on metatranscriptomic samples of COVID-19 patients and SARS-COV-2-infected Vero cells have recovered contrasting findings. Using RNAseq data from time course experiments of infected human cell lines and transcriptome data from Vero cells and clinical samples, we prove that A-to-G changes observed in SARS-COV-2 genomes represent genuine RNA editing events, likely mediated by ADAR1. While the A-to-I editing rate is generally low, changes are distributed along the entire viral genome, are overrepresented in exonic regions, and are (in the majority of cases) nonsynonymous. The impact of RNA editing on virus-host interactions could be relevant to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genome, Viral , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , RNA Editing , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Deamination , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inosine/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/immunology , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/immunology , RNA, Viral/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome , Vero Cells
6.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481015

ABSTRACT

The causative agent of COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2, has a 29,903 bases positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome. RNAs exhibit about 150 modified bases that are essential for proper function. Among internal modified bases, the N6-methyladenosine, or m6A, is the most frequent, and is implicated in SARS-CoV-2 immune response evasion. Although the SARS-CoV-2 genome is RNA, almost all genomes sequenced thus far are, in fact, reverse transcribed complementary DNAs. This process reduces the true complexity of these viral genomes because the incorporation of dNTPs hides RNA base modifications. Here, we present an initial exploration of Nanopore direct RNA sequencing to assess the m6A residues in the SARS-CoV-2 sequences of ORF3a, E, M, ORF6, ORF7a, ORF7b, ORF8, N, ORF10 and the 3'-untranslated region. We identified fifteen m6A methylated positions, of which, six are in ORF N. Additionally, because m6A is associated with the DRACH motif, we compared its distribution in major SARS-CoV-2 variants. Although DRACH is highly conserved among variants, we show that variants Beta and Eta have a fourth position C > U change in DRACH at 28,884b that could affect methylation. This is the first report of direct RNA sequencing of a Brazilian SARS-CoV-2 sample coupled with the identification of modified bases.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/virology , Immune Evasion/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , 3' Untranslated Regions , Adenosine/metabolism , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Genome, Viral , Humans , Methylation , Nanopore Sequencing/methods , Open Reading Frames , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Vero Cells
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19998, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462031

ABSTRACT

Understanding the effects of metabolism on the rational design of novel and more effective drugs is still a considerable challenge. To the best of our knowledge, there are no entirely computational strategies that make it possible to predict these effects. From this perspective, the development of such methodologies could contribute to significantly reduce the side effects of medicines, leading to the emergence of more effective and safer drugs. Thereby, in this study, our strategy is based on simulating the electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) fragmentation of the drug molecules and combined with molecular docking and ADMET models in two different situations. In the first model, the drug is docked without considering the possible metabolic effects. In the second model, each of the intermediates from the EI-MS results is docked, and metabolism occurs before the drug accesses the biological target. As a proof of concept, in this work, we investigate the main antiviral drugs used in clinical research to treat COVID-19. As a result, our strategy made it possible to assess the biological activity and toxicity of all potential by-products. We believed that our findings provide new chemical insights that can benefit the rational development of novel drugs in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenine/adverse effects , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Adenine/metabolism , Adenine/pharmacology , Adenosine/adverse effects , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Amides/adverse effects , Amides/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Chloroquine/analogs & derivatives , Chloroquine/metabolism , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Drug Design , Humans , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nitro Compounds/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds/metabolism , Nitro Compounds/pharmacology , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazines/metabolism , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/adverse effects , Pyrrolidines/metabolism , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ribavirin/metabolism , Ribavirin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thiazoles/adverse effects , Thiazoles/metabolism , Thiazoles/pharmacology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 720192, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378190

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 might lead to multi-organ failure and, in some cases, to death. The COVID-19 severity is associated with a "cytokine storm." Danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are proinflammatory molecules that can activate pattern recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs). DAMPs and TLRs have not received much attention in COVID-19 but can explain some of the gender-, weight- and age-dependent effects. In females and males, TLRs are differentially expressed, likely contributing to higher COVID-19 severity in males. DAMPs and cytokines associated with COVID-19 mortality are elevated in obese and elderly individuals, which might explain the higher risk for severer COVID-19 in these groups. Adenosine signaling inhibits the TLR/NF-κB pathway and, through this, decreases inflammation and DAMPs' effects. As vaccines will not be effective in all susceptible individuals and as new vaccine-resistant SARS-CoV-2 mutants might develop, it remains mandatory to find means to dampen COVID-19 disease severity, especially in high-risk groups. We propose that the regulation of DAMPs via adenosine signaling enhancement might be an effective way to lower the severity of COVID-19 and prevent multiple organ failure in the absence of severe side effects.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Adenosine/metabolism , Alarmins/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/prevention & control , Patient Acuity , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/antagonists & inhibitors , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology
9.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 8(15): e2100606, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340232

ABSTRACT

Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is the core signaling adaptor in the RNA signaling pathway. Thus, appropriate regulation of MAVS expression is essential for antiviral immunity against RNA virus infection. However, the regulation of MAVS expression at the mRNA level especially at the post transcriptional level is not well-defined. Here, it is reported that the MAVS mRNA undergoes N6 -methyladenosine (m6 A) modification through methyltransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14), which leads to a fast turnover of MAVS mRNA. Knockdown or deficiency of METTL14 increases MAVS mRNA stability, and downstream phosphorylation of TBK1/IRF3 and interferon-ß production in response to RNA viruses. Compared to wild-type mice, heterozygotes Mettl14+/- mice better tolerate RNA virus infection. The authors' findings unveil a novel mechanism to regulate the stability of MAVS transcripts post-transcriptionally through m6 A modification.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Methyltransferases/immunology , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/immunology , Adenosine/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Methyltransferases/genetics , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology
10.
Genes Dev ; 35(13-14): 1005-1019, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334329

ABSTRACT

N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant internal RNA modification, influencing transcript fate and function in uninfected and virus-infected cells. Installation of m6A by the nuclear RNA methyltransferase METTL3 occurs cotranscriptionally; however, the genomes of some cytoplasmic RNA viruses are also m6A-modified. How the cellular m6A modification machinery impacts coronavirus replication, which occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm, is unknown. Here we show that replication of SARS-CoV-2, the agent responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, and a seasonal human ß-coronavirus HCoV-OC43, can be suppressed by depletion of METTL3 or cytoplasmic m6A reader proteins YTHDF1 and YTHDF3 and by a highly specific small molecule METTL3 inhibitor. Reduction of infectious titer correlates with decreased synthesis of viral RNAs and the essential nucleocapsid (N) protein. Sites of m6A modification on genomic and subgenomic RNAs of both viruses were mapped by methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (meRIP-seq). Levels of host factors involved in m6A installation, removal, and recognition were unchanged by HCoV-OC43 infection; however, nuclear localization of METTL3 and cytoplasmic m6A readers YTHDF1 and YTHDF2 increased. This establishes that coronavirus RNAs are m6A-modified and host m6A pathway components control ß-coronavirus replication. Moreover, it illustrates the therapeutic potential of targeting the m6A pathway to restrict coronavirus reproduction.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/genetics , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Nucleocapsid Proteins , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(8): 732, 2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322464

ABSTRACT

Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by symptoms of lymphopenia and multiorgan damage, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the function of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modifications in COVID-19, we performed microarray analyses to comprehensively characterize the m6A epitranscriptome. The results revealed distinct global m6A profiles in severe and mild COVID-19 patients. Programmed cell death and inflammatory response were the major biological processes modulated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Further, RBM15, a major m6A methyltransferase, was significantly elevated and positively correlated with disease severity. Silencing RBM15 drastically reduced lymphocyte death in vitro. Knockdown of RBM15 remarkably suppressed the expression levels of multitarget genes related to programmed cell death and inflammatory response. This study shows that SARS-CoV-2 infection alters the m6A epitranscriptome of lymphocytes, particularly in the case of severe patients. RBM15 regulated host immune response to SARS-CoV-2 by elevating m6A modifications of multitarget genes. These findings indicate that RBM15 can serve as a target for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Transcriptome , Adenosine/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Humans , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , THP-1 Cells
12.
J Biol Chem ; 297(2): 100973, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1312455

ABSTRACT

N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most frequent chemical modification in eukaryotic mRNA and is known to participate in a variety of physiological processes, including cancer progression and viral infection. The reversible and dynamic m6A modification is installed by m6A methyltransferase (writer) enzymes and erased by m6A demethylase (eraser) enzymes. m6A modification recognized by m6A binding proteins (readers) regulates RNA processing and metabolism, leading to downstream biological effects such as promotion of stability and translation or increased degradation. The m6A writers and erasers determine the abundance of m6A modifications and play decisive roles in its distribution and function. In this review, we focused on m6A writers and erasers and present an overview on their known functions and enzymatic molecular mechanisms, showing how they recognize substrates and install or remove m6A modifications. We also summarize the current applications of m6A writers and erasers for m6A detection and highlight the merits and drawbacks of these available methods. Lastly, we describe the biological functions of m6A in cancers and viral infection based on research of m6A writers and erasers and introduce new assays for m6A functionality via programmable m6A editing tools.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Eukaryotic Cells/metabolism , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism
13.
Cell Rep ; 35(6): 109091, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213072

ABSTRACT

It is urgent and important to understand the relationship of the widespread severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus clade 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with host immune response and study the underlining molecular mechanism. N6-methylation of adenosine (m6A) in RNA regulates many physiological and disease processes. Here, we investigate m6A modification of the SARS-CoV-2 gene in regulating the host cell innate immune response. Our data show that the SARS-CoV-2 virus has m6A modifications that are enriched in the 3' end of the viral genome. We find that depletion of the host cell m6A methyltransferase METTL3 decreases m6A levels in SARS-CoV-2 and host genes, and m6A reduction in viral RNA increases RIG-I binding and subsequently enhances the downstream innate immune signaling pathway and inflammatory gene expression. METTL3 expression is reduced and inflammatory genes are induced in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These findings will aid in the understanding of COVID-19 pathogenesis and the design of future studies regulating innate immunity for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Methylation , Methyltransferases/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction
14.
J Immunol ; 206(8): 1691-1696, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158408

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 disease is associated with elevated inflammatory responses. One form of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome caused by inactivating mutations in ADAR results in reduced adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of endogenous dsRNAs, induction of IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes, other inflammatory mediators, morbidity, and mortality. Alu elements, ∼10% of the human genome, are the most common A-to-I-editing sites. Using leukocyte whole-genome RNA-sequencing data, we found reduced A-to-I editing of Alu dsRNAs in patients with severe COVID-19 disease. Dendritic cells infected with COVID-19 also exhibit reduced A-to-I editing of Alu dsRNAs. Unedited Alu dsRNAs, but not edited Alu dsRNAs, are potent inducers of IRF and NF-κB transcriptional responses, IL6, IL8, and IFN-stimulated genes. Thus, decreased A-to-I editing that may lead to accumulation of unedited Alu dsRNAs and increased inflammatory responses is associated with severe COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/genetics , Alu Elements/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Inosine/genetics , RNA Editing/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Adenosine/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/virology , Genome, Human , Humans , Inosine/metabolism , Interferon Regulatory Factors/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA-Seq , Signal Transduction/genetics
15.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 727-736, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123193

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease COVID-19, caused by the virus SARS CoV-2, has exerted a significant unprecedented economic and medical crisis, in addition to its impact on the daily life and health care systems all over the world. Regrettably, no vaccines or drugs are currently available for this new critical emerging human disease. Joining the global fight against COVID-19, in this study we aim at identifying a potential novel inhibitor for SARS COV-2 2'-O-methyltransferase (nsp16) which is one of the most attractive targets in the virus life cycle, responsible for the viral RNA protection via a cap formation process. Firstly, nsp16 enzyme bound to Sinefungin was retrieved from the protein data bank (PDB ID: 6WKQ), then, a 3D pharmacophore model was constructed to be applied to screen 48 Million drug-like compounds of the Zinc database. This resulted in only 24 compounds which were subsequently docked into the enzyme. The best four score-ordered hits from the docking outcome exhibited better scores compared to Sinefungin. Finally, three molecular dynamics (MD) simulation experiments for 150 ns were carried out as a refinement step for our proposed approach. The MD and MM-PBSA outputs revealed compound 11 as the best potential nsp16 inhibitor herein identified, as it displayed a better stability and average binding free energy for the ligand-enzyme complex compared to Sinefungin.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Databases, Protein , Drug Stability , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Kinetics , Methyltransferases , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
16.
Front Immunol ; 11: 604944, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058416

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia and inflammation often coincide in pathogenic conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chronic lung diseases, which are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality for the general population. For example, the recent global outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has placed viral infection-induced ARDS under the spotlight. Moreover, chronic lung disease ranks the third leading cause of death in the United States. Hypoxia signaling plays a diverse role in both acute and chronic lung inflammation, which could partially be explained by the divergent function of downstream target pathways such as adenosine signaling. Particularly, hypoxia signaling activates adenosine signaling to inhibit the inflammatory response in ARDS, while in chronic lung diseases, it promotes inflammation and tissue injury. In this review, we discuss the role of adenosine at the interphase of hypoxia and inflammation in ARDS and chronic lung diseases, as well as the current strategy for therapeutic targeting of the adenosine signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/therapy , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Inflammation/etiology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Receptors, Purinergic P1/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Signal Transduction
17.
J Med Chem ; 65(4): 2785-2793, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057678

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a global pandemic due to the rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At the time of this manuscript's publication, remdesivir is the only COVID-19 treatment approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. However, its effectiveness is still under question due to the results of the large Solidarity Trial conducted by the World Health Organization. Herein, we report that the parent nucleoside of remdesivir, GS-441524, potently inhibits the replication of SARS-CoV-2 in Vero E6 and other cell lines. Challenge studies in both an AAV-hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 and in mice infected with murine hepatitis virus, a closely related coronavirus, showed that GS-441524 was highly efficacious in reducing the viral titers in CoV-infected organs without notable toxicity. Our results support that GS-441524 is a promising and inexpensive drug candidate for treating of COVID-19 and other CoV diseases.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disease Models, Animal , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , Structure-Activity Relationship
18.
Cell Res ; 31(4): 404-414, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054016

ABSTRACT

The newly identified Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in a global health emergency because of its rapid spread and high mortality. The molecular mechanism of interaction between host and viral genomic RNA is yet unclear. We demonstrate herein that SARS-CoV-2 genomic RNA, as well as the negative-sense RNA, is dynamically N6-methyladenosine (m6A)-modified in human and monkey cells. Combined RIP-seq and miCLIP analyses identified a total of 8 m6A sites at single-base resolution in the genome. Especially, epidemic strains with mutations at these identified m6A sites have emerged worldwide, and formed a unique cluster in the US as indicated by phylogenetic analysis. Further functional experiments showed that m6A methylation negatively regulates SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 infection also triggered a global increase in host m6A methylome, exhibiting altered localization and motifs of m6A methylation in mRNAs. Altogether, our results identify m6A as a dynamic epitranscriptomic mark mediating the virus-host interaction.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Genome, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA Methylation , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , Phylogeny , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
19.
Biomolecules ; 10(7)2020 07 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951579

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown that epigenetic abnormalities are involved in various diseases, including cancer. In particular, in order to realize precision medicine, the integrated analysis of genetics and epigenetics is considered to be important; detailed epigenetic analysis in the medical field has been becoming increasingly important. In the epigenetics analysis, DNA methylation and histone modification analyses have been actively studied for a long time, and many important findings were accumulated. On the other hand, recently, attention has also been focused on RNA modification in the field of epigenetics; now it is known that RNA modification is associated with various biological functions, such as regulation of gene expression. Among RNA modifications, functional analysis of N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant RNA modification found from humans to plants is actively progressing, and it has also been known that m6A abnormality is involved in cancer and other diseases. Importantly, recent studies have shown that m6A is related to viral infections. Considering the current world situation under threat of viral infections, it is important to deepen knowledge of RNA modification from the viewpoint of viral diseases. Hence, in this review, we have summarized the recent findings regarding the roles of RNA modifications in biological functions, cancer biology, and virus infection, particularly focusing on m6A in mRNA.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Epigenesis, Genetic , Neoplasms/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , RNA/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Neoplasms/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , RNA Folding , RNA Stability , RNA Transport , Virus Diseases/metabolism
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